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01-03-11 Town Council Packets(1) SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL W4 REGULAR MEETING AGENDA JANUARY 03, 2011 PLEASE NOTE THAT ALL TIMES ARE APPROXIMATE ITEMS COULD START EARLIER OR LATER THAN THE STATED TIME CALL TO ORDER AT 4:00 P.M. Item No. 1: ROLL CALL Item No. 2: PUBLIC NON AGENDA ITEMS (5- minute time limit) Item No. 3: COUNCIL UPDATES Item No. 4: RESOLUTION NO. 1, SERIES OF 2011 DESIGNATION OF PUBLIC NOTICE BOARDS CONSIDERATION OF A RESOLUTION DESIGNATING THE LOCATION OF THE OFFICIAL PUBLIC NOTICE BOARDS FOR THE TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE (Time: 5 Minutes) ACTION REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: Approve, Modify or Deny Resolution No. 1, Series of 2011 Rhonda B. Coxon Page 1 (TAB A) Item No. 5: RESOLUTION NO. 2, SERIES OF 2011 APPOINTING MUNICIPAL JUDGE- A RESOLUTION APPOINTING H. LAWSON WILLS AS MUNICIPAL JUDGE, SETTING THE TERM OF OFFICE AND COMPENSATION. (Time: 10 Minutes) ACTION REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: Approve, Modify or Deny Resolution No. 2, Series of 2011 Rhonda B. Coxon Page 4 (TAB B) Item No. 6: RESOLUTION NO. 3, SERIES OF 2011 A RESOLUTION APPOINTING MEMBERS TO NEW TERMS FOR BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS (Time: 30 Minutes) ACTION REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: Interview applicants for Board and approve, modify or deny Resolution No. 3, Series of 2011 Rhonda B. Coxon Page 7 (TAB C) 01 -03 -11 TC Page 2 of 3 Item No. 7: PUBLIC HEARING AND DISCUSSION CONSIDERATION OF THE SPECIAL REVIEW APPLICATIONS FOR THE ELK CAMP RESTAURANT AND A NIGHT LIGHTING PLAN FOR NIGHTTIME OPERATIONS TO 12:00 MIDNIGHT, TOGETHER WITH THE ASSOCIATED MINOR PLANNED UNIT DEVELOPMENT (PUD) AMENDMENT TO SNOWMASS MOUNTAIN (Time: 60 Minutes) ACTION REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: Follow up the review /discussion from the December 20, 2010 meeting and consider the applicant's responses. Complete the review of the applications, including the Minor PUD Amendment. After evaluation, direct staff in preparing a resolution for the Special Review and an ordinance for the Minor PUD Amendment if desired. Jim Wahlstrom Page 31 (TAB D) Item No. 8: DISCUSSION FOR APPOINTMENTS FOR THE ICE AGE DISCOVERY COMMITTEE (Time: 30 Minutes) ACTION REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: Short listing applicants for Education and Citizen at Large positions for the Ice Age Discovery Committee -Russ Forrest Page 65 (TAB E) Item No, 9: RESOLUTION NO. 5 SERIES OF 2011 IGA APPROVAL OF AN IGA BETWEEN SWFD AND TOSV TO SHARE FALSE ALARM SERVICE FEES (Time: 15 Minutes) ACTION REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: Approve, Modify or Deny Resolution No. 5, Series of 2011 -John Dresser Page 101 (TAB F) Item No. 10: RESOLUTION NO. 6, SERIES OF 2011 AUTHORIZATION TO SELL CCV #1210 AND REMOVE ALL DEED RESTRICTIONS Time: 15 Minutes) ACTION REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: Approve, Modify or Deny Resolution No.6, Series of 2011 -John Dresser ...........................Page 109 (TAB G) Item No. 11: MANAGER'S REPORT (Time: 10 minutes) Russell Forrest ...........................Page 114 (TAB H) Item No. 12: AGENDA FOR NEXT TOWN COUNCIL MEETING ...........................Page 118 (TAB 1) 01 -03 -11 TC Page 3 of 3 Item No. 13: APPROVAL OF MEETING MINUTES FOR: December 6, 2010 ...........................Page 120 (TAB J) Item No. 14: COUNCIL COMMENTS /COMMITTEE REPORTS /CALENDARS Page 130 (TAB K) Item No. 15: ADJOURNMENT NOTE: Total time estimated for meeting: Approx 2.75 Hours (excluding items 1 -3 and 12 —16) ALL ITEMS AND TIMES ARE TENTATIVE AND SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT FURTHER NOTICE. PLEASE CALL THE OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK AT 923 -3777 ON THE DAY OF THE MEETING FOR ANY AGENDA CHANGES. MEMORANDUM TO: Snowmass Village Town Council FROM: Rhonda B. Coxon, Town Clerk DATE: January 3, 2011 SUBJECT: RESOLUTION NO. 01, SERIES OF 2011 CONSIDERATION OF A RESOLUTION DESIGNATING THE LOCATIONS OF THE OFFICIAL PUBLIC NOTICE BOARD FOR THE TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE I. PURPOSE AND ACTIONS REQUESTED OF COUNCIL Section 24 -6 -401 C.R.S. declares that it is the policy of the State of Colorado that the formation of public policy is public business and may not be conducted in secret; and The Town Council, the Planning Commission, the Liquor Licensing Authority and other boards and commissions of the Town are local public bodies within the meaning of Section 24- 6- 402(1)(a) C.R.S. and therefore all meetings of such bodies are open to the public; and Section 24- 6- 402(2)(c) C.R.S. requires that any meetings at which the adoption of any proposed policy, position, resolution, rule, regulation or formal action occurs shall be held only after full and timely notice to the public has been provided; and Section 24- 6- 402(2)(c) C.R.S. provides that full and timely notice shall be deemed given, if notice of the meeting is posted in a designated public place within the Town no less than 24 hours prior to the holding of the meeting; and Section 24- 6- 401(2)(c) C.R.S. requires that the public place for posting such notice shall be designated annually at the first regular meeting of each calendar year of the Town Council; and Section 24- 6- 401(2)(c) C.R.S. requires that the posted notice include specific agenda information where possible. Approve, modify or deny Resolution No. 01, Series of 2011 11. DISCUSSION The Town of Snowmass Village has one Public Notice Board; located in the lobby of the Town Hall, 130 Kearns Road near the Town Clerk offices. TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL RESOLUTION NO. 01 SERIES OF 2011 CONSIDERATION OF A RESOLUTION DESIGNATING THE LOCATION OF THE OFFICIAL PUBLIC NOTICE BOARDS FOR THE TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE WHEREAS, Section 24 -6 -401 C.R.S. declares that it is the policy of the State of Colorado that the formation of public policy is public business and may not be conducted in secret; and WHEREAS, the Town Council, the Planning Commission, the Liquor Licensing Authority and other boards and commissions of the Town are local public bodies within the meaning of Section 24- 6- 402(1)(a) C.R.S. and therefore all meetings of such bodies are open to the public; and WHEREAS, Section 24- 6- 402(2)(c) C.R.S. requires that any meetings at which the adoption of any proposed policy, position, resolution, rule, regulation or formal action occurs shall be held only after full and timely notice to the public has been provided; and WHEREAS, Section 24- 6- 402(2)(c) C.R.S. provides that full and timely notice shall be deemed given, if notice of the meeting is posted in a designated public place within the Town no less than 24 hours prior to the holding of the meeting; and WHEREAS, Section 24- 6- 401(2)(c) C.R.S. requires that the public place for posting such notice shall be designated annually at the first regular meeting of each calendar year of the Town Council; and WHEREAS, Section 24- 6- 401(2)(c) C.R.S. requires that the posted notice include specific agenda information where possible; and WHEREAS, the Town Council desires to insure that all local public body meetings comply with the provisions of the laws of the State of Colorado. NOW, THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED by the Town Council of the Town of Snowmass Village, Colorado, as follows: 1. Designation and Locations One located in the Town Hall 130 Kearns Road, Snowmass Village, Colorado is hereby designated as the Official Public Notice Board for the Town as follows: 11 -01 Page 2 of 2 a. The notice board located in the lobby of the Town Hall at 130 Kearns Road, near the Town Clerk offices. 2. Board Compliance Notices of meetings of all boards and commissions of the Town within the meaning of Section 24- 6- 402(1)(a) shall be timely posted on the Public Notice Board. 3. Direction to Town Manager The Town Manager shall cause all notices of public meetings within the meaning of Section 24- 6- 402(1)(b) to be timely and conspicuously posted on the Public Notice Boards. INTRODUCED, READ AND ADOPTED, by the Town Council of the Town of Snowmass Village, Colorado on the 3rd day of January 2011 with a motion made by Council Member and seconded by Council Member by a vote of in favor and opposed. Council Member Wilkinson opposed. TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE BILL BOINEAU, Mayor ATTEST: RHONDA B. COXON, Town Clerk APPROVED AS TO FORM: JOHN C. DRESSER, JR., Town Attorney MEMORANDUM TO: Snowmass Village Town Council FROM: Rhonda B. Coxon, Town Clerk DATE: January 3, 2011 SUBJECT: RESOLUTION NO. 02 SERIES OF 2011 CONSIDERATION OF A RESOLUTION APPOINTING H. LAWSON WILLS AS MUNICIPAL JUDGE 1. PURPOSE AND ACTIONS REQUESTED OF COUNCIL Section 7.2 of the Home Rule Charter provides that the Town Council will appoint a Municipal Judge and may reappoint the Municipal Judge subsequent terms. Approve, modify or deny Resolution No. 02, Series of 2011 11. DISCUSSION The Municipal Judge will be available to give a brief report and answer any questions you may have. TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL RESOLUTION NO. 02 SERIES OF 2011 A RESOLUTION APPOINTING H. LAWSON WILLS AS MUNICIPAL JUDGE, SETTING THE TERM OF OFFICE AND COMPENSATION. WHEREAS, Section 7.2 of the Home Rule Charter provides that the Town Council will appoint a Municipal Judge and may reappoint the Municipal Judge for subsequent terms; and WHEREAS, due to excellent service as the Municipal Judge the Town Council would like to reappoint H. Lawson Wills as Municipal Judge; and NOW, THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED by the Town Council of the Town of Snowmass Village, Colorado: Section One: Appointment H. Lawson Wills is hereby appointed as Municipal Judge for the Town of Snowmass Village. Section Two: Term ,The term shall commence January 4, 2011 and shall expire December 31, 2011 Section Three: Compensation The rate of compensation shall be $8,100.00 annually, payable in twelve equal installments on the first of each month and a ski pass. INTRODUCED, READ AND ADOPTED as amended by the Town Council of the Town of Snowmass Village, Colorado on the 3rd day of January 2011 with a motion made by Council Member and a second made by Council Member and by a vote of in favor to opposed. TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE ATTEST: BILL BOINEAU, Mayor RHONDA B. COXON, Town Clerk APPROVED AS TO FORM: JOHN C.DRESSER, JR., Town Attorney Attachment A 2010 Court Cases Cases Filed 173 Bench Warrants Pending -4 Bench Trial Pending -1 Disposed Cases 168 MEMORANDUM TO: Snowmass Village Town Council FROM: Rhonda B. Coxon, Town Clerk DATE: January 3, 2011 SUBJECT: RESOLUTION NO. 03 SERIES OF 2011 A RESOLUTION APPOINTING MEMBERS TO THE ARTS ADVISORY BOARD, FINANCIAL ADVISORY BOARD,CITIZENS GRANT REVIEW BOARD, MARKETING AND SPECIAL EVENTS AND GROUP SALES BOARD, LIQUOR LICENSING AUTHORITY, PART TIME ADVISORY BOARD, AND PLANNING COMMISSION I. PURPOSE AND ACTIONS REQUESTED OF COUNCIL There were a total of 18 vacancies created by expiration of terms and some positions that were open from last year. A notice has been posted and published in accordance with the Home Rule Charter. The Town Clerk is requesting the Town Council interview and appoint appropriate people to positions available. Approve, modify or deny Resolution No. 03, Series of 2011 II. DISCUSSION Listed below are the boards, number of vacancies and names of applicants. I have denoted applicants that are incumbents. Section One ARTS ADVISORY BOARD 5 vacancies, 2 applicants Barbara Bloemink Michelle Bates FINANCIAL ADVISORY BOARD 4 vacancies, 4 applicants *Gary Hartman *Teddy Farrell *Howard Gross *Rick Griffin CITIZENS GRANT REVIEW BOARD 1 vacancy, 1 applicants *Susan Cross 01 -03 -11 Boards Memo Page 2 of 2 MARKETING, SPECIAL EVENTS AND GROUP SALES BOARD 1 Retail, 1 Lodging, 1 applicant for lodging *David Perry LIQUOR LICENSING AUTHORITY 1 vacancy 2 applicants Staci Stokes Michelle Bates PART TIME RESIDENTS ADVISORY BOARD 1 vacancy, 1 applicant Tom Guggenhiem PLANNING COMMISSION 3 vacancies, 3 applicants *Doug Faurer *Jim Gustafson *Don Crouch TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL RESOLUTION NO. 03 SERIES OF 2011 A RESOLUTION APPOINTING MEMBERS TO THE ARTS ADVISORY BOARD, CITIZENS GRANT REVIEW BOARD, FINANCIAL ADVISORY BOARD, MARKETING, GROUP SALES SPECIAL EVENTS BOARD, LIQUOR LICENSING AUTHORITY, PART TIME RESIDENTS ADVISORY BOARD AND PLANNING COMMISSION WHEREAS, Section 8.3 of the Home Rule Charter states that members of all boards and commissions shall be appointed by the Town Council; and WHEREAS, the terms of members on certain boards and commissions have expired and resignations have been submitted; and WHEREAS, vacancies have been publicly posted and published in accordance with the terms and conditions of the Home Rule Charter; and WHEREAS, the following citizens have submitted applications expressing a desire to be appointed: NOW, THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED by the Town Council of the Town of Snowmass Village, Colorado: That the following citizens are hereby appointed to serve as follows: Section One: Appointments and Terms ARTS ADVISORY BOARD 5, Two Year Terms Barbara Bloemink Michelle Bates CITIZENS GRANT REVIEW BOARD 3, Three Year Terms Susan Cross FINANCIAL ADVISORY BOARD 4, Two Year Terms Gary Hartman Teddy Farrell Howard Gross Rick Griffin MARKETING, SPECIAL EVENTS AND 2, Three Year Terms GROUP SALES David Perry 11 -03 Page 2 of 2 LIQUOR LICENSING AUTHORITY 1, Three Year Term Staci Stokes Miohelle Bates PART TIME RESIDENT ADVISORY BOARD Remainder of Syr term Tom Guggenhiem Expires 12/31/12 PLANNING COMMISSION 3, Three Year Terms Doug Faurer Jim Gustafson Don Crouch INTRODUCED, READ AND ADOPTED by the Town Council of the Town of Snowmass Village, Colorado, on the 3rd day of January 2011 with a motion made by Council Member and seconded by Council Member and by a vote of _in favor to opposed. TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE BILL BOINEAU, Mayor ATTEST: RHONDA B. COXON, Town Clerk APPROVED AS TO FORM: JOHN C.DRESSER, JR., Town Attorney ��v� vv. �i JI (JJLJ VJf V DHllrICLLGK r -iU� bl TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE Application for Boards /Commission Position Board of Appeals and Examiners Liquor Licensing Authority Financial Advisory Board Planning Commission Citizens Grant Review Board Snowmass Art Advisory Board Marketing, Group Sales and Special Events Part Time Residents Advisory Board Name: n I Homo Phone: Email: �0 Cv�jCj Gl� a� Lj cyp�M l Physical Horne: �lr 9 Permarieni Residence Address: �h� C city: 0, 1i O wl 'P —d ST. a. ZIP: Yes, No El Mailing Address: S" W�4�wh.. U l cL C O IR" I `f If No, place of Permanent Residence Business Malling Address: P 0 6 Lfy 5 q Office Phone: S. ow�rrass V I U I b 1 9 z o `Q 3 31 9/ Employed With: Posi "on: Are you Registered to Vote in Snowmass Village: Yes or No List the Experience or Education which may qualify you for this position: P hb Why do you wish to be appointed to this position? n 4S 0. \I l c.� CC.I 4 s I acknowledge that 1 am familiar with the qualifications, duties and responsibilities of the position for which I am applying and, if appointed, I am ready, willing and able to take an oath as well as accepting the responsibilities and duties. a?4;:n eLL I I 15 I Applicant's Signature Date Return to: Rhonda B. Coxon, CMC, Town Clerk, Town of Snowmass Village, Box 5010, Snowmass Village, CO 81615, TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE Application for Board /Commission Position Board of Appeals and Examiners Liquor Licensing Authority Financial Advisory Planning Commission Citizens Grant Review 3 >Arts Advisory Marketing, Group Sales &Special Events Part Time Residents Advisory Board .J' '4;,'.... Name: MICHELLE— BATES- Ho Phone: g 93= 07_0.6 Email: MICHELLEBATES @ALPINEBANK. OM Physical Home Permanent Residence Address:o051 ASSAY HILL COURT #3 City: SNOWMASS VILLAGE CO 81615 ST. &ZIP: Yes R No Mailing Address: PO BOX 5575 If No, place of Permanent Residence: SNOWMASS VILLAGE CO 81615 Business Mailing Address: Ppp BpX 5 90 Office Phone: SNOWMASS VILLAGE (0 8161 429 -2177 Email address: Employed With: ALPINE BANK SNOWMASS Position: BANKING OFFICER Are you Registered to Vote in Snowmass Village: Yes IR or No List the Experience or Education which may qualify you for this position: Why do you wish to be appointed to this position WHEN I MOVED TO SNOWMASS VILLAGE 4 YEARS AGO, I WAS WELCOMED WITH OPEN ARMS. I WOULD LIKE TO GIVET,BACK TO THE COMMUNITY THAT HAS SUPPORTED ME AND MY FAMILY. I acknowledge that I am familiar with the qualifications, duties and responsibilities of the position for which I am applying and, if appointed, I am ready, willing and able to take an oath as well as accepting the responsibilities and duties. Ap icant's Signature Date Return to: Town Clerk, Town of Snowmass Village., Box 5010, Snowmass Village, CO 81615 p: \shared \clerk \boards \app.b &c TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE Application for Boards /Commission Position Board of Appeals and Examiners Liquor Licensing Authority ✓rinancial Advisory Board Planning Commission Citizens Grant Review Board Snowmass Art Advisory Board Marketing, Group Sales and Special Events Part Time Residents Advisory Board Name: Home Phone: P 2 -z- c SGo 3 y Email: cy"Y ,.ecfret✓G !r C.o� Physical Home: O f Permanent Residence Address: City: S;r v ST. ZIP: Yes )K' No Mailing Address.- If No, place of Permanent Residence Business Mailing Address: SAC Office Phone: Employed With: Position: Are you Registered to Vote in Snowmass Village: Yes K or No List the Experience or Education which may qualify you for this position: IqwAve -r /C3 Ylt Ll� Why do you wish to be appointed to this position? L. ✓L-� L� �/oti -e.�D �l`t Cv rLt�t3 -a' ��'�'3'3 �+✓v /�z ��-�i✓ �.✓?1tr�u?a�. "jb �h �clCvlSia,✓,s' G.rdcivq ti'tr 79 (J le t- E T'c l�ici� I acknowledge that I am familiar with the qualifications, duties and responsibilities of the position for which I am applying and, if appointed, I am ready, willing and able to take an oath as well as accepting the responsibilities and duties. Applicant's Signature Date Return to: Rhonda B. Coxon, CMC, Town Clerk, Town of Snowmass Village, Box 5010, Snowmass Village, CO 81615, TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE Application for Boards /Commission Position Board of Appeals and Examiners Liquor Licensing Authority Financial Advisory Board Planning Commission Citizens Grant Review Board Snowmass Art Advisory Board Marketing, Group Sales and Special Events Part Time Residents Advisory Board Name: yam Home Phone: 306 5 UGC 1 (1� Tf�. Email jj Physical Home: J y,,munS Permanent Residence Address: City: 1 lee Ca 616 ST. ZIP: Yes No Mailing Address: If No, place of Permanent Residence {'o •r s6ofo Business Mailing Address: Office Phone: 1 7> o t3 o,- 14-,6 co (!g l 6 i z— ?2- 3 Z S S Employed With: Position: Are you Registered to Vote in Snowmass Village: Yes a--or No List the Experience or Education which may qualify you for this position: C ct 6 -0 ,w4i'- 3U phtf"' plil,'S ?e" fi+rsIho e51 Why do you wish to be appointed to this position? /1 CaXd' /00/ktl D7 V-1'Ie� kavG tnr�f) S fire �,r- C( b�-' id o a 'Toter o4:' '3 L q ��o y h� et �C! /o7� �f1��� Cli �rt✓/�c? �`re Lt/d��{,C� 1� f't%— �vi� /��G ���f�Lr I acknowledge that I am familiar with the qualifications, duties and responsibilities of the position for which I am applying and, i appointed, I ready, willing and able to take an oath as well as accepting the resp i 'Pe an uties. (r 10 A licantlg Signature Date Return to: Rhonda B. Coxon, CMC, Town Clerk, Town of Snowmass Village, Box 5010, Snowmass Village, CO 81615, TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE Application for Board /Commission Position Board of Appeals and Examiners Liquor Licensing Authority X Financial Advisory Planning Commission Citizens Grant Review Arts Advisory Marketing, Group Sales Special Events Part Time Residents Advisory Board Name: Home Phone: How ,fib G'tzosS Email: Physical Home Permanent Residence Address: i 1 9 r -r i,�.� A O A tD City: SrJ o �t S t t] i i-� I Co sr. ZIP: �I l� rS� Yes No Mailing Address: 1 0 J3 C) v 1� S If No, place of Permanent Residence: S /`10 VJ &j, 5'1' V f t L A G -C Business Mailing Address: Office Phone: AJ/A Email address: Employed With: I Position: Are you Registered to Vote in Snowmass Village: Yes -R' or No List the Experience or Education which may qualify you for this position: AS S' v C,N 117- Lj yn\- S t4eA i L 14J v o VAS I >J 74 FN,,) c- 3oi) G rte F N A r J Li -\L LAA) 13',, o T4t 100S i ,1 t,1 GJAS /SUS o i rJ \v o 0 G-'o c.J i `�'I J3 �J r4 ten. ra t Why do you wish to be appointed to this position ^J Ar,.� c.�z\ J o✓z� �a v_ M �17 i Ts� T Boy t, 1 acknowledge that I am familiar with the qualifications, duties and responsibilities of the position for which I am applying and, if appointed, I am ready, willing and able to take an oath as well as accepting the responsibilities and duties. Applicant's Signature Date Return to: Town Clerk, Town of Snowmass Village, Box 5010, Snowmass Village, CO 81615 p:\shared \clerk \boards \app.b &c TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE Application for Board /Commission Position Board of Appeals and Examiners Liquor Licensing Authority Financial Advisory Planning Commission Citizens Grant Review Arts Advisory Marketing, Group Sales Special Events Part Time Residents Advisory Board Name: t� -i �'n aJ Home Phone: s?q Email• i 7, c,i,(i7t, 6e1 a Physical Home Permanent Residence Address: t 2. j_2v �BGef� c �5 city: ttt, c ST. ZIP: Yes No ii Mailing Address: po t :!S (0 j ,i If No, place of Permanent Residence: c�J'Ld7�1Yy� r! l i u Business Mailing Address: S Yry e5F" Office Phone: Email address: t c f�J1c� C� t2f� 1 r �f 2 `S t Employed With: �j t 007 �e Position: 3� r� ket' Are you Registered to Vote in Snowmass Village: Yes �'or No List the Experience or Education which may qualify you for this posi iQn: v r "'7 l�Zi�C? vte.2 L 4 r^..ea -so r 9v rm �c��Ott� y r /�'C�IT� C�i'J K Yz9 t cE. �'f'c- c i ft 4 d l b (0 "t wCL t o ?V' all d Why do you wish to be appointed to this osition?^, CLt`rirr j} U S U 6-. OYt s` J SS i r1 i vi S S`!Ji U i C 40 br S cQ 0 v I acknowledge that I am familiar with the qualifications, duties and responsibilities of the position for which I am ap ly and, if appointed, I am ready, willing and able to take an oath as well as accepting the onsibiliti d duties. /l Apnnf"s i n ture D ate Ret n Clerk, Town of Snowmass Village, Box 5010, Snowmass Village, CO 81615 p: \shared \clerk \boards \app.b &c DEC -15 -2010 WED 02;43 PM SNOWMASS ADMIN FAX NO. 9709230505 P. 02 TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE Application for Board /Com miss ionl Position Board of Appeals and Examiners Liquor Licensing Authority Financial Advisory Planning Commission Citizens Grant Review Arts Advisory Marketing, Group Sales Special Events 2 Homeowners Name: Home Phone: 7- 3 C 1 38Z �'/�oss �Y Email: scrroLc a if Physical Home Permanent Residence Address: 7 2 ST. S ZIP: Cit YES I No C? 5N 0Wrn1 1/my" C-o l(o(f Mailing Addrespo fav� If No, place of Permanent Residence; Business Mailing Address. fS t-")V C'4tj Office Phone, p0 6X /2.Y p ll S l E6AI r 6Z? I l r1i f I q2- 3 Email addres p o wr �c? C r-rn 7 'ypz-�J ed With: Positron: Are you Registered to Vote in Snowmass Village: Y es X or No P List the Experience or Education which may qualify you for this position: �r- �✓1ivYe(I�1�" C�ui�d'a�byr 4s c:Gt�rr� Why do you wish to be appointed to this position?: I ackno dge that I am familiar with the qualifications, duties and responsibilities of the position for which ]am p ing and, if appointed, I am ready, willing and able to take an oath as well as accepting the resp lbilities and duties Applicant's Signature Date Return to: Town Clerk, Town of Snowmass Village, Box 5010, Snowmass Village, CO 81615 p: \shared\clerk \boards \app.b &c TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE Application for Boards /Commission Position Board of Appeals and Examiners Liquor Licensing Authority Financial Advisory Board Planning Commission Citizens Grant Review Board Snowmass Art Advisory Board Marketing, Group Sales and Special Events Part Time Residents Advisory Board Name: Home Phone: C C Email:���V'r L%ccSP- C}v2S�c:.�'w+�t S,c�wt Physical Home: Permanent Residence Address: �5 13 C=?e7- LA City: LA 0' Y C 1� n S ST. ZIP: Yes \�i No J Mailing Address: If No, place of Permanent Residence Business Mailing Address: A S tlj 6v S (<1 I &lc z Cis '_t P4A Office P ic 7 Employed With: Position: Y Are you Registered to Vote in Snowmass Village: Yes `1 or No>6 I List the Experience or Education which may qualify you for this position: m C' ut Yl S E ALL vW 0,t twT" ,+M) 1 4 S K i ..bz F'i`t E: alt�r�wtitrl 5 5� t �C NF gS ?5 U F 7 t L I Nc C- t I' 6 M,.+,eEli- nA, �1 C /t L; v C- c P 'tz Z ,Aj I h��UtL)tti!� L_ �s tt��l�scit �c� Why do you wish to be appointed to this position? w c l t 5 •1J 1 t�.%N i R) 0e F I r �7 t C -c v f' 7� -T t "A-) i3 i "Tz� j r ELI S f47�i/ WCZ Cc�; F /U b 7 Z_�' S U i= I acknowledge that I am familiar with the qualifications, duties and responsibilities of the position for which I am applying and, if appointed, I am ready, willing and able to take an oath as well as accepting the responsibilities and duties. f Applicant's Signature Date Return to: Rhonda B. Coxon, CMC, Town Clerk, Town of Snowmass Village, Box 5010, Snowmass Village, CO 81615, TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE Application for Board /Com misssion Position Board of Appeals and Examiners Liquor Licensing Authority Financial Advisory Planning Commission Citizens Grant Review Arts Advisory Marketing, Group Sales Special Events Part Time Residents Advisory Board Name: Home Phone: Email: Physical Home Permanent Residence Address: City: L2-) ST. ZIP: Ye No Mailing Address: If No, place of Permanent Residence: Business Mailing Address: Ox Office Phone: Email address: Employed With: Q Position: Are you Registered to Vote in Snowmass Village: Y or No List the Experience or Education which may qualify you for this position: 1 Why do you wish to be appointed to this position I acknowledge that I am familiar with the qualifications, duties and responsibilities of the position for which I am applying and, if appointed, I am ready, willing and able to take an oath as well as accepting the responsibilitie�and-datles: p (cant's Signature Date Return to: Town Clerk, Town of Snowmass Village, Box 5010, Snowmass Village, CO 81615 p: \shared \clerk \boards \app.b &c TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE Application for Board /Commission Position Board of Appeals and Examiners X, Licensing Authority Financial Advisory Planning Commission Citizens Grant Review >Arts Advisory Marketing, Group Sales Special Events Part Time Residents Advisory Board E— BATES Home Phone: 9 -23-0706 Email: MICHELLEBATES @ALPINEBANK. OM Physical Home Permanent Residence Address:0051 ASSAY HILL COURT #3 City: SNOWMASS VILLAGE CO 81615 ST. ZIP: Yes M No Mailing Address: PO BOX 5575 If No, place of Permanent Residence: SNOWMASS VILLAGE CO 81615 Business Mailing Address: Po B X 5[� 90 Office Phone: SNOWMASS VILLAGE C0 1615 429 2177 Email address: Employed With: ALPINE BANK SNOWMASS Position: BANKING OFFICER A Registered to �Vote �inSno�wmassVilla�qe: �Ye�(Ro No List the Experience or Education which may qualify you for this position: t Why do you wish to be appointed to this position WHEN I MOVED TO SNOWMASS VILLAGE 4 YEARS AGO, I WAS WELCOMED WITH OPEN ARMS. I WOULD LIKE TO GTVERBACK TO THE COMMUNITY THAT HAS SUPPORTED ME AND MY FAMILY. I acknowledge that I am familiar with the qualifications, duties and responsibilities of the position for which I am applying and, if appointed, I am ready, willing and able to take an oath as well as accepting the responsibilities and dutie 42Y,�g A plicant's Signature Date Return to: Town Clerk, Town of Snowmass Village, Box 5010, Snowmass Village, CO 81615 p:\shared\clerk\boards \app.b &c From: c d <cdoyleemail @gmail.com> Subject: Snowmass Village Part -time Residents Advisory Board Date: November 24, 2010 3:15:33 PM EST To: guggenhaus @aol.com Cc: Mery Claire Butler <MBL @tampabay.rr.com> 1 Attachment, 45.5 KB Mr. Guggenheim, It was good to talk with you about the Snowmass Village Part -time Residents Advisory Board. I am so glad you will consider applying. I have attached an application. Applications are due by the end of December, and the applications will be reviewed during a January 2011 Town Council meeting. If you have any questions, please let me know. You now have my e -mail address, and my cell phone number is (970) 456 -7751. Colleen Colleen Doyle 970.456.7751 TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE Application for Board /Commission Position Board of Appeals and Examiners Liquor Licensing Authority Financial Advisory Planning Commission Citizens Grant Review Arts Advisory Marketing, Group Sales Special Events 2 Homeowners Name: 1 Home Phon S 3'6 fnn,. V Email: ���LVO� 0.61, Physical Home Permanent Residence Address: g City: S r� LSD sr. a ZIP: Yes No f Mailing Address: 1 If No, place of Permanent Residence: s z� s Sr 11 l�q c� Business Mailing Address: 1 Office Phoned Email address: Employed With: Position: Are you Registered to Vote in Snowmass Village: Yes or No List the Experience or Education which may qualify you for this position: Why do you wish to be appointed to this position 1 acknowl dge that I am familiar with the qualifications, duties and responsibilities of the position for which I am app g and, if appointed, I am ready, willing and able to take an oath as well as accepting the respons' ili nd duties. Applicant's Signature Date Return to: Town Clerk, Town of Snowmass Village, Box 5010, Snowmass Village, CO 81615 p: \sh a red \clerk \boards\app. b &c TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE Application,for Boards /Commission Position Board of Appeals and Examiners Liquor Licensing Authority Financial Advisory Board Planning Commission Citizens Grant Review Board Snowmass Art Advisory Board Marketing, Group Sales and Special Events Part Time Residents Advisory Board Name:\ Home Phone: ot7o..'y ?Q -zSUZ Email QL ur r 01 2.' e Cow'- Physical Home: 9& 0 '1' 14C it A Permari t Residence Address: City: V tC.Ltj i- 60 c� l5 ST. ZiP: Yes e No Mailing Address: If No, place of Permanent Residence Business Mailing Address: E 4 Office Phone: �c �tc�Ewttr�T skvi\ 1. L'� �t(c1`5 R Employed With:: f j� Position: �-t j 1.4 E ;2 c c �2 C t-1 A r, 1- WL C Are you Registered to Vote in Snowmass Village: Yes .L?" or No List the Experience o wh may qualify you for this position: X- P t r2.� G oc�o v 4ULu�� i'�. t,..o� rY c.� S c�.� C' e..22�5 ¢s �cs:Z �L' c:�� F Why do you wish to be appointed to this position trv�s t CE L "0 -4 6v�. V cric w� �JLK Wtl u l 1i1 v a C VLF ivyGi w�^E" 6� i l l lx V� GC2 �5 4pz ,u v` c wi b� �t -4 1?— c A U'X-J5 o �Gt l t' C 4 v. e v^ tt a -1 3� k"-�� L 0-r O ,s v ;z f j7Gl, �I Lr�tiS'f Oct�c�� 1ti �v�A CDE�f�N�'/ f "ifiL is��cv la.t� 71 'f I acknowledge that I am familiar with the qualifications, duties and responsibilities of the position for which I am applying and, if appointed, I am ready, willing and able to take an oath as well as accepting the responsibilities and duties. t Applicants ib nature Date Return to: Rhonda B. Coxon, CMC, Town Clerk, Town of Snowmass Village, Box 5010, Snowmass Village, CO 81615, TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE Application for Boards /Commission Position Board of Appeals and Examiners Liquor Licensing Authority Financial Advisory Board X Planning Commission Citizens Grant Review Board Snowmass Art Advisory Board Marketing, Group Sales and Special Events Part Time Residents Advisory Board Flame, Jatr!es A. Gustafson Hrnr,e Ph;:na: 923- 3639 I Physical Home Permanent Residence Address: 81 North Ridge Lane City: Snowmass Village, CO 81615 sr. s ZIP: Yes X No Mailing Address: If No, place of Permanent Residence: P.O. Box 6067 Business Mailing Address: Office Phone: 234 E. Hopkins, Aspen, CO 81611 925 -3383 Employed With: Position: Caudill Gustafson Assoc. Architects, P.C. President Are you Registered to Vote in Snowmass Village: Yes. X or N List the Experience or Education which may qualify you for this position: Homeowner and Resident of Snowmass Village since 1976. Resident of Roaring Fork Valley since 1970. Membership and participation in several Snowmass Village organizations, such as: Homeowner's Association Board of Directors, Snowmass Village Rotary Club, Design Review Committee, etc. (See Resume). Professional training in planning architecture as well as Bd. of Appeals (Building Code Experience). Many years of prior experience on the Snowmass Village Planning Commission. Why do you wish to be appointed to this position My motivation for seeking this appointment, which I realize is a substantial time commitment, is primarily related to my role as resident and business person within the community. As someone raising a family in Snowmass Village and expecting to live here for mahy years to come, I am concerned about the impacts of development and the quality of life within the Village. I believe that I recognize the very special qualities of our Village and Valley, which should be maintained and enhanced. And, as a business owner, I recognize the importance of maintaining a vital and quality resort. My objective is to contribute to a process that leads to the planning and further development of the Village in a positive way, while attempting to balance the many concems and issues which we face. I acknowledge that I am familiar with the qualifications, duties and responsibilities of the position for which I am applying and, if appointed, I am ready, willing and able to take an oath as well as accepting the respon iZaK*ties. Applicant's Signature Date Return to: Rhonda B. Coxon, CMC, Town Clerk, Town of Snowmass Village, Box 5010, Snowmass Village, CO 81615, j��������� a. ��0fson y7ra»b James A. Gustafson woARo. President of Caudill Gustafson &Amsmc/mtys joined the firm in 1970 and has been the Managing Principal since 1880. He has broad experience in the management of large-scale design and construction projects ofe Public/institutional and Resort/Hospitality nature in the Rocky Mountain region as well as Internationally. Mr. Gustafson has served as Project Architect, Project Manager or Principal-in-Charge for over two hundred nfthe firm's most significant projects over the past thirty-five years. These facilities have received more than fifty Architectural Design Awards. Since 2082.he has also served ase President nfZ-Gno4pArchitects. Mr. Gustafson has been actively involved in a wide range of recent building programs including major Educational, Conference Hotel facilities in the United States as well as in Asia, Russia, elsewhere. In addition to basic Architectural/ Engineering services, these projects have included substantial Programming and Planning activity for many multi-faceted building complexes, which have incorporated phased and fast-tracked construction. He has also remained very active in Community and Professional affairs. PERSONAL: Born: io Oak Park, Illinois November 12,1943 8Varied: Mary Brent Childers May 30, 1970 Children: �8ritta Anne Gustafson April i3.1A78 *Ko6YAne6aGustafson July 20.i081 k Sonya Marie Gustafson November 15,1983 EDNCA TION: University of Illinois: Undergraduate Division: Chicago, Navy Pier 1061-1904 �Chompaign/Urbano: 1964 -1966 Bachelor ofArchitecture: 1900 k Continuing Education Programs: 1975'Present REGISTRATION. Colorado License: B-1062 -1076 (by Examination) i NCARB (National Council of Architectural Registration Boards) Certificate No. 2&.754 PROFESSIONAL p Society of American Registered Architects CIVIC ACTIVITIES: American /notib//a of Architects, Colorado Society of Architects k Counc of Educational Facility Planners, International -Member. /\4oen School District RE-y Accountability Committee Past Member Snown7aoa Village Planning Commission Member Past Chairman. Snowvneeo Architectural Design Conhn/Connnnitbpe AnnhdooL Colorado Mountain College Past Community Advisory Committee Member. k Value Analysis/Va/ue Engineering N/bnkoh4o/Senninar-Graduate. International Day-Lighting Conference -Phoenix. International Resort Conference 'Tokyo. p American Society of Landscape Architects 'Mel Award Rec American Planning Association Past Member. k National Trust for Historic Preservation -Member' Construction Specifications Institute -Member. National Fire Protection Association -Member. o Snow/mans Homeowner's Assn. Bd. of Directors Past Vice President. Colorado Mountain College Foundation Bd. of Directors, Past Member. k Who's Who in Arnenton Education and Who's Who in The VN*nt Aspen Community Service Award 'Recipient for Six years A4nen/Japan Sister City Committee Past Member. Aspen Japan Institute, Ltd. Board ofDirectors. Japan America Society, Denver Chapter Bd. of Directors, Pax/Member Sister City Housing, Inc. Board ufDirectors, Past Member, o Bi-National Mounby/n Resort Conference: Kiroro. Japan Speaker Keynote Speaker International Symposium on Highlands Resorts Aso Region, Kumamoto Prefecture Kyushu, Japan AIA Committee on Architecture for Education Member. Snowmass Board of Examiners Appeals Member Past Chairman Aspen Valley Medical Foundation Past Member. American Arbitration Association Panel Member. Rotary International Snowmass Village International Committee Chairman PROFESSIONAL Z-GROUP ARCHITECTS, P.C. President: 2002 Present EXPERIENCE: CAUDILL GUSTAFSON& ASSOC. ARCHITECTS, P.C: 1980-Present President: 1984-Present Comprehensive General Architectural Practice located in Aspen with a Staff of up to 23, including 15 Registered Architects. Major Projects include: Over 75 major Educational Projects 30 Higher Education Facility Projects 25 Secondary School Projects ,25 Elementary School Projects o Over 100 Public Commercial Projects 30 Resort/Hospitality Projects 30 Government Projects 30 Housing Complex Projects 25 Health Care Service Projects Over 50 Residential Projects Over 20 International Projects in Japan, and elsewhere in Asia Russia Managing Partner: 1980-1983 Awards: 1980-R Over 50 Architectural Awards participation as Principle-in-Charge, Project Architect, and Design Team Member. CAUDILL ASSOCIATES, ARCHITECTS: 1971-1979 o Chief ArchitectlOffice Manager: 1978-1979 Project Architect: 1975 -1978 Job Captain: 1972 1974 Designer/Drafter: 1971 1972 ASPEN INTERNATIONAL PROPERTIES: 1970 Architectural Model Maker, Assistant Designer a Aspen Wildcat Project MILITARY U.S. ARMY CORPS of ENGINEERS: 1966-1969 SERVICE: 1 Lieutenant with Honorable Discharge in 1969 Basic& Advanced Engineer Training, Ft. Leonard Wood, MO: 1966 Officers Candidate School (OCS) Ft. Belvoir, VA: 1967 Combat Engineers Graduate as 2 d Lieutenant Asst. Master Planner Post Engineer's Off ice, Fort Carson, CO: 1967 Platoon Leader-7 Combat Engr. Battalion, 5 1h Infantry Division 1968 Off icer's Vehicle Maintenance School ,Off icer's Chemical Biological Radiological (CBR) War School Mekong Delta Assistant Area Engineer: 1968 1969 IV Corps Base Development Officer: 1968 1969 City of Can Tho, Republic of South Vietnam Project Supervisor 213 Engineer Detachment (USAECAV): 1968-1969 Officer-in-Charge for Construction of a 200-Man Special Forces Compound at Village of Cao Lanh on the Cambodian Border Installation of Support Facilities for 2 4-Man MACV Advisory Teams l ocated throughout Mekong Delta IV Corps Sector Bronze Star Medal Service in Republic of South Vietnam: 1968 1969 TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE Application for Boards /Commission Position Board of Appeals and Examiners Liquor Licensing Authority Financial Advisory Board Planning Commission Citizens Grant Review Board Snowmass Art Advisory Board Marketing, Group Sales and Special Events Part Time Residents Advisory Board Name: Home Phone: Email: s Physical Home: Permanent Residence Address: City: ST. ZIP: YeS NO U L L lc* Qz Maili ddre s: If No, place of Permanent Residence Business Mailing duress: Office Phone 1 Employed With: Position: I W.k I Are you Registered to Vote in Snowmass Village: Yes or No List the Experience or Education which may qualify you for this position: 1 Why do you wish to be appointed to this position? I acknowledge that I at familiar with the qualifications, duties and responsibilities of the position for which I am applying and, if appointed, I am y9ady, willing and able to take an oath as well as accepting the es onsibilities and duties. App ican 's Signature Date Return to: Rhonda B. Coxon, CMC, Town Clerk, Town of Snowmass Village, Box 5010, Snowmass Village, CO 81615, P.O. Box 2673 Phone Home 970 923 -5086 Aspen, Colorado 81612 cell 970- 309 -3900 Fax 970 -923 9588 E -mail doncrouch @comcast.net Donald Crouch Summary of Proven experience in the following areas: qualifications Marketing, Real Estate, New Business Development, Sales, Business Management, Public and Customer Relations, Construction and Construction Management, Budget Control and Financial Management, Human Resource Management and Training, eight year member Snowmass Village Planning Commission Employment 1980 to Present, Real Estate sales license issued 1980, actively employed by Chaffin Light real estate Snowmass Village. Purchased and developed land in Pitkin County 1970, 1978, 1981, 1985, 1987, 1989,1996, 1999, 2000. These developments were a combination of single family homes and commercial developments. I also had a commercial development in Gunnison County 1990 to 1998 1985 to present, I purchased renovated and reorganized an existing business. The Aspen Quick Mart has been a successful business for over 25 years with sales exceeding $1,000,000. The Real Estate was purchased in 1996 and I am currently applying for a zoning change so future development can occur. 1990 to 1998, I purchased a financially troubled business in Crested Butte Co. The Marketplace was a financial success for seven years. The lease expired in April 1998. 1978 to 1997,1 was half owner of North Mill Investment Corporation. I was founder, owner, and manager of Great Western Spirit Co; a retail liquor and wine store in Aspen Co. North Mill later became a commercial landlord in downtown Aspen. Related Experience I have been involved in a number of building and development projects. These projects include total responsibility for the design and general contracting of two personal residences. I was also general contractor for my retail businesses. This included initial construction and subsequent remodels. Seasonal Ski Patrolman during the winter, construction during the summer. A sales representative for International Business Machines. We sold equipment for the Office Products Division of IBM. I was a member of four 100% clubs and a member of the Golden Circle. A 100% club requires one to sell their sales quota for a year. The Golden Circle is the top one percent of the sales force. The sales force included 5,000 sales people. Member Aspen Board of Realtors Education Member National Board of Realtors Member Colorado Board of Realtors Member Snowmass Village Planning Commission (five years) Independent Real Estate Broker license State of Colorado Broker associate Real Estate license State of Colorado Real Estate sales license State of Colorado Bachelor of Science Degree Michigan State University, Business and Marketing I have worked in Snowmass Village since 1971, and had a residence since 1980. I have raised a family and owned and started several businesses in the area. This experience and my knowledge of the planning process through seven years of serving on the commission give me a unique perspective on planning. I have learned a great deal serving on the commission, and would like to continue to serve. We have some extreme challenges in the future and I would like to use my knowledge and experience to help us move forward in a constructive manner. Don Crouch MEMORANDUM TO: Snowmass Village Town Council FROM: Planning Department DATE: January 3, 2011 meeting SUBJECT: PUBLIC HEARING AND DISCUSSION ELK CAMP RESTAURANT SPECIAL REVIEW APPLICATIONS FOR THE ELK CAMP RESTAURANT WITH LIGHTING PLAN FOR NIGHTTIME OPERATIONS TO 12:00 MIDNIGHT, AND A MINOR PUD AMENDMENT TO SNOWMASS MOUNTAIN. ACTION REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: Follow up the review /discussion from the December 20, 2010 meeting and consider the applicant's responses. Complete the review of the applications, including the Minor PUD Amendment. After evaluation, direct staff in preparing a resolution for the Special Review and an ordinance for the Minor PUD Amendment if desired. Applicant: Aspen Skiing Company Project Manager /Planner: Chris Kiley Company Planning Director: David Corbin Planner: Jim Wahlstrom, Senior Planner I. PURPOSE: The purposes of the meeting would be to: 1) Follow up the review /discussion from the December 20, 2010 meeting and consider the applicant's responses dated December 22, 2010 on the issues identified (reference Section II `Background' below and Attachment 5); 2) Complete the review of the applications, including the Minor PUD Amendment (see Section IV below); 3) Open the public hearing to consider comments from the general public; and 4) After evaluation, direct staff in whether a resolution for the Special Review and an ordinance for the Minor PUD Amendment should be prepared for consideration at the next meeting. Ill. BACKGROUND AND FOLLOW UP: From the meeting discussions on December 20 and pursuant to staff's notes, Town Council seemed to request follow up responses from the applicant on the following matters: Concrete walls That the applicant provide addresses locations of other board formed concrete wall examples in the area; Glazing type That the applicant confirm usage of non mirrored or non reflective glass on the proposed restaurant building; 1 Skier access That the applicant address a stated preference or option for skier access from top of Elk Camp Meadows /Turkey Trot ski run; See the applicant's responses in Attachment 5 on pages 1 and 2 of their correspondence regarding the above note items. Environmental education Concerning the information /interpretive usage, it was not carried forward (including an envisioned 2,300 SF Environmental Interpretive Center) from the 1994 approval as a requirement, but it was carried forward as one of the limited usages allowed in Elk Camp Meadows per the 2005 Final PUD Guide. It is proposed as one of the limited allowed usage in the applicant's updated version of the Final PUD Guide. Staff requested that the applicant should confirm in writing their proposed interpretive programs for the restaurant in their responses, pursuant to the applicant's verbal presentation on December 20 (see Attachment 5 page 2 of 3). Patio seats Council requested information concerning the comparison of the specific number of patio seats for the proposed Elk Camp Restaurant patio versus the existing scenario for the Cafe Suzanne patio /deck area, and that the new patio area be accessed directly from the outside without first entering the restaurant. The applicant represented in their responses in Attachment 5, page 2 that the outdoor seating at Cafe Suzanne versus the new Elk Camp Restaurant patio would be the same at 150 seats. Construction Management Plan (CMP) issues that should be addressed more specifically: Mitigation of construction truck traffic and perhaps limiting heavy truck traffic to 6 -days per week instead of 7 for example; Notification to Mountain Event staff of anticipated construction traffic and coordination to avoid conflicts with event activities; The impacts and proposed mitigation to Town and on- mountain activities during the summer, together with the impact mitigation proposed before and after summer operations; The mitigation of construction worker traffic, if they are to use the intercept lot, then how would they be vehicle pooled up to the construction site? Reference the applicant's responses in Attachment 5 (bottom of page 2 and on page 3 of their correspondence). Restaurant hours Possible consideration of varied hours and /or days that the restaurant with lighting operates to 12 Midnight during the year: Consider the Colorado Division of Wildlife (CDOW) letter dated December 6, 2010 (provided again for reference see Attachment 4). Pursuant to the White River National Forest Record of Decision for the Snowmass Ski Area Final Environmental Impact Statement dated 1994, it indicated under the `Associated Action and Implementation Requirements' in Subsection titled `Visual Resources' (p. 23) stating: "Requirements that lighting schemes, fixtures and glazing technology minimize light transmission and nighttime lighting constraints." 2 o Per the Final PUD Guide from Ordinance No. 2, Series of 2005, [Reference the current Final PUD Guide for list of allowed and restricted uses (Attachment 1)], any nighttime operations that require lighting to 12 Midnight or extended hours beyond 12 Midnight trigger the Special Review. Other operations were allowed to operate to 12 Midnight per the 2005 Final PUD Guide, such as night operations of the Elk Camp Gondola, Burlingame, Cabriolet, and the Village Express lift together with on- mountain restaurants to 12:00 a.m. This would assume that the restaurants would only include interior lighting. Note that the nighttime operations that would require lighting would presume to involve exterior lighting, requiring the Special Review. Also, special events including weddings, concerts, children's activities, private parties, worship services and other group activities and social events less than 500 people at one time are allowed per the Final PUD Guide. Therefore, the applicant's proposal for outdoor lighting with the added potential of possible outdoor activities /music should be examined under the current Special Review application. One could assume that if there is outdoor lighting, then outdoor performances might be conducted. The evaluation of such possibilities would provide the Town Council an option at this time to restrict certain outdoor activities at minimum to 10:00 p.m., such as performing music inside the building after this time, even if the current exterior lighting plan appears to meet the Town's lighting ordinance subject to final review by the Chief Building Official during the building construction plan review. o If the exterior night lighting is granted, confirmation in writing should be provided from the applicant that everyone would need to be off the mountain and operations shut down by 12 Midnight, as seemed to be represented by the applicant at the December 20 meeting. Reference the applicant responses in Attachment 5 including previous approval language, in particular from the 2006 Environmental Assessment. Also reference the US Forest Service letters in the previously provided application materials (Tabs 4 and 13). Minor PUD Amendment Evaluate the effects upon previously approved Final PUD Guide (Minor PUD Amendment). The staff report below in Section IV carries forward the information from the December 20 report concerning the proposed Minor PUD Amendment. III. APPLICABLE REGULATIONS Municipal Code review criteria that regulate the review of a Special Review application include Municipal Code Section 16A- 5- 230(e), Review Standards For Minor PUD Amendments, the standards that regulate the review include Section 16A -5 -390, Amendment of final PUD of the Snowmass Village Municipal Code. These standards make reference to Section 16A- 5- 300(c), General Restrictions and Section 16A -5 -310, Review Standards which also make reference to Article IV, Development Evaluation Standards of the Municipal Code. 3 The burden of proof is upon the applicant to demonstrate to the Town Council that the review standards have been met so that the Council can make their findings in a subsequent resolution and ordinance regarding the applications. Public Notification: For the public hearing scheduled for the January 3, 2011 Town Council meeting, the notice for the hearing was published in the Snowmass Sun on December 15, 2010 to meet the 15 -day notification period for Special Reviews and the Minor PUD Amendment applications pursuant to Municipal Code Section 16A -5 -60, Notice of public hearings The applicant also submitted the required executed affidavits for the mailing and posting of the public hearing notice. IV. DISCUSSION ITEMS: CORE ISSUES MINOR PUD AMENDMENT Effects upon previously approved Final PUD Guide (Minor PUD Amendment). As a result of the Special Review application for the Elk Camp Restaurant, which might conceivably be the last new restaurant on the ski mountain for a while, the applicant submitted a Minor PUD Amendment to address changes in the Final PUD Guide approved with Ordinance No. 2, Series of 2005, for the ski mountain as a whole. See Tabs 3 and 15 of the application for the description of the proposed changes to the Final PUD Guide. Tab 15 incorporates the adopted and the redlined version showing the proposed changes together with the final intended version of the development parameters. The Final PUD Guide was not amended when the new Sam's Knob Restaurant was proposed. The amendment would clarify certain sections of the Final PUD Guide such as: a) updating the primary restaurant and picnic facility figures; b) adding or modifying separate definitions for `Ski Related Commercial Facilities,' `Ski Related Facilities,' and `Commercial Service Areas,' as these uses were previously all grouped together as part of the `Ski Related Facilities' definition from the Municipal Code and the expanded definition of `Skier Services' also included in the previous Final PUD Guide; and c) modifying the language in the `Limitations of Facilities and Uses' section such as clarifying that the previous maximum 120,000 SF floor area and 80,000 SF building coverage limitations apply to the new definition of `Ski Related Commercial Facilities.' The applicant plans to later update their inventory list of on- mountain structures and total square footage figures or other information as such data may likely be needed for reference purposes following construction or completion of the Elk Camp Restaurant. Planning Commission findings /recommendations Pursuant to Section 16A -5- 390(3) of the Municipal Code and as more particularly described in the applicant's application notebook received October 1, 2010 regarding the Minor PUD Amendment application, which includes clarification of the development parameters and usage definitions, the Planning Commission found that: 4 a) The ski related operations facilities on the mountain should not be considered commercial in nature; b) The inventory list of on- mountain facilities has been proven helpful in the review of past amendments, and it appears acceptable to defer an update of the inventory list of on- mountain facilities to utilize as a baseline reference for future amendment reviews after the new Elk Camp Restaurant is built and the Cafe Suzanne removed; c) The proposed revisions to further clarify the Final PUD Guide standards seem consistent with, or an enhancement of, the original PUD approval; d) The proposed amendments do not appear to have a substantially adverse effect on the neighborhood surrounding the land where the amendment is proposed, or have a substantially adverse impact on the enjoyment of land abutting upon or across the street from the subject property; e) The proposed amendments do not appear to change the basic character of the PUD or surrounding areas; and f) The proposed amendments comply with the other noted and applicable standards of the Municipal Code such as Section 16A- 5- 300(c), General Restrictions and Section 16A -5 -310, Review Standards and as more specifically addressed in the Planning Commission's resolution. The Planning Commission recommends that the applicant should provide an update of the inventory list of all on- mountain commercial and operational facilities to utilize as a baseline reference for future amendment reviews after the new Elk Camp Restaurant is built and the Cafe Suzanne removed, or provide no later than December 31, 2015. Staff Comments Recommendations Staff concurs with the Planning Commission findings and recommendations. However, Town Council should take the following staff analysis below under advisement or consideration. Staff welcomes the idea of clarifying or updating the Final PUD Guide after almost six years since the previous approval. Staff believes the intent all along was to limit on- mountain commercial or restaurant type facilities to the maximum 120,000 SF building commercial space or floor area and the 80,000 SF building coverage limitations. However, it should be more specifically determined by the Town Council the necessary on- mountain operational structures are commercial in nature, but all the structures combined on the mountain currently exceed the 120,000 SF limitation. The added definition of `Ski Related Commercial Facilities' would more specifically determine what types of facilities are regulated by the current limitations. The proposed new commercial definition or standard would not include the necessary on- mountain operational structures on the ski mountain (see Attachment 2 for current inventory list). Secondly, the added definition of `Commercial Service Areas' clarifies more specifically what may be exempt from the floor area calculations and seems consistent with the Municipal Code. The Code states that, "service areas and other similar uses" are exempt from the floor area calculations for commercial and other non residential uses. Staff believes the floor area plans and calculations for the new Elk Camp Restaurant are consistent with the Municipal Code's floor area calculation standards. Staff has worked with the applicant on 5 these drawings and calculations during the completion review process of the application submission. Lastly, it is recommended that the applicant's proposed new definition of 'Ski related facilities' be changed to `Ski related operational structures' or another term to avoid possible conflict or confusion with the Municipal Code definition of `Ski related facilities' (see Attachment 3), which includes restaurants and other food services. In 2004/05 the applicant and staff inventoried the other facilities on the ski mountain. However, it was and has been difficult in the recent past to monitor on -going changes to the ski mountain inventory and to regulate and update on- mountain structures that are needed for the necessary operation of the ski mountain. Such structures, not including vehicle maintenance or gondola facilities, include: lift terminal structures, lift maintenance rooms, snowmaking compressor structures, pump houses, miscellaneous outhouse and storage structures, patrol huts, bomb caches, temporary type yurts, Nastar shacks, or similar types of buildings that are most typically less than 5,000 square feet of floor area in size (see Attachment 2 for current inventory list). In Ordinance No. 2, Series of 2005, these operational buildings totaled approximately 35,000 square feet, not including restaurants, gondola and vehicle maintenance facilities. To address the above matter, the applicant's added definition of `Ski Related Facilities' seems reasonable and might clarify which types of facilities may be exempt from the commercial square footage calculations and could be advantageous in this case rather than addressing at this time the inventory updates or other changes in the PUD Guide for future consideration. However, decision makers should determine if the `Ski related facilities' or operational type structures are commercial in nature since the ski operations as a whole appear commercial in nature. There are currently in place in the Final PUD Guide triggers for different types of application reviews if certain expansions or changes are proposed in the future. The applicant has always had the opportunity now or in the future to propose amendments to the Mountain Master Plan PUD, if the current proposal is to defer addressing changes to or eliminating the current inventory list. However, the proposed new `Ski Related Commercial Facilities' definition at this time attempts to better clarify which buildings or uses would need to comply with the 120,000 SF limitation. In the future, it may still be helpful to have an updated list of on- mountain facilities in place for future reference, and if it is agreeable that such an update be deferred, then staff would recommend a new base line of inventoried structures on the mountain after the new Elk Camp Restaurant is built and the Cafe Suzanne removed, or no later than 2015. A baseline inventory would assist staff and decision makers in evaluating future proposed amendments. 6 V. OTHER HEADINGS RELATED TO THE TOPICS Attachments 1. List of allowed and restricted uses under the current Final PUD Guide; 2. Inventory list of on- mountain facilities as of February 7, 2005 from Final PUD Guide; 3. Municipal Code definition of `Ski related facilities'; 4. Latest reply from CDOW dated December 6, 2010 (provided again for reference purposes); and 5. Applicant responses dated December 22, 2010 to Town Council issues, comments and concerns from the December 20 meeting. (Note: Reference as needed the signed Planning Commission Resolution No. 7, Series of 2010 provided as Attachment 7 in the December 20 staff report). VI. NEXT STEPS Continue the public hearing to the next meeting; and The Planning Department staff is prepared to draft a resolution for the Special Reviews and an ordinance for the Minor PUD Amendment for scheduling and consideration at the next meeting, unless otherwise directed by the Town Council. 7 ATTACHMENT 1 LISTING OF PERMITTED AND CONDITIONAL USES FINAL PUD GUIDE IN ORDINANCE NO. 2, SERIES OF 2005 SNOWMASS MOUNTAIN MASTER PLAN AMENDMENT OF 2004 EXHIBIT `1' (Snowmass Mountain PUD Guide) 2005 Specific and Definitive Listing of Permitted or Conditional Uses Snowmass Mountain Master Plan Amendment of 2004 The following listing of uses shall serve as the standard for the administration of the zoning process for the lands within the Snowmass Mountain boundaries within the Town of Snowmass Village. The uses are divided into the following three categories: Activities and uses allowed all year; Activities and uses allowed during the traditional winter ski and snowboard season; Activities and uses which are allowed by further review Activities and Uses Allowed All Year Activities which are allowed all year are those uses which are typically associated with the year -round recreational use of the mountain and have little or no environmental and service related impacts. Refer to the Snowmass Mountain Master Plan illustration (Figure 2, Proposed Conditions) which shows locations of buildings, lifts, ski and snowboard terrain, catwalks and utility corridors. Permanent uses allowed by right year round include the following, but are subject to Special Review if substantial changes in the use are proposed: 1) All permitted existing uses and activities. 2) General maintenance activities normally associated with the operation of the recreation area including but not limited to: a) Construction of new ski and snowboard lift facilities as shown on the plan as well as lift renovation, relocation, upgrading and maintenance to the extent there is no significant increase in either the bulk of the top or bottom terminals or that there is no increase in the ski and snowboard area capacity as a result of such work beyond the ski and snowboard area capacity identified in the Master Plan. b) Removal of lifts (except that the Burlingame lift shall remain as modified and provided for in the supplemental information dated July 7, 2004) c) All ski and snowboard trail work including grading, clearing, glading, fine grooming, revegetation and other such activities normally associated with the construction, maintenance and improvement of trails. d) Construction of terrain gardens, snowboard parks and ancillary snowmaking. e) All hiking, biking and equestrian trail work including grading, clearing, glading, fine grooming, revegetation and other such activities normally associated with the construction, maintenance and improvement of trails. The summer trails plan is depicted in the supplemental information dated July 7, 2004. 3) General maintenance and construction and reconstruction and renovation of mountain buildings, subject to local building permit regulations. 11 EXHIBIT `1' Page 2 of 5 (Snowmass Mountain PUD Guide) 2005 4) Construction of the utility trenches as needed for the repair and maintenance of all utility and snowmaking systems. 5) Maintenance of all mountain facilities. 6) Expansion of Snowmaking terrain depicted in the Plan Amendment of 2004. 7) Grazing and Timber cutting on Forest Service lands when allowed by Special Use Permits through the Forest Service. 8) Hunting on Forest Service lands where and when allowed by governing state, federal and local authorities. 9) Hiking, biking, horseback riding on mountain roads and trails and other recreational endeavors on federal, state and locally controlled areas, except when prohibited due to on- mountain construction or wildlife closures. 10) Water lines, water treatment facilities, sewer lines, compressed air lines and other such utilities required for the operation of existing snowmaking machinery, restaurants and other such facilities in the area 11) Existing access roads for maintenance and construction of facilities within the ski and snowboard area. 12) Existing Fuel farms. 13) Existing storage of Avalanche Control Devices including construction of the Powder Mixing and Storage Magazine Facility. 14) Aspen Skiing Company offices. 15) Picnics. 16) Tube and lattice lift towers needed to achieve normal ski and snowboard criteria. 17) New or replacement top and bottom drive and return stations and lift operators cabins /huts. 18) Annual maintenance and or replacement of lift machinery and systems as long as such work does not significantly result in change to the lift's capacity, alignment or length. 19) Snowboarding, snowshoeing and skiing, both Nordic and Alpine. 20) Qperation of the proposed Elk Came gondola. 21) Existing storage of ski and snowboard area equipment 22) Special events including weddings, concerts, children's activities private Raaies wors ip services an of er group activities and social events l ess than 500 people at one time. 23) Guided and self guided environmental tours. 24) Accessory recreational facilities and structures designed to support specific recreational endeavors, such as climbing walls and paintball games. 25) aeration of the mountain restaurants. 26) Operation of the on- mountain chil&Frs activities in summer and winter. 27) Information shelters and cookie stands on the mountain. 28) Existing transit centerldepot at Two Creeks (informational only subject to the East Village PUD development standards) 29) Rental and sales of recreational equipment and goods. 30) Night operations of the Elk Camp gondola, Burlingame, Cabriolet, and Sam's Knob Express lifts until 12:00 a.m., with option to extend hours subject to Special Review. 31) Night operations of on mountain restaurants unti 12: a.m 32) Surface water storage facilities and features Y 12 EXHIBIT `'I' Page 3 of 5 (Snowmass Mountain PUD Guide) 2005 Uses Allowed by Right During the Traditional Winter Season or During the Preparation for the Opening of the Ski and Snowboard Area Uses and activities allowed during the traditional winter season or during the preparation for the opening of the ski and snowboard area are set by the adoption of this plan. "Activities which are allowed during the traditional winter season are those uses which provide basic support services for skiers and snowboarders and the ski and snowboard area operations and have little or no environmental and service related impacts." 1 Ski and Snowboard School and toddler skiing and snowboarding activities including meeting areas and structures. 2) Existing restaurants, including indoor and outdoor ea ting and drinking establishments, as described in this PUD Guide 3) aces or retailing of goods in support of skiing and snowboarding operations. 4) Personal service outlet including minor ski and snowboard repair activities in support of ski and snowboard operations. 5) Public restrooms. 6) Ski snowboard lift operations of all lifts shown described in accompanying plan. 7) Ski and snowboard trail operations on all trails shown and described in accompanying plan. 8) Existing accessory buildings including, but not limited to ski and snowboard patrol stations, warming huts, equipment storage buildings and lift operator huts. Replacement of such buildings. (Note: Existing accessory buildings shall be limited by the uses mentioned, including size maximums, and should not be unlimited as stated in the application; Otherwise, any replacement building shall be subject to the Administrative Modification or PUD Amendment procedures, whichever applies). 9} Indoor recreational facilities including, but not limited to video games and table games, that do not change the primary use of the building. 10) Ticket sales areas. 11) Snowboarding, skiing, and snowshoeing. 12) Snowmaking in areas depicted on map insert (attached Exhibit `D'). 13) Avalanche control work accomplished by the use of high explosives. 14) Snow grooming including, but not limited to, rolling, tilling, compaction, cutting, dozing and relocating. 15) Outdoor recreational uses and facilities set in a natural environment including but not limited to ski and snowboard racing, free -style contests and other such organized special events utilizing amplified public address systems during normal daytime ski and snowboard operations. 16) Establishment of lift opening times, trail closures, grooming schedules, existing snowmaking efforts and other on -going mountain management issues. 17) Professionally guided tours. 18) Guided skiing and snowboarding tours within and outside the ski and snowboard area permit boundary. 13 EXHIBIT `1' Page 4 of 5 (Snowmass Mountain PUD Guide) 2005 19) Ice- skating and all grooming and maintenance associated with ice maintenance. 20) Professional and amateur ski and snowboard racing and free riding events. 21) Sledding and Tubing Hill Uses allowed, subject to Special Review 1 Special on- mountain events designed to host more than 500 2eople at one time which shall address the impacts associated with security, trash removal noise ig ting, and hours of operation, including proposed mitigation techni ue (Applies to individual App icants, but Town- sponsored events shall be exempt). 2) Special summer attractions including hand gliding, paragliding, zip line, commercial jeeping, commercial mountain biking. 3) Expansion of fuel farms 4) Expansion of storage areas for Avalanche Control Devices 5) Antenna Reception or Transmission Devices 6) Expansion of storage of ski snowboard area equipment and construction staging 7) Overnight truck parking 8) Indoor recreational facilities, including but not limited to video games and table games, that changes the primary use of the building. 9) Personal Services. 10) Restaurants, includinq:_ a) Dining and food service associated with night operations for skating an tubin b) Private dining ski /snowboard clubs on the private lands located o n the mountain. c) New shelters or restaurant facilities or expansion thereof no i o n the current plan submission, which shall also be subject to review and a r val of 0 nor PUD Amendment within the Elk Camp Meadows, Alpine Sp rings, Uq for Pizza, Ullrhof, Spider Sabich, and Sam's Knob areas. 11) Qperation of the Elk Camp gondola, Burlingame, Cabriolet, and S am's I Snob Express lifts beyond 12:00 a.m. 12) Commercial snowmobile tours 13) Expansion of snowmaking, including related facilities (e.g., buildings and structures) 14) Alpine Slide 15) Any nighttime operations that require lighting, subject to conformance Vith the ig tang ordinance 16} Restricted mployee Housing processed in conformance with the application requirements of Sec. 16 -A -5 -300, which shall also be subject to review and approval of a PUD Amendment. 17) Public Utility Uses, Services and Facilities, including above and below grade water storage tanks 18) Overnight accommodations, limited to hotel /lodge room or lock -off room, time share unit, dormitory, and/or manager's unit/restricted employee housing, which are tied to the operation of the ski and snowboard area and do not involve private vehicular access, and shall also be subject to review and approval of a PUD Amendment. 19) Overnight camping facilities 14 EXHIBIT `'I' Page 5 of 5 (Snowmass Mountain PUD Guide) 2005 New conditional uses allowed subject to Administrative Modification: 1) Modifications, renovations, upgrading and /or the demolition and reconstruction of existing restaurant facilities. 2) Expansions of any individual building on the mountain other than restaurants and lift top and bottom drive terminals by 10 or 2,000 square feet, whichever is less. New conditional uses allowed subject to review and approval of a Minor PUD Amendment 1) Expansions of any individual building on the mountain other than restaurants and lift top and bottom drive terminals by more than 10% or 2,000 square feet, whichever is less. 2) New shelters or restaurant facilities or expansion there not identified on t l e__ current plan submtsston within the Elk Camp Meadows, Alpin 5prrngs, Up far Pizza, Ullrhof Spider Sabich, and Sam's Knob areas, which shall also be subject to Special Rev 3) Restricted Employee Housing processed in conformance with the application requirements of Sec. 16 -A -5 -300, which shall also be subject to Special Review. 4) Expansion of existing transit center /depot at Two Creeks (informational only subject to the East Village PUD development standards). 5) Parking lot reconfiguration and expansion other than those approved with the Base Village application. 6) Overnight accommodations, limited to hotel /lodge room or suite, lock -off room, time share unit, dormitory, and /or manager's unit/restricted employee housing, which are tied to the operation of the ski and snowboard area and do not involve private vehicular access, and shall also be subject to Special Review. 15 ATTACHMENT 2 ANCILLARY ACCESSORY STRUCTURES INVENTORY AS OF FEBRUARY 7, 2005 FROM SNOWMASS MOUNTAIN FINAL PUD GUIDE IN ORDINANCE NO. 2, SERIES OF 2005 SNOWMASS MOUNTAIN MASTER PLAN AMENDMENT OF 2004 EXHIBIT `5' (Snowmass Mountain PUD Guide) Page 1 of 4 Snowmass Mountain PUD Guide Square Ancillary/Accessory Structures Footage Existing Inventory as of February 7, 2005 Lift O hjEda L Moiuges Two Creeks bottom 110* Two Creeks to 138 Elk Cam bottom 110 Elk Cam top 156 Funnel bottom 112 Funnel top 72 Assay bottom 96 Assay top 48 High Alpine bottom 286 High Ad pine top 140 Alpine Springs bottom 240 Alpine Springs top 125 Naked Lad bottom 80 Naked Lad top 117 Woodrun bottom 252 Woodrun top 54 Big Burn bottom 108 Big Bum to 104 Sheer Bliss bottom 80 Sheer Bliss top 56 Coney Glade bottom 168 Coney Glade top 66 Fanny Hill bottom 192 Fanny Hill top 72 Burlingame bottom 168 Burlingame top 72 Sam's Knob bottom 110 Sam's Knob top 120 Campground bottom 120 Campground top 126 Scoo er bottom 48 Scoo er to 48 Cirque bottom 72 Cirque top 30 SUB- TOTAL: 3,896 NOTE: IF THERE ARE CONFLICTS BETWEEN THE FIGURES IN THE ABOVE LIST AND THE LIMITATIONS IN THE PUD GUIDE FOR THE CONSIDERATION OF FUTURE PLANS, THE PUD GUIDE PARAMETERS SHALL APPLY DENOTES STRUCTURES BUILT AFTER ORD, 94 -09 APPROVAL (TOTAL 54,347 SF AS OF FEB. 7, 2005) EXHIBIT'S' (Snowmass Mountain PUD Guide) Page 2 Of 4 Snowmass Mountain PUD Guide Square Ancillary/Accessory Structures Footage Existing Inventory as of Februag 7, 2005 Outhouses and Stores e-.5uiidih 's at =Lifts Ski locker at Poma i 72 Burlingame Counterweight Shack 99 Lower platter at The Pines bottom 24 Lower platter at The Pines to 24 Upper plafter at The Pines bottom 24 Upper platter at The Pines to 24 Nacked Lady Counterweight Shack 182 Fanny Hill top storage 48 Coney Glade Storage 136 Coney Glade Outhouse 3 Burlingametop Outhouse 36 Sam's Knob bottom Outhouse 36 Naked Lady Bottom Outhouse 36 Campground top Outhouse 36 Sheer Bliss bottom Outhouse 36 Sheer Bliss top Outhouse 3 Wood Run bottom Outhouse 270 Wood Run Storage 120 Wood Run top Outhouse 36 AI ine Springs bottom Outhouse 36 B -12 Outhouse 36 B -15 Outhouse 36 13-6'0uthouse Stores e 2 Levels 1,000 B -7 Outhouse 36 T -10 Outhouse 256 Winecabin Outhouse 256 B -5 Bankhouse 240 B -2 Storage 2 O.H. Doors 86 SUB TOTAL: 3,287 Lift Maintenance Shop Knob 1,980 Metal Building beside Knob Shop 1,280 T-5 Motor Room Knob Control Desk 800 T -2 Motor Room 500 T -7 Motor Room 560 T -9 Motor Room 500 T -11 Motor Room 560 Old #8 Motor Room 1 L.M. Storage 56 Sam's Knob Storage Lift Maintenance 120 SUB- TOTAL: 6,860 NOTE: IF THERE ARE CONFLICTS BETWEEN THE FIGURES IN THE ABOVE LIST AND THE LIMITATIONS IN THE PUD GUIDE FOR THE CONSIDERATION OF FUTURE PLANS, THE PUD GUIDE PARAMETERS SHALL APPLY. DENOTES STRUCTURES BUILT AFTER ORD. 94 -09 APPROVAL (TOTAL 54,347 SF AS OF FEB. 7, 2005) EXHIBIT `5' (Snowmass Mountain PUD Guide) Page 3 Of 4 Snowmass Mountain PUD Guide Square Principal /Ancillary/Accessory Structures Footage Existing Inventory as of February 7, 2005 Rest�ura�n`ts Caf6 Suzanne 17,500 Slow sand filter building 252 Storage tank building 64 High Alpine Restauraunt 18,000 Ullrhof 10,000 Sam's Knob Restauraunt 13,000 Up 4 Pizza (2 levels) Burn Patrol Room 2,780 Lynn Britt Cabin 1,650 Spider Sabich Cabin 6,348 Wine Cabin 320 Lynn Britt Food Storage Building 120 Scoo er Cabin Lizard Lodge 1,200 Storage Building Lizard Lodge and Restrooms 240 SUB TOTAL: 71,474 Yurt #1 Tube Town 706 Yurt #2 T -2 201 Yurt #3 112 p 314 SUB TOTAL: 1,221 5kt S.erv'tc�s Guest Services Center T -19 234 Performance Center 1,200 Spider Sabich Water Storage Tank 192 SUB- TOTAL: 1,626 h1ATAt Shan, Registration Building 48 Start Shack #6 64 Start Shack #5 112 Start Shack #4 64 Start Shack #3 T -2 36 Finish Shack #6 Race Office 196 Finish Shack #5 240 Midway Start Shack #3 36 SUB- TOTAL: 796 ,Twa Cireks Buildin A Retail Cafe Info on ly part of Two Creeks PUD 7,851 Tickets Building B Info only patt of Two Creeks PUD 2,348 Trash Buildin Info orL/ art of Two Creeks PUD 180 SUB TOTAL: 10,379 NOTE: IF THERE ARE CONFLICTS BETWEEN THE FIGURES IN THE ABOVE LIST AND THE LIMITATIONS IN THE PUD GUIDE FOR THE CONSIDERATION OF FUTURE PLANS, THE PUD GUIDE PARAMETERS SHALL APPLY. DENOTES STRUCTURES BUILT AFTER ORD. 94 -09 (TOTAL 54,347 SF AS OF FEB. 7, 2005) EXHIBIT `5' (Snowmass Mountain PUD Guide) Page 4 Of 4 Snowmass Mountain PUD Guide Principal /Ancillary /Accessory Structures Square Existing Inventory as of February 7, 2405 Footage Vehicle Mai riteharMce:: Elk Camp Vehicle Maintenance Shop 11,854 Divide Shop (per Ord 01 -16- not a part of this PUD) INFORMATION ONLY 14,810 Knob Fuel Farm 810 Alpine Fuel Farm 918 Sand /oil separator Stink Shack 544 SU 13-TOTAL: 28,892 watet. Snowmairtn Hydro Plant 8 -19 252 Compressor Building T -2 6,278 Primary Pump Building 1,440- New Bldg 5- Thornton Rd Hal's Hollow VBH5 216 Garrett Gulch Old Lift Shack 96 Garrett Gulch Plant Building 150 Garrett Gulch Clean Well Building 120 Ullrhoff Pump House 120 B -9 Pump House 358 Hi h Alpine Tank Building at Raidar's 64 Sam's Knob Pump House 255 Sam's Knob Concrete Bunker 221 SUB- TOTAL: 9,570 PAtr6l'BuIldlibil s Alpine Patrol Room (T-12) 2,208 Elk Camp Patrol Roam Wildlife Center 1,521 Clinic (to be removed re laced in B_V. project 3,584 SUB TOTAL: 7,313 Patrol' Bomb- .GaChlis: T -8 "Chapel" 121 Big Bum 2 East 56 West 112 High Alpine 2 East 64 West 64 SUB TOTAL: 417 Ticket' Offides Woodrun T.O. 40 Fanny Hill T.O. 1,000 Assay Hill T.O. 140 SUB TOTAL: 11180 iddikineo Run Gun Paint Ball not a art of this P UD to be removed w/ BV ro'ect 9 1 000 Adm. Buildin (not a art of this PUD to be removed w/ BV project) 22,650 Grizzlies Kid's Kave} info ant part of Woodrun V PUD 4,000 Reception Building at Kid's Kave info only- Bart of Woodrun V PUD) 394 Scoo er Video Shack 169 SUB-TOTAL: 36,213 GRAND TOTAL (Entire Mountain): as of 2,7 -05 1$3;124 NOTE: IF THERE ARE CONFLICTS BETWEEN THE FIGURES IN THE ABOVE LIST AND THE LIMITATIONS IN THE PLED GUIDE FOR THE CONSIDERATION OF FUTURE PLANS, THE PUD GUIDE PARAMETERS SHALL APPLY. DENOTES STRUCTURES BUILT AFTER ORD. 94 -09 APPROVAL (TOTAL 54,347 SF AS OF FEB. 7, 2005): BV BASE VILLAGE Art. 11, Definitions §16A -2 ®20 ATTACHMENT 3 Sign, on premises means a sign that Slope means the inclination of land from advertises goods, services, facilities or events the horizontal, determined by dividing the available on the premises upon which the horizontal run of the slope into the vertical sign is located. rise of the same slope and converting the resulting figure into a percentage value. For Sign, projecting means a sign that is sup- purposes of regulation and measurement, a ported by a building or other structure which slope must involve an elevation change of at projects over any sidewalk or pedestrian or least ten (10) feet within a horizontal distance other landscaped area. of at least thirty (30) feet measured in incre- ments as approved by the Planning Director. Sign, temporary means any nonpermanent sign or banner erected, affixed or maintained State means the State of Colorado. for a limited period of time. Street means any public or private high Sign, wall mounted means a sign attached way, road, lane, alley, cul -de -sac, avenue, to or painted on a wall of a building, the dis- bridge, viaduct, underpass, overpass or tun play surface of the sign being parallel to the nel in the Town, dedicated or devoted to wall of the building to which the sign is public use. attached. Street, arterial means any street which Sign, window means a sign, meant to be provides direct year -round connection to permanent, that is visible from the exterior of another jurisdiction, or which links such a building and is painted on a window or roads, and is intended or used primarily for depicted upon any material placed on, taped free flowing traffic movement. Traffic on or hung immediately behind a window. velocity is generally greatest on arterial streets, due primarily to roadway design. Ski- related facilities means alpine and The arterial streets within the Town are Nordic ski /snowboard areas, related uses and Brush Creek Road, Highline Road and Owl support or appurtenant facilities typically Creek Road. associated with the use and operations of ski /snowboard area; outdoor recreation uses, Street, collector means any street into games and facilities; 'Skier Services;' food which local streets feed and which connects service /kitchen/cafeteria operations; tours; directly with an arterial street. The collector sledding and tubing hills; group activities, streets within the Town are Carriageway, social events and racing competitions for less Divide Road, Faraway Road, Horse Ranch than five hundred (500) people at one (l) Drive, Meadow Road, Pinecrest Drive, Sin time; indoor recreation facilities that do not clair Road, Snowmass Club Circle, Two change the primary use of the building; Creeks Drive and Wood Road. recreational trails of all types; restaurant and picnic facilities; vehicle maintenance facili- Street, local means any street providing ties and their related storage of materials; for the movement of vehicles within a geo- domestic water pump houses and treatment graphically limited area such as a single facilities; race arena and terrain park facili- family or two- family residential subdivision ties. containing numerous lots, or between a group of connected multi family complexes or 16A -21 Supp. 13 r ATTACHMENT 4 STATE OF COLORADO Bill Ritter, Jr., Governor DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES DEC 0 2010 b DIVISION OF WILDLIFE_ y AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER Off, Thomas E. Remington, Director OF 6060 Broadway For Wildlife- Denver, Colorado 80216 For People Telephone: (303) 297 -1192 wildlife. state. co. us December 6, 2010 Town of Snowmass Village P.O. Box 5010 Snowmass Village, CO 81615 RE: Elk Camp Restaurant Dear Jim: The town asked for further information regarding our recommendations for the use of the Elk Camp Restaurant; specifically hours of,operation and music events. While there is no scientific study that we are aware of that deals specifically with disturbance by music events and time of operation it is our best biological opinion that in order to minimize impacts to wildlife that the recommendations we provided will do just that. Minimize impacts, not eliminate them. Small scale music events have never been defined as we have consistently asked. Through the Division's negotiations with the U. S. Forest Service and SKICO we have asked for this definition and have stressed the need to minimize impacts. Music events at the restaurant, if located outside and during the day, should have the music pointed away from Burnt Mountain. During evening and nighttime events, these events should be hosted inside the restaurant to minimize disturbance to wildlife when most wildlife becomes active. The effect of noise on wildlife habitat use may lead to further displacement and increased stress. It is well documented in the literature the effects of roads on elk use as well as the zone of influence a home has with wildlife habitat use due to all of the associated activity. The Elk Camp area is now receiving a significant increase in human use during the summer months where it never had that amount of use before. Most wildlife is crepuscular and nocturnal in their foraging habits. Continued use during this time will have a negative impact. The Snowmass environmental assessment states "during construction elk would be displaced by noise and activity within the project area. Upon termination of construction the area would continue to provide forage opportunities for elk." If continuing activity until midnight occurs and this is an important foraging time for wildlife, how will this not impact them and other wildlife species? It makes it much less desirable and wildlife has much less opportunity. Ending events by 10 p.m. still allows the events while minimizing the impact to wildlife. By hosting music events inside the facility, noise impacts would be minimized and not amplified by hosting the music outside where the noise will carry much further. There is a need to have a quiet, nondisturbing period when wildlife can have adequate time to forage. Thank you for the opportunity to comment. If you have any questions, please give me a call. Sin er y, y evin Wrig t District Wi life M nager DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES, Mike King, Executive Director ILDLIFE COMMISSION, Tim Glenn, Chair. Robert Streeter, Vice Chair Mark Smith, Secretary Members, David R. Brougham Dennis Buechler Dorothea Farris Allan Jones John Singletary Dean Wingfield Ex Officio Members, Mike King and John Stulp ATTACHMENT 5 ASPEN SKIING COMPANY CORRESPONDENCE DATED DECEMBER 22, 2010, RECEIVED DECEMBER 23, 2010 IN RESPONSE TO THE TOWN COUNCIL'S ISSUES, COMMENTS AND CONCERNS AT THE DECEMBER 20, 2010 MEETING ELK CAMP RESTAURANT SPECIAL REVIEWS INCLUDING LIGHTING PLAN FOR NIGHTIME OPERATIONS TO 12:00 MIDNIGHT ASPEN (AA N OWMASS Jim Walhlstrom Planning Department Town Of Snowmass Vlllage PO Box 501 Snowmass Village, CO 81615 DEC 2 3 2010 onuwrnass village December 22, 2010 ICommunity Development Dear Jim. This letter provides additional information for the Elk Camp Restaurant Special Review /Minor PUD Amendment application as a follow up to Town Council comments and questions that arose during our first review on December 20, 2010. This letter includes confirmation and /or additional information regarding the program and material specifications, construction management plan and how's of operation vis a vis wildlife Impacts. Program and Materials Board- f0rmed concrete walls. Board formed concrete walls can be found in Snowmass and in Aspen. A horizontal plank pattern with a wood -grain texture reveals in the concrete as a result of using high quality formwrork and finish detail in exposed areas of the foundation walls. Local examples include: 107 Willorrghbv Wav, Aspect. Site wall and gate housing, at the front entry of a 12M residence constructed uses horizontal board formed concrete with it very high quality wood pattern reveal. This application is easily seen up close from the road and is most similar to the quality and natural color of the concrete proposed for the Elk Camp Restaurant. The house uses the same board -form technique for the 25' tall concrete retaining walls behind the house. See photo below. 'I L _f �A, P.D- Box 1248 Aspen. GO 81612 -1248 970- 925 -1220 www.aspensnowmass.con Page I of 3 0 Snomnass Recreation Center, Siiuirwass Village, The site walls Surrounding the oou| are ou1oru/ concrete with u rcrdua| boa fioisb. The board-form vvu\|s O1 well within the site landscaping and are ufunctional and attractive backdrop for the pool pa The walls also complement the building's mater palette of' wood and x{000 siding cou\criu]s. 0 /2mDBed/Noxn/o/n Road, Aspen. The retaining wall leading up the ddvcvvayof' this S25M residence is constructed oaiu8nu|ura{ concrete with uhorizontal board- form |cx|unc. The quality of the revealed board-form \Cz\urc is very good and provides uhi�h|yr�Doud c��o�p|eo[this technique. Non-reflec/ivca/uss Non-reflective glass will bc specified [or all window and door assemblies, uo was also the case ut Sam's 8000kebouac. f}o`i/nnnzex/o/Ywc(yrotu//nx. Enri/oouocotul interpretive features will bc integrated into the exterior si-nage pnogcain and the chi|d[co`m dining room. These elements will complement the outdoors-based environmental education program in the Elk Coun0 Meadows area and the existing Wapiti nature center. The education program iothe coordinated product of Aspen 8kiio�Coonpuoy. the Forest Service and /\<�I�S. &direobouuViofornoudoo sign in noted on the proposed site plan and will provide ski area and environmental in1crpocbwc io[arnuubon to winter and summer visitors. The obUdnoo`a dining room will feature an cnviroorncmia/ education pro-ram that is integrated iok} U�c �o|ohordcmi�u theme for the room. The room will be used by the cbiidrcn`s ski school prograno during the winter season and will he incorporated into dxe summer operations prooruno for public use. The 1994 Snowmass Ski Area EIS and subsequent Town of Snowmass Village approval documents (Ordinance No. 09-94) envisioned environmental education facilities and programming as one of the activities at the ]B|k Camp mid-station at The oonohiou\ioo Of the existing outdoor interpretive prograrn and Wapiti nature center plus the new outdoor signage and environmental education-therned children's dining room will provide u wide range of interpretive c|cnneuts and facilities across the !Elk Cocoy area and fulfill the vision o[ the |994plans. {7uu6/orSeu/b/g. Iboce are 150 outdoor 8ouNs at the cxixbog, Cuf6 Suzanne. and the sxcuc amount is proposed for the Elk Camp Restaurant. Construction Management Plan The followin- will be added to and included in the final Construction Management Plan to he submitted to the BuildioL Dopuctmocui at time of Building Permit submission: Sunday truck traffic will be limited tosmall trucks and vebiclrs equipment or material deliveries requiring large vehicles will be scheduled for Sundays. Page 1v[3 Aspen Skiing Company and (he geneodomtractmkvU1 coordinate with Town of Snowrnuss\/Ulugle event staff io facilitate the summer event schedule and |ouvoid conflicts between construction and event activities. Regular communication before and during construction will assist with dorctui|ioou complex coil ytnucdoo schedule with events and operations central (o the OucStexyffdCnce- Key events Such as B|ux< the Muuy bike races or the Golden Leaf' hu|f-cuaruthoo vv ill be integrated into the construction schedule by the construction team and domdy coordinated with event e1u/7dudugthe events themselves. All events and operations will bc reviewed dodo�rcou|ur construction coordination noccdV's with appropriate pers000cL Construction workers will hccucnomoedm carpool frorn down valley. Crews will park at the Brush Creek intercept lot and drive tm the site io one work ncbicio con{uinincy the crew plus necessary tools and rnoieriu|y. Parking is very limited at the construction site and will be strictly controlled by ASC and the contractor. m Crew arrival/departure times and deliveries will be scheduled for morning and late afternoon io minimize impact oo�uesto and cnouotoinoporn1imm. A more detailed dnyD of the Construction K4anaweooeni P\uo with additional pudkio", traffic, operations. wildlife and sjierodigutiun oocuauncs is included with the land use application. fully detailed plan will he submitted with the Building Permit application and will <e similar io scope and content Nthe Sam`a Smokehouse 0MPmu0e with the Building Department. Hours m[Operation/ Wildlife Imparts See Applicant Response to Comments... AnClUding Hours of Operation, Lighting and CI}()YY Comments attached hz this |c11er. We look [bovurd \o reviewing this information with you and the Town Council u(our next mecting ooJouuxry 3, 2011. In the meantime, please don't hesitate 10 contact nunif l can answer any questions. 'Chris Kiley Skiing Company DEC 23 20 ge m�vo0�r��M� Attachments: Applicant Bcxpuose to Cornmcntu....hnd udbog Hours ot'Operation. Lighting and C[X]WCommeots. poi 3 ma Applicant Response to Comments and Questions of TOSV Town Council made 12/20/10, including Hours of Operation, Lighting an CEI-iff-ITIED Colorado Dept. of Wildlife Comment Letters regarding Wildlife Impacts DEC 2 3 2010 6iUvIff na" The Applicant re-states and re-asserts the factual background and its positions ase. omirur previously stated in its Application, as previously represented to the Planning Commission, as separately described in the staff report, and as made at the Town Council hearing, on 12/20/10. Z:� Concluding Summary: The guest services components of the Elk Camp Meadows area, including the Ells Camp restaurant as a project "element", were previously considered in the 2006 USFS Environmental Assessment. The clear conclusion of the EA was that no significant impacts would occur to wildlife in the area as a result of the project. Wildlife Impacts, Hours Operation and Lighting:, Land uses and related wildlife impacts in the nearby Burnt Mountain and Elk Camp Meadows area have been studied and regulated, environmental decisions issued, codes adopted, and subsequently monitored and managed intensively for more than twenty years. These reviews and decisions date back to and include the 1994 Snowmass Ski Area EIS [Environmental Impact Statement], the subsequent TOSV Ordinance No. 9. Series of 1994, and more recently, TOSV Ordinance No. 2, Series of 2005 approving the Final PUD for the Snowmass Mountain Master Plan Amendment, and the 2006 USDA Forest Service Environmental Assessment and Decision Notice. In all of these past environmental, legal and regulatory processes the Town of Snowmass Village and the Colorado Department of Wildlife [CDOW] were either directly participating, governing or referring governmental agencies. In DO case have determinations been made without their prior involvement or input. CDOW Connnent Letters: In response to requests for referral comments CDOW has submitted letters in July and December of 20 noting in its first letter that, "Nighttime activities of the restaurant was approved to end at inidni ght [but] believes all nighttime operations should end by 1= tl 10 p.m." In its second comment letter CDOW notes that the area is -receiving a significant increase in human use during the summer months Most wildlife is nocturnal in their foraging habits. Continued use during this time will have a negative impact." CDOW further reports that, "The Snowmass environmental assessment states, `Upon termination of construction the area would continue to provide forage opportonidcmforcik,` C[XJW then cocu onto ask, "If 000dnuing act] vi1y Lint] luddoigli occurs and this isanimportant foraging time for wildlife, how will this not impact them and other wildlife speci cumc uding. without further assessment. excJuuodon or scientific mJimlale, that events should thus end at 10p-Mo. Aoo/hzrn/ Response Hours and Lighti Applicant would again be: These matters have been previously considered, studied, reviewed, and decided by the agencies and author specifically iodo so, name the [}8 Forest Service and the Town u[Soowozumo Village and one need not goso far back in time ua the l994EIS to find that authority. As noted on page 5 of the staff report, the Final PlJI} Guide for the &400utuio Master Plau vvbicb was considered and codified hY the Town in Ordinance No. 2, Series of2OO5apecifiuuJ1y approved "Night opera o[the Elk Camp Good0)a...nud] 12:00 n.ou., with option 10 extend hours subject <nSpecial Bevievv.`` And, that same Final PlJD Guide and enabling Ordinance also approved, "Night operations of on mountain restaurants until 12:00 u.m." (See Exhibit 'I' [Snowmass Mountain PUD Guide 2005] Activities and Uses Allowed All Year, numbers 30 and 3]— copy utiacbed). Consequently, the Town has already considered and decided that the Elk Camp gondola operation is u use by right until 12:00, as are oieb< operations of mountain restaurants. The hours of operations Lbco. 41 )coxt from a municipal point of view, have thus been previously determined and fixed, unless extended by Special Review. Certainly with the prior approval of the nighttime operations theiriselves the Town Council assumed that lighting of some sort would also necessarily occur concurrent with tboscoperuhunm. The necessary inference of lighting seems obvious, but Applicant acknowledges that the Town retained the authority to review such lighting. The Final PUD Guide, Exhibit 'F page 4 of 5 also contains a section entitled, "Uses allowed, subject toSpecial Bevievv." Number 15ofthis section references among such uses, "Ally nighttime operations that require lighting. subject io conformance with the |iebdog nnUuaucc." The Applicant reads this section, together with the previous section regarding nighttime, Uses Allowed All Year, to mean that a lighting plan associated with b would reviewed the Council mo� would h� ao6icct tu the standards such usoovvVu urcv�vvc by v/o ouo subject cuioiudzeudversn and environmental impacts, as well as conform (n the Town's lighting ordinance and applicable codes. This io not a question of 'should there bonigbUiroe lighting urnot?` That question would seem to have been settled with the explicit approval of the nighttime uses which are the subject matter of the application. The proper Special Review oflighLin�m/ou|dwceon\mbe its visibiUty,intensity, design Quabty audcnnfo=mcc to code. The Applicant has included a lighting plan and nbo1onoctrioo study in its Application which the Applicant believes successfully mitigates any adverse lighting iznpsoto and reduces ambient light associated with the facility and its operations ioon acceptable level. bn short, given the approved nighttime uses, which bynecessity require lighting, the Applicant believes that the Special Review consideration of this subject should focus on the suitability of the lighting plan submitted with the Application [found u(tab )Oofthe Application]. Aonb/zn/r Response Environmental Reiliew Gm,eru8y Nlib8�fe: The staff report. pug e4, Wildlife Impacts, notes that Ordinance No. 2. Series o[ 2005 found ibu1, "The requirements of the -Municipal Code Section 16A-4'20, Sensit wildlife habitat ,ore xutia1lod by the U.S. Forest Service process o[ evaluating an Eovir8Uolcn<ul Assessment. (EA) in addressing the environmental and wildlife impacts kmmu —'`[1hcElk Camp area improvements, including the restaurant. which were the xohioc| matter of the EA]. The subsequent EA conducted by the iJSFB analyzed three alternatives which included the Elk Camp Meadows beginners' area, as well as odu\ed ski and guest service iufruoknotorc, including u proposed restaurant, and summer trails. The aueui services ill Elk Camp studied in the EA were described as follows on page DN-6 of the Record of Decision: "A new guest services facility is proposed adjacent to the Elk Camp Gondola's top terminal. Among other things, this roughly |5,A00 square foot facility would provide indoor and outdoor seating (both cafeteria and restaurant style), re3Unoonu, ski srhnO( operations, and ancillary product sales. The guest services at Cuf63uzaomc vvoo|d be shifted to the proposed guest services building a| Elk Camp Gondola. Small-scale musical events are proposed to occur in conjunction vvi<hthr operation o[ the proposed Elk Camp guest services facility periodically during the 5uozmer. Musical pro�ran�vvouldbe intended 1oucumrnpuoy special events, parties and weddings at the proposed facility." Aftcrdhnrou�hcurinonn/�uiul review undertaken in tbc����, iuc|odin�orteo8ivc review of potential wildlife impacts, the USFS Record of Decision issued on June 29, 2006 included a Finding of No Significant Impact and in particular the Wbi1eRiver Forest Supervisor found, "10. Consideration of whether the action violates Federal State or local laws or J have reviewed the EA, the Biological Assessment, and the project file, and have determined that no Federal, S1u1c, or local laws. r:�;|oduos, or requirements for protection ofthe eovin)omncot will bc violated with the implementation ofthe Selected Alternative." ]Lookiu�fmnvurd,aspa� of the |�ccondofI}ooisi0u(yu�e[)��-3) the Supervisor also required tbu|, Prior (o the use of either Elk Camp Gondola o« the Elk Camp Lift for sunz cr use, the Forest Service, Division of Wildlife [emphasis ouDp|icdl, and the Aspen Skiing Company will develop a joint mitigation and monitoring plan that respond to surni use concerns in the Burnt Mountain area." The required mitigation and monitoring plan, The Elk Camp Summer Operations Z:� Wildlife Mitigation Plan, in which CDOW took part during its formation, was approved by the USES on March 18, 2010 and subsequently undertak en and implemented. The plan describes various seasonal Closures of nearby terrain, including the upper Elk Camp area from May 15 through June 20, gates, educational signs, recreational restrictions (particularly involving the Burnt Mountain area and Willow Creek drainage), dog C-1 4.1 restrictions and bear management measures. It should be emphasized that in the Wildlife Mitigation Plan. the Elk Camp Gondola terminal area, its uses and facilities (which stand nearby, but outside of sensitive elk habit) were explicitly not subjected to additional closures or seasonal or hourly nighttime restrictions (see the Plan, map and approval letter previously submitted with the Application, tab 13). Wildlife impacts have been exhaustively reviewed in the 1994 EIS and the 2006 EA and determinative environmental decisions already rendered by the pre eminent authorities charged with making them and the Applicant can not fully restate them all here. Should staff or Council wish to review these matters in greater detail, Chapter 3: Affected Environment and Environmental Consequences of the EA documents the impacts, or lack thereof, in significant detail. For the most part the EA concluded that category by category, species by species, there were "no impacts" and other potential impacts were unlikely, insignificant or remote. The CDOW letter comments allude to the foraging opportunities for elk in the Elk Camp Meadows area. However, the EA describes the seasonal movements and preferred habits of what is known as the Maroon Bells Snowmass Wilderness (MB® SW) herd and while sometimes present, they do not predominately sum i iner n the area. Generally the herd numbers around 340 animals. Calving typically occurs in the Burnt Mountain area in early spring, after which the herd splits into two smaller herds, one moving to the east between Buttermilk and Snowmass, the other up and over Upper Elk Camp ski terrain and into the Willow Creek basin. In short, the majority of animals in the local herd are not typically present in the Elk Camp Meadows area during those times when either winter or summer recreational uses occur. Given those migration patterns it is not particularly surprising that the impacts are considered to be of no significance. 4:� More specifically, the Applicant does not dispute the EA sentence quoted above by the CDOW indicating the Elk Camp Meadows area offers foraging opportunity for elk. However, the CDOW comment tellingly fails to include any of the summary statements of the EA concerning elk as an indicator species for the entire area. Other findings taken from the EA which bear upon the issue include the following: Z:1 "In surrimary, the limited direct impacts to elk summer range on the project area would not be measurable at the DAU [Data Analysis Unit text supplied] and would not affect overall elk populations or trends with the DAU." (SM Ski Area EA 2006— Page 3-103) 4 "Winter rancre has been identified as the limiting factor for elk seasonal ranges for this DAU: summer range is not considered to be limiting populations. The project area does not contain any winter range and the proposed action will not affect any elk winter range. Transition range has also been cited as highly valuable in enabling elk to store energy reserves for use during winter. The project would have no direct or indirect impact on transition range." (SM Ski Area EA 2006 Pages 3-103-104) Under the current DAU plan, the objectives are a population of 3,300 elk and to maintain the current calf ratio. Since the proposed Elk Camp projects would not adversely impact winter, production or transition range, it would not prevent the CDOW from reaching its population objective... The Forest will continue to supply adequate, suitable elk summer habitats to support the population objective for this DAU." (SM Ski Area EA 2006 Page 3-104) "The proposed action has been fully evaluated and discussed and no element [emphasis supplied] creates any negative trends that would affect achieving the Forest Plan MIS [Management Indicator Species text supplied] objectives or create viability concerns for this MIS." (SM Ski Area EA 2006 Page 3: 107) zn In summary, the guest services components, i.e. the Elk Camp restaurant as a project "element", were considered in the EA. The clear conclusion of the EA was that no significant impacts would occur to wildlife in the area as a result of the project. TIN DEC 2 3 2010 M t 5 EXHIBITT (Sno Mountain P[]DGuide) Specific and Definitive Listing of Permitted or Conditional Snowmass Mountain Master Plan Amendment of 2004 The following listing of uses shall serve as the standard for the administration of t zoning process for the lands within the Snow/mass Mountain boundaries within th6- M�"���� ofSnnwnmmosVillage. DEC ��1M The uses are divided into the fo||ovvingthree categories: v��� ��/e ww �I�� Un8­ ActividesanduaeaaUowedaUyear; m Activities and uses allowed during the traditional winter ski and nnowboand season; Activitie Activities and uses whicbare Activities and Uses Allowed All Year l it tle and the year-round xuw, service related impacts. Refer to the Snovvmaas Mountain Master Plan illustration (Figure 2. Proposed Conditions) which shows locations of buildings, lifts, ski and snowboard terrain, catwalks and utility Permanent uses allowed by right year round include the following, but are subject to Special Review if substantial changes in the use are proposed: 1) A||penni�edexiahnguses and activities. 2' <�enens|nnaintenancaaotivihasnonna||yaosQoiahadvvitkiheOpersdionc��he recreation area including but not limited to� a] Construction of new ski and snowboonj lift facilities ao shown on the plan aa well as lift renovation, relocation, upgrading and maintenance to the extent there is nV significant increase in either the bulk of the top pr bottom terminals 0r that there iano increase in the ski and onowboand area capacity asa result of such work beyond the ski and snmwboa/d area capacity idenUf|�d\n the Master Plan. b) Removal of lifts (except that the Burlingame lift shall remain as modified and f i dn supplemental |nYormsd|DndatedJu|y �OO41 provided or n e upp c ski and anov�)oardtnai| work including grading, clearing, g|ading. fine A' onning`revegetehonandotheraucheot(v|tinsnormaHyasSooietedvviththe conatruction, maintenance and improvement oftrails. d) Construction of terrain gardens, snowboard parks and ancillary snowmaking. e) All hiking, biking and equestrian trail work including grading, clearing, g|ading. tine grooming, revegetation and other such ac normally associated with the construction, maintenance and improvement of trails. The summer trails plan |s depicted in the supplemental information dated July 7. 2004' General maintenance and construction and reconstruction and renovation of mountain buildings, subject to local building permit regulations. EXHIBIT Page 2 o 5 (SnowmasS Mountain PILID Guide` —2005 41 Construction of the utility trenches as needed for the repair and maintenance of all utility and snowmaking systems, 6' Maintenance o{ all mountain facilities. 8) Expansion of Snowmaking terrain depicted in the Plan Amendment oi20D4. 7) Grazing and Timber cutting on Forest Service lands when allowed by Special Use Permits through the Forest Service. 0\ Hunting on Forest Service lands where and when allowed by governing state, federal and local authorities. Q) Hiking, biking, horseback riding on mountain roads and trails and other recreational endeavors on federal, state and locally controlled areas, except when prohibited due to on-mountain construction orxvi|d|ifeclosures, 10) Water lines, water treatment facilities, sewer lines, compressed air lines and other such utilities required for the operation of existing snowmaking machinery, restaurants and other such facilities in the area. Existing access roads for maintenance and construction of facilities within the ski and snovvboardarea. 12) Existing Fuel farms. 13) Existing storage of Avalanche Control Devices including construction of the Powder Mixing and Storage Magazine Facility, 14\ Aspen Skiing Company offices. 15\ Picnics. 16) Tube and lattice lift towers needed to achieve normal ski and snowboard criteria. 17) New or replacement top and bottom drive and return stations and lift operators cabins/huts, 18) Annual maintenance and or replacement of lift machinery and systems as long as such work does not significantly result in change h7 the lift's capacity, alignment or length. 18) Snovvb0arding.onnwshoong and skiing, both Nordic and Alpine, 20) Operation of 'the proposed Elk Camp gondola. 21) Existing storage of ski and snow/boond area equipment 22) Special events including weddings, concerts, children's activities, private parties, worship services and other group activities and social events less than 500 people at one time. 23) Guided and self-guided environmental tours. 4 Accessory recreational facilities and structures deaiAnodtm support specific and paintball games. 25) Operation of the mountain restaurants, in summer and winter, 27) Information shelters and cookie stands on the mountain, 28) Existing transit center/depot at Two Creeks (informational only subject to the East Village PUD development standards) 30) Night operations of the Elk Camp gondola, Burlingame, Cabriolet, and Sam's Knob Express lifts until 12 a.m., with option to extend hours subject to Special Review. 31) Night operations of on mountain restaurants until 12:00 a.m. 32) Syrface-wate EXHIBIT'1 Page 40f5 (Snowmass Mountain PUD Guide) ~2005 10) Ice-skating and all grooming and maintenance associated with ice maintenance. 2O) Professional and amateur ski and snowboard racing and free-riding events. 21) Sledding and Tubing Hill Uses allowed. subiect to aecial Review l) Special on-mountain events designed to host more than 500 peopie at one time, which ohe|| address the impacts associated with security.. trash removal, noise, lighting, and hours of operation, including proposed mitigation techniques (Applies !o individual Applicants, but Town-sponsored events shall beexennpt). 2) Special summer attractions including hand gliding, parag|id(ng. zip |ine, comnme,cia(jeeping. commercial mountain biking. 3) Expansion of fuel farms 4\ Expansion o1 storage areas for Avalanche Control Devices 5) Antenna Reception or Transmission Devices G) Expansion of storage of ski snowboard area equipment and construction staging 7) Overnight truck parking 8\ Indoor recreational facilities, including but not limited 10 video games and table games, that changes the primary use of the building. 9) Personal Services. 10\ Ras1auronin, including: a> Dining and food service associated with night operations f or skating and tubing. b) Private dining eKi/anpvvbourd clubs on the private lands located onthe mountain. o\ New shelters or restaurant facilities or expansion thereof not identified on the current plan submission, which shall also be subject to review and approval of a Minor PUD Amendment within the Elk Camp K8eadows, Alpine Springs, Up for Pizza, UUrhof, Spider8abioU. and Gam's Knob areas. 11\ Operation of the Elk Camp gondola, Burlingame, Cabriolet, and Sam's Knob Express lifts beyond 12:UUo.m. 12) Commercial sDovYrD0bi|u tours 13) Expansion of snowmaking, including related facilities (e.g., buildings and �truc ne 15) Any nighttime operations that require lighting, subject to conformance with the lighting ordinance Res_ Employee �W" processed-in, for iance the approval of a PUD Amendment. 17) Public Utility Uses, Services and Facilities, including above and below grade water storage tanks 18> Overnight accommodations, limited to hotel/lodge room or suite, lock-off room, time share unit, dormitory, and/or manager's Vm/yieStriCted*nnp|0yee housing, which are tied to the operation of the ski and snowboard area and do not involve private vehicular access, and shall also be subject to review and approval of a PUD Amendment. 18) Overnight camping facilities PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT A PUBLIC HEARING WILL BE HELD BEFORE THE SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL. THE PUBLIC IS INVITED TO ATTEND AND COMMENT. DATE: Monday, January 3, 2011 TIME: During a meeting which begins at 4:00 P.M. or at such time thereafter that the item appears on the agenda of the Town Council. WHERE: Town Council Chambers Town Hall, 1 st Floor 0130 Kearns Road Snowmass Village, CO WHY: To receive public comment on applications by the Aspen Skiing Company proposing 'Special Reviews' regarding the new Elk Camp Restaurant with a lighting plan for nighttime operations to 12:00 Midnight together with an associated 'Minor Planned Unit Development (PUD) Amendment' to Snowmass Mountain, generally located within the Elk Camp Meadows area and next to the top terminal of the Elk Camp Gondola and Cabin Storage building on Snowmass Mountain. CODE: The application is being processed in accordance with Section 16A -5 -230, Special review and Section 16A -5 -390, Amendment of final PUD of the Town of Snowmass Village Land Use and Development Code. INFO: As more particularly described in the applicant's application notebook received October 1, 2010, the Special Review applications propose a replacement restaurant of 17,480 square feet in size for Cafe Suzanne that is proposed for utilization as the main site and base camp for on- mountain, winter and summer, day and night time dining, activities, special and group events. Interior seating would be available in an approximate 250 -seat "great room" with side seating areas. A separate bar for approximately 20 seats, an outdoor deck for 150 seats and a children's ski school dining room are included as other seating options and functions. Public restrooms are located on both levels of the proposed facility. The other specific requests include: a) a lighting plan for night time operations until 12:00 midnight year- round, that would also include the gondola operation, and b) a request to allow construction hours between 7:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. seven days per week to facilitate ongoing summer operations and to accelerate within the shortened, high altitude construction season; and As more particularly described in the applicant's application notebook received October 1, 2010, the associated Minor PUD Amendment application to Snowmass Mountain has been submitted concurrently with the Special Review applications as a means to propose modified updates to the usages, figures and development parameters in the Final PUD Guide that would also accommodate the new Elk Camp Restaurant, as well as clarify usage definitions. Written comments are encouraged and will be accepted until the close of the public hearing. For inclusion of written comments in the staff report, submissions must be received a minimum of 12 days prior to the public hearing to the following address: Snowmass Village Planning Department P.O. Box 5010 Snowmass Village, CO 81615 Attention: Jim Wahlstrom, Senior Planner; Email: jimwahlstrom(a),tosv.com Additional public hearings may be held before the Town Council at later dates, for which only published notice may occur. Town Clerk Telephone: 923 -3777 Internet access to Council email: http: /www.tosv.com Citizen Feedback Hotline: 922 -6727 clerk(a tosv.com Printed in the Snowmass Sun on December 15, 2010. TO: Town Council FROM: Russ Forrest DATE: January 3, 2011 SUBJECT: Decide on Final Applicants for IADC PURPOSE: The purpose of this memo is to re -cap the process and procedure that has taken place for creating the Ice Age Discovery Committee (IADC). Tonight, Council will be deciding on whom to interview for the final two positions on the IADC— Education and Citizen -At- Large. Attachment A contains answers to specific follow -up questions submitted by the candidates for both these positions. BACKGROUND: On December 20 Council appointed individuals to seven positions on the IADC. Of those seven, one was approved as an ex- officio member: Senator Gail Schwartz. Two more positions still need to be filled, and those interviews will take place on January 18 Here are the final positions and individuals that were approved: IADC Positions: 1) Science: It is recommended that the Denver Museum have a representative on the Task Force as the science resource. The Denver Museum will be the source for the science and the ultimate story of the site. MEMBER Dr. Kirk Johnson 2) Education: An individual /institution that has significant experience in delivering natural science related educational programs (including informal science education) is recommended. DECIDE TONIGHT WHO TO INTERVIEW 3) Fundraising: An individual with significant experience in not for profit fund raising, significant capital campaigns, and obtaining grants that are applicable to this type of discovery would be desirable. MEMBER Stan Kornasiewicz 4) Marketing: An individual that has significant experience in marketing, promoting ideas, events, educational opportunities. It is recommended that the Director of Snowmass Tourism be considered for this position. MEMBER Susan Hamley 5) Citizen -at- Large: We would suggest one individual from Snowmass Village who has significant communication skills and community experience and will provide a constructive conduit to a broad spectrum of Snowmass Village residents be appointed to the Task Force. It was also suggested that the Town might want to consider both a full time and a part time resident for this position. DECIDE TONIGHT WHO TO INTERVIEW 6) Planning and Design: Since some form of exhibitor facility maybe needed, finding someone that has significant experience in design and /or construction is recommended to be appointed to the task force. MEMBER Julie Ann Woods 7) Town of Snowmass Village: It is recommended that a Town of Snowmass Village staff member participate in the task force. The Town Manager could provide close coordination with the rest of the Town organization and the Town Council. MEMBER Russ Forrest 8) Snowmass Water and Sanitation District: On Thursday, December 16 TOSV received a letter from the Snowmass Water and Sanitation District requesting that Board Member Rhonda Bazil be appointed as a voting member to the IADC. MEMBER Rhonda Bazil 9) Ex- Officio Member: On Thursday, December 16 TOSV received a letter from Senator Gail Schwartz requesting participation on the IADC. Senator Schwartz is requesting to be an ex- officio member and liaison between local and state interest. MEMBER Gail Schwartz RECOMMENDATIONS: It is recommended that Council decide who to interview on January 18 for the final two remaining positions left on the IADC. Attachment A Education Positions Sandy Jackson PO Box 27 Glenwood Springs, CO 81602 (970)618 -6808 siackson@coloradomtn.edu 1.) Please explain in more detail why you would like to participate in the Ice Age Discovery Committee? There are many reasons I would like to participate on this committee: probably the most important one is that it sounds like fun! In addition the excitement that this significant find has generated not only in me but my students and the communities at large is energizing and has created a desire to learn more. It was incredible to watch the enthusiasm in one of my college students who told me after our tour that "the tour was the most exciting thing she had done in years." One of my personal goals is to create enthusiasm for learning in my students; I want to share that aspiration with others. I am fascinated by the find and believe the knowledge we gain from it will influence our understanding of this period. I enjoy working with a variety of people and organizing activities. My position in the CMC community offers access to many areas of expertise. The person in this position will influence the quality of education and will need to work cooperatively with all organizations and schools in the area to draw together the best teams to promote the site. The CMC community contains scientific, educational, fund raising, and community outreach experts. The opportunities to involve CMC students in various aspects of public outreach such as graphic design, photography, archaeology, geology, science labs, and law enforcement presents the option for partnerships to develop between CMC, Snowmass Village and the Denver Museum of Nature and Science as well as other educational groups in the area such as public and private schools and non profits. 2.) if you became a member of the IADC, what is your vision for developing specific educational programs? What would you consider a success in your program? Educational programs developed and promoted by the IADC will fall into several categories; the success of any program must be evaluated individually. A blanket definition of success is impossible to make as constant modifications will be necessary as the committee continues to develop their goals while working in cooperation with the town council. Here are some ideas to consider: Public display of characteristic or noteworthy finds All information should be verified by DMNS staff for accuracy Small interpretive sculptures placed through the Snowmass Village Brochures describing the find in all lodging rooms Interpretive signs on lift towers Emphasize the ecological and environmental importance of the site What the site tells us about the past What the site can tell us about the future Tie in post -Ice Age use of the Snowmass Village area by Native American groups, early trappers and traders, early ranchers to give a sense of the flow of time in the valley Provide or coordinate experts to provide programs centering on the Ziegler Site finds Working with DMNS, consider a non intrusive way to allow visitors to view the Ziegler Site as work progresses there IADC should consider several models: Outreach efforts Traveling exhibits and experts Finding a dedicated space for exhibits Promotion of scientific seminars, educational tours, and meetings centered on interpreting and evaluating the finds Educational opportunities for teachers at all levels "Teach the Teacher" programs) Educational opportunities for members of the service industry in Snowmass Village so they may educate visitors on the value of the site Facilities and programs to handle visiting school groups, from elementary- to college -level Educational programs targeting area visitors Summer or off season visitors Family- oriented peak- season programs 3.) lfyou became a member of the /ADC, how do you plan to deliver the educational programs you develop? How would you tailor those programs to multiple audiences of varying demographics? With the support of the committee, educational programs could be delivered in a variety of ways; obviously, the programs must be tailored to the audience we wish to reach. As an educator the program provided to the "students" must be flexible to fit each unique group and is often determined at the time of presentation. This would entail training individuals in multiple techniques: Place -based educational opportunities Design a dedicated space for displaying the finds A single person, supported by a small staff, should coordinate and schedule use of the space The space should accommodate seminars and meetings All programs, labels, and other information should be vetted for accuracy Make use of facilities, staff, faculty and students of Colorado Mountain College CIVIC offers a pool of trained talent which might be made available to the IADC CIVIC already provides educational programming to various demographics. In a standard course through CIVIC an instructor might have a dual- credit high school student, a traditional college -age student and a retiree who is interested in the topic, as well as students whose native language is other than English As funds become available, design and construct an Ice Age Discovery Interpretive Center to permanently house and explain the Ziegler Site finds Work with local Girl Scouts /Boy Scouts troops on developing a specific badge which incorporates the find. I G f I Lee C. Wilson 334 Apple Dr. Basalt, CO 81621 (970) 927 -3764 h; 922 -4957 w i wilsonlel@hotmail.com I Snowmass Village Town Council IADC Search P.O. Box 5010 Snowmass Village, CO 81615 I December 27, 2010 I Dear Snowmass Village Town Council: I am writing in answer to the questions posed by the Council as part of the education I member selection process: i 1) 1 would like to participate in the Ice Age Committee because the bone discoveries offer a wonderful opportunity for us to engage a wide audience in the study of the local Geology, and attract visitors to Snowmass Village. I have been teaching Geology in the Roaring Fork Valley since 1985. 1 enjoy helping people understand a geological perspective of the world around them. 2) My vision for the educational programs includes three primary approaches. It is my experience that people are drawn to see where significant discoveries are made, want to see what was discovered, and are further engaged if they can have the discoveries placed in context of the physical setting and history of the area. I think it will be important to establish a physical venue (museum where some of the bones or replicas could be displayed, and exhibits showing what the animals looked like as well as the paleo- ecologic and geologic features that existed in the Snowmass Village area when they roamed here. The Museum of Nature and Science has wonderful resources to assist with scientifically accurate displays. The displays and activities presented at Base Village this fall are a good example of the approach that would work well for a continuing presence in the Village. The life size wall hanging pictures, handouts with walking directions through time, the hands -on activities (coloring, touching replicas), and museum staff live progress reports were all examples of the museum staff's expertise involving the subject. The turn -out that day also shows the level of excitement I hope we can generate on an on -going basis. F I i There is something about seeing where a discovery was made that fascinates people. In our situation, visits to the pond /reservoir may not be practical. However, I the location is visible from the ski hill. That vantage gives the opportunity for year round displays offering an explanation of what was found and pointing out where the discovery was made (from a distance). Some sort of large display near the reservoir would help define the location for people viewing from afar. A self guided hiking tour (skiing in winter) could be designed to present the context of the bone finds, as well as explain other features visible from the ski hill. Such a tour route would provide an activity for visitors to Snowmass Village. i There is also an opportunity to offer guided tours of the area showing off the discoveries, other area geologic features, and explaining the paleo- historical context of the animals. School and professional groups could be attracted to Snowmass Village to participate in the tours, and perhaps hold meetings in close proximity to a significant paleontological discovery. I presently teach local Geology classes at Colorado Mountain College. A museum and or displays of the finds would definitely enhance the classes. Additionally, classes could be offered that specifically focused on the paleontology in Snowmass Village. I would view the programs a success by the number of people visiting the specific venues and generally an increase in visitors to Snowmass Village, particularly in the "off- seasons 3) The Museum of Nature and Science would be a great resource for the possible museum displays and activities. The Museum's staff expertise in presentations to multiple audience levels was evident in November. The interactive activities they set up for the younger visitors in November are a good example. I think the museum of Nature and Science would also be a resource for the design of the on- mountain and Village -wide displays. I would develop the CMC classes in coordination with present CMC personnel. 1 hope to contribute to the Ice Age Discovery Committee. It is important to continue the excitement of the discovery. Sincerely, Lesley Co pagnone From: Andre Wille [awille @aspenk12.net] Sent. Monday, December 27, 2010 12:57 PM To: Lesley Compagnone Subject: RE: Education Seat on the Ice Age Discovery Committee Dear Lesley, below are the responses to your questions: 1.) Please explain in more detail why you would like to participate in the Ice Age Discovery Committee? The discovery of the Pleistocene animal skeletons is perhaps the most exciting scientific discovery to occur in the Roaring Fork valley. As a science educator, I see this as an amazing opportunity to promote our understanding of the natural world. This goes for both children and adults, locals and visitors alike. For children, I would like to take advantage of this discovery to inspire their curiosity in natural history. We live in a fantastic natural laboratory where children can learn about many aspects of nature. They can see first hand the results of mountain building processes, and the landforms shaped by glaciers. They can walk through a diversity of ecological life zones and see the native plants and animal that call the Roaring Fork Valley home. Though we have these wonderful opportunities right in our back yard, they are not always taken advantage of; many kids take our natural heritage for granted. After all, they see it everyday. With the Ice Age Discovery and the variety of large charismatic mega fauna, we have the potential to captivate many more children. With this discovery we have a lens to look at nature through the ages. A time machine of sorts. What amazing creatures we see when we look back in time! In terms of adults, I see this as a great opportunity to stimulate intellectual curiosity and improve adult science literacy. Many of the residents and guests of Snowmass are very well educated and eager to learn about their surroundings. This exciting discovery has already inspired many locals and could be an attraction for visitors, making their stay that much more satisfying. 2.) If you became a member of the IADC, what is your vision for developing specific educational programs? What would you consider a success in your program? The educational programs that could be developed depend greatly on the role of the Museum of Nature and Science. I would love to see them bring one of their paleontology field courses to Snowmass and let some interested and qualified local adults and High school students participate in the excavation. Currently, the museum has an extensive training program for adult volunteers but it really only serves the metro Denver population. Outreach to other parts of the state would be great for those of us that are far from any University, or the Museum. For local school children, I would like to see a curriculum put together that could be used by teachers in valley schools (and beyond). Materials would have to be tailored to elementary, middle or high school for age appropriate learning. Ideally, it could be integrated into a specific grade so that all students would be exposed as they moved through the grade, but the curriculum would not be redundant. These materials would involve a "kit" containing a variety of activities, lab experiments with all needed materials, photos, casts of bones, models, multi- media presentations, computer simulations /animations, etc. These kit's could easily be replicated for other school districts if interested. The materials in the Ice Age Discovery Kit can be tailored to meet and teach required state educational standards in science, math, reading, and writing. This would potentially provide teachers with an high interest theme to teach a variety of required topics. 3.) If you became a member of the IADC, how do you plan to deliver the educational programs you develop? How would you tailor those programs to multiple audiences of varying demographics? The above response applies to programs that could be tailored to traditional school programs. I would also like to see a Summer program for kids taught in Snowmass Village as a field course. This could include building a life size mammoth skeleton with Styrofoam bones, fossil hunting in the nearby Mancos Shale, a simulated archeological dig with bones buried in a sand box. a variety of art projects help students imagine the area during the ice age. These ideas are just the tip of the iceberg, there is lots of potential here. This could be something ACES or Anderson Ranch may want to get involved in or it could be taught as a summer program with Aspen School District educators. Kids shouldn't be the only ones to have all the fun. Adult courses, even with graduate credit attached (this is a big draw for teachers) could be offered. If the Museum doesn't want to do this, courses can be set up with credit granted from Adams State University. One possible focus for the course could be a look at the landforms and ecology, past and present. I would love to discuss the possibilities for the IADC further. I thinks lot depends on what the Committee decides to do in terms of a physical location for interpretive materials such as casts of the bones, and a display. The level of involvement of the Museum is going to be a large factor also. I am happy that Snowmass is actively involved in taking advantage of the opportunities this discovery could provide to the Town. My fear is that the bones will all be taken to the museum, and this amazing discovery will essentially be forgotten at the local level. Cheers, Andre Wille Original Message---- From: Lesley Compagnone [mailto:lcompagnone @tosv.com] Sent: Monday, December 27, 2010 10:32 AM To: Lesley Compagnone Subject: RE: Education Seat on the Ice Age Discovery Committee Applicants, Just a friendly reminder that your answers to the questions below are due by 5:00 today. Thanks! Lesley Compagnone Community Relations Officer P.O. Box 5010 Snowmass Village, Colorado 81615 p. 970.923.3777 ext. 613 f. 970.923.608 3 l compagnoneQtosv. coin From: Lesley Compagnone Sent: Tuesday, December 21, 2010 9:36 AM To: Lesley Compagnone Subject: Education Seat on the Ice Age Discovery Committee Dear Applicant, You were one of several very qualified candidates for the position of Education Seat on the Ice Age Discovery Committee. In order to help in this difficult selection process, Town Council is asking that you answer the following questions. We understand that the timing may be inconvenient given the holiday season, but we do appreciate your attention to this matter. Please fill out the questions and send them back to Lesley Compagnone by December 27 at 5:00 p.m. They can either be emailed to: Iompagnone@tosv.com or faxed to 970 923 -6083. Interviews for this position are now scheduled for January 18 at approximately 4:00 p.m. Thank you. Lesley Compagnone Community Relations Officer P.O. Box 5010 Snowmass Village, Colorado 81615 p. 970.923.3777 ext. 613 f. 970.923.6083 Ico!npap-none@tosv.com 2 1.) Please explain in more detail why you would like to participate in the Ice Age Discovery Committee? I am thrilled about the Ice Age ecosystem discovery and I would like to develop a community plan to share this excitement and knowledge with others. Education is my career and contributing to this committee would be a great way to give back to my community. 2.) If you became a member of the IADC, what is your vision for developing specific educational programs? What would you consider a success in your program? The first step in developing educational programs would be to empower the community. In order for new programs to be successful, the community members must feel a sense of ownership. This discovery is theirs. After listening to the varied ideas and viewpoints, I would help create a plan to successfully disseminate information about the Ice Age discoveries. I believe that a successful educational program would incorporate the following 3 goals: 1. Every school -age student receives in- school lessons or a field trip to learn about the Snowmass discoveries. 2. Visitors to Snowmass Village have the opportunity to enhance their stay by participating in Ice Age programs. 3. Educational opportunities are provided for all residents of Snowmass Village and the rest of the Roaring Fork Valley so that community members are knowledgeable about the discoveries. However, merely providing programs to multiple- audiences is not enough. The programs need to be eye- opening, meaningful programs that participants can't stop talking about. They need to get people excited about the mysteries in the ground we walk on and how that history applies to our modern -day. I would like to explore how the ice age discoveries could be a bridge to help people gain a perspective on contemporary issues such as climate change. 3.) If you became a member of the IADC, how do you plan to deliver the educational programs you develop? How would you tailor, those programs to multiple audiences of varying demographics? A few specific ideas for programs /exhibits include: Mountain Biking through Time: Participants are either guided or self guided (signage) through Snowmass's trails to learn about the Snowmass discoveries and local geology. -A Walk Through Time: People walking down a multi -use path may browse interpretive signs explaining Snowmass's geological timescale. Thursday Night Concerts: During these fun summer evenings, Ice Age activities could be provided for kids. -On Mountain Education: The Ice age findings could be incorporated into Snowmass ski area's existing mountain education (ski school, the tree house, naturalist hikes.) Teacher Training: Programs offered for teachers to learn about topics related to the Snowmass Discoveries. Presentations at Local Lodges: Programs offered to visitors of Snowmass Village in their lodging. -Mock Dig: A site for kids to become paleontologists and unearth specimens. The dig site could be along a trail, or playground. School Visits and Field Trips: Programs offered in school classrooms and in the field for school groups. Ambassador Training: Snowmass Village community members are the ambassadors of this remarkable discovery. Programming for the community ambassadors could be provided. (Ambassadors may include concierges, ski instructors, sales associates, food servers, and others that are the face of the community.) In order to implement the chosen program ideas, the IADC must plan who will teach the programs and where they will be held. I believe partnerships are essential for providing high quality, engaging programs to multiple audiences. Partners may provide a location, teaching staff, curriculum, funding, or other resources to enable the programs to occur. Some possible partners include Snowmass Village businesses, Anderson Ranch, Aspen Art Museum (AAM), Aspen Center for Environmental Studies (ACES), Aspen Skiing Company (ASC), Aspen School District (ASD), Roaring Fork School District (RFSD), other local schools /camps, Colorado Mountain College (CMC), and Denver Museum of Nature and Science (DMNS). If given the opportunity to be a part of the IADC, I would be honored to help develop programs, and help create a plan to utilize partnerships to incorporate Ice Age education into Snowmass Village's beautiful location, existing programs, and recreational activities. Lesley Compagnone From: csmithl90 @aol.com Sent: Monday, December 27, 2010 3:07 PM To: Lesley Compagnone Subject: RE: Education Seat on the Ice Age Discovery Committee To: TOSV Town Council From: Christy Smith Re: IADC Education Position Here are my responses to the three questions posed: 1) Snowmass is my home. The finds at Ziegler Reservoir offer a fascinating, once -in -a- lifetime opportunity to serve my community and do what I love best making education meaningful and exciting to all. I am a firm believer in lifelong learning and would immerse myself in the study of paleontology and the details surrounding the finds. My educational background and marketing savvy will give me an advantage in taking content and making it easy to understand and fun to learn for a broad audience. 2) First of all, the educational programs must compliment the overall strategy and vision of the IADC. I would like to see the programs have an interactive, fluid learning component to guide participants to make their own discoveries and learn something different each time they participate. I think it would also be important to invite local schools to be both participants and contributors in exhibits and programs. This would foster increased pride and ownership in the great finds. When people talk about learning and come back, then I would consider any program a success! 3) Marketing, budget, strategic goals and physical location are important components in planning the educational programs. I would like to envision a permanent display as a forerunner to a long -term planned Mastodon Museum in Snowmass. An example would be the Aspen history exhibit next to Wagner Park. It has interesting aspects and is in a great location. Local students could be encouraged to participate in ways similar to the Aspen Community School's in -house mastodon model. There could also be on- mountain learning venues, from .question and answer highlights at the chairlifts, "digs" at the Treehouse and overlap into local commerce and promotion to reach people of all ages. The goal would be to have fun and generate curiousity. Partnering with The Denver Museum of Nature and Science would be ideal, as well as looking to other educational facilities to see what works. The educational programs should be both traditional and promotional. It would be an honor and privilege to be part of the IADC. I would strive to serve the community well for the good of Snowmass and the treasures found and waiting to be found at Ziegler Reservoir. Best regards, Christy Smith Original Message---- From: Lesley Compagnone <lcompagnone @tosv.com> To: Lesley Compagnone <lcompagnone @tosv.com> Sent: Mon, Dec 27, 2010 10:33 am i Subject: RE: Education Seat on the Ice Age Discovery Committee Applicants,Just a friendly reminder thatyour answers to the questions below are due by 5:00 today. Thanks! Lesley CompagnoneCommunity Relations OfficerP.O. Box 501OSnowmass Village, Colorado 81615p. 970.923.3777 ext. 613 f. 970.923.6083 lcompagnoneotosv.comFrom Lesley Compagnone Sent: Tuesday, December 21, 2010 9:36 AM To: Lesley Compagnone Subject: Education Seat on the Ice Age Discovery Committee Dear Applicant,You were one of several very qualified candidates for theposition of Education Seat on the Ice Age Discovery Committee. In orderto help in this difficult selection process, Town Council is asking that youanswer the following questions. We understand that the timing may beinconvenient given the holiday season, but we do appreciate your attention tothis matter. Please fill out the questions and send them back to LesleyCompagnone by December 27th at 5:00 p.m. They caneither be emailed to: lcompagnone (@tosv.com or faxed to 970 923 -6083. Interviewsfor this position are now scheduled for January 18th atapproximately 4:00 p.m. 1.) Please explain in more detail why you would like toparticipate in the Ice Age Discovery Committee? 2.) If you became a member of the IADC, what is your visionfor developing specific educational programs? What would you consider a successin your program? 3.) If you became a member of the IADC, how do you plan todeliver the educational programs you develop? How would you tailor thoseprograms to multiple audiences of varying demographics? Thank you. LesleyCompagnoneCommunityRelations OfficerP.O. Box 501OSnowmass Village, Colorado 81615p.970.923.3777 ext. 613 f. 970.923.60831compagnone(@tosv.com z Attachment A Citizen at Large Position y x v t� I` ti gg I r y t v Chien At urge Seat on the Ice Age; Discovery Committee Chuck Barth, Applicant Please explain in more detail why you would like to participate in the Ice Age Discovery Committee? To begin, it is an honor to be considered for a seat on the Ice Age Discovery Committee (IADC). As well, it is tremendously encouraging to see such interest by other neighbors in our community. Regardless of the outcome I feel privileged to have been part of such an historic event and selection process. I will continue to show enthusiasm, cooperation and creativity wherever I can be of help to see this incredible journey move forward. When the first bones were discovered and identified, I knew this would be a monumental turning point in our village's history and feel just as strongly about that today. As long as American travelers continue to venture off the highways and byways to see "The World's Largest Ball of Twine" in Cawker City, Kansas and "The Thing" near Benson in the Arizona Desert, one can rest assured that oddities and curiosities will capture the mind and imagination of children of all ages for generations to come. As a committee member, I wish to be an integral part of our mission to attract and welcome those who will come to support our efforts; namely, the display, and marketing _of:.thejossils and artifacts for the educational value they inherently posses, A r r t t The Ziegler Site is ot ri tfae ,c �o hoa `ers ns; is it n o; coction arlata aki 7 ��t�`''`�,'''`�'4t .'s�!` Liris Valle "ltli»'irr faGt,�/real t n ible h�stoncal the UFO hwa ofi the„ aid asset of incalculable�ValGe �o` meal �7ng a dart of�th �1rif ctual� and commercial development =of�this tre eu're is tantartJnt ob�eiigxone °of the FM original rimerxrbers of theniithsonia o rd °otR�gelts`c��f 1 It's not just a Bunch of bones! f i "17� s As, committee members it ls�importa to a l nowlecl a at least this: The success" f of the committee will riot. be;Oneasurecllbyth Ilective productivity of the �E sum of its,�members, but,rathe�r the insp4raio �w� Y �turn instill in the commupi yfto embraceF�and those,r ff to the goal of J perpetuityand continuing f knowled' n+d ge,�Ari�! cetainly,riotf`guided merely by the 3 z tem_ ptation of, philanthropi� S6 =ti r ia tr q�t' We �dy ta(Cen the fir taste s i �c o e�i trot to be content with simply n '}d a������.4t �is -�,�?P G? �Y1 ¢f being aige a`p y Y� al referent ona play otSrant�xhibit in a Denver museum. We have =ch en�opportunity „no�offered�byadeyeloper, wealthy entrepreneur or g land owrre but by Mother N ture herself. Wefiave chosen great responsibility; ;Let's dolts right!” (c6nfinuea)`j1 t V I look forward to working together as a team and aggressively and responsibly addressing all issues necessary to create the "presence" of the Ziegler Site findings here in Snowmass Village. In conclusion, I greatly appreciate the time and effort the Council has thus far and continues to put forth to ensure this undertaking is expertly managed and staffed with the highest caliber of competence and integrity. Once again, I am honored and humbled by your consideration for this seat and If selected I will devote my full intellect and creative power to the "Tusk at Hand Chuck Barth J t r r -z ,�,t s" t 4r iv"- J ''y"ti ✓iii ie r. ��.i lam' K r K. r f ,T Hh J, t ty '�i s �i TY y�t1 ttrli� l L 2 u t f f 5 ut 1 7 RA a fr 6,.,. �t� `f 1 i"'^'�t it +f �n55y{�r1b E r i A y+,. 3. Ak kc .ms•t t. d ry' r� What is your vision for this discovery and how it relates to the community? How do you see TOSV benefitting from this unique opportunity? My vision for this discovery creates new business, new jobs and an exciting new brand. It portrays a different subject outside the winter sports complex, but fits the high altitude, alpine paradigm. It is favorably a non industrial, non- competitive, geographically complimentary identity with the potential of breathing new economic vitality into our town through new tourism models, science community conferencing and national name recognition. A first -class museum will be a first for our village; it will give locals and seconds something else to be proud of. We all realize this discovery will never come close to the economic benefit of our winter sports industry and the allure of Aspen, but the Town of Snowmass Village will benefit from an increase in revenues from a new industry that attracts a new type of visitor at diverse times of the year. It will also benefit from increased name recognition the Ice Age Discoveries will create world -wide as more is unearthed. x r x. J �L t a 1,! tr S �t.(_'.,�s".,y ,r t r r ��''a, te a .e f r gy, t- F°'� 4 .k'. -h e� k .r .fit;. ".A LS r' f rig -;rs �t 7f1 R stc ttt s S_ze t t lv 4 yie n.f �z t,,, N' 6 i' f x t o t i ii k ti. nl r„� .ti. r' t t ^l••w�.� t ",CF t, L t ,F If you become a member of the IADC, please give some specific examples of how you would engage the community in this discovery /discussion. Of course these are just out -of- the -box ideas, but I hope you can get an idea of how my creative brain organizes and functions. "A Night at the Museum" Lecture Series Fundraiser lecture series hosted in local homes and /or businesses featuring guest speakers from Snowmass Village, DMSN and industry experts from around the world; Devoted to stimulating lecture, project updates and future plans; followed -up by Q A. Refreshments provided by host or potluck. Children's' series with stories, crafts and exhibits Photos and hosting recognition could appear in local and Denver news print as an Arts Social interest story. J fi w S' �a: tr t 'J Local, State andfNationalradior�d :N`edia iJl ouraged, o of vii they story of the Ziegler Sit 1ntain pt�b intere5ttr r. f 7" 1 r 4 r J +7 Industry periodicals willefi' j ueq apprised Jas'to4�ej��`sof the site'and anyiiews concerning neWdiscove,r�� aweekly update in the local ne-Wo scr�b�r�g recent Tusk Force /IADC t 4 b e- f bT e f meetings, discussions, upe nmg� v stand sornet�mes fun stuff like quizzes- r puzzles. an�d�word games,��deas fo�' S es f r the column include: l l einn z� 4 (already'haveW i v, d' 1 t j k ✓ads F' 4 t� .;rd a It 1`� o_ v, Tu �orce5u' a e E eY y w*ftl t� C.ltti4 aF�� t° X Contes a Togo, art, w� its 9), hr t; 'S y =nnuaj Fu r Braising Galas `r, h 'Scho lars, p Fund (continued) Ap x F r rp+� Fundraising direct mailing, solicit local celebrities, billionaires, foundations Sports Events run /walk, snowshoeing, cycling, ski races, Big Air Street re- designation e.g. Divide Road becomes Mammoth Way or Mastodon Road, Ice Age Ave Ski Company Involvement re- naming of ski and hiking trails, high powered observation deck telescopes or binoculars overviewing the Ziegler Site from the resort with semi permanent educational signage and vista layout. Ntlta?kit"Bnxix Ai lrrtax.Yox,Gx't;Srr i"ea�en+n;. e F 1' 4,J e'g. r k. j t r t•+ d,.,,�# t t l t1. ate' CDOT cooperation for Plac restsig�i gealong �I�7QSH82 and Brush Creek t t tt F 4G Road. f rr 1 e.g,. a .g r Ot t ti r 3 y The Rocky Mountain Ice Age Museum An idea for a name. This discovery site has contributed significantly to the greater understanding of The Ice Age in the Rocky Mountains during the last glaciations in North America. The Conference Center would make a great museum multi -plex. Annual Festivals, Concerts Parties Ice Age Days, Snowmastodon Village Day, Mammoth Day, The Sloth Festival, etc. Adopt an "Official" stamp of approval for merchandise to assure some proceeds go toward our specific funding. Official Ice Age Gift Shop. Pre historic Tours Blazing Adventures Retail stores, ice age merchandise, counter -top donation canisters Sundance, 81615, Soul Impact, etc. Submit for U.S. Postage Stamp Commemorative USPS Create commemorative coin proof sets Peter Affolter Mammoth Storybook Johnny Boyd Incorporate subject into existing museums and Storyt�ll�ng groups:;,- y Spellbinders, Aspen His #oncal,Socety,` by the Campfire, P�tk�n County Library, Wheeler °Stallard�Museum r d t 3 f a k� y1 Research other communities ,that �hav`i made sim�lar,discover�es op n l: c J z dialogues share stoeslearn -from. th ir,expe�ir�ences tt' 1 Create Ice Age Discovery Youth Committee f Create specific donor categories, and goals i 3 Recruit local�musiciansao ernbrace� project, ,create songacontest Identif s ecialized; donor rou s e Roann Fork Vahle Orthopaedists, Eco- Y p g p 9 g Y p businessesy Enco rnedJ6 to conduct "mati on the street" .opinion polls Get credentials anrlaccess for comin�tteemenbers Plan exploratory trips to Frusta Dihdiidr Journey'Museum, DMSN University of Colorado, etc. �Createrr�emberships �offer deals, discounts, ��monhly newsletter, admission to parties a`nd. Local andtDenver targets. Snowmass,Ice Age Get -Away d more. packages an Please describe in more detail your involvement with local community groups, non profits, and participation in community related events or projects. Valley Veterans: Supported veterans awareness activities in the Roaring Fork Valley through active participation in Memorial Day and Veterans Day ceremonies, Fourth of July Parades and Buddy Poppy fundraising for veterans. Spoke at Aspen High School telling "my military story" with other veteran's to students. Participated in local Veterans' History Project for Library of Congress inclusion. Wrote column to the Snowmass Sun while deployed as a soldier in Saudi Arabia during Gulf War I, entitled "Howdy from the Saudi It was written to keep Snowmass Village apprised of the war through the eyes of a local, 1991. Represented Snowmass�V'lla ge, s "i#q e o �Ofin military w deployments in cold war Berlifi'198'(�85Opert�d s 1'� a Celt and 1. r Desert Storm S d'Ara61C1 1990 Oper tin Jrnh`t ea'v��r rid Joint j dY in Bos i�a, Crot t ,an'c JHi it garj�,1997. Challenge Aspen Disabled'Vetere R, A N t �YF�' 1'tPr��t 1 j L p i ii i k r i Volunteer On mauntainesc�dtsabletlsierfram Alaska who used a a AW"i 4 L i 1 pod ski (an earlier` more °,cum,e t '�uer of today's adaptive mono- p ski),,1989 lbG f r .i y VoWrlteer Aspen Municipaolf,Go irsc course for Amy Grant �t E s�-�� r,= and/nce Gill Go Classic to benefi.'dlsabledyvomen veterans, 2009 �1�rC` It Voluui1' eert Trap ported, accompa�n a`d" nd assisted 2 blind skiers during a daX s of bowling El Jebow) °BAs §I tedsw itl dad #ive equipment and t ti d' t4 E'r Chu t� 1 scorekeepi�ng 12008,, x t t` A 3 t t F3 1 i'r' 1 !/'l µy t.''. V olunteer�o a: t�yde; �pund� #�tp. transportation for 2 GXa Junctionrb se Fsabled veterans,�o'4 a0fij Iles on a Mountainside", /2886 =07. (continued) r�z 'S. "Ft`s �h TT Town Clean -up Day: Volunteer, 5 years total Little Red School House: Board Member, 1 year, 1992 Volunteer, Hits and Misses Softball Fundraiser, played game and sang National Anthem, 3 years, 2006 -08 Co -wrote grant and facilitated distribution of $25,000 Ted Turner Foundation award for Marty Stouffer's American Wildlife Project, $5,000 of which was donated to The Little Red School House, 2010 Snowmass Village Special Events Oktoberfest Burgermeister I donned the Lederhosen, sang German songs, danced with guests, officiated contests, drank a little beer and made sure everyone had a great time! Brewers' Fest Pro Qs _c oord4cted research for the inception ofyeryuf oky YNf �trirrr riNi; ;pe' fornaed��ta t ing ,t.� Wy f by tr k unar1d anrinter serfs hrs activity grew, on' r' e(ri l �x ecta ion s� ucc s� re o rte qu�ckFy� n t�11 r r publicaftos o thou ttrtas�a�hdocal marketing brochure cfiite`rare� r V Snowmass Chapel Com�i .arty C" �'e- f.ct., �r= volunteer, 3 years tofal-" s .f tkm ,County Republrc an" s listricfeeL0p ointee r,r T Colorad republican 6 6mbly itl�� P'i�` u i �De e 9 a t 2010 appointee t to t P� .ta i t. L Snowms =i[lae le i�orEJ g�,5 n �ars0 �1'r a po�ntee `t V 1 y w Pitkrn du, Bfedt o Judge iitern >blic� iud0,10 appointee Also- se�rr ttde on 1e #or err Pitkin County Election AS systems, 1 r j� w 'FS; 1'. UX Yy`F frfi y r e r a a v t x' t a- z jF J "✓X Mr-^e4 Describe your availability to meet 1 -2 times per month in the next 4 -6 months. I have no plans to travel away from Snowmass Village in the next 4 -6 months and my wife and I do not plan on taking a vacation this year. My winter 2011 job, providing traffic control and security for the Snowmass Urgent Care Clinic as an employee of Aspen Valley Hospital is Monday through Friday, 8:30 am 4:30 pm. I have evenings and weekends free. 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M� e j A L I E�o 6XN161 FVF� -SO R-El A sly NVMA- iMAM)Y- OTATIOW A ?Re x-))57 2)c CENTUR MUCq Ll K THIS CAN Nbbb CWN PHF"C)YA►plb�L, T ff Fe L P- EP-TA CIZAN AV-* qo �)C P&IR i EN QjES /�j SPEMb N\/ 7F.L)FFLE MAMM o (D2 Tz)p qj),pi7 fAATFEjp WI BDs�Q& TMF �OP-N J &UT I D)'o Woek- F-or, 4 M114 FFZIT�? jc C)� 6RO�WMAss off=" )MO EpD oM w -TP?3 AMD I'va pp-OVI DIED CAL COPCEPTS A[-otJ(-Ij MTP Lc>c4oLs tDEWT►ES �i�Vv HOW 'TO 8-PINC v PL5 MAMMOTO W) 'TO ME,l Ice Age Discovery Committee For review by town council, Thank you for your considerations. If appointed to the citizen at large position, I believe this committee to be an essential component in guiding this discovery to fruition. Both the science community and local community of Snowmass Village are forever changed by this amazing fortuitous discovery. In answer to your questions. 1. I wish to serve on this committee because I believe it represents a new generational era of change for our town. I wish to be part of developing a vision for the future of Snowmass, rather than the current strategies of relying exclusively on ski seasons for our livelihoods. I have been a business owner and local in Snowmass for over thirty years and I know the town, the people and the business environment. I have seen Snowmass grow over the years and recently unfortunately stagnate, backslide and founder. This paleontological site should be utilized to create an exciting new identity for Snowmass Village, as a stand alone town. If you please, picture the town with a shining new vitality supporting a vibrant year round economy. I realize these challenges have faced many previous town administrations. Continuity and clear direction are key elements to successfully developing and implementing a strategy for our collective advantage and I believe I possess the skills necessary to contribute in a positive manner to this committee. 2. My vision for this discovery....., fill the hotel beds, restaurants, retail establishments and recreation center and create a buzz around the paleontology science to benefit the Town of Snowmass Village that will sustain a year round economy and build on that for many years to come. It is imperative to our survival as a viable community in the face of a sorry economy and ultra competitive winter resort market place. 3. Snowmass is an extremely diverse blend of self reliant well endowed successful retirees, high level corporate executives, tourists and enthusiastic locals, all stewed up in an eclectic blend that is Snowmass. We can and should utilize all facets of our community diversity, couple it with creating a state of the art science and paleontology exploration program, based on the Ice Age theme, in cooperation with the state, museum and town. Concerns must be addressed to resolve the issues of continued exploration, preservation and yet balance these issues to the benefit of all. Specifically, if you wish to benefit from my ideas and skills, respectfully, appoint me to the committee! 4. I currently, albeit not so successfully due to the warm start of the winter season, have built and volunteer the caretaking of the Western Heritage Rodeo Arena Ice Rink. Those of you, who know me, also know my passion for this form of ice age insanity. It is and has been a favorite new free amenity enjoyed by all, at no cost to the town. Volunteerism can produce very positive results when direction and management are well developed and implemented. I have formerly occupied an appointee position to the Town of Carbondale 4" parks and recreation board, as well as serving the valley wide community as a captain/ medic for the C'dale fire dept., president of the Kings Row homeowner's assoc., volunteer coach for Aspen Junior Hockey, and parent adviser for Aspen High School extracurricular clubs. I successfully developed water rights in the Kings Row subdivision with an agreement between the CWCB and the Homeowners Assoc. to develop an irrigation system that benefited the Kings Row subdivision. I have been qualified to ICS 300, a command level rating for large scale emergency incident management. As a volunteer I have been a medic, officer and red card certified wild land firefighter. I currently lecture globally for the ski industry training program management group, Masterfit Enterprises, having recently completed a tour in Australia. I have been published in numerous magazines and have lectured at the Aspen Sports Medicine Institute. In summary, I feel I am qualified to contribute to this committee in a positive manner for the future conscientious and beneficial development of this discovery. Thank you for the consideration, Jack Rafferty Ice Age Fossil COLLEEN DOYLE December 26, 2010 Snowmass Village Town Council IADC Search c/o Lesley Compagnone Community Relations Officer POB 5010 Snowmass Village CO 81615 Sent via email to: lcompagnonentosv.com RE: Ice Age Discovery Committee Citizen -at -Large Questions /Answers Dear Mayor Boineau and Council Members, Thank you for the opportunity to tell you more about what I will bring to the Ice Age Discovery Committee (a.k.a Tusk Force) Citizen -at -Large position. 1. Please explain in more detail rvly you would like to participate in the Ice Age Discovery Comivittee? On a local level, having brought this idea to Town Council just four days after the prehistoric find, and talking with Council, staff, and the community to help us get to where we are today with the Tusk Force having built consensus, addressed concerns, identified a local non profit as a funding pass- through entitity, received a preliminary commitment for a site from a local developer, and begun the process of creating implementable programs for this winter I want to continue to work with a community- centric vision to explore how Snowmass Village can further its aspiration and mission, while benefiting our community and the broader community, given the paleontological findings. On a broader level, as a country we are falling behind in science, math, technology, and engineering (STEM). The implications for this are too broad and deep to discuss here, but they are the reasons that I have worked for so long to examine and reform our education system, especially STEM education, in Colorado, Minnesota, and elsewhere. With the recent finds in our backyard, our community became a potential gateway to growing wonder and interest in science. Being a member of the Tusk Force is a natural segue to continue to pursue my passion, for Snowmass Village and STEM education, for the benefit of our community and the broader community. My application, resume, and answers to your questions, below, will explain what I can bring to the Tusk Force. 2. IVhat is your vision for this discovery and horn it relates to the community? Hory do you see TOSV benefztting f om this unique opportunity? I envision that the rebirth of Snowmass Village lies naturally in its past. The gates to the past have been opened and Snowmass Village stands at the threshold. It is the community's responsibility and should be the Tusk Force's mission to unearth and shape this opportunity as carefully and thoughtfully as the paleontologists are unearthing and preserving the bones. But, the potential opportunities are not limited to the bones. Where there is wonder and excitement, there is opportunity especially to learn and grow. Growing what is in our backyard into a wonder for science, scientific discovery, science education (informal and formal), and science literacy for POB 5623 SNOWVIASS VILLAGE CO.81615 970.456.7751 CDoyleEmail @Gmail.com COLLEEN DOYLE Page 2 of 4 young and old; for children, students, families, and scientists; for locals and visitors from afar requires vision, community input, expertise from several sectors, careful planning, and hard work. After seeking and assimilating community input and needed expertise, I would work to plan, implement, and grow the community- centric vision. Without being bound to preconceived ideas, I expect that the local and broader community will want a museum like center in which to learn more about the Ice Age, the local finds, and our local geology, flora, and fauna. This vision may be broader, however, and include an educational center that will host programs such as science cafes, summer and school- holiday science camps taught by scientists, winter science day programs for children and families, backcountry educational explorations /treks, internships for scientists and educators in- training, science educator continuing education, professional scientist conferences, and more all of which can be hosted in an education center in Snowmass Village. While science, and much of our education system, has become segmented, natural innate learning is not. A holistic approach to science education, at all levels, can be established. The science need not be limited to paleontology. Wonder in one area of science can lead to wonder about other branches of science. Having an observatory and making this a day- and -night center is another way of growing science wonder and knowledge, while also adding to the benefits to the community. And, while literally creating this from the ground up, we can also explore and expand the field of research into how we best learn science and how informal science education can best inform formal science education. Planning for, implementing, and growing such a vision will require thoughtful steps. But, these steps will lead to immediate and long -term community benefits. We will tell the story of our community, including its history and its prehistory. We will grow future scientists. And, recognizing that not all of our children will choose science careers, we will also help grow a scientifically literate electorate that can understand and make sound policy based on science. We will grow parents and educators who cultivate science wonder and exploration, while being role models for life -long learning. We will grow and advance science at all levels. And, we will bring many others to Snowmass Village. They will visit, learn, stay in our local lodging, eat at our local restaurants, explore our natural wonders, and give back to the community. Snowmass Village will develop its identity to include being a unique science education and recreation destination that benefits our local community and humankind. 3. If you become a vneniber of the IADC Tease give some specific examples of hory you would engage the cornnaunity in this discovery /discussion. I will immediately create a webpage or website to solicit community input and would publicize that input is being solicited. I will also create an online survey seeking community input and send it out to the town's email addresses and the PTRAB's email addresses. I will set up public forums, some in Snowmass Village and some online, to meet with the community, and I will publicize the forums to ensure that I hear from as many members of the community as possible. I will call organizations and individuals seeking input and expertise as needed. I will publish my contact information which includes a local cell phone number so that anyone can reach me as needed. I will then assimilate community input and expert advice and bring it to the Tusk Force and Council. I will also serve as liaison with our community, keeping them apprised of what the Tusk Force and Snowmass Village are doing. 4. Please describe in more detail your involvement with local community groups, non profits, and participation in communid l related events orprojects. Snowmass Village has been my community for over thirty years. I have literally grown up with the town, sharing its values and vision, and working to "be the change" long before Gandhi's phrase was popularized. I serve on the Part -time Residents Advisory Board (PTRAB); I have served as Vice Chair, Chair, Co- chair, and am currently Chair elect. As a member of PTRAB since its inception in 2005, I was instrumental in planning and setting the organizational structure, and defining its mission and goals within the creating ordinance's parameters. I serve as a liaison between Council and part -time residents. I work with PTRAB, Council, and staff to increase COLLEEN DOYLE Page 3 of 4 community participation and awareness, such as the vision to have online webstreaming and archiving of Council and PTRAB meetings, now available through Granicus. I worked with PTRAB and the community to create a PTRAB email address database, as well as writing updates. I maintained and updated the PTRAB webpage on tosv.com until recently. I helped set -up an information booth at the Fanny Hill concerts to meet community members and visitors, listen to their input and suggestions about our community, and convey information, such as fire safety and emergency preparedness. I attended homeowner association meetings to speak with and hear from part -time residents. I met with other local organizations looking at the role of part -time residents in and on the community, such as Piper Foster from the Sopris Foundation. And, as you well know, I have written many letters to Council on behalf of PTRAB, and spoken to Council on PTRAB's behalf on many occasions. I served as a member of the Snowmass Village Financial Advisory Board. I attended many community meetings and planning sessions, including those for the Comprehensive Plan, as well as what became the Renewable Energy Off -Set Program (REOP). I know many local merchants and support them whenever possible, and have publicy supported actions to maintain our local businesses, as well as their need for employee housing. I work for synergy, knowing that the sum is often greater than the parts, as I build on previous experiences, including opportunities I have created and the network of contacts I have made. My experiences and work in and near Snowmass Village fully integrate and build on my prior experiences, both locally and elsewhere; I discussed many of these experiences with you briefly during the 11/15/10 Council meeting when I spoke about my holistic perspective and having worked at the intersection of Snowmass Village, policymaking and advocacy, science, education, development /philanthropy (including grant writing), non profit management, legal and business degrees (including marketing), and parenting two science and math oriented students. In these areas I have worked closely with local, state, national, and international organizations and their individuals, from many sectors. While it is not possible to fully explain all of my experiences with-the local community and the broader community that I will bring to the Tusk Force, I have highlighted a feu below and am happy to discuss this further with you at any time. I integrated and built on my previous experiences including opportunities I created and the network of contacts I made when I worked with the Aspen Science Center (ASC) as the Director of Operations and also as a volunteer, and when working with other organizations. I worked on issues as diverse as education, education reform, and climate change. I spoke and met with members of presidential administrations (including a meeting to discuss eduation and reform with the Assistant to the President for Science and Technology and Director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) in the Executive Office of the President; and conversations with some members of the Presidents Council of Advisors on Science Technology); many federal and state policymakers (including conversations with the U.S. House Committee on Education and Labor's now Chair -elect and members of his staff, Colorado Senator Gail Schwartz, and many Minnesota policymakers); scientists from many areas of science; educators (Minnesota Department of Education Executive Team members; University of Colorado Boulder; University of Minnesota; Aspen High School and Aspen Middle School; Colorado Rocky Mountain School; Minnesota magnet and charter schools; etc.); museums; local, state, and national non profits, for profits, and non governmental organizations (including a conversation with the Head of the Directorate for Education and Human Resources Programs of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)). I oversaw the ASC's High School High Scholar (HS) Program, which brought forty-five gifted high school students from across the country, from groups underrepresented in science and math (i.e., African American, Hispanic /Latino, and Native American), for five weeks, for three consecutive summers, for a rigorous science, math, college preparatory, and experiential education on the Colorado Rocky Mountain School campus, followed by continuing support and community interaction during the school year. I worked with schools, administrators, teachers, and high school students from across the country to draw and select from the strongest possible applicant pool. I worked with the summer program's teachers and staff, creating unique opportunities for those Scholars in need of more challenging programs (e.g., I arranged for several students to work with a teacher holding a Ph.D. in Biochemistry and they created a working model of a photovoltaic cell using chlorophyll; I COLLEEN DOYLE Page 4 of 4 arranged for two freshmen students to work with the third -year Physics teachers, using newly- purchased laboratory sensors and software that I had experience with from my previous work with gifted students; I arranged for a student to work with a college -level text on the math needed to study science in college). I also worked with a Physics Professor and the Dean of Admissions at University of Colorado Boulder to arrange a day on a college campus and explore science careers for students who will be first in their family to attend college. Scholars met with the Dean of Admissions, toured the campus, participated in a lecture with two Physics Professors, broke up into smaller groups to visit several labs and talked with the scientists and students (including seeing the Nobel- winning equipment used by Carl Wieman), and then explored the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics and spoke with scientists there. During my tenure with the ASC, I also drafted strategic, marketing, and development plans; wrote grant applications, which involved working with many individuals and organizations; helped plan, develop, and implement high -level Solution Summits; worked with local community members and media; developed brand identity; raised awareness of programs, including working with media; hosted local science events; assisted with summer science camps; and worked on a Colorado model science curriculum initiative. I also worked with Dr. Kathy Klug and local rising seniors during three of her Aspen High School College Boot Camps, two of which also included the (HS) Scholars (one of whom was just accepted into Stanford University). And, I worked with Andre Wille with the ASC Summer Science Camps, and also with my daughter and son in the Semi Professional Scientists demonstrations. I also serve on the Board of Directors of the Semi Professional Scientists (Semi- Pros), a non profit corporation based in Snowmass Village. The Semi -Pros have done community outreach through water quality research with the Roaring Fork Conservancy; writing science columns; and doing hands -on science education activities locally in the Fanny Hill Family Fun Zone during concerts, as well as during SnowMagical, at Aspen's Ducky Derby (at the request of then President of the Aspen Rotary), at the Physics -is- for -Kids BBQs in Aspen, and at Basalt's former Town Center Booksellers Harry Potter release party. Please see the information submitted with my application previously regarding my non -local community service and experience. 5. Desaibeyour availability to vveet 1 -2 timer jeer wontb in the next 4 -6 months. Realizing the importance of the vision, goals, and potential community benefits following the prehistoric find, I came to town on two occasions to talk with Town Council, staff, and the community, and I commit to doing so for Tusk Force meetings, including, potentially, a day at the Denver Museum of Nature Science. Please note, however, that there will be three days in January (dates still to be finalized) for which I have previously committed to be elsewhere. Sincerely, Colleen Colleen Doyle Enclosure Janis Huggins —379-X&51— @0000uum1.net 1.) Please explain in more detail why you would li bo participate in t lee Age Discovery Committee? Having lived here for 40 years, Snowmass Village and this community are my passion, iuconjunction with an extreme passion for science in every realm that drives my life and decisions. Since Ivvua given the job tucn:ate/*dtc/produoe 3oon/onuua Village -Wild at Heart, nothing has crossed my path as exciting as this opportunity an opening in the window of our history that is unparalleled in its significance for our future as a community and the depth of what we can offer our visitors. l would like to participate as we plan aputb to travel with this discovery. 2,) What is your vision for this discovery and how it relates tnthe community? How do you see TOSV bemuOttingDroom this unique opportunity? My vision is definitely om|d-boetnd, as it includes both educational and economic aspects for the community focusing on how the discovery makes us an even greater year-round destination resort. The educational opportunities are boundless whether in paleontology, pu|oobotuoy, biolngy, geology, botany, ornitho|ogy yon name it! Bow what we see today relates to thousands of years ago will be thrilling to learn and to share with our residents and visitors alike. l have }ouzocd from talking to people recently, many have no idea how the discoveries here differ frorn the age of dinosaurs. Just working briefly with the USGS scientist who is studying the vegetation/pollen they removed, and |cmnniug what they are doing, being able to bc|D in small ways has been terrific Most importantly, this find increases the depth and complexity of our history we are no longerjust a ski resort oruplace to recreate. We have u chance to share o new vision ofSuowoouas Village oma place vvberc ancient mammals rounzed, and toteach rcaidouiu, Co|orudoauy and visitors from around the globe about the ecologyoftheoogioutapcoica howundvvbydidihoycomehoze andtobe{p them understand the -eoloOcal time table of the valley and Colorado, and how the geological events influenced the existence of these species, as well as the formation of the pond were their remains have been found. In rny mind, it is what I have hoped for since I moved here 40 years ago for Snowmass Village to have u powerful and distinct connection tn the past that would excite everyone who comes here. The summer activities we offer, such as biking, pro|[ horseback riding, rafting, the rodeo and music are all wonderful and now we have the new discoveries to appeal to the entire family. These can be a spring board to nouuy other evenia, as event planners will have ugrco1crdesire to bring people hero because of the increased activity. Of course, on the top of my mind is how we can create a location or locations to help educate and excite everyone how we create avenues for teaching and invo|vio�people in the discovery —and how we make it special so that it is not just the experience of being in a museum room somewhere, looking o1bones inu glass case. 3.)0[ you become u member of the DAl0C,please give some specific examples nf how you would engage the community in thiod0mcoverv/dYuuoasiom. l think itis important that we have open meetings and set upxwebxiie/ecoai| contact ao that vve can �a1bcridcuyfioon(h�w�ulUzofhi�hly educated and experienced people that both live here and visit. There are many ways to do this so that we can formulate a clear path and to do it as soon as possible. It also has to be a somewhat staggered plan as the Museum staff will not have all the auovvcro immediately. We should not form the committee with too many preconceived ideas, but be open-minded and ready to listen, listen. |imten ondtbenbndostornoiUordertoiokeuodon. 4J Please describe im more detail your involvement with local community groups, and participation 8m community related events or projects. l.iviu�he/efurao|oog,[bovebecn involved ino lot of things, all primarily associated with my love o[ science bn some way, Volunteering for ACES over the years, both summer and winter, has been very important to noe— however, I also guide for thern in recent years as an employee at various times throughout the summer. l have been u member of the Colorado Native Plant Society for over l5 years, and always contribute my time duhu�annual nooedogx. Producing the book, Wild at Heart, for the Town of Snowmass Village, has been the greatest labor of love in my life as a scientist and as a resident of this community. What was supposed to be a small nature guide for just the Brush Creek Valley, of under 2OU pages and u one year p J ect bocomeu book of 468 pages, and a comprehensive guide to the multitude of ecosystems surrounding us something to provide a guide to generations of young and old naturalists who visit the Roaring Fork Ya||oy and similar areas in Colorado. What ogift our Town has given to Colorado! It grew from u paid project foruyour for 5 years, one that consumed my every waking hour literally! The reason we won the Colorado Book Award for Non-fiction is because the book has uomotbin�for every nature lover vvbovvuntutoexplore SoowrnuuuVd|oge and other areas of Colorado and because of its versatility to be either a trail guide or a coffee table book. This book demonstrates a|ot about me and ug' ability toproduce, edit, organize, and orobosbuiunouny different aspects ufuproject, vvhc{hor writing, rcaourcbio�, designing ]uyoot, photographing, and collaborating vvdbnnunyiudividoulaiopnoduccufininhcdprodnct. I do also consider my work researching rare plants around Colorado as somewhat of a volunteer project, as it pays little and has involved intense time commitments, lots of personal equipment and auto use that can never bc reimbursed. Through rny ten years vvorkJn�with the (�o|orudoY�u/nnd Heritage Program a1CS[}, lfee| l have been able to "give back" to my community and to rny o|n1e. For three ycura. l �ot op at 4:30 an�dur�urthe spring biud hrcediu� season to work with Lbnda\/kkJ (the valley's Queen of Birds) and other volunteers oou bird banding project that helped expand understanding of the aiotoo of migratory binds in Colorado. Of course, i have also volunteered for the uaxiatodcureconomonityoverdheyeucatodehvcrooeu|u aad o|vvuyu enjoyed that. 7 have been involved in many small volunteer projects, such as the Droste video, talks to libraries and garden clubs and other local groups, and hikes for local organizations. 5.) Describe your availability ko meet 1'2 times per month imthe next 4-6 months. l have overy flexible acbcdu|o through Moy and will only be working part-time after that, plus revising Wild at Heart all which will give nue time to attend meotio�x� lanoreally looking forward too to giving back n'oo:to the cozno�oui(ythat ia rnyhon�o, and to helping organize events that will help in foodru singforuU the things we want to accomplish! Thanks for considering me, Janis Huggins unio.bogginu@comoaxLoc{ llad� Dear Applicant, You were one of several very qualified candidates for the position of Citizen -At -Large Seat on the Ice Age Discovery Committee. In order to help in this difficult selection process, Town Council is asking that you answer the following questions. We understand that the timing may be inconvenient given the holiday season, but we do appreciate your attention to this matter. Please fill out the questions and send them back to Lesley Compagnone by December 27 at 5:00 p.m. They can either be emailed to: Compagnone @tosv.com or faxed to 970 923 -6083. Interviews for this position are now scheduled for January 18` at approximately 4:00 p.m. 1.) Please explain in more detail why you would like to participate in the Ice Age Discovery Committee? V"c ra �e t� UISE ?off 2.) What is your vision for this discovery and how it relates to the community? How do you see TOSV benefitting from this unique opportunity? ►t., uS�-� cu� c 0 3.) If you become a member of the IADC, please give some specific examples of how you would engage the community in this discovery /discussion. t4 c� l� lY� �.r-�- �"�'t� w try g t 4. Please describe in more detail our experiences in the TOSV community and p roj ects lJ Y p y p sects you have worked on. .GPs l Thank You, Q Lesley Compagnone I CtAIA L �o Mps� a�d'-1 Az -1k o'-J MEMORANDUM TO: Snowmass Village Town Council FROM: John Dresser DATE: January 3, 2011, 2009 SUBJECT: Resolution No. 5 of 2011 Emergency Alarm Program IGA with Snowmass Wildcat Fire Protection District I. PURPOSE AND ACTIONS REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: Consideration and approval of an IGA with SWFPD to share revenue generated by false alarms pursuant to the Emergency Alarm program in SVMC Section 18- 141 et.seq. II. BACKGROUND SVMC Section 18 -141 et.seq. establishes an Emergency Alarm program that among other things provides service fees for responses to false alarms. TOSV classifies alarm requests as fire /medical, intrusion, or panic. TOSV is the primary response to intrusion and panic requests and SWFPD is the primary response to fire /medical requests. The Emergency Alarm program requires an annual alarm user permit at a cost of $35.00 per alarm system. III. APPLICABLE REGULATIONS The Emergency Alarm program is in the SVMC at Section 18 -141 et.seq. and provides the schedule of service fees at Section .18 -145 which also provides that fees paid pursuant to the program shall be allocated to the cost of operations of the Police Department. Sec. 18 -145. False alarm service fees and penalties. (a) The alarm user permit holder is subject to the following service fees for all false alarms occurring within a calendar year: Residential and Commercial Facilities: 0 through 3 false alarms no fee 4 through 7 false alarms $50 per alarm Public Accommodation Complexes: 0 through 5 false alarms no fee 6 through 9 false alarms $50 per alarm The eighth false alarm for a commercial or residential facility and the tenth false alarm for a public accommodation complex shall be deemed a failure to comply with the proper maintenance or operation of a trouble free alarm and a violation 1 of this Article. The permittee shall be charged three hundred dollars ($300.00) for this and each false alarm thereafter, and the permittee may be required to meet with the Chief of Police and the alarm contractor to determine the cause of the problem and discuss possible solutions. (d) Fees paid to the Town pursuant to this Section shall be allocated to the cost of operation of the Police Department. (Ord. 1 -1989 §1; Ord. 24 -1992 §1; Ord. 4 -1994 §1) IV. DISCUSSION ITEMS: ALTERNATIVES AND IMPLICATIONS SWFPD has suggested that because it is the primary response for fire /medical alarm requests that it should receive the revenue from false firs /medical alarms to which it responds. The Police Department agrees this is equitable. Permit fees generate approximately $20,000.00 annually which closely approximates the administrative costs of the program. TOSV will continue to retain all user permit fees to administer the program. Pursuant to the IGA, TOSV will track and annually pay to SWFPD the revenue generated by the service fees for fire /medical false alarms reported to TOSV by SWFPD. Historically the amount of revenue for fire /medical service fees for false alarms fluctuates, but the five year average is approximately $1,800.00 V. STAFF RECOMMENDATIONS AND FINDINGS Staff recommends that Town Council approve the IGA with SWFPD. 2 1 TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE 2 TOWN COUNCIL 3 4 RESOLUTION NO. 5 5 SERIES OF 2011 6 7 A RESOLUTION AUTHORIZING THE ENTRANCE INTO AN 8 INTERGOVERNMENTAL AGREEMENT WITH THE SNOWMASS WILDCAT FIRE 9 PROTECTION DISTRICT REGARDING REPORTING AND SHAREBACK OF FALSE 10 ALARMS SERVICE FEES. 11 12 13 WHEREAS, the Town of Snowmass Village "TOSV has codified an Emergency 14 Alarm program in the Snowmass Village Municipal Code "SVMC in Chapter 18 which 15 requires all emergency alarm users to obtain a user permit; and 16 17 WHEREAS, the Town Manager has determined that a contract with the 18 Snowmass Wildcat Fire Protection District "SWFPD a Title 32 C.R.S. special district, 19 fosters efficiency in government and fiscal responsibility; and 20 21 WHEREAS, the Town Council desires to approve and enter into the proposed 22 Intergovernmental Agreement "IGA to administer TOSV's Emergency Alarm program; 23 and 24 25 WHEREAS, the Town Council finds that the adoption of this Resolution is 26 necessary for the immediate preservation of the public health, safety and welfare. 27 28 NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED by the Town Council of the Town of 29 Snowmass Village, Colorado: 30 31 1. Approval of Proposal The proposed IGA of Pitkin County to administer 32 TOSV's Emergency Alarm program, in the form of the Intergovernmental Agreement 33 attached hereto as Exhibit "A" and incorporated herein by this reference, is hereby 34 approved and accepted. 35 36 2. Direction to Town Manager The Town Manager is hereby authorized and 37 directed to execute the Intergovernmental Agreement and administer the Emergency 38 Alarm program as provided in the IGA. 39 Resolution No. 5, Series of 2011 Page 2 40 3. Severability If any provision of this Resolution or application hereof to any 41 person or circumstance is held invalid, the invalidity shall not affect any other provision 42 or application of this Resolution which can be given effect without the invalid provision 43 or application, and, to this end, the provisions of this Resolution are severable. 44 45 INTRODUCED, READ AND ADOPTED, by the Town Council of the Town of 46 Snowmass Village, Colorado, on the 3rd day of January, 2011 upon a motion made by 47 Council Member seconded by Council Member and by a vote 48 of in favor and opposed. 49 50 51 TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE 52 53 54 55 By: 56 Bill Boineau, Mayor 57 ATTEST: 58 59 60 61 62 Rhonda Coxon, Town Clerk 63 64 65 APPROVED AS TO FORM: 66 67 68 69 70 John C. Dresser, Jr., Town Attorney INTERGOVERNMENTAL AGREEMENT CONCERNING REPORTING AND FINANCIAL SHAREBACK OF SERVICE FEES FROM FALSE ALARMS This Intergovernmental Agreement concerning reporting and financial shareback of service fees from false alarms (the "Agreement" or the "IGA is made and entered into this 1 St day of January, 2011 by and between the Snowmass Wildcat Fire Protection District "SWFPD and the Town of Snowmass Village "Town (sing ularly a "Party" and collectively the "Parties WITNESSETH: WHEREAS, Parties desire to enter into this IGA in order to improve communications, provide for cost sharing of certain false alarm service fees, and for any other lawful purposes not inconsistent with the provisions of this IGA; and WHEREAS, SWFPD is a duly formed and constituted Title 32 fire protection district; and WHEREAS, the Town is a duly formed and constituted home rule municipality; And WHEREAS, per 32 -1 -1001 and 32 -1 -1002, C.R.S. SWFPD has the lawful power to perform the tasks and services contemplated by this Agreement; and WHEREAS, pursuant to Title 31 of the Colorado Revised Statutes and its Home Rule Charter the Town has the lawful power to perform the tasks and services contemplated by this Agreement; and WHEREAS, pursuant to Colo. Const. Art. XIV, Sec. 18(2), and 29 -1 -201, C.R.S., political subdivisions and governments such as SWFPD and the Town are permitted and encouraged to make the most efficient and effective use of their powers and responsibilities by cooperating and contracting with other governments; and each may cooperate and contract with each other to provide any function, service or facility lawfully authorized to each and any such contract may provide for the joint exercise of the function, service or facility; and WHEREAS, the Parties represent that this Agreement was presented to and approved by the governing board of each Party and that the signatories hereto have specific authority to sign on behalf of each respective Party. NOW, THEREFORE, in consideration for the promises and conditions set forth below the Parties agree as follows: 1 A. Terms /Definitions Except as specifically set forth herein, the terms and conditions appearing in this Agreement shall have the same meaning as is found in Article VIII of the Town's Municipal Code (the "Code B. User Permit The Code currently requires all persons desiring to install an emergency alarm within Town limits to apply for and receive an Alarm User Permit. Failure to obtain an Alarm User Permit constitutes a violation of the Code. As consideration for the administrative costs of administering the Alarm User Permit program and otherwise associated with this Agreement the Town shall be entitled to keep all revenue associated with the Alarm Use Permit process and to alter the applicable Alarm User Permit rates as it sees fit. C. False Alarm Service Fees: The Code currently provides service fees for false alarms. The service fees are based on a sliding scale connected to the number of false alarms (see Section 18 -145 of the Code as amended, incorporated by this reference). In the event SWFPD responds to a false alarm, including false alarms from carbon monoxide detectors, SWFPD shall provide an incident report to the Town in order to permit the Town to keep track of the number of false alarms per Alarm User. Irrespective of any language contained in the Code, SWFPD shall be entitled to 100% of the service fees imposed by the Town on an Alarm User if a false fire, medical emergency, or carbon monoxide alarm is triggered and SWFPD responds. Should the Town wish to alter the service fees schedule in Section 18 -145, it shall provide SWFPD of actual notice of the pending legislative action. SWFPD may at its election terminate this Agreement in the event the Town lowers the service fees from their present level as set forth in the Code. D. Service Fees for False Alarms For Users Without Alarm User Permits In the event that SWFPD responds to a false alarm, submits its report to the Town, and the Town determines that the property does not have a properly issued Alarm User Permit, the Town may take such action against the property owner as it deems necessary in order to obtain compliance with the Code. In the event the Town receives revenue as a result of a fine being imposed for a false alarm when such a property possesses no properly issued Alarm User Permit, SWFPD shall be entitled to 25% of the fine imposed or $50, whichever is higher. E. Record keeping /Disbursements The Town shall disburse any payments due to SWFPD under this Agreement once annually upon the close of the previous fiscal year's accounting cycle and in no event later than March 15th of the following year. The Town shall keep records of any and all false alarms and shall compose an annual report to accompany payment. F. Termination /Amendment Except as otherwise set forth herein this IGA may be amended only by written agreement of all Parties. Either Party may terminate this IGA as of any subsequent December 31 by giving written notice to the other Party on or 2 before December 1 St in the year of the termination. In the event the IGA is terminated, the Town shall perform a final accounting of the penalties and disburse a final payment. G. Entire and Sole Agreement: Subsequent Modification; Survival: This Agreement constitutes the entire agreement between the Parties relating to the subject hereof. No subsequent modification of any of the terms of this Agreement shall be valid, binding upon the Parties, or enforceable unless made in writing and signed by the Parties. H. Signatures; Counterparts Signatures transmitted by facsimiles or electronically via e-mail shall be valid for all purposes. This Agreement may be signed in one or more counterparts, and when taken together, each of such counterparts shall constitute one and the same document. I. Choice of Law and Venue This Agreement and all disputes arising hereunder shall be governed by and construed in accordance with the laws of the State of Colorado and venue for any disputes concerning this Agreement shall be in the District Court for the County of Pitkin. J. Notice Notices regarding any action taken under this Agreement shall be delivered in person or by certified mail as follows: To SWFPD: Fire Chief Snowmass Wildcat Fire Protection District 5275 Owl Creek Road PO Box 6436 Snowmass Village, CO 81615 With copy to: Garfield Hecht, P.C. 420 Seventh Street, Suite 100 Glenwood Springs, Colorado 81601 To Town: Town Manager Town of Snowmass Village 130 Kearns Road PO Box 5010 Snowmass Village, CO 81615 With copy to: 3 Town Attorney Town of Snowmass Village 130 Kearns Road PO Box 5010 Snowmass Village, CO 81615 K. Compliance with TABOR No provision of this Agreement shall be construed or interpreted: i) to directly or indirectly obligate either party to make any payment in any year in excess of amounts appropriated for such year; ii) as creating a debt or multiple fiscal year direct or indirect debt or other financial obligation whatsoever within the meaning of Article X, Section 20 of the Colorado Constitution or any other constitutional or statutory limitation or provision; or iii) as a pledge of credit, donation or grant by or in aid of any person, company or corporation within the meaning of Article XI of the Colorado Constitution. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the parties hereto have executed this Agreement and the effective date hereof shall be as of the day and year first above written. SNOWMASS WILDCAT FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT BY: TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE BY: Russell W. Forrest, Town Manager 4 MEMORANDUM TO: Snowmass Village Town Council FROM: John Dresser DATE: January 3, 2011 SUBJECT: Resolution 6, Series of 2011 Authorizing Sale of Club Villa #210 I. PURPOSE AND ACTIONS REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: Authorize the sale of Club Villa #210. II. SUMMARY OF PROJECT Council purchased the units for resale without deed restriction to eliminate the mixed free market and restricted market ownership of Club Villa units. III. BACKGROUND The restricted units were becoming unaffordable due to onerous special assessments voted by the overwhelming majority of free market owners in the HOA. IV. APPLICABLE REGULATIONS TOSV Charter Section 1.4. V. DISCUSSION ITEMS: ALTERNATIVES AND IMPLICATIONS Council has previously determined to buy and sell without deed restrictions this unit. This action is requested by the buyer's attorney to effect the sale. VI. STAFF RECOMMENDATIONS AND FINDINGS Staff recommends that Town Council approve Resolution 6. I TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE 2 TOWN COUNCIL 3 4 5 RESOLUTION NO. 6 6 SERIES OF 2011 7 8 9 A RESOLUTION AUTHORIZING THE SALE OF CLUB VILLAS CONDOMINIUM UNIT 10 #210 AND AUTHORIZING THE TOWN MANAGER AND THE TOWN ATTORNEY TO 11 EXECUTE CONTRACTS, DEEDS, RELEASES OF DEED RESTRICTIONS AND 12 OTHER DOCUMENTS TO EFFECTUATE THE SALE THEREOF 13 14 15 WHEREAS, Section 1.4 of the Home Rule Charter grants to the Town the power 16 to sell property; and 17 18 WHEREAS, the Town Council has determined that it is in the best interests of the 19 Town to sell certain real property owned by the Town; and 20 21 WHEREAS, the Town has received an offer to purchase Club Villa Condominium 22 Unit #210; and 23 24 WHEREAS, the Town Council has determined that it is in the best interests of the 25 Town to accept said offer to purchase; and 26 27 WHEREAS, the Town Council has determined that it is the best interests of the 28 Town to release the affordable housing deed restrictions on the real property; and 29 30 WHEREAS, the Town Council finds that the adoption of this Ordinance is 31 necessary for the immediate preservation of the public health, safety and welfare. 32 33 34 NOW, THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED by the Town Council of the Town of Snowmass 35 Village, Colorado: 36 37 1. That Club Villas Condominium Unit #210 is hereby authorized to be sold and 38 conveyed to third party purchasers pursuant to contract. 39 40 2. That the Town Manager and /or the Town Attorney are hereby authorized to 41 execute on behalf of the Town of Snowmass Village any contracts, deeds, 42 Releases of Deed Restrictions, and other documents necessary to effectuate 43 the sale to third party purchasers without restrictions made in furtherance of the 44 Town of Snowmass Village Permanent Moderate Housing Program, specifically 45 including deed or other restrictions included in the following documents 46 recorded in the Office of the Pitkin County Clerk and Recorder, but not limited 47 to only those documents: 48 49 a) Town of Snowmass Village Option to Purchase Permanent Moderate 50 Housing Unit, recorded February 14, 2005 as Reception No. 506990; 51 b) Special Warranty Deed, recorded February 14, 2005 as Reception 52 No. 506989; and 53 Resolution 6 -2011 Page 2 of 2 54 55 56 c) Condominium Unit 210, Club Villas Condominiums Permanent 57 Moderate Housing Restriction, recorded December 7, 1995 as 58 Reception No. 388059. 59 60 61 INTRODUCED, READ AND ADOPTED by the Town Council of the Town of Snowmass 62 Village, Colorado, on the 3rd day of January, 2011 upon a motion made by Council 63 Member and seconded by Council Member 64 and by a vote of in favor to opposed. 65 66 67 TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE 68 69 70 71 72 Bill Boineau, Mayor 73 74 75 76 77 ATTEST: 78 79 80 81 Rhonda B. Coxon, Town Clerk 82 83 84 85 APPROVED AS TO FORM: 86 87 88 89 John C. Dresser, Jr., Town Attorney RELEASE OF EMPLOYEE HOUSING RESTRICTIONS THIS RELEASE is made by the Town of Snowmass Village, a Colorado home rule municipal corporation, whose address is Post Office Box 5010, Snowmass Village, Colorado 81615, hereinafter referred to as the "TOWN" for the benefit of James Guest, hereinafter "BUYER" and any of his successors in interest. WITNESSETH: WHEREAS, the TOWN is the beneficial grantee of certain deed restrictions burdening certain real property situate in the Town of Snowmass Village, County of Pitkin, State of Colorado, to wit: Condominium Unit 210 as shown on the CLUB VILLAS CONDOMINIUM MAP (PHASE I) filed in the records of the Clerk and Recorder of Pitkin County, Colorado, on March 27, 1981, in Plat Book 11 at Page 29, as defined and described in the Condominium Declaration for the Club Villas, Snowmass Village, Colorado, appearing in such records, filed on March 24, 1981 in Book 406 at Page 38, as defined and described in Amendment No. 1, filed on April 11981 in Book 406 at Page 434, and as defined and described in Amendment No. 2 recorded April 10, 1984 in Book 464 at Page 356 as Reception No. 258661. COUNTY OF PITKIN, STATE OF COLORADO commonly referred to as 294 Snowmass Club Circle, Snowmass Village, Colorado 81615, and hereinafter referred to as the "PROPERTY;" and WHEREAS, the PROPERTY is a Housing Unit regulated under and subject to the provisions of the Snowmass Village Municipal Code and the regulations adopted pursuant thereto; and WHEREAS, it is the desire of the Town to forever release the PROPERTY from the continued administration of the Housing Unit under the provisions of the Snowmass Village Municipal Code and the regulations; and WHEREAS, the Town desires to remove any and all encumbrances and burdens on the PROPERTY, pursuant to Town Council Resolution No. 6, Series of 2011 for the benefit of BUYERS and their successors in interest as hereinafter set forth. NOW, THEREFORE, for good and valuable consideration, the adequacy and sufficiency of which is hereby acknowledged, the TOWN does hereby forever release and remove all of the burdens of the restrictive covenants contained in the following documents recorded in the Office of the Pitkin County Clerk and Recorder: a) Town of Snowmass Village Option to Purchase Permanent Moderate Housing Unit, recorded February 14, 2005 as Reception No. 506990; b) Special Warranty Deed, recorded February 14, 2005 as Reception No. 506989; and c) Condominium Unit 210, Club Villas Condominiums Permanent Moderate Housing Restriction, recorded December 7, 1995 as Reception No 388059; that encumber the Property by the establishment of the certain restrictive covenants that run with the land for the benefit of the Town, in perpetuity. 1 IN WITNESS WHEREOF, on behalf of the Town of Snowmass Village and pursuant to the authority granted the undersigned by Town Council Resolution No. 6, Series of 2011, the undersigned executed this Release of Employee Housing Restrictions on January 4, 2011. TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE By: Russell W. Forrest Town Manager ATTEST: Rhonda B. Coxon Town Clerk ACKNOWLEDGMENT STATE OF COLORADO ss: COUNTY OF PITKIN The foregoing Release of Employee Housing Restrictions was executed and acknowledged before me by Russell W. Forrest as Town Manager of the Town of Snowmass Village on January 4, 2011. WITNESS MY HAND AND OFFICIAL SEAL. NOTARY PUBLIC My commission expires: 2 TO: SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL FROM: RUSS FORREST, TOWN MANAGER SUBJECT: MANAGER'S REPORT DATE: JANUARY 3, 2010 Homestead Bus Stop At the December 20 meeting, several residents living on Brush Creek Road, across from the Homestead Townhomes, came to Council concerned about Shuttle service at what has been an unsigned stop at the Homestead Townhomes. Attached is a memorandum from David Peckler on this issue, which also responds to several questions the Council had. In talking to the supervisory staff at the Transportation Department and with the Police Department, the decision to eliminate this stop was based on valid safety concerns. Pending Actions Last Updated December 27, 2010 The following is a summary of actions that either the Council has requested or actions staff has proposed and is working on for the Town Council. Staff Action Status Date to follow -up Contact I I I w/ Council Land Use Planning Other Land Use The comprehensive plan has been 1St Phase of Land Department Code Issues approved. The Town Council has Use Amendments adopted the 1st round of high priority approved on 2" actions. reading on October 18, 2010 Housin Housing Housing Policy The Comprehensive Plan has a Housing Code Department mitigation goal of 70% for developers. Amendments being Staff is preparing code language to prepared and will implement the updated Comprehensive be reviewed by PC Plans goals in January 2011. Housing For -Sale Deed Review current policy on doing January 18, 2010 Department Restriction biannual reviews of deed restricted Enforcement homeowners qualifications. Finance Marianne GID Advisory Once the foreclosure is complete, bring After Base Village Board back the discussion of the GID Foreclosure is Advisory Board to the GID Board. complete but before the budget process begins for 2012 budget Marianne Sales Tax Finance Department was requested to February 18, Evaluation evaluate sales tax collection between 2011 between the commercial nodes and by sector. commercial This is planned to be forwarded to FAB nodes in January. Other Mark Kittle REOP Based on input from various January 18, 2011 stakeholders, proposed changes have been forwarded to the Council for their consideration. Most recently Council has requested that stakeholders again review the proposed changes and p rovide their input to Council. Russ URA- Phase 1 On November 15 the Town Council To be scheduled Forrest authorized on October 4 th moving after Council forward with the next steps to create an retreat on Urban Renewal Authority. Council January 10 requested that no further action on this be taken until after the Council retreat scheduled for January 10 th Russ IADC Applications for the IADC were due on January 3rd. Forrest December 16 On January 3rd, Council will be requested to short -list candidates for the IADC and make a tH final selection on January 18 MEMO To: Russ Forrest, Town Manager and Town Council From: David Peckler, Transportation Director Date: December 22, 2010 Re: Manager's Report Information on Meeting with Homeowners on Homestead Bus Stop Here is a brief description of the events to date. Homestead bus pullout consolidation with formal bus stop at Sinclair Rd: At the Council meeting held on December 20, 2010 residents expressed their concerns about the decision by the Transportation Department (TD) to discontinue making stops at the pullouts along Brush Creek Rd adjacent to the Homestead condominium complex. Conditional bus service (not stopping on bad snow /ice days) had been provided to this informal and un- posted bus stop by the Village Shuttle since sometime after the development of the Homestead properties circa 1990. The TD's main concern driving the decision to discontinue stopping here was the general public's safety. When the Village Shuttle attempts to stop and board /alight passengers here the dimensions of the pullouts, being minimal at best, do not allow the bus to get fully off the road and out of the flow of traffic. Russ Forrest (Town Manager) and I met with representatives of the concerned residents on Tuesday December 21, 2010. At the meeting with the residents I presented the Town's safety concerns with the current pullouts and reviewed the homeowners' concerns (which were presented to Council in a handout at their last meeting). After the meeting, the Town Manager and I also spoke with the Police Department about their observations. They agreed that this section of roadway is problematic due to the grades and icing. In addition, the Town Manager met with the TD supervisors and confirmed that there have been accidents and issues with loss of traction along this stretch of road, one accident involving a bus being rear -ended at the downhill stop at Sinclair Rd before the new bus stops were completed. It is regretful that greater and more advanced notice from the TD to the residents did not take place. Because there is a well designed bus stop roughly 200 yards from the Homestead and that the pullouts in this location are inadequate for the buses to safely get completely out of the travel lanes, this informal stop was abandoned. The following are answers to Council's questions generated at the last meeting: Page 1 1. The issue of buses being able to safely stop here has been an operational concern and was not an impact to the budget, so this was not discussed with Council at the budget presentations. Being an operational issue it was not viewed as a policy issue requiring Council direction. 2. The safety issue here is that industry standard is "On moderately busy and busy streets (with an average daily traffic volume of roughly 4,000 or more), all stops should be made outside the moving travel lanes." A bus partially in the roadway constricts the traffic lane and creates an obstacle to the general traffic. Traffic volume in this area during the winter is roughly 9,000 ADT. This is double the traffic volume in other locals: Owl Creek Rd 3,500 ADT and upper Brush Creek Rd at Mountain View 4,050 ADT. Staff was attempting to address a liability issue that they considered important. 3. The concern about the safe handling of passengers here and the impact on traffic has been debated internally as long as the service has been provided. Traffic volume here hasn't fallen at a relative rate to the other indicators in the recession. Overall local traffic volume is probably increasing, so future traffic volume will impact bus service headways by causing longer delays to enter the flow of traffic. In addition there are more requests for stops. Should the overall resort activity rebound, there would be greater erosion of the service headways. 4. This has been an informal bus stop subject to use under certain conditions. There is a formal bus stop 200 yards (.11 mile) away. The industry standard is generally .25 mile separation between stops, with exception for certain considerations mostly high volume or obstacles. The potential for greater ridership from multi family complexes and parking/portals have been the traditional prerequisite for a bus stop, with the exception of Route 8. 5. Another question asked by Council was how many people get on and off the bus at this location. Since this is not a formal bus stop, passenger boarding data is not available. It most likely is not a larger number. Page 2 3 RD Draft SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL REGULAR MEETING AGENDA JANUARY 18, 2011 PLEASE NOTE THAT ALL TIMES ARE APPROXIMATE ITEMS COULD START EARLIER OR LATER THAN THE STATED TIME CALL TO ORDER AT 4:00 P.M. Item No. 1: ROLL CALL Item No. 2: PUBLIC NON AGENDA ITEMS (5- minute time limit) Item No. 3: COUNCIL UPDATES Item No. 4: FINAL APPOINTMENTS FOR THE ICE AGE DISCOVERY COMMITTEE (Time: 30 Minutes) ACTION REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: Interview applicants and appoint to the Ice Age Discovery Committee -Russ Forrest Page (TAB) Item No. 5: CONTINUATION OF PUBLIC HEARING RESOLUTION NO. 4, SERIES OF 2011 SPECIAL REVIEW APPLICATIONS. FOR THE ELK CAMP RESTAURANT AND A LIGHTING PLAN FOR NIGHTTIME OPERATIONS TO 12:00 MIDNIGHT; AND FIRST READING ORDINANCE NO. 1 SERIES OF 2011 MINOR PLANNED UNIT DEVELOPMENT (PUD) AMENDMENT TO SNOWMASS MOUNTAIN (Time: 30 Minutes) ACTION REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: Approve, approve with conditions, or deny the resolution for the Special Review requests and the first reading of the ordinance for the related Minor PUD Amendment. -Jim Wahlstrom ...........................Page (TAB) Item No. 6: DISCUSSION OF THE RENEWABLE ENERGY OFFSET PROGRAM (REOP) FEES (Time: 30 Minutes) ACTION REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: Determine if there should be any changes to the current fee structure. -Mark Kittle Page (TAB) 01-18-11 TC Page 2 of 2 Item No. 7: DISCUSSION DEED RESTRICTED FOR SALE EMPLOYEE HOUSING ENFORCEMENT (Time: 30 Minutes) ACTION REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: Review information and provide comments. --Joe Coffey Item No. 11: MANAGER'S REPORT (Time: 10 minutes) --Russell Forrest Page (TAB Item No. 12: AGENDA FOR NEXT TOWN COUNCIL MEETING Page (TAB Item No. 13: APPROVAL OF MEETING MINUTES FOR: Page (TAB Item No. 14: COUNCIL COMMENTS/COMMITTEE REPORTS/CALENDARS Page (TAB) Item No. 15: ADJOURNMENT NOTE: Total time estimated for meeting: Approx 2 hours (excluding items 1-3 and 8 —11) ALL ITEMS AND TIMES ARE TENTATIVE AND SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT FURTHER NOTICE. PLEASE CALL THE OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK AT 923-3777 ON THE DAY OF THE MEETING FOR ANY AGENDA CHANGES. 1 SNOWMASS VILLAGE 2 REGULAR MEETING MINUTES 3 MONDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2010 4 5 CALL TO ORDER: 6 Mayor Boineau called to order the Regular Meeting of the Snowmass Village Town 7 Council on Monday, December 6, 2010 at 4:05 p.m. 8 9 Item No. 1: ROLL CALL 10 11 COUNCIL MEMBERS PRESENT: Mayor Bill Boineau, John Wilkinson, 12 Markey Butler, Jason Haber, and Fred 13 Kucker 14 15 STAFF PRESENT: Russ Forrest, Town Manager; Hunt 16 Walker, Public Works Director; John 17 Dresser, Town Attorney; Marianne 18 Rakowski, Finance Director; Mark 19 Kittle, Chief Building Official; Lesley 20 Compagnone, Public Relations; David 21 Peckler, Transportation Director; and 22 Donna J. Garcia, Deputy Town Clerk 23 24 PUBLIC PRESENT: George Bletsas, Wendle Whiting, Jack 25 Rafferty, George Newman, Bernard 26 Grauer, Bill and Cleo Boehringer, Bob 27 Sirkus, Wayne Floyd, Colleen Doyle, 28 Madeleine Osberger, Katherine Dart, 29 and other Members of the Public 30 interested in today's Agenda items. 31 32 Item No. 2: PUBLIC NON- AGENDA ITEMS 33 Pitkin County Commissioner George Newman 34 Announced that they have a contract sealed on the Droste Property, with a closing on 35 December 29, 2010. He requested a courtesy call from the Town next Monday, 36 December 13th when the Town sets the Mill Levy. 37 38 In response to an inquiry by Council Member Fred Kucker, Newman stated that the 39 purchase price has been reduced by 1 million dollars and explained that the contract is 40 for $17 million and they have acquired an additional 90 acres, which is a parcel that is 41 under conservation easement currently and is adjacent to the Seven Star's property. 42 43 In response to an inquiry from Council Member Markey Butler, Newman stated that 44 things look promising from Go Co. 45 46 Newman reported that the EOTC Budget has been approved by Pitkin County 47 Commissioners, with $250,000 going towards the Feasibility Study and engineering of a 48 pedestrian overpass or underpass at the Airport Business Center. 12- 06 -10tc Page 2 of 10 49 Council Member Wilkinson stated his concern with today's presentation because the 50 way it was structured at the EOTC Meeting was that the money for the study would 51 come out the Entrance to Aspen. 52 53 In response to an inquiry by Mayor Boineau, Newman stated that it would not be 54 impacting the free service and the original approval of this was for three years with 55 a revisit during a three -year time frame. 56 57 Wendle Whiting, Representative of the Hyatt Grand Aspen 58 Stated concern with an issue the Hyatt Grand Aspen is having with the Lot C drop off. 59 He reported that the Aspen Skiing Company (ASC) has been encouraging all lodge and 60 hotel vehicles to drop off at Lot C. The Hyatt has owners with children who attend the 61 Treehouse on a daily basis and the ASC is fine with them dropping off families at this 62 location. It is difficult to drop guests off at Lot C and the Treehouse and creates a lot of 63 confusion as to where guests are going to get picked up in the afternoon. Whiting 64 further reported there aren't any ski racks or benches to sit on; it is a very long walk 65 from Lot C to the gondola or the six pack; and there isn't shelter in case of bad 66 weather. Lastly, Whiting suggested the Town allow a morning shuttle with a route from 67 Lot C to the Base Village location and for the Hyatt to drive into the building and drop off 68 at the Arrival Center so guests can ride the elevators up to Base Village. 69 70 After further discussion, Council requested that staff work on this issue and see if there 71 is a way to put in benches and ski racks. Council Member Haber directed staff to 72 investigate having a shuttle route at this location. Council Member Butler suggested 73 using the Silvertree Hotel's circle as an option. 74 75 Item No. 3: COUNCIL UPDATES 76 Loving Tree Event 77 Council Member Butler invited the community to the Loving Tree event at the Silvertree 78 Hotel, December 7, 2010 at 5:00 p.m. This is a free event, with food, wine, beer, and 79 special service at 5:30 p.m. 80 81 Recreation Center Pool 82 Council Member Wilkinson inquired of staff if the pool at the recreation Center has been 83 fixed? Town Manager stated he would provide Council with an update. 84 85 Music Festival 86 Council Member Kucker reported that he has contacted the Music Festival in an effort to 87 stimulate summer tourism via establishing a summer series in TOSV with music on the 88 mall; he will keep his colleagues posted. 89 90 Denver Museum of Natural Science Visit 91 Mayor Boineau reported that the Town Manager, Susan Hamley, John Wilkinson, Kit 92 Hamby and he drove to Denver to visit DMSN and all are very excited about coming 93 back next spring. 94 12- 06 -10tc Page 3 of 10 95 Item No. 4: DISCUSSION ON ICE AGE NEXT STEPS 96 97 The Town Manager Russ Forrest provided Council with background information 98 regarding the Ice Age Discovery. He stated that on November 15th Dr. Kirk Johnson 99 from the DMNS, Kit Hamby and Doug Throm from the Water and Sanitation District 100 (SW &SD) provided a summary finds. During this meeting Council directed staff to 101 develop a structure for taking the next steps in communicating the story. Staff 102 emphasized the importance of continuing close communication with both the SW &SD 103 and DMNS as plans evolve for construction and excavation of the site next summer. 104 105 Forrest referred the Town Council to the Short -term actions attachment which depicts a 106 set of objectives and composition of the Task Force. It is recommended that this Task 107 Force have seven different positions and would report back to the Town Council for 108 recommendations, considerations and approval of implementations. It is being 109 recommended that the Director of Snowmass Tourism be considered for this position; 110 and the Town Manager could provide close coordination. 111 112 Forrest and Council discussed next steps and determined that on December 7th staff 113 can put out an announcement to the community regarding the application and 114 positions. Staff could then bring the applications to the Town Council meeting on 115 December 20th so they can make their first cut decisions, then on January 3, 2011 116 Council would finalize the Task Force. 117 Council Member Butler thanked the Town Manager and others who have invested 118 countless hours of work on the Ice Age Discovery. Butler further requested that 119 "Whatever we do be done very thoughtfully to get the right people in the right seat, as 120 this is one of the most important discoveries in the United States of this magnitude and 121 we need to do it right." In terms of the Task Force objectives and the Vision, Butler 122 referred to item No. 1, Develop a proposed educational /communication plan (i.e. 123 business plan) for the discovery and stated that she doesn't see the Task 124 Force assigned to creating a vision statement. She requested that some kind of a 125 vision come out of a focus /community group organized through the part -time 126 homeowners and involve the guests. 127 128 Butler further requested that a feasibility study be conducted after the Task Force 129 recommends a vision in terms of the size of the building, how much money we need 130 and who pays, etc. She commented that fundraising skills and capital campaigns are 131 two very different things so the ad needs to include capital campaigns skills. She 132 requested setting a visioning session soon in December during the holiday season and 133 stated that the timeline of December 13 is very aggressive because applications need 134 to be screened. She recommended having first cuts on December 20th. 135 136 Mayor Boineau stated that he believes the Task Force is part of the Visioning Group. He 137 further stated that step C within the proposed next steps is too aggressive and 138 requested that it be push to December 30th as an application deadline date. 139 140 Council Member Haber stated that the visioning could be a part of the Task Force first 12- 06 -10tc Page 4 of 10 141 steps and emphasized that the scope might not be focused on ice age but could include 142 an observatory. He prefers to have two citizen representatives and one Town 143 Representative because of the lean economic times we are experiencing and 144 suggested using the Snowmass Tourism Director and increasing representation from 145 the community would be very positive and there might be some value in responding to 146 the applications that come in with a sharp eye on resources. 147 148 Council Member Kucker stated there has been an outpouring of interest in this issue 149 and the Town Manager has done an admirable job in setting out a place to start. 150 151 After further discussion, Council consensus directed staff to set an application deadline 152 for submissions on December 16th and forward the applications to Council, schedule a 153 Council meeting for interviews on December 20, 2010 for first cuts and conduct final 154 interviews on January 3, 2011 to appoint who will be on the Task Force. Council 155 Member Wilkinson stated his approval of having a full and part -time resident on the 156 Task Force along with Town staff besides Susan Hamley, the Tourism Director. 157 158 Colleen Doyle 159 Ms. Doyle from PTRAB suggested that people who cannot be on the Task Force should 160 compose a sub committee in terms of the timelines. When applying for grants she 161 requested that this person's skills be sharp and have track records with the NSF grants 162 in particular. She suggested that we maintain partnerships geographically because the 163 NSF will be looking for this kind of geographical expansion. She stated importance in 164 keeping the distinction level between formal and in- formal science education separate. 165 Lastly, she reported that she talked to the Mountain Dragon Restaurant and they are 166 ready to set up an Alpine Bank account. Fred Kucker pledged his left -over campaign 167 funds to this account. 168 169 Jack Rafferty 170 Jack Rafferty proprietor of jack@ snowmasstodon.com stated that the time frame being 171 discussed occurs during the holidays and he is wondering if the short -term action plan 172 includes bringing this to light in time for tourism season so guests may participate. 173 174 Kit Hamby 175 Kit Hamby explained that the first agreement between the SW &SD and the DMNS 176 was for a complete casting of one of the mammoths that were found; the second 177 agreement was for casting of any bones. 178 179 Bernie Grauer 180 Bernie Grauer a resident of the Town of Basalt, Colorado commended the Town in 181 taking the leadership in a pro- active role. He offered his assistance by means of his time 182 and a small contribution. He further recognized the SW &SD staff for being so willing to 183 share the discovery with the public on a weekend day. 184 185 Town Manager Russ Forrest clarified the objectives of the Task Force and composition; 186 Council agreed with the staff memo presentation, with an addition of non residents and 187 requested that a sub committee be developed as the process evolves. 12- 06 -10tc Page 5 of 10 188 Kiesha Techau, Tourism Group Coordinator provided the Town Council with a 189 PowerPoint presentation. 190 191 Item No. 5: R.E.O.P. PRESENTATION BY C.O.R.E GRANT AND EDUCATIONAL 192 OPPORTUNITIES 193 194 The Town Manager introduced Katherine Dart from COR.E who also participates on the 195 EAC. Mark Kittle was also present to answer any questions; Kittle has been trying to 196 find a balance between the various interests on REOP. 197 198 Dart provided Council with an update regarding a $4.9Million grant Pitkin County has 199 received that will provide a new educational opportunity for REOP. The purpose of the 200 grant is to facilitate residential energy improvements. CORE suggested that a small 201 portion of funding from these programs be used to directly educate contractors and 202 property owners on REOP. CORE feels that a comprehensive outreach effort will 203 provide property owners with a better understanding of REOP and thereby assist the 204 Town with its successful implementation. Dart stated there is no cost to the Town and 205 CORE will be administering the program. 206 207 Dart reported that CORE will be opening a new Energy Resource Center and will be 208 staffed with two full -time employees. The second component of the Resource Center is 209 to create financing via loans for interested individuals who want to do an energy 210 improvement. In response to an inquiry by Council Member Kucker, Dart stated that 211 they have a solar rebate program and support REOP. She explained that REOP pushes 212 people to do efficiencies first and then engage in renewable improvements. CORE will 213 be launching the program in January 2011 and the Resource Center will officially be 214 opened at that time. 215 216 Council Member Wilkinson stated he is in favor of the proposed educational program. 217 218 Council Member Haber announced that he works for CORE and does not feel that his 219 working relationship will interfere with any decisions he may make as a Council Member 220 regarding this topic. He stated his disapproval in moving forward on December 20th 221 without having an opportunity to reach out and educate the community first. 222 223 Council Member Kucker clarified that he sees this as two different issues including an 224 education outreach, which is a wonderful opportunity for the community and the other 225 issue is a REOP ordinance policy issue and he believes discussions regarding the 226 policy issue on the 20th should proceed with the amendments. 227 228 In response to an inquiry by Council Member Kucker, Mark Kittle stated that the 229 Stonebridge Inn and the Timberline Condominiums have come to agreement allowing 230 them to forgo the mitigation fees until he sees the CO. Kittle stated that the accessibility 231 portion of the ordinance is huge because it allows the applicant to snowmelt a portion of 232 their property. 233 234 After further discussion, Council directed staff to schedule further discussion of this item 12- 06 -10tc Page 6 of 10 235 on January 3, 2011, which will allow appropriate time for the community to become 236 educated with the CORE grant and REOP education. 237 238 Item No 6: FINANCIAL FORMAT UPDATE 239 The Town Manager Russ Forrest reported that this was a request from the previous 240 Council that staff provide them with a simple financial monthly report on the major town 241 funds. Forrest referred Council to the Revenues and Expenditures Budget Report. 242 Mayor Boineau stated unfortunately Council Member Butler had to leave today's 243 meeting and she is the person who requested this information. Russ Forrest reported 244 that he spoke to Council Member Butler concerning the packet information being 245 presented today and she stated that everything looks great! 246 247 In response to an inquiry by Council Member Kucker, Rakowski stated that the 248 unrealized revenues are different between what the Town received and what actually 249 came in. She further explained that all the Town accounts work off an accrual basis for 250 governmental, accounting so if we have it budgeted to be received as revenues and it 251 comes in as sales tax for December 2010, we won't get that revenue in until the 252 beginning of January/February; we approve that back to this year as money that is 253 budget but that we have not received yet. 254 255 Council Member Haber requested that staff provide Council with dialogue pertaining 256 to a percentage indicator, objections or expectations of where we are to date. Rakowski 257 stated that she would be happy to add a section for "notes" and will e-mail the up -dated 258 report to Council 259 260 Council Member Wilkinson stated that he does not want to micro manage the budget 261 process and he does not need this information as a part of the monthly information. 262 Council Member Kucker stated his agreement with Wilkinson's comment. Mayor 263 Boineau requested that staff go a head and e-mail the information and if it starts to be 264 a non -issue it can be discontinued. 265 266 In response to an inquiry by Mayor Boineau, Rakowski stated that staff bonuses are 267 being considered. The Town Manager explained that the Town originally had 268 approximately $65,000 in the budget, which is the equivalent of a 1 bonus somewhere 269 between $600 to $700. 270 271 After further discussion, Mayor Boineau stated his approval of Financial Format Update 272 to allow moving forward with the bonus program of $65,000. Council majority was in 273 favor. Council Member Haber suggested that staff look into other opportunities for staff 274 incentives such as free use of the Recreation Center or some level of use at the facility. 275 276 In response to an inquiry by Council Member Haber, Rakowski stated the FAB 277 requested that staff put together the information regarding which properties go into what 278 nodes specifically at the Snowmass Center, Mall, Base Village, and other locations 279 and staff has developed an analysis for their review. This information has already been 280 e -mail out to the FAB and staff is currently working on responses. 12- 06 -10tc Page 7 of 10 281 282 Item No. 7: RESOLUTION NO. 45, SERIES OF 2010 APPROVAL OF ELECTED 283 OFFICIAL TRANSPORTATION COMMITTEE (EOTC) 284 285 David Peckler provided Council with a brief background on funding for the E.O.T.C. and 286 the Comp Plan update. Staff requests Council's approval of Resolution 45, Series of 287 2010 to appropriate funds for the projects in the 2010 Revised and 2011 Proposed 288 Elected Officials Transportation Committee budgets for the Pitkin County 1/2 Cent Sales 289 and Use Tax. The Town has a balanced budget moving forward and is creating 290 reserves in two categories 1) Entrance to Aspen and 2) Discretionary funding. The 291 budget includes for the No -fare Aspen Snowmass bus services thru April 15, 2013. 292 There is one caveat to approve the $250,000 that was appropriated for design work on 293 the pedestrian bridge connecting the RFTA stop at the ABC and the Airport. It was 294 approved that the funding would be taken from reserves; the City of Aspen is asking for 295 a commitment to repay that over five years using $50,000 per year. He referred Council 296 to the Budget Spread Sheet on packet page 31 thru 2016. He stated that the fund is 297 capable of this kind of a repayment plan subsidizing the No -fare bus service and still 298 generates a surplus and has a cumulative remaining discretionary funding after ETA 299 reimbursement of approximately $800,000. 300 301 Mayor Boineau requested that the Transportation Director provide the new Council 302 Members with an overview of why the three organizations are involved with the EOTC. 303 304 In response to an inquiry by Council Member Haber, Peckler requested that Council use 305 the proposed 2011 Budget and Multi -year plan when making their decision to approve 306 or deny the resolution. 307 308 Council Member Wilkinson stated his concern with today's information because it runs 309 contrary to his understanding, when the EOTC resolution was passed it was his 310 understanding that it would go back to each jurisdiction to pay for the overpass and 311 would come out of the Entrance to Aspen Fund and today's information states it should 312 come out of discretionary funding and not the Entrance to Aspen Funding. Wilkinson 313 further stated there is no way he would have voted in favor of it had it not come out of 314 the Entrance to Aspen Funding. 315 316 There being no further discussion, Mayor Boineau made a motion to approve 317 Resolution No. 45, Series of 2010, seconded by Council Member Kucker. The vote 318 passed with 3 in favor and 1 opposed. Council Member Wilkinson was opposed and 319 Council Member Butler had left the meeting. 320 321 Voting Aye: John Wilkinson, Jason Haber, Fred Kucker, and Mayor Bill Boineau. 322 323 Voting Nay: None. 324 325 Item No. 8: MANAGER'S REPORT 326 327 CAST 12- 06 -10tc Page 8 of 10 328 The Town Manager reported that TOSV will be hosting a Colorado Association of Ski 329 Towns (CAST) meeting on January 27 and 28 at the Stonebridge Inn. This will occur 330 during the X- Games. He stated that colleagues will want to ski either the day of the 27 331 or the afternoon of the 28 and then attend the X- Games. 332 333 Council Member Wilkinson stated that he will be on vacation at this time. 334 335 Receiver Walk Through 336 The Town Manager reported that staff will be walking through Base Village with the 337 Receiver and ASC looking at way finding later this week. 338 339 Town Christmas Party 340 The Town Manager announced that the Holiday Party is scheduled for December 16th 341 at the Town Hall and will be a potluck for employees. 342 343 Moratorium 344 The Town Manager reported that the current moratorium will end this year and a couple 345 of key things have occurred including completion of the Comp Plan and legislation 346 approval. The Housing Policy will be hitting the Planning Commission in January, then 347 presented to Council during the month of February. Chris Conrad, Planning Director and 348 John Dresser, Town Attorney have determined there is no value in continuing the 349 moratorium and there will be some complex housing issues to discuss. 350 351 In response to an inquiry by Council Member Haber, the Town Attorney explained 352 that anything that would exceed measurable limitations would need a variance to move 353 forward and the way one gets to those thresholds is to provide community purposes. 354 The Town Council and staff entered into lengthy discussions regarding what occurred 355 historically at this time. 356 357 After further discussions, Council consensus stated they would like to extend the 358 moratorium for another six months at this time, with the clear understanding for further 359 discussions relating to the Housing Mitigation. The Town Council directed the Town 360 Attorney to make preparations for First Reading for extension of the moratorium on the 361 December 13, 2010 Special Meeting Agenda and Second Reading on the December 362 20, 2010 Agenda. 363 364 Item No. 9: AGENDA FOR NEXT TOWN COUNCIL MEETING 365 The Town Manager stated that staff is adding First Reading of the moratorium and pull 366 the Executive Session, due to the Droste Property purchase from the December 13th 367 Agenda. On the December 20th Agenda staff will add committee assignments, Second 368 Reading of the moratorium extension and pull First Reading of Ordinance 15 discussion 369 of the Renewable Energy Offset Program. 370 371 The Town Manager reported that Council Member Butler has a scheduling conflict for 372 the December 13th meeting, which is scheduled to begin at 4:00 p.m. and is requesting 373 that the meeting start at 2:00 p.m. After further discussion Council consensus directed 12- 06 -10tc Page 9 of 10 374 staff to schedule the start time for the December 13, 2010 meeting at 4:00 p.m. 375 376 Town Attorney John Dresser requested that the Call to Order for the Special Meeting on 377 the Agenda be changed to 4:00 p.m. in case the G.I.D. Board meeting finishes early, 378 this would allow the Special Meeting to begin as soon as the G.I.D. Board Meeting 379 adjourns. Council further directed staff to place an Item on the December 13, 2010 380 G.I.D. Board meeting to discuss the G.I.D. Advisory Board. 381 382 The Town Council and Town Attorney discussed Item Nos. 6, 7 and 8 on the December 383 20th Agenda and clarified that the Council is in a quasi judicial position and cannot 384 discuss these items with the Applicants, since these are considered to be active 385 applications. 386 387 Item No. 10: APPROVAL OF MEETING MINUTES FOR November 1 2010 388 389 Council Member Wilkinson made a motion to approve as amended the Town Council 390 minutes for November 1, 2010 and provided the Deputy Town Clerk Donna J. Garcia 391 with those amendments. The motion was seconded by Mayor Boineau. The vote was 392 approved by 4 in favor and 0 opposed. Council Member Butler had left the meeting. 393 394 Voting Aye: John Wilkinson, Jason Haber, Fred Kucker, and Mayor Bill Boineau. 395 396 Voting Nay: None. 397 Item No. 11: COUNCIL COMMENTS /COMMITTEE REPORTS /CALENDARS 398 399 RFTA Up -date 400 Council Member Wilkinson reported that a RFTA meeting is scheduled for December 9, 401 2010 at 8:30 a.m. He inquired of staff if shuttles are not dropping off at the Base Village 402 garage; they have been driving approximately 200 feet away to drop off at a bay 403 location and the drop off closest to the escalators and elevators are strictly for the RFTA 404 buses. Russ Forrest agreed that this needs to be looked at during the walk through. 405 Lot C Drop off 406 Council Member Wilkinson requested that staff follow -up on the Lot C drop off. Russ 407 Forrest stated that on the way finding walk through this would occur and staff will be 408 investigating a way to provide amenities at that location for a bench and ski racks. 409 410 Ski Company Employee's Parking 411 Council Member Wilkinson stated that he understands ASC employees parking is at the 412 Black Saddle and a number of them have been parking on Town Lots at the Rodeo. 413 Wilkinson requested that staff pin point the parking situation and let Steve Sewell or 414 Susan Cross know if employees are in fact parking where they should not. 415 416 Homestead Bus Stop 417 Mayor Boineau received a phone call from a member of the community asking why the 418 bus stop at the Homestead was moved. The Town Manager explained that buses were 12- 06 -10tc Page 10 of 10 419 just being helpful in picking up at that location and the primary bus stop for that location 420 is at the top where Sinclair connects and is a safer place to stop. 421 422 Council Member Haber stated that the Town has created some confusion relating to 423 parking and directed staff to investigate parking resources within Base Village and 424 related costs to park within the Village. 425 426 Item No. 12: ADJOURNMENT 427 428 There being no further business for discussion, Council Member Kucker made a motion 429 to adjourn the Regular Town Council meeting, seconded by Council Member Haber. 430 The vote passed with 4 in favor and 0 opposed. Council Member Butler had left the 431 meeting early. The meeting adjourned at 8:15 p.m. 432 433 Voting Aye: John Wilkinson, Jason Haber, Fred Kucker, and Mayor Bill Boineau. 434 435 Voting Nay: None. Respectfully Submitted by: Donna J. Garcia, CMC Deputy Town Clerk 436 II Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat 1 New Years Day! HA PP}- NEW BAR 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Town Council Meeting 4:00 p.m. 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 Town Council Retreat Location TBD 3:00 p.m. 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 Martin Luther Town King's Council Birthday Meeting y 4:00 m. 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 L l Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Town Council Meeting 4:00 p.m. 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 Valentines Day 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 Town President's Council Day Meeting 4:00 m. Town Offices Closed 27 28