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10-16-17 Town Council Packet.pdfTown Council Monday, October 16, 2017 4:00 PM 130 Kearns Road Council Chambers Agenda 1.CALL TO ORDER - Mayor Butler called to order the Regular Meeting of the Snowmass Village Town Council 2.ROLL CALL 3.PROCLAMATIONS AND PRESENTATIONS 3.A.Aspen Skiing Company Update General Business Update - Mike Kaplan New Marketing Campaign - Christian Knapp On Mountain Improvements - Steve Sewell Limelight Hotel, Discovery Center, Sky Cab and Transit Center Introduction COO of Hospitality - Alinio Azevedo Introduction of Managing Director for Limelight Hotels - Richard Stettner Agenda Item Summary Aspen Ski Company Update Page 1.pdf 4.PUBLIC COMMENT - This section is set aside for the Town Council to LISTEN to comments by the public regarding items that do not otherwise appear on this agenda. Generally, the Town Council will not discuss the issue and will not take an official action under this section of the agenda. ( Five Minute Time Limit) 5.CONSENT AGENDA - These are items where all conditions or requirements have been agreed to or met prior to the time they come before the Council for final action. A Single Public Hearing will be opened for all items on the Consent Agenda. These items will be approved by a 1 Town Council Page - 2 single motion of the Council. The Mayor will ask if there is anyone present who has objection to such procedure as to certain items. Members of the Council may also ask that an item be removed from the consent section and fully discussed. All items not removed from the consent section will then be approved. A member of the Council may vote no on specific items without asking that they be removed from the consent section for full discussion. Any item that is removed from the consent agenda will be placed on the regular agenda. 5.A.Draft Agendas Draft Agendas Page 3.pdf 5.B.Minutes for Approval 09-18-17 Minutes for Approval Page 6.pdf 10-02-17 Minutes for Approval Page 11.pdf 6.PUBLIC HEARINGS - QUASI-JUDICIAL HEARINGS - Public Hearings are the formal opportunity for the Town Council to LISTEN to the public regarding the issue at hand. For land use hearings the Council is required to act in a quasi-judicial capacity. When acting as a quasi-judicial body, the Council is acting in much the same capacity as a judge would act in a court of law. Under these circumstances, the judicial or quasi-judicial must limit its consideration to matters which are placed into evidence and are part of the public record. The Council must base their decision on the law and the evidence presented at the hearing. 1)Staff Presentation. Staff will present an overview of the project, comments and reports received from review agencies, and offer a recommendation. 2)Applicant Presentation. The petitioner is asked to present the proposal. Presentations should be brief and to the point and cover all of the main points of the project. 3)Public Input (limit of 5 minutes per person). People speaking should step up to the microphone and state their name and address. Speakers should be to the point and try not to repeat the points of others have made. 4)Applicant Rebuttal. The Mayor will ask for the applicant’s rebuttal. During this brief time, the applicant should answer the questions raised by the public. 5)The hearing is then closed to public comments. 6)Questions from the Council. After a Council member is recognized by the Mayor, they may ask questions of the staff, the applicant. 7)Make a motion. A member of the Town Council will make a motion on the issue. 8)Discussion on the motion. The Town Council may discuss the motion. 9)Vote. The Town Council will then vote on the motion. 7.POLICY/LEGISLATIVE PUBLIC HEARINGS 2 Town Council Page - 3 8.ADMINISTRATIVE REPORTS 8.A.RESOLUTION NO. 36, SERIES OF 2017 - A RESOLUTION APPROVING THE SNOWMASS ARTS ADVISORY BOARD'S (SAAB) ARTS STRATEGIC PLAN Agenda Item Summary Reso 36 ARTS Strategic Plan Page 23.pdf Draft Strategic Plan Page 28.pdf Draft Strategic Plan Appendix Page 45.pdf Breckenridge Art Master Plan Page 119.pdf 8.B.RESOLUTION NO. 35, SERIES OF 2017 - A RESOLUTION APPROVING THE RECOMMENDED SNOWMASS ARTS ADVISORY BOARD (SAAB) ARTS ACQUISITION POLICY Agenda Item Summary Reso 35 Arts Acquisition Page 179.pdf 8.C.MARKETING, GROUP SALES AND SPECIAL EVENTS BOARD - BUDGET DISCUSSION Agenda Item Summary Tourism Budget Page 204.pdf 8.D.BUDGET DISCUSSION Agenda Item Summary Budget Disc Page 205.pdf 9.TOWN COUNCIL REPORTS AND ACTIONS - Reports and Updates 10.EXECUTIVE SESSION 10.A.EXECUTIVE SESSION Agenda Item Summary Executive Session Page 206.pdf 11.ADJOUNMENT 3 Town of Snowmass Village Agenda ltem Summary DATE OF MEETING October 16,2017 AGENDA ITEM: Aspen Ski Company Update PRESENTED BY: Mike Kaplan, Christian Knapp, Steve Sewell, Aspen Skiing Company BACKGROUND: The Aspen Skiing Company provides and annual update to the Town Council each year and the topics they will be discussing include the following items: . General Business Update . New Marketing Campaign . On Mountain lmprovements o Limelight Hotel . Discovery Center . Sky Cab . Transit Center . lntroduction of new COO of Hospitality and Managing Director for Limelight Hotels FINANCIAL IMPACT: N/A APPLICABILITY TO COUNCIL GOALS & OBJECTIVES: N/A COUNCIL OPTIONS: Listen to presentation and provide feedback. STAFF RECOMMENDATION: N/A 10-16-17 TC Packet Page 1of207 4 ATTACHMENTS: N/A 10-16-17 TC Packet Page 2 of 207 5 DRAFT 2017 Agenda ltems o Regular Meetings begin at 4:00 p.m. unless otherwise noted o Work Sessions begin at 4:00 p.m. and aim to end at 5:00 p.m. o The dates on which agenda items are listed are only a best approximation. Agenda items are added to this list as they arise. Agenda items may well be moved to different meeting dates. Agendas are generally not finalized until the Thursday prior to the meeting. o ln addition to agenda items, this document also lists expected absences of Town Council members. ln compliance with section 2-49 of the municipal code, once the consent agenda is approved, the absences noted will be considered to have received the prior approval necessary of the majority of the Council for members to be absent from meetings. Thur. Oct 19!h - EOTC Meetins - Pitkin Countv Mon. Nov 6!! - Regular Meeting o Budget adoption - CK/MR - Public Hearing o Road Mill Levy Fund - Public Hearing o Review Building 6 LOI o Enclave Public Hearing ?? Mon. Nov 13o - Work Session o Review electronic public feedback tool regarding marijuana? o Update on RFTA ITSP (from their consultants) o Update on trail easements/ allowed uses Mon. Nov 20s - Reeular Meeting - Shenk out o Reso setting 2018 TC Meetint Dates Mon. Dec 4Ih - Regular Meeting Mon. Dec 1llh - Special Meeting Mon. Dec 18!h - Resular Meetine r SAAB Recommendation on Sculpture Name -TE 2018 TENT MEETING DATES N OT APPROVED BY TOWN COUNCIL Tues. Jan 2d- Resular Meetins o Reso - Designating PN Boards o Reso - Appointing various Board Members Mon. Jan 8!! - Work Session Tues. Jan 16!h - Regular Meeting Mon. Feb. 5tr - Reeular Meeting Mon. Feb 12!E - Work Session 10-1 6-17 TC Packet Page 3 of 207 2017 Meetines 6 DRAFT 20L7 Agenda ltems Tues. Feb 20$ - Resular MeetinE Mon. Mar 5t - ReFular Meeting Mon. Mar 12t - work session Mon. Mar 19& - Regular Meetins Mon. Apr 2qd - ReEular Meetinq Mon. Apr 9s - Work Session Mon. Apr 16!I - Resular Meeting Mon. Mav /b - Reeular Meeting 10-16-17 TC Packet Page 4of207 7 DRAFT 2017 Agenda ltems rk Sessions or Other Meetin s uested Town. Update on Daly Town Home regarding retaining wall. How did they do that? 1)new web assels, transit and recreation. EnvironmentalDiscussions/Approaches: 1) Meet with EAB and prioritize Sustainability goals 2) update on Solar and Renewable Energy for the Town of Snowmass Village 3) Discuss the Climate Reality Project 4) overview of the Re-Op Fund, its uses and successes. 5) a presentation of the Energy Navigator from the EAB/PW 6) discussion regarding how to move energy conservation efforts beyond town government to a community wide effort enabling individuals to help make progress 7) a presentation from CORE on the high five program. Housing strategy: 1)discuss a potential regional approach to aging in place/ work with Pitkin county and county senior services- 2) find ways to encourage/ allow individuals to move from larger homes lo smaller homes 3) meeting other needs- such as specific housing for town employees 4) update on current housing construction project 5) update on meeting the overall housing strategy. Action on Necessary IGA's or other documents regarding "school property tax" distribution. (expected) Base Village PUD update / review. Continued discussion use of building 6. Continued discussion on Comprehensive Plan consideration and adoption. A discussion on potentially allowing camping (RV or other) within the Village. E-Bike & Trail Easement Restrictions Update. An update from CORE on their High 5 Program. An update on the Trails program, potentially separating uses, improving etiquette, and upcoming projects. Upcoming Land Use Hearings 1) Base Village possible amendments to PUD- expected to require a 1't and 2id reading 2) Sonnenblick Minor PUD Application 3) Enclave PUD Applicaton 10-16-17 TC Packet Page 5 o'f 207 8 L 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 L2 r.3 L4 15 16 SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL JOINT MEETING WITH THE PLANNING COMMISSION REGULAR MEETING MINUTES SEPTEMBER 18,2017 1 ) CALL TO ORDER Mayor Pro Tem Sirkus called to order the Regular Meeting of the Snowmass Village Town Council on Monday, September 18, 2017 at 4:02 p.m. A complete live recording and/or audio of this meeting can be found at www.tosv.com under Town Council Meetings. This will be archived indefinitely allowing you to view at any time. 2) ROLL CALL COUNCIL MEMBERS PRESENT: Bob Sirkus, Bill Madsen, Tom Goode and Alyssa Shenk COUNCIL MEMBERS ABSENT: Markey Butler Clint Kinney, Town Manager, John Dresser, Town Attorney, Travis Elliott, Assistant to the Town Manager, Anne Martens, Public Works Director, Kathy Fry, Human Resource Director, Jim Wahlstrom, Senior Planner, and Brian McNellis, Planner L9 PUBLIC PRESENT:Greg Rulon, Jami Lee Ferraro, Toni Kronberg, Drew Detrick, B.J. Krabacher and other members of the public interested in today's Agenda items. 20 2L 3) JOLNT NIEETING WITH PLANNING COMMISSION A. Snowmass Center Redevelopment, PUD Sketch Plan - Joint Meeting with Planning Commission Brian McNellis, Planner stated that the applicant for the Snowmass Center Redevelopment is requesting Sketch Plan review of a Major Planned Unit development (PUD) Application which not only includes the Snowmass Center but also the surrounding areas of the Faraway Ranch North subdivision. Pursuant to the Snowmass L7 18 STAFF PRESENT: 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 10-1 6-17 TC Packet Page 6 of 207 9 29 30 31 32 33 14 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 51 58 59 60 61 62 53 64 65 56 67 58 59 09-'18-'17 TC Minutes Page 2 of 5 Village Municipal Code Section 'l64-5-320 (c) (4), the sole purpose oftoday'sjoint meeting is for both the Planning Commission and Town Council to jointly hear the applicant's initial presentation of the applicalion by the applicant. This presentation is limited to this one meeting and after this meeting it will go to the Planning Commission for its Sketch Plan review. John Dresser, Town Attorney reminded the Council and Planning Commission this is not a discussion item but to listen to the presentation only. ROLL CALL: Planning Commission those present: Jim Gustafson, Tom Fridstein, Doug Faurer, Teri Hooper, Patrick Keelty At this time Council Member Shenk recused herself from this discussion as her husband is lhe Attorney representing the applicant. Shenk also asked that in the future when this item is being discussed it be placed on the end of the agenda. Brian McNellis, Planner explained that the applicant is requesting Sketch Plan review of a Major Planned Unit Development (PUD) Application for the Snowmass Center and su.rounding areas ofthe Faraway Ranch North subdivision to include 20,160 square feet of additional commercial/office space, 10950 square feet of restricted housing and 62 free market residential units. Pursuant to the Snowmass Village Municipal Code Section 16A-5-320 (c) (4), the sole purpose oftoday'sjoint meeting is for both the Planning Commission and the Town Council to jointly hear the applicant's initial presentation of the application by the applicant. The presentation by the applicant is all that will occur at the joint meeting and the presentation is limited to this one meeting. The Planning Commission shall then conduct its Sketch Plan review of the application and upon receipt of the Planning Commissions resolution, Town Council will undertake their Sketch Plan review. Mike Tunte and Richard Shaw presented the PowerPoint presentation and the Managing Partners of the property were also in attendance at today's meeting. 4) PUBLIC COMMENT Toni Kronberg a resident of the Roaring Fork Valley gave kudos to the Town of Snowmass Village for the Snowmass Balloon Festival and she was so impressed with the families that attended. Shewould like to see d inosaur shaped swimming pool al Base Village to this untapped market. Shewould also like to see Ariel connectivity to the Snowmass Center from Base Village. B. Winter Parking Plan 2017-2018 70 71 10-16-17 TC Packet Page 7 o'f 207 5) CONSENT AGENDA A. Draft Agendas 10 12 73 74 75 76 77 7a 79 80 81 82 83 a4 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 09-18-'17 TC Minutes Page 3 of 5 Mayor Pro Tem Sirkus spoke to an email received from the Board for the Metro district which asked that the Winter Parking Plan be pulled out of the consent agenda and put it on the consent agenda for October 2, 2017. Consensus by Council was to move it to the October2,20'17 meeting. Council Member Shenk had some questions to language in the agreement. She asked for clarification on some of the language, where is states without prior approval, we should define somewhere, who's approval based on who owns what lot. Tom Goode made the motion to approve those items on today's consent agenda except for the Winter Parking Plan which will be moved to the October 2, 20'17 Town Council Meeting. Alyssa Shenk seconded the motion. The motion was approved by a vote of4 in favor to 0 opposed. 96 A, RESOLUTION NO, 32. SERIES OF 2017 - A RESOLUTION ACTING ON 97 APPLICANT'S REQUESTED SUBDIVISION EXEMPTION TO ADJUST THE 93 COMMON LOT LINE BETWEEN LOT 'I, BASE VILLAGE AND THE 99 LICHENHEARTH PROPERTY 100 101 102 103 704 105 106 707 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 Voting Aye: Bob Sirkus, Bill Madsen, Alyssa Shenk, and Tom Goode Jim Wahlstrom. Senior Planner introduced the Resolution No. 32, Series of 2017 a resolution acting on applicant's requested subdivision exemption to adjust the common lot line between Lot 1, Base Village and the Lichenharth Property. Joe Krabacher attorney for Base Village and Mike Hoffman attorney for the Lichenhearth Condominium Association were available to answer questions and comments from Council. l\rayor Pro Tem Sirkus asked that Krabacher explain the entire process and show the lot line exchange on the larger map. Bill Madsen made the motion to approve Resolution No. 32, Series of 2017 Lot Line between Lot 1, Base Village and the Lichenhearth property. Tom Goode seconded the motion. The motion was approved by a vote of 4 in favor to 0 opposed. Page 8 of 207 She also questioned the signs at Brush Creek and 82 number 12 states they "will" post information signs for the lot's that are full, this should also be done at Brush Creek and 82 so people can park at the lntercept Lot. This language should be clarified. She asked that is just be worded and clarified within the document for next year. Voting Aye: Bob Sirkus, Bill Madsen, Alyssa Shenk, and Tom Goode. Voting Nay: None. 6) PUBLIC HEARINGS - QUASI.JUDICIAL HEARINGS 10-16-17 TC Packet 11 115 117 118 09-18-'17 TC Minutes Page 4 of 5 Voting Nay; None. 7) POLICY/LEGISLATIVE PUBLIC HEAEINqS None at this time 8) ADMINISTRATIVE REPORTS119 120 127 127 121 124 t25 726 721 124 179 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 A. Reviewand Approval of Formatto Request Letters oflnterestfor Building 6 Clint Kinney, Town Manager stated that through the December 21, 2015 Base Village PUD approval, the Town accepted the dedication of (the future) Building 6 as part of the necessary community purpose requirement. The approval of the PUD did not specify or otherwise require a specific use ofthe building. He spoke to a format to Request Letters of lnterest for Building 6. Building 6 should not be delayed due to lhe construction of Building 7 and 8. This process r,/vill allowall ideas flow forward and maybe find some other opportunities and partnership for this building. The letter of interest is open to everyone and Snowmass Discovery should be submitting ideas also. Undertaking this process will allow the Town to receive feedback, ideas and input from a variety of sources. After a lengthy discussion, the Town Council provided language changes for the letter under the introduction portion, submission requirements, proposed use of the building (Section 2) and under the section basic information about the site. Mayor ProTem asked about the review committee requirements and guidelines. Clint Kinney, Town Manager stated this would be determined by the Town Council. Council also discussed the time and the deadline date. B. Review of Mariiuana Legalization Community Feedback Tool Clint Kinney, Town Manager noted that staff was directed to begin designing a tool to collect community feedback after the Town Council's last work session about marijuana in Snowmass Village. The questionnaire was designed to do so in an organized and methodicalway and it has protections in place to limit responses to one person and require a valid name and address. Council lrember Shenk would like to see the types of licenses listed in the questionnaire under question number one including retail, medical, none or allthe above. The survey is not anonymous and Councilexpress concerns with this. John Dresser, Town Attorney will do some research regarding the CORA Law before Town Council decides to ask for names on the survey. Mayor Pro Tem mentioned the car race and how fun it was to watch them throughout the village. He also spoke about Mark Fuller and the letter from RWAPA regarding the mussel inspection program. 140 741 742 143 '144 145 746 141 148 149 150 151 152 153 L54 Page 9 of 207 9) TOWN COUNCIL REPORTS AND ACTIONS 10-16-17 TC Packet 12 161 t62 155 156 r57 158 159 160 163 t64 165 166 L67 168 169 L70 777 09-18-17 TC Minutes Page 5 of 5 Council Member Goode and Madsen spoke to the ETOC meeting the week before. Madsen also thought the car race was very successful and fun. Council Member Shenk attend the RFTA Board meeting for Mayor Butler and she will be distributing some information on the lntegrated transportation system plan with the costs and funding options. Shenk also commented on the wonderfuljob the Fire Department did with the 9/1 1 event and the greal BBQ after the walk. 1O) ADJOURNMENT At 7:02 p.m. Tom Goode made the motion to adjourn the Regular Meeting of the Snowmass Village Town Council on Monday, September 18,2017. Bill Madsen seconded the motion. The motion was approved by a vote of 4 in favor to 0 opposed. Voting Aye: Bob Sirkus, Bill Madsen, Alyssa Shenk, and Tom Goode. Voting Nay: None. This set of minutes was approved by the Town of Snowmass Village Town Council at their Regular Meeting on, Monday, October '16,20'17. r7s Submitted By, t74 L76 L77 t78 L79 Rhonda B. Coxon, CMC Town Clerk 10-16-17 TC Packet Page 10 of207 772 t73 13 1 2 3 4 5 5 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 17 18 19 20 27 22 23 SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL JOINT MEETING WITH THE PLANNING COMMISSION REGULAR MEETING MINUTES ocToBER 02,2017 1) CALL TO ORDER Mayor Butler called to order the Regular Meeting of the Snowmass Village Town Council on Monday October 2nd, 20'17 al4.O2 p.m. A complete live recording of this meeting can be found at WUUltqltLCp!0 under Town Council Meetings. This will be archived indefinitely allowing you to view at any time. At this time the N4ayor asks for everyone to take a few moments to pray for families and those injured in the Las Vegas tragedy. 2) ROLL CALL Markey Butler, Bob Sirkus, Tom Goode, Alyssa Shenk and Bill lvladsen COUNCIL MEMBERS All council members were present ABSENT: COUNCIL MEMBERS PRESENT: STAFF MEMBERS PRESENT: Clint Kinney, Town Manager, John Dresser, Town Attorney, Travis Elliott, Assistant to the Town Manager, David Peckler, Transit Director, Julie Ann Woods, Community Development Director, Jim Wahlstrom, Senior Planner, Marianne Rakowski, Finance Director and Barbara Peckler. Admin. Asst. PUBLIC PRESENT 3) PROCLAMATIONS AND PRESENTATIONS CALL TO ORDER PLANNING COMMISSION Jamie Knowlton called to order the Joint meeting of the Planning Commission with the Snowmass Village Town Council on Monday October 2, 2017 at 4i04 p.m. 10-16-17 TC Packet Tony Neidenbach, Mel Blumenthal, Luke VaArsdale, Erika Gibson, Barnett Davis, Patrick Rawley, Mike Hoffman, Emzy Veazy lll, BJ Adams and other members of the public interested in today's Agenda ltems Page 11 of 207 14 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 ROLL CALL PLANNING COMMISSION: PLANNING COMMISSIONERS PRESENT: Teri Hooper, Patrick Keelty, Jim Gustafson, Jamie Knowlton, Doug Faurer, Tom Fridstein, Jim Anathan PLANNING COTVII\iIISSIONERS ABSENT: All Planning Commission members were present. 3.A JOINT MEETING WITH TOWN COUNCIL AND PLANNING COMMISSION FOR: RESOLUTION NO. 39, SERIES OF 2017 - A RESOLUTION OF THE TOWN COUNCIL PROVIDING DIRECTION, IDENTIFYING SPECIFIC COMPONENTS, AREAS OF THE CODE, OR CORE ISSUES FOR THE PLANNING COMMISSION'S REVIEW OF THE MAJOR PUD AMENDMENT PRELIMINARY PLAN APPLICATION FOR THE SONNENBLICK CONDOMINIUMS. Brian McNellis, Town Planner introduced the initial presentation to Council for the proposed Sonnenblick Condominiums Major PUD Amendment application. Specific components or project elements and areas of the code or core issues were outlined and presented to Council. Staffs recommendation to Council was to direct the Planning Commission to focus on these issues. Currently the application is in the review stage so this is the time for Council to ask questions or voice any concerns they may have. A draft Resolution has been prepared for Council's review. The Planning Commission will continue this discussion at their next meeting on October 18rh, 2017. Patrick Rawley and Barnett Davis representing the Sonnenblick Homeowners provided a PowerPoint presentation outlying their proposed changes. At a previous presentation to the Planning Commission, the PC made six (6) recommendations to the developer concerning areas they would like to be addressed. With this new proposal the developer has addressed all six (6) conditions and provided information as to how each was handled. The slides depicted current conditions and views along with simulated slides of future views and conditions to help Council fully understand the project. Council was encouraged to do a site visit to the Sonnenblick so they would have a better understanding of the proposed project. A few of the main issues the applicant addressed were; creating a centralwalkway, easements(fire-sewer-water-stream), drainage issues and neighboring complex's view changes. 10-16-17 TC Packet 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 10-02-17 Joint TC and PC meeting Minutes Page 2 of 8 Page 12 of 207 15 ln summary the project will consist of building six (6) two car enclosed garages with addilional storage space. All questions, clarifications and concerns from Town Council and Planning Commission were answered by the applicant. Mayor Butler, asked Brian, Town Planner if he felt that within the 8 listed directions from staff for the Planning Commission to focus on, does it adequately cover the issue of the sewer line easement for Snowmass Water and Sanitation. Julie Ann, Community Development Director, stated that the applicant would have to provide proof that all conditions of Snowmass Water and San have been met to the Building Department, but they will add this to the draft Resolution to make sure. Mayor Butler asked for any public comment, none were received. Bob Sirkus made the motion to approve a Resolution 39, Series of 2017 Town Council providing direction, identifying specific components, areas of the code, and or core issues for the Planning Commission's review of the Major PUD Amendment Preliminary Plan application for the Sonnenblick condominiums. Alyssa Shenk, seconded the motion. The motion was carried by a vote of 4 in favor to 1 opposed. Voting Aye:Markey Butler, Bob Sirkus, Alyssa Shenk and Bill Madsen Tom GoodeVoting Nay: Jamie Knowlton made the motion to adjourn the Planning Commission Meeting. Jim Gustafson seconded the motion. The motion was carried by a vote of 7 in favor to 0 opposed. Regular Town Council Meeting now continued 4) PUBLIC COMMENT Emzy Yezy,lll stated his opinion on funding/financingtor JAZZ ASPEN Snowmass, Snowmass Summer Free Concerts and entertainment in local restaurant. 5) CONSENTAGENDA 5.A 09-05-17 Town Council Minutes Correct double negative on Line '181 and 1 82 10-02-17 Joint TC and PC meeting Minutes Page 3 of 8 10-16-17 TC Packet Page 13 of207 53 64 65 66 67 68 69 7l 72 71 74 75 76 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 a7 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 702 103 704 105 106 5.8 WINTER PARKING PLAN Questions concerning the rate for winter parking in the garage and other concerns were asked by Council and clarified by staff. With fewer parking spaces available this winter staff was asked if they would talk to the entities in charge of providing a digital sign at the entry to Snowmass providing guests 16 707 108 109 110 111 772 113 tL4 115 115 L17 118 719 120 tzt 122 123 724 t25 L26 L27 L28 r29 130 131 732 133 134 135 135 137 138 139 140 L4! 142 143 r44 145 L46 L47 148 149 150 with information of the status of available parking in the Village. Staff will follow up with this request. Bob Sirkus made the motion to approve those items listed on today's Consent Agenda with the modifications as discussed. Tom Goode, seconded the motion. The motion was carried by a vote of 5 in favor to 0 opposed. Voting Aye: Markey Butler, Bob Sirkus, Tom Goode, Alyssa Shenk and Bill Madsen Voting Nay: None 6) PUBLIC HEARINGS - QUASI-JUDICIAL HEARINGS Mayor Butler opened the continued Public Hearing from September 51h,2017, regarding a Major PUD Amendment Preliminary Plan application for the Enclave. 6.A CONTINUATION OF A PUBLIC HEARING REGARDING A MAJOR PUD AMENDMENT PRELIMINARY PLAN APPLICATION FOR THE ENCLAVE Jim Wahlstrom, Senior Planner provided background information on what has occurred since this application was originally submitted. On April 3rd the developer met in a joint meeting with the Town Council and Planning Commission, then followed up with the Planning Commission for 4 additional review meetings. Since those meetings the developer has provided 4 amendments to the application addressing the Planning Commission's recommendations. Jim outlined in a comparison matrix the major categories as to the existing condition, proposed conditions and difference. At this time it is the staff's opinion that the applicant has not adequately addressed mitigation treatments to demonstrale compliance with the municipal code's review standards related to civil and drainage requirements, nor provided additional information to sufficiently address all of the effects from the addition of a restricted "RO" unit into the mix. Jim Gustafson and Randy Henry from Z Architects and Mike Hoffman, Association Attorney made a presentation on behalf of the Enclave Homeowners Association. They covered in detail the eleven (1 1) primary concerns they felt the Town had with the application. They are as follows: 1. Build-out Chart a. Exceptional Circumstance b. Community Purpose 2. View lmpacts & Heights 3. Setbacks 4. Civil Engineering a. Drainage lssues 10-02-17 Joint TC and PC meeting Minutes Page 4 of 8 Page 14 of20710-16-17 TC Packet 17 151 752 153 t54 155 1.56 L57 158 159 160 767 762 163 764 165 166 167 158 769 770 t7t 772 173 774 775 176 177 778 179 180 181 782 183 784 185 186 L87 188 189 190 797 t92 193 194 b. Fire Truck Access 5. Parking & Transportation a. Parking Management Plan b. Transportation Access c. Wood Road Sidewalk 6. Solid Waste Disposal 7. Easements 8. Landscaping (Community Purpose) 9. Shadow Studies 10. Construction Management Plan & Environmental Quality 1 1."Conference Facility" 't2.. Mayor Butler now opened the Public Hearing for public comment. Lucas Van Arsdale and Erika Gibson Attorneys representing various Crestwood property owners, outlined in a PowerPoint presentation their objections to the Enclave proposed development. Before they submitted the objection letter they did try to reach a mutually agreeable solution between the Enclave and their clients. Every attempt was made to come to a consensus but no resolution has been reached. They are now recommending to the Town Council to 1) deny the Application, because the proposed development does not meet the code criteria for maximum buildout variance, and (2) require the Enclave, if it wishes to proceed with its application, to evaluate the degree to which its compliance with the code criteria would improve if the height of its proposed new building was reduced from three stories to two. Michael Hoffman, Attorney for the Enclave and Jim Gustafson, Z Architects were allowed time to provide a rebuttal to the objection statements made by Mr. Van Arsdale Mayor Butler asked for any further public comment. None at this time. Council comments were now taken. The issue of the additional information needed concerning the "RO" unit before the application is complete was brought up. Suggestion was made by Council for the applicant to make a formal amendment to the application with the new information and continue the Public Hearing. Members of the Town Council all agreed with this suggestion. The continuation of a public hearing regarding a Major PUD Amendment Preliminary Plan application for the Enclave will be set for November 6th, 2017 at 4:00 PM with the option for continuation. 7) POLTCY/LEGtSLAT|VEpUBLtCHEAR|NGS None 10-16-17 TC Packet Page 15 of 207 10-02-17 Joint TC and PC meeting Minutes Page 5 of 8 18 195 196 L97 198 L99 200 20t 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 2L0 211 212 2L3 214 275 276 277 2t8 2t9 220 221 222 223 224 225 ))R 227 228 229 230 231 232 233 234 235 236 237 234 8) ADMINISTRATIVE REPORTS 8.A BUDGET INTRODUCTION Clint, Town Manager submitted to Council the proposal for the 2018 budget. With Revenues over $30 million and Expenditures $31 million, Clint would like to make sure Council is comfortable with the proposed budget and that Council never feels rushed. ln preparing the 2018 proposed budget staff has maintained a fiscally conservative approach and will make adjustments in 2018 if needed to maintain a balanced budget. As part of the conservative approach, staff took several additional steps and made several assumptions, which are outlined in the packet. Several other financing, tax rate and service rate issues were also outlined in the proposed budget. Clint also wanted to point out the specific actions called for in the budget designed to ensure the Council is meeting its desired goals. Recommendations from the Financial Advisory Board have been included in this presentation. This discussion will continue at the next meeting of Town Council on October gth,2017 Council had comments, questions for staff at this time. Mayor Butler, asked for a comparison on staff benefits with other municipalities to be available at the next discussion concerning the budget. 9) TOWN COUNCTL REPORTS AND ACTIONS 9.A DISCUSSION ON FUTURE DRAFT AGENDA ITEMS Friday October 13rh Special Meeting approved to move start time to 9:30 instead of 9:00 AM and end at 1:30 PM Clint Kinney, Town Manager stated normally the Draft Agendas would have been included in the Consent Agenda but due to some potential to have a discussion on how Council would like to discuss Building 6 and how Council would like to move forward with this discussion, it was decided to include it in the Town Council Reports and Actions. Bob Sirkus, Council Member started the discussion noting that with the additional information that was received by East West last week Council might want to consider a second option and list Building 6 for sale ASAP. With so many uncertainties it might be beneficial to have the Building listed while things get worked out. Council members continued the discussion with each Council members providing their opinion on possible dates for making this a formal topic of discussion and reasons they had for selling or not selling the building. At this time no formal LOI applications have been received back but a lot have been sent out and staff is expecting several before the deadline of October 31st. Consensus was reached by the Council members to schedule a formal discussion at the November 6th Regular Town Council Meeting. At that time Council will be provided with all the LOI proposals received. Council will now be better informed to discuss all options available such as do they want to move forward with the potential sale or do 10-02-17 Joint TC and PC meeting Minutes Page 6 of 8 10-16-17 TC Packet Page 16 of 207 19 239 240 241 242 243 244 245 245 247 248 249 250 251 252 2s3 254 255 255 257 258 259 260 267 262 263 264 265 266 267 268 269 270 271 272 273 274 275 276 277 278 279 280 28L they want to condominiumize any portion of space and they can receive community input at this time. Bill Madsen, Council Member would like lo see on a future agenda an updated Trails report so Council can talk about future trails and any separation of hiking, biking and horseback riding. Clint Kinney, Town Manager is working with the POSTR committee to make sure they are up to speed with Council concerns, once they are ready they will present their findings to the Town Council. Tom Goode, Council Member would like to schedule in Snowmass a presentation from CORE explaining the High Five Program concerning Energy efficiency. Staff will contact CORE and see if there is a time that works with them as well as Council. 1O) EXECUTIVE SESSION At 8:50 PM Town Council will now meet in Executive Session pursuant to C.R.S. 24-6-402(4) and Snowmass Village Municipal Code Section 2-45(c), to specifically discuss one item: a) Personnel matters, except if the employee who is the subject of the session has requested an open meeting, pursuant to C.R.S. 24-6-402(4)(f)(l) and Snowmass Village Municipal Code Section 2-45(c)(6); Provided, there is an affirmative vote of twothirds of the quorum present at this meeting to hold an Executive Session and for the sole purpose of considering item (a) above. Provided further, that no adoption of any proposed policy, position, resolution, regulation, or formal action shall occur at this Executive Session. Bill Madsen, made the motion to convene to executive session, Bob Sirkus, seconded the motion. The motion was carried by a vote of 5 in favor to 0 opposed. Voting Aye: Markey Butler, Bob Sirkus, Tom Goode, Alyssa Shenk and Bill Madsen, Voting Nay: None At 9:30 PM Bob Sirkus, made the motion to approve reconvening the Town Council Regular Meeting on Monday October znd, 2017, Alyssa Shenk seconded the motion. The motion was canied by a vote of 5 in favor to 0 opposed. Voting Aye: Markey Butler, Bob Sirkus, Tom Goode, Alyssa Shenk and Bill Madsen Voting Nay: None 11)ADJOUNMENT At 9:33 PM '10-02-17 Joint TC and PC meeting Minutes Page 7 of I 10-16-17 TC Packet Page 17 of 207 20 282 283 284 285 286 287 288 289 290 29L 292 293 294 29s 296 297 298 299 300 301 Bob Sirkus made the motion to adjourn the Regular Meeting of the Snowmass Village Town Councilon Monday, October 2nd,2017, Tom Goode seconded the motion. The motion was approved by a vote of 5 in favor to 0 opposed. Voting Aye: Markey Butler, Bob Sirkus, Alyssa Shenk, Bill Madsen, and Tom Goode. Voting Nay: None. This set of minutes was approved by the Town Council at their Regular Meeting on Monday, October 16th, Submitted By, Barbara Peckler, Admin. Asst. 10-02-17 Joint TC and PC meeting Minutes Page 8 of 8 10-16-17 TC Packet Page 18 of 207 21 Town of Snowmass Village Agenda ltem Summary DATE OF MEETING: October 16,2017 AGENDA ITEM: Resolution No. 36, Series of 2017 (Revised) Considering the Adoption of the SAAB Arts Strategic Plan PRESENTED BY: Julie Ann Woods, FAI LA, Community Development DirectorCP/M BACKGROUND: At the Town Council's August 2lstmeeting, the Arts Shategic Plan (ASP) was reviewed and discussed. ltems request by Town Council for further information and clarification were the following: . Distinguish existing SAAB members from former members in Acknowledgements (added) . Add more information on the Colorado Creative lndustries program (added under F. Grants, page 1 3) . Clarify that Appendix I 2002 Art Walk Master Plan is provided for historical reference only (indicated in both the Table of Contents and on Appendix l). Add that a possible funding source could include a portion of the Lodging and Marketing tax (added under item B. Direct Town Funding, page '12) . lnclude a reference to identifying locations along the POSTR's Brush Creek Park that may be appropriate for public art installations (added in Appendix K Arts Strategic Action Plan under Housekeeping) . More useful access to the Appendices (added as separate links in the Table of Contents and within the document itself) o More information about the Town of Breckenridge's successful arts program and their method of funding (added to Table 2 Funding by Community, page '14) The Town Council seemed particularly interested in finding out more about the Town of Breckenridge's public art program, and Staff has provided as Attachment 2 a copy of the pass-through non-profit, Breck Create's Master Plan + Policv 2016 with yellow highlights provided by Staff. To summarize, Breck Create is a non-profit that manages all of the public arts in Breckenridge and is funded primarily by $2.3 million annually (as allowed by budget) in General Fund dollars from the Town. 10-16-17 TC Packet Page 23 of 207 22 To summarize, there are essentially three parts to the Draft Strategic Plan (Atlachment A to Resolution 36, Series of 2017): '1) the plan summary that identifies the mission and goals of the SAAB, their working vision and focus areas, and potential funding sources; 2) an extensive appendix that encapsulates the history of SAAB's work to date and includes inventories, the Art Trail Map, and includes a placeholder for the revised draft policy for art acquisition (to be acted on by Town Council by separate resolution); and 3) Appendix K which is the working document portion of lhe Arts Strategic Plan. This working document is what the SAAB will reviev/ on a monthly basis to update projects and plan new ones. This portion of the plan is iniended lo change and evolve on a monthly basis, so the ASP was designed with this in mind. FINANCIAL IMPACT Although the adoption of the Arts Strategic Plan does not have a cost associaled with it, as a remjnder, Town Council should be aware that the SAAB took action to request funding of $25,000 for FY2018 and for each subsequent year from Town Council so that they may begin fulfilling their goal of more public art throughout the community. APPLICABILITYTO COUNCIL GOALS & OBJECTIVES Community Building A major component of community building is creating more community oiented spaces and gathering places. ln addition, the Town needs to increase utilization of existing community spaces by programing them with community focused activities and exploting padnerships with organizations, such as Pitkin County Library, that create vitality. These community places need to be conveniently connected such that "a flow" between them is evident and high levels of vitality can be enjoyed throughout the Village. This community building initiative should further include cultural activities including pertorming and visual a,7s. Finally, the Town needs to clearly define the Town Park projecl and complele a master plan design so that improvemenls can be set into motion for this community oriented space. (Emphasis added) COUNCIL OPIIONS '1. Adopt, modity ordenyapproval of Resolution 36, Series of20lTAdopting the Arts Strategic Plan. STATF RECOMMENDATION Staff recommends that Town Council adopt Resolution 36 adopting the Arts Strategic Plan as modified. ATTACHMENTS 1 . Resolution 36, Series of 2017 Adoption of the Arts Strategic Plan 10-16-17 TC Packet Page 24 o'f 207 23 With Attachment A Atls Strategic Plan dated Revised October 16,2017 2. Breckenridge Public Arl Program Master Plan + Policy 2016 10-16-17 TC Packet Page 25 of 207 24 I 2 -) 4 5 6 7 8 9 l0ll l2 t3 14 l5 l6 Attachment 1 Reso. 36, Series 201 7 TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL RESOLUTION No.36 SER|ES OF 2017 A RESOLUTION APPROVING THE SNOWMASS ARTS AOVISORY BOARD'S (SAAB) ARTS STRATEGIC PLAN. WHEREAS, the Snowmass Arts Advisory Board has been charged with providing direction and leadership for future cultural arts initiatives and acts as a cultural arts advocate and consultant to the Town Council: and WHEREAS, pursuant to the municipal code Section 2-'l 74. - Responsibilities, the SAAB shall "Process, review and make recommendations to the Town Council on arts-related and cu ltu ral-related issues", and WHEREAS, the SAAB desired to develop a Strategic Plan to be more efficient in the methods of acquiring art and promoting awareness and education concerning the cultural arts in Snowmass Village; and WHEREAS, the SAAB selected a consultant to assist them and Staff to develop an arts strategic plan; and WHEREAS, the SAAB, Staff and the consultant worked for over a year and a half to develop an Arts Strategic Plan (ASP) that includes: 1) the plan summary that identifies the mission and goals of the SAAB, their working vision and focus areas, and potential funding sources; 2) an extensive appendixthat encapsulates the history of SAAB's work to date and includes inventories, the Art Trail Map, and includes a placeholder for the new draft policy for art acquisition; and 3) Appendix K which is the working document portion of the Arts Strategic Plan; and WHEREAS, at their regular meeting on May 18, 2017 the SAAB voted to recommend approval of the draft Arts Shategic Plan, by a vote of 6 to 0; and NOW, THEREFORE, BE lT RESOLVED, by the Town Council of the Town of Snowmass Village, as follows: t7 l8 l9 20 2t 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 3l 32 JJ 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 4t 42 43 10-16-17 TC Packet WHEREAS, at their regular meeting on August 21 ,2017 the Town Council reviewed the draft Arts Strategic Plan and directed Staff to make certain modifications. Page 26 of 207 25 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 5l 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 6l 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 7t 72 73 74 75 76 77 Attachment 1 to Staff Report dated October 16, 2017 TC Resolution 36, 2017 Page 2 ot 2 Section One: Ac tion. Town Council Adoption of Arts Strateqic Plan. The Town Council accepts the SAAB's draft of the Arts Strategic Plan and hereby adopts the Arts Strategic Plan as set forth in Attachment A. Section Two : Severabilitv. lf an y provision of this Resolution or application hereof to any person or circumstance is held invalid, the invalidity shall not affect any other provision or application of this Resolution which can be given effect without the invalid provision or application, and, to this end, the provisions of this Resolution are severable. READ, APPROVED AND ADOPTED, by the Town Council of the Town of Snowmass Village on October 16,2017 upon a motion by Council Member- the second of Council Member _, and upon a vote of - in favor and -against. TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL Markey Butler, Mayor ATTEST: Rhonda B. Coxon, Town Clerk APPROVED AS TO FORM: John C. Dresser, Jr., Town Attorney Attachment A: Arts Strategic Plan dated revised October 16,2017 10-16-17 TC Packet Page 27 of207 26 Attachment A to Reso. 36. Series 2017 2017 - 2027 Arts Strategic Plan Town of Snowmass Village, Colorado Approved by the SAAB on May L8,2017 Adopted by the Town of Snowmass Village Town Council Revised October 16, 2017 10-16-17 TC Packet Page 28 of 207 27 "Communities that invest in public arts--in the "tourism product" thot is the ploce ond its residents--will see o compounding dividend, significant new tourism revenue." pride while generoting Laura Mandala Arts & Americo: Arts. Tourism & Culturol Diplomocv 2 1 0-16-17 TC Packet Page 29 of 207 28 S SiN(fWMA,EiEi VILI_A.GIE AFITS AEVIEiOFTY BOAFItrt On behalf of the Snowmass Arts Advisory Board (SAAB), I am community this Arts Stratesic Plan. This plan isthe culmination Snowmass Town Council and the Snowmass members, including the SAAB, Snowmass El many Tourism, Town Council, Town Staff and many others with arts for our We want to thank the Snowmass Village Town Council for providing the funding to allow us to arts consultant,Waldorf, and believing in what our board can accomplish with a good strategic plan. We expect this evolve next several years as we work to bring more visual and performing arts into our Sincerely, Joanne Houck, Chair Snowmass Arts Advisory J 10-16-1 7 TC Packet Page 30 of 207 29 Table of Contents Laura Mandala Quote Letter from the SAAB Chair Table of Contents Acknowledgements lntroduction: Arts and the Creative Economy SAAB Mission Statement and Goals Strategic Planning Process Relationship of Strategic Plan to Town A. 2002 Art Walk Master Plan 8. Town Comprehensive Plan C. Ease Village PUD StrateSic Plan Adoption Process A. Adoption B. Amendments Snowmass Village Cultural SAAB Working Vision Five Focus Areas Criteria for Program Quality Funding A. Percent for Art 10-16-1 7 TC Packet 4 6 6 9 10 10 11 t2 11 4 Page 31 of 207 30 B. Direct Town Funding C. Temporary Oonations ofArt D. Donations and Gifu E. Fundraising F. Grants G. Real Estate Transfer Tax H. How Other Arts-Based Communities are Funded Table 2. Funding by Community Table 3. Potential Funding Opportunities for Snowmass Village Arts Promotion Arts Strategic Action Plan-The First Few Years Evaluation Plan Summary Aooendix F. Art Trail Mao Table i. Project Assignment and Table ii. lmplementation Calendar Table iii. Quarterly Action Calendar Table iv. Project Details Table v. Estimated Project Budget Table vi. Arts Ambassador Projects Table vii. Annual Program Evaluation 1 0-16-1 7 TC Packet 15 77 Sheet 5 Page 32 of 207 31 Acknowledgements The arts StrateSic Plan is the result ofpublic input and the creative thinkintofthe 20162017 Snowmass Advilo.y Board Arts Advisory Board (SAAB), Town Cou ncal m em bers, fOSV was made possible by the Snowmass Village Townstaff, residents, second homeowners and communityaft leaders. FundinSforthe Council. Joann€ Houck (Chair) Genoa Farber {past chair)' Agustin Goba' CarolBatchelder Joyce schenk MichaelMiracle Bell Haiiey Manage. Board tiaison Former Town Planner, StafI Markey Butler, Mayor 8ob Skkut Mayor Pro'Tem Bill Medsen Edltor Julie Ann woods, FAICP/Ml-A, Development Director Support Barb Peckl€r, Administrative Assistant Cindy Ford, Admin. Tech. Page 33 of 207 consuhant 6 10-16-17 TC Packet 2017 Snowrnass Vlllalr To{n Coun ll Tom Goode Alyssa Shenk 32 Strategic lnlrodudlon: Ans and the Cr€athr. Economy Sociologist Richard Florida's20c4 landmatk book,Ihe Rise of the Creolive Closs. highlights the impad of the arts on communities. Nationally, the "Creative Class" comprises some 30% ofthe workforce and includes iobs in design, film and media,literature and publishing, performing a(s, vasual arts aod crafts, and food. a study commissioned by the National Endowment for the arts found ranks 5th amonS all states for concentration ofartists Colo.ado! strengths are design, literary and publishinS, end film and media, whi.h of all creative industry jobs. Colorado has also rtudied the impacts state'wide and discovered in its 2008 repo i "Colarado: Stote ol the Aft,Stote ol Colotodo's Oeotive Economy",lhal Colotado's . Colorado's creat;ve enterprises employed over 122,00o individuals 8,0m establishments . another 64,000 individuals worked in creative occupations in . Employee earninSs io€reative industryiobs, includinB benefits, To fu(her meastrre the impact of arts on local economies, the the nataon's communities based on creativeiob!,rnrnSs, lndex (2014 CVI) of 3.75 as €ompared with service restaurants; fine arts schoolsi arch increase in cultural non-profit revenues and an agencygrants to organizations within the community Clearly, 5nowmass village being fueled by arts and culture, technology and creativity, nature and recreation; this is what 8y nurturing its already vibrant a rts rcene, encouragingthe creation of more affordable places to both aod rupporting the creative class, Snowmass village will better position itself as a create the roadmaptoensurethe arts remain vitalin thevillage with investments in Creative Economy offers the following: . 186,251jobs in the state are a5sociated with creative enterprises sustainable and resilient community the arts that ar€ sound and rational- 10-16-17 TC Packet with the highest €arnings in Snowmass Village are full relations agencies. Of nole in the 2014 indo( is a sliSht ) has created the "Cr€ative vitality lndex" which ranks Town ofSnowmass Village maintains a Creative Vita lity 7 Page 34 oi'207 33 SAAB Mi$lon Statement .nd Goals tn 1991the Town ofSnowmass villaSe passed Ordinan.e No. ll which established the Snowmass VlllaSe Arts Advlro.y Board (SAAB)to provide leadership in aultural arts initiatives and to help the community invest in public arts, thereby strenSthening the Town's tourirm economy. The mhsion of SAAB is to demonstrate howthe arts can contribute tothe unique culturalidentity of Snowmass Village. ThiaStrategic Plan willprovide the roadmapfor howculturalarts initiatives will b€ accomplished. Since its inception, the SAAB has worked tofurther define thir role, set practicalgoak for tuelf, and ad as the Town's partner in developinS its culturalagenda Its primary goals arei 5AAB also works to ensure thatthe Town's public arts projects are hlSh quality, very accelslble, and represent a diversity of cultura I offerings. fhis strategic plan was created to provide direction forthe Board in pursuinSthes€ 8oals. Stratcgic Plannlng Process The Arts Strate8ic Plan is the outcome ofa seriesofSAAB planninS meetin8sthat occurred betrveen Apriland September 2016. An a rchival com mittee first reviewed prior planning documents stretchingbackto 1992; construd€d a timeline ofpan SAAB activiti€s and siSnificant communityart eventr (see aopend x E); and created a list ofthe Town's many cultu.alassets, including performingvenues, exhibition spaces, arts partners, and viewabl€ artworks {see A!!S!!Ee: E Q, !and O. Bared on that information, the Soard created a olhuralidentity statementthat reflects long held values and perceptions about the role ofthe arts in the community. From there, input was Sathered from art5 organization leaders, com mu nity leaders, and residentsthrouSh a series of int€rviews and planning meetings, These €fforts resuhed In the creation ofa workingvlslon forthe 8oard, that identifies major proSram elements and states how it wil! achieve its proposed objedives. [aitly, a strateticadion plenwas developed that adentifies potentaal projects to be actualized overthe next 3to 5 years in each ofthe five pro8ram area9, lists the necessary steps to be talen in the first year, and identifies the variou5 resources required to ensure a su€cesrful outcome. The results ofthese plannlng efforls are presented as aooend x K. Art! Strateprc Actron Pian (Work nq Docunrent). R.lationahip of Stratetic Plan to Town plrnniu Docum€nts The provision of public art and community aesthetics har alw-ays been one ofthe cornerstones of Snowmass village's development. This is evidenced in the many publlc art installations, the quality of p hysical improverients and developments throu8hout Town, and through many ot the Town's land use plannin8 tools. The followinS sections document the relevance of the Art5 to other planning documents adopted and utilized by the fown. A. 2002 Art Walk Master Plan 10-16-17 TC Packet 8 Page 35 of 207 (t) Promote a cultural con5ciousnersi (2) StimLrlate economic viability; and (3) Fostera sense ofcommunity pride and connectivity. 34 tn 2OO2 the SMBwork€d with a consultant, blueSreen, to developthe 2002 ArtWalk MasterPlan. The ArtWalk is d€siSned to provide connections between existing and proposed destinations within the Town using the existing trailryst€m and connedingto the establirhed transit system. The plan is attached as Appendrr G. Sl.atrgk PLn Adoptbn Proaa.3 This section describes the formalTown of snowmass Villa8e r6rlew procerr utllized to obtain apptovalofthis doqrment, The section also describes the process by which this do.ument may be amended in thefuture. 8. Town comprehe.sivc Plan Ihe@provide5anentire5ection(chapter3)oncommUnitYArts,ltre.o8ni2estheimportanceof the VisualArts (Anderson Ranch, PublicArt Program, ArtWalk)and PerforminSAru (lAS Aspen Snowmass, Concen Series, Co mmuoity Cu ltural Series) as importantto be maintained within thevillage. stated policies within the plan lnclu de tinding dedicated fundin8forthe ans, planninSforand supportingthe arts, and eraminint development proposak for inclusion ofthe arts. The Comprehensave Plan i5 in the p.ocess of being updated in 2017, so it willbe incumbent upon the SAAB and the communityto be involved in the processtoensure policies regardinSthe arts and thecreative economY remain antact. C. 3.se VlllaSc PUO Duringthe 2015 amendment processforthe Base Villa8e PUo, the SAAB successfully rcquested thatthe amendment incorporetethe "PublicArts Map for Base VillaSe" to ensure locations for public art within Ease Villa8e would be ldentified, with the Soalofworking toward future art anstallations. as projects movefoMard through rubrequent amend ments and/or buildinS p€rmits, this plan should be used to ensure opportunities for public a rt are notoverlooked in the process. Th€ BaseVillage Ans Location Map is attached as Aooendix l. A. Adoptbn The formalTown review proc65 ufllaed tor the revlew and adoptlon of thls strateSic plan is as follows: . Review and re@mmendation by the SAAB Board to theTown Council . Review and adoption by the Town Council by re.olution 8. Amendments lo thc Plan The Arts Strate8ic Plan wa5 always intended to be a "working str?te8y document" thatwould be modified and chanSed based on fundingand opportu n ities for a rts insta llations. Projects, responsible parties, timelanes, etc. in th e tables a re expeded to be reviewed on a monthlv basis and upd ated by SAAB members. The working vhion, mission a nd goa ls an d focu s a reas a re not expect€d to change rad ica lly over the next severa I yea rs. However, should the SAAa decide thatthis Arts Strategic Plan should be amended accordinSly, then the processwould be for the SAAS to make a recommendation toTown Councilwith theTown CounciladoptinS amendments to the plan by resolution 10-16-17 TC Packet Page 36 of 207 35 Snowmass Arts Explore. Connect. Be lnspired Snowmassvillage i5 a world-class skidestination and vibrant mountain community with an activevisualand perform in8 ans scen e. ThrouShout the year, visitors and residenis ofallager and nationalaties can enioy arts progrems thet offer a deeper conneation to nature and to place. Forthose with an adventurour spirit, the arts in Snowmars Villa8e provide ample opportunities to explore, conn€d, and be inspired by the celebration o, creativity th roughout our town and stunninS landscape. kplore. Anderson Ranch Arts Center, the historic heart of the Village, is a world-renowned hub of creative ideas that Suests are able to experience through visual arts workshopt visiting anist lectures, and hi8h-quality e)(hibitions. Public art can be found in unerpected places alonS the extensive trail system that meanders through the Town and surroundinS mountains. The ecleclic collection exudes a sense ot place, and work cafl be viewed while bikinS, hikin& and skiinS. Forchildren, art5-and{rafts activities al numerous locations throughout thevillage encou rage cr€ative erplorations. Conoect. The unique character and beautifullandscepe ofSnowmass Village make lt a naturelpoint ofconnection between the environment, people, and the ar!s. The An Trallis an interactive display of public an that orients and connects walkers to the hi8hlishts ofthe villaSe. The aontemplation of temporary and permanent art installations throuShout theTown provides a wayforviewersto make new connections with artists, theirwork, and their ideas, Femily and friendr, in the spirit offun, can enjoy shared time at cultural events such as music festivals and mountainside concerts, the summer rodeo, and annual culinary events. Be lmpired. The countless ways ofparticipating inthearts in Snowmass Village aredesigned to inspire, ignite, and restorethe human spirit. whether dancinS at a concert, hikint the Nature Trail, cr€ating art atthe Ranch, or introducinS children to new forms ofself-s(pression, the intersection ofthe ans and nature offers maSical moments that create lasting memories. Snowmass Village Cultural ldentity Statement To clarify the cultural identity for the Town, SAA8 members drew from past planning docurnents, current fOSv marketing materials, and sugSestions made by community leaders and residents. Three culturalldentifiers were seleded to define the art5 and €ultural experience ofvisitors and residents: explore, connect, and be inspired. These can be used when promoting arts activities and events and function as crileria when making decisions about the types of proieds to pursue in the future. The ldentity Stat€ment describes the Town's public and performing arts progams as they are perceived today, while also allowinS considerable flexibility for g.owth end erpansion. l0 10-16-17 TC Packet Page37 of207 SAAB Working Vlslon The working vision for SAAB strenSthens the public and performin8 arts throuSh high visibility installations, paths of discovery, peak performances, an happenin8s, and community partnershipr. SAAB willwork toward manifestinS this vasaon by spea.headinS specific projeds, ensuringthe visibility of the Town's diverse ans and cultural p.ograms, and coordinating fundin8 to strenSthen the public art collection. As amba5sadorr for the art5, SAAB members will seek collaborationswith the Town and localans organizationsto leverage locil financiel and human resourcesthat could be used to further the culturaland economi€ vitality of the community. 36 1. Hirh Vislbllltv lnstallation3. works ofanthat have hiSh visibility becausethey aresituated in high traffic areas, such as the Mall, Base VillaSe, the Snowfias5 Recreation Center/Town Park area, the sli area, and alonS main roads. 2. t4b!-SlqiEgyCI. Trails and walkways throughoutthe Villagethat are enhanced by the presence ofpublicand performing arts, such as the An Walk. 3. Eg3llCdgIE g!. Hlgh quality events are offered in music, dance, theatre, and film, such as JAS tabor oay Festival and Snowmass Chapel plays. 4. AILtEp!€Oilf!. Art activities that provide ways for people to participate in and leam through the arts, including children's classes, adult workshops, artist ledures, interactive sculptures and installations, and Sroup art projects. 5. Communitv Parhe6hlos. Collaborations with local organiu ations that strenSthen the breadth of public and performing arts programming in the village throuSh leveraSing fu nd ing, visibility and implementation capacity. Funding There are severaloptions for acqu iring the tundr needed tofully adualizethe proposed strategic plan. Generally, funding forerts programminS is derived from frve sources: municipal budget5, foundation and Sovern ment 8rants/ business sponsorships, ind ividua I donations a nd gifu, and earned income. A h ea lthy fund ing plan includes revenue from each ofthese sourcer!. Currently. SAAS is operating without a stable source offunding to support the development of its public and performing ans proSrams. This greatly impactt lt5 ability to pursue its mitsion. A solution that is gaining momentum in Colorado is a 1% or ,,l% fee on new construdion, in support ofthe arts. Other ideas include creating a Snowmals Arts nonprofit entity; orengaging an existinggroup, such astheSnowmass Village Community Fund,to poolresources from thecommunltyand house an erts coordinatorto assist in implementinSthe art5 Strategic Plan, Part of SAABt function willbe to follow up on the ideas listed below and in Table 1 to determ ine which arethe most appropriate and viable to pursue. I artandard fundin8 formula for civic atr prot,ammint ar 1/3 tactet sale!,1/3 donitions, 1/3 ftunicipalbudget 10-16-17 TC Packet Page 38 of 207 Criteria Ior ProFam Quality SAAB projects should be evaluated a8ainn the following criteria, which refled the values of the €ommunity and ensure an arte & cultural program that is befitting of a world class resort end mountain communlly: / Enhance the identity ofthe Town locally, regionally and nationally as a creatave commLrnity / Be a means to fo5terthe community's sense ofspirit, pride, and community values r' Enhance the experience ofpublicspac€s r' Provide opportunities for emerSin8 artists r' En8a8e allages and abilitiesr' Provideinteradiveentertainment '/ Enhance the user experience ofTown trails r' Tellthe hi5tory and geology ofthe region r' Enhance €onnectivity between existing and proposed amenities in Snowmass Villager' Be appropriately placed in specific locetions for largest impact 37 A. Percent for Art Many communlties require a percentage ofthe total bud8et of a capital project to fund the art components ofthat projed- Some communities limit applicatior ofthe percentfor art proSram to projeca \f,ith budgets over a 5et amount 1e.8., over S50O,00O)and capthe amount availabl€ fora specific project. Percent for art ordinances typically include criteria for determining which public projects are appropriate for inclusion in the program, often based on re€ommendations ofan advisory board, such as SAAB. These criteria are gen€rally ba5ed on the "visibility" ofthe improvementt. For instance, utitity projects that are completely underSround are often excluded from such programs. The funds are typically earmarked directly within a speciflc pOect but some programs include provisions for reservingthefunds of severalprojects to fund another priority public art proiect within thecommunity. The SAAB has never enjoyed a stable and reliable funding sourc€ for public art installations or the administration of its arts proSrams, and believes a stablefundinSsource like a percentfor art program would be effective in supportinSthe Town's arts-based creative communitY. tn addition tothis program, development projectsseeking PUD approval fro m the Town should be allowed to offerpublicart asa "com mu n ity purpore', and developers should be encouraged to think of opportunities for public an within their developments. lo clarit public art could be considered a community purpose, an amendmentto Sedion 16A-5-300 (c )(6)the Land Use and Development Codewould be necessary. 8. DiredTown Fundint Th€ Town Council has provided funding to cover the costs of developing this Arts Strategic Plan and acquiring important public an pieces within the arlnual budSet. Generally, the sqAE Board must request thls fundlnSas public art projects have rarely been considered in the overall budSet p.ocesr. This process males it difficult for the SAAB Board to plan for new proiects and tends to be an unstable method offundinS public art projects in Seneral. Forthe 2018 fiscalyear, the SAAa ir requening thet Town Councll allocate, on an a n nual basis, 525,000 for arts projects. One source forsuch fundin8 could also include the lodginS and marketing tar which helps fund Snowmass Tourism. C. Tampora ry Oonations of Art The temporary donation of artwork is another area that has b€en explored and implemented successfully in the past by the SAAB. The temporary donalion of ert allows the comm{rnity to take advantage of artwork it may not otherwise be able to afford to commission. lt also allows for a variety of art pieces to be dhplayed overa p€riod oftime. Thetemporary art program has been discussed by the SM8, and some proSress has been made with discursions with both Ande6on Ranch and the Aspen An Museum. Program guidelines and policies for a successfu I t€mpora ry art donation pro8.ao will require additionalwork by the SAAa Board. D. Donat'rons and Gifu Donations and gifts also help to fund or provide publicart in the Town. The acceptance ofdonations aod gifts was not reBUlated by the Town, but a new policywas recentlyadopted bytheSAAB Board (ABpe!!1U..]l) which wallhelp provideSuidance when advisingtheTown Council. E. tundralrlng FundraisinS has been a majorsourceoffundingfor public art proiects in the Town ofSnowmass Village,led primarily bythe SAAB. tn the past, fundraise.s included the auctioning ofanist-painted chairlift chairs retir€d from Snowmass Mountain and engraved brick in the Base village ptara. ForfundraisinS to be truly effective there would need to bea commitment of allSAAB members and 5ome financial resources. Efforts to havethe community participate financially io the promotion ofart may be a means offundinS en, and should remain an option for the SAAB. l: 10-16-17 TC Packet Page 39 of 207 38 t. Grants Grants from national(for example, the National Endowment for the arts)and state or8aniations (Colorado Creative lndustrie, often requi.e that the recipient be a non p.ofit organiration. B€cause SAAS is an advisory board within theTown government, it may need to pannerwith other non-profits (e.g., Snowmass Village Community fund, Anderson Ranch, Snowmars Oiscovery, eic.)lt it wants to pursuethese typet ofgrants. TheColorado Creative tnd ustry (CCl) recendy a nnounced grant recipients for its 2017-18 year wh ich includ€d both Anderron Ra nch a nd ,AS aspen Snowmass. fo further the investment in the arts throuSh Srants, the SAAB should work with partners to support Srant applications with letters of support and/or small match money where needed. tn addition, SAAB and the Town should conrider pursuinS Creative District desiSnation throuSh CCl, thus qualifying for arts fundinS if so designated. IThe Colotodo Creotive lndustry is o division ol the Stote ol Colorodo's Ollce ol Economic oevelopment & lnteholionol Trode. lhrouqh qront opportuhities, diverse Nogrcmfiing ond owords & initiotives, CCI provides frnonciol suwtt ond rcsources lot Colotodo's thrivinq cteotive economy, The mission ol CCI is to prcmote, support ond expoml the creotive industries to d ve Cohrodo's economy, grow hbs ond enhonae Colotodo's quolity of lile- Among the progrohs thot they ollet is the ettoblishment o, designote.l Creative Astbtt thot then becone eliglble lot qrdnts dnd support ond marketing to toix owoteness ol otTs ond oeotives within d community. Moe inlormotion is owiloble ot w!!!9!919!b!!89!jgl!!!:!!E:!!gl G. Real Estare Tranrf., Tax Another opportunity to fund public art is the Real Estate Transter Tar (RETT). The stated purpose of th€se funds in Snowmass village is to pay for expenditures related to trensportation capitel,landscapin& majorroad networks, transportation operatinBand maintenanc€ costs for rollinSstock and recreation corts. Th e fund was voted on a8a in in 2fi)4 to remain in perpetulty for these uses, The down side of this fund is that it is based on the sale of real estate, so in a y€ar with few realestate saler, fewer funds are available. ln addition, it would lilely require anothervote ofthe citizens ifthe fund wereto be used foranother use, such as publicart, unless the workwere incorporated into an eliSible project, such as landscepingand trailwork. The RETT fund currently operates at a deficit, m€aningthere is more demand for the funds than are collected, so it is an unlikely source of funds for public arts projects. However, arttul paving mateaiah could be utilized in the construction of a recreation path, rhuttle stop or artistic elements incorporated into recr€ation equipment custom designed for its settjn& but fundin8 dkectly to the art component itselfwould not likely be allowed. H. How Other Arts-Bar€d Communhl€sare Furdcd The SAAB researched what other communities have done in terms offundingfor ans in theirvarious communities. Som€ communities have non, profits that are provid€d funding by the localgovernment (e.8, Town of E reckenridSe)j rome towns have a percentfor arts program; stillothers are dependent on fundraiserr (Carbondale's Mountain Fair)and donations. There is no single method for allarts proSrams, but thetable below indicates the size ofeach community, their total fun ds for arts, where the funds come from and whether they are a statedesignated Creative District. ll 10-16-17 TC Packet Page 40 of 207 39 Community Town Size Organization in Population Table 2. Funding By Community (2015) Funding Town/City S1s8,ooo Snowmass 2,865 village Telluride 2,372 Carbondale 7,2@ Breckenridge 4,648 Arts Advisory Board 501 c(3); Creative District 501 c(3) Arts Commission; Creative District Town GovernmenU Creative District Donations Other S12s,000 a rts Sso,ooo from art sales 53ss,soo Notes: Mtn. Fair 7%for Arls (Town Projects) Other funds from classes, ticket sales, facility rental t4 Slo,ooo Sso,ooo 520,s00 !%for the arts; commission on arts sold 1% for the arts on Capital projects of S5ok+ Total Slo,ooo S4so,ooo s5s0,000 S2,37o,ooo s50,000 Vail 5,31r Loveland 7L,334 Crested Butte 1,500 District 1 0-16-1 7 TC Packet S3o,ooo Page 41 of207 s2,300,000 s44,800 (General Fund pass thru an arts non-profit htto://www.breckcreate.orql ) 53o,ooo s2s0,000 40 Table 3. Potential FundinS Opportunitieslor Snowmass VillaSe Arts rom @iotrt . 1% or 0.5% new construction "Communi, Puryo5e" in Land Ure Oevelopment Code . Repurpose an existang Real . HolycrorrEnhancement . Businesrtaxincentivet . Oepartment budsett . loral family foundations. 5.owma55 Community . PrnnershipS.antr with local ory.niz.tiont ruch a5 the . snoHness Rotary Club tr.nt. Cre.tive Plac€maki.t . N.tional G..ntmake6: NEA Dois Duke, ArtPl.c!, Bonllls, Gates, Kreste, and Ford 8!5incttSrotrsoE . Aipen SliinS Company . tattwood Developments . othd lo.rl burinesses E.m!d l.rom! . Engraved b,icks or rimalar donor re(ognition proiect . Mammoth hvasion-au€tio. . Ticlet sales to SAAB rndividu.l ooffi . Resident and other localart Duringthe planning process, it became evident that theTown akeady has an actrve arts program, but it is not asvisible as it could be. This is partly because arts activiti€sand events have historically been managed and promoted by a variety ofindependent entaties, and partly because arts activities are not yet marketed as a notable a5ped ofthe SnowmassVillaSe experience. Theexception 15 the Summer Concerts S€ries, which is paid for bythe Town. SAAB proposes that the Town embrace and promote allofthe fown's public and performinS arts progremminB under the headlinel Srowmos, A/ts. By takinS a more inclusive stance in creating more visibility for SqAB adivities and those ofcommunltyarts partne6, allwillbenefit. Ways to increase the visibility ofSnowmass Ans adivities lnclude: . Create and promote an online celendar (or use an eristing calendar)thet SAAB and various arts partner! can update theflselves . DesiSn a new loSo forSnowmars Arts . lnclude Art Adivities on the dropdoM menu, IhirgJ to Do on the Town's www ToSV com website, and create a general information page about Soowmass Arts . Employ socia I media to promote the aru: Twltter, lnstaSra m, Facebook . Work with the Colorado Creative lndustry to establish Snowmass Village as a recoSnized Creative District. Update end cla riry characterhtacs ofthe publicrrt collection tostrengthen its brandingand to Suide future acquisitions. Design artfulflags and banners with the SnowmassArts logofor installation in high traffi€ areas l5 10-16-17 TC Packet Page 42 of 207 41 An5 $ratetic Action Plan-The FIrsI Few Y..R DurinSthe first year, the Eoard intends to focus on "houseke€ping- matters that willlaythe groundwork for future projects and arts activities. Thes€ include policy development for the selection and donations of art (completed), investiSation of a percent for erts program/ development of e Snowmass Ans lo8o, pursuinsCCtArts District Desi8nation, finding a location to reinstallPeaks by Barbara Sorensen, developingthe Artt About Town calendarwith arts and cultural events in coordination with the ]OSV Tourism Department, establishint an Arts HappeninS paSe on the Town website, identifying and pursuinS a fundraisinS initiative, etc. ln addition, further detailed "mappin8: of ea€h of the project5Ior the next two fiscalyears wlllbe coftpleted. ln 2017, the Town a nd SAAB worked with local benefadors to install a major sculpture for the neu/ rounda bout on Upper Srush Creek Road- To further engage the communiry about this important art worl, the SAAB willbe sponsorinS a "Sculpture Naming Contesf and willselect from entries with a grend prize to the winn er, To further svenglhen pu blic awa reness of Snowmass Ans pro8n mmin& the SAAB will continue to work with Snowmass Tou rism on selecting perma n€nt art pieces for placement a on8 major bike/hike traik that willenhance the Town's paths of discovery throughout the trailsystem. Smaller proiects akeady in process include hirinS localartilts to decorate Tosv trash receptacles, For 2018, ideas under consideration are temporary and permanent muralsthroughoutTown and orSanirinS winter and summer "happenin8s," such ar projecting ima8e9 ofvisitors or "dis€overy'' mammals crossing on the snow or mountaiflside. ln the area of pennerships, the Board will contanue to pursue flrndin8 options, a nd la u nch an a m bassado r progra m (see Table vl). The Am basgdor Program was conceived a5 a way to im prove com muniration b€tween SAAB a nd itr existinS and potential collaborators at TOSV and in the community. lt is eryected that each member ofthe Board willact as a liaison to assigned stakeholders who are in a position to help facilitate SAAB projects or could be encoura8d to participate in strengthening the role of the arts throuth spearheadinS projects oftheir own. TableT contains a list ofpossible partnership proiects that SAAB Ambassadors €ould promote without taling on the necessaryexpense or implementation work. Add the artTrailand new art installations to the TOSV'STrailMapdurins the next update PromotetheArtTrailand other adivities on TOSV buses Evaluation Plan The €valuation plan is intended to capture a hhtoricalrecord of SAAB activitiesand provide a meansto reflecton annualaccomplishments and challenges faced throughout theyear. Tabl€ vii as the SAA8 AnnualProgram Evaluation which willallow the Board to assess its prog.ess overtime, address anyobstacles, make necessarycourse corrections, and accommodate new opportunities that will inevita bly a.ise.Iablevi provides a simple way to record outcomes each year for projects undenalen by the SAAB Board. 10-16-17 TC Packet Page 43 of 207 lo A!!e!!]!L the Ans Strat!8ic Aalion Plan contains Tabl€ iwhich lists the projects that SAAB intends to pursue in each ofthe five focur areas over the next three to five yea.s. This is followed bya SAAB lmplementation Calendar Fable ll),5AAB Quarterly Action Celendar (Tablc iii), SAAB Project Details (Table lv), and the SAAB Estimated Proied Budget llabl. v). Th ir is the lection of the An5 Strategic Plan that is considered the "worlinS docu ment" that will cha n8e and be mod ified oo a monthly ba sis as pro8ress is made and priorities change. AlthouSh Town Cou ncil is expeded to adopt this document in iE entirety, it s hould be clear that the working document willneed to remain fluid to maintain progrers in impl€mentin8 arts within thevillaSe. 42 Summary The SAAB would like to thank the Town Council for providing the funding to develop this Arts Plan that will assist them in providing leadership in cultural arts initiatives and to help the community invest in public arts. This comprehensive Plan consolidates the historic work and contributions of the SAAB to the Village, and establishes a "roadmap" to accomplish investments in the strengthen our arts culture. lt is the recommendation of the SAAB that Town Council adopt this document in its entirety, with the maintain progress in implementing arts within the Village. document (Aopendix K) will need to remain fluid to t7 10-16-1 7 TC Packet Page 44 of 207 43 Appendix A. 10-16-17 TC Packet Snowmass village Creative Vitality lndex ffiYlr.flthdq lorralopsbdoi 61 3.75 3,357 hrtM e$tdQd tBthbi @d.qffi.,ter&+.t F*.frffidndkiar h&s, s*{imrqdrngrr,M Pat3yc.Rdwlmmo a.6iIII uacnadeJob &ruPalo6 dth tmrtsl@mk ofJot! A*fi Wnww w M127 DR&alw nts cft.2ot! strl ffi$6 &k ^tu $# EI lflt *.nl! Ala &!.tk l.d6tdar lndu3tl6 stitnaGrt aani6t! h $19.8M_otal ,.fur/ trdtEs h4 b. '.h ol 12.l hd6ry a.mi$ h th Etm !ix. ml l Ld6!, rrfa l&SGltu @t rat re&1'o$r @t a ,tt for r.d (llk. 20r 3 rct4Cu,M.l bnP6&$rnt t4.2M Ihmtl8M tl@i.ffilGhtE G8h sitc 2lrl l $10.0K 1 $2.9t1 tn(r Saa 201 1 ft6a an 0 tletr.Bft!Alt uosi. e**&E*.,'*frk.drb6 EM&.*ry-!dcrucffi 16ri.&E-ffi ffi l8 Page 45 of 207 SBprhototthe Aft! In 5nffi5 lot48r613 U Creative VitatihlsurtE- 2Ol4 S.i. mrAl6(Y GrilE *-e4a,*t'&Hd* tu4.rI,..r6l-r* 5wc.frEsD-q rF.*ffi 44 Appendix L Year 20L7 2016 20t5 2014 2010 2008 Timeline of SAAB A.tivitie5 and Significant Community Art Events 2007 2005 2003 2002 2000 Planning Eflorts SAAB Strategic Plan Adopted (pending) SAAB Strat€gic Plan updated Town Comprehensive Plan Adopted Town Comprehensive Plan Draft includes Arts Chapter SAAB Arts Strategic Plan Updated Cultural Arts Assessment 5tudy by webb Mgmt/NYC - no preforming arts center recommended Art Walk Master Plan created PlanninB charrette for Art walk & PerforminS Arts Center SAAB Activitie5 [7] Personalized Pavers in Base village Fundraiser - 589,000 Chair waik Fundraiser- raised s21,000 Publi. Art lnstalled lNote: Nunbery coaespond to Art Troil Mop Locotionsl Trash Can An Program initiated [17] A/t furrel, various artists l2l untitled,Elk camp Mural, David Muller [3] Bike rack sculptures, various Artists l10l T ru n spo rc n cy, Michael Clapper lll Blissful Helix,Bland Hoke l13l The Leone6, G Frcdell, FlyinS Hammer Studios [8] urt t/e4 wood sculpture, Steve Blanchard l9l untitled,wood s.ulpture, Steve Blanchard I12l Lody with Diomonds, James Surls lLll Moyfly, K Reiley, H Hoffman, & J Burleigh Page 46 of 207 I9 10-16-17 TC Packet Snowmass Arts Trail Map Updated Cholk lt Up! Festival 45 Planning Efforts SAAB Strate8ic Plan written Ben Wood Report: plan for pocket parks, Art Walk, intersections, cteek development, performing arts center SAAS c.eated to develop a unique cuhural identiw Ior the Village Anderson Ranch became a nonprofit. Anderson Ranch run by Town appointed Board ot Directors 116l Our Refuge, Our P/o.e, N Lovendahl [5] date unknown, Spirit Ctcles, adist unknown l4l Snowmoss Londscope F Heberlein & W Page 47 of 207 SAAB Adivities [5)Alpine (Benedict) Ga rd en created by Town and laterturned over to HOA to maintain Public Art tnstalled [15] lohn Denver Memorial Gardens created at snowmass chapel 1998 t997 1993 7992 1985 1966 10-16-17 TC Packet Anderson Ranch became an art center 20 46 Facility L@tion S€atins caDaciW Condition/Size Comments AsDen Hish 5chool Black BoxTheater Aspen 100 Excellent Anderson Ranch Meetinc Hall Snowmass 100 Excellent Theatre Aspen Tent Asoen 150 Fai( lmproved facilities in discussion. Snowmass Chapel Snowmass 200 Good New sanctuary will seat 300. Paepcke Auditorium Aspen 350 Good Renovations planned. Eellv Uo Nishtclub Aspen 200 Excellent Harris Concert Hall As pen 500 Excellent State of the art. Wheeler Opera House Aspen 500 Excellent Addition in discussion. The District Theater Aspen 550 Good westin Conference Center Eallroom Snowmass 1,100 11,000 sq ft Benedict Music Tent Aspen 2,08s Excellent Town Park / Entryway / Rodeo Grounds Snowmass 10,000 (Rodeo = 1,200 seats) Soccer and ball fields; rodeo grounds Viceroy Ballroom Snowmass 350 5.500sq ft Base Villase Conference Center Snowmass 300 3,600 sq ft westin Meeting Spaces Snowmass 28,000 sq ft Elk Camp Restaurant Snowmass 200 Excellent Appendix C. 10-16-17 TC Packet Performing Arts venues - Facility lnventory 2l Page 48 of 207 47 Append D. E)(istingArts V€nues Snowmass Villa8e An5 Colla borators 10-16-17 TC Packet Snowmass village cultural Ass€tt PotentialArts venues anderson Ranch - [exhibitions, events, adult and kid classe, Towo Park, Sasebellfield leventsl Snowmass Fanny HillStage [tourism Dept.] Summer Concert5 on the Milchild.en's arttentl Snowmass Che pel lvisual and performinSarts proSrammingl Snowmass Club lrotating a.t erhibitions] Snowmars Clubvillas Rec. Room hotatinS artshowsl Treehouse [VlX program; SummerCamp art activities] Elk Camp Lodge lart installations; musicevents] Art Traillpublac art locationsl Pocket Parkr - Ipublicart placed on private propertyl H ite/Bike Trail system lpublic art locations, TrailTunet viceroy Hotel IAR ceramican €rhibitions in tounge] Town HalllAR visualart exhibition, . Entrance off Hwy 82 lpublicart piece] . Newroundabout (publi€art piece-completedl . Ret Center/Pools lpublic art piece] . Rodeo Grounds (.rttent) . Base village Plara [public aru performance events] . Discovery center Iinformation outlet; childrent art] . Alpine (Ben€dict) Garden [public an location] . Hotels/snowmass club conference & meetinS rooms . Snowmass Club Irotating exhibitions] . Trailheads Ipublic art installationsl . SMCGolf Course loutdoorinstallations,events]. Snowmass Center Ihallway art installationl . Two Cre€k5SkiBase . Buses, gondolas lSraphicanworkl. alpine Bank . Aspen Airport- IhinttoS0to snowmassl . Restaurants llocalart erhibitsl Aspen & Other Art5 Collaborators Snowmass Parks and R€c. Snowmass Oiscovery Center Snowmass Tourism oept. Eastwood Developers (Snoxnl.lss Center) Vl( ProSram Snowmass West€rn Heritage Aslodation (Rodeo) JAS Asp€n/Snowmass Snowmass Wine Festival (Rotarv Club) Anderson Ranch Snowmass Chapel Snowmass Club . Asp€n Fringe F€stival . Aspen Film . Aspen MLrsicSchool . Aspen Skiing Corporation . Hudson Reed Ensemble . Pitkin Co Library lmovie niShts; kid's anl . Five Points Film Festival . Thunder RiverTheatre . Danc€ Conn€ctions . Out-of-area festivel & event organizers Page 49 of 207 48 Appendix E. 1 0-16-1 7 TC Packet Public Art Collection within Snowmass 23 Page 50 of 207 Art Piee Artist Owner Lffition Costlnstalled Between Dalv Lane and Burlinpame Lane Needs maintenanceL967 Maintained by HOA5, Terrace Houe, Snowmass lnn 7992 Steel wall desirn-aiqhtirq Heort Hevedein Morrow TOSV Mall bus depot lohn Denver Memorial Gardens snowmass Chapel By Snowma$ Chap€l funds donated1998 Roarine Forae TOSV Mav Flv Trail below Wodbridce Condos s1s,0002000MetalMay Fly Yarrow Park bv snowmass chapel S2o,ooo2001steel Lody with Diononds lames Surls TOSV S15.ooo2007slone- Our Refuqe Ploce Nancy Lovendahl TOSV Town Soccer Fields Steve Blanchard Aspen Skiim Co.Treehouse2007Wood Grving5 donation2008Yinq Yona ln memory of Sta* (int TOSV top of South Rim T6al multiple individua15 Ba* Village Metro District Base Village Plaza SAA8 fundraiser2008Ease Village Perrcnalized Pavers Asoen Skiinr Co.Be* ofConev Glade lift, Snowma$ Ski Mtn.2008 Curled Steel Cable- 8r3tu,Helt Bland Hoke Area bv Snowmars ChaDel s15,000 tunds donated2008Wood- The Leoners Gail Fredell TOSV Memory of Cara Bunne-Yates Challenre Aspen Base VillaEe near Gondola2008 Mon & Guide Dog b@nze Sculpture TOSV Town Hall s70,00020LOSle el Ri ngs -T r o n s po r e n cy Michael Clapper various TOSV C.nte., Town Parlg Mall S4,ooo each20t45 Bike Racks 20L5 Tunnel Wall Paintins5 Community Citizens TOSV Tunnel between Town Ball Fields ss00.00 20L7 4 art pieces different artists TOSV To be placed out on Bike tEils Andeasn Ranch Displavs art piecer throushout the villaseVarious exhibitions Andepn Ranch from La C&ina in Aspen Gwn's Hirh Alpine Gwn's Hirh Alpine Double Black Diamond Dale Lamphere TOSV Brush Creek Rd./wood Rd. Roundabout donation wall muEl chanEes Aspen SkiinE Co.Elk Camp RestaurantrotatinB Westin HotelRotatinE art 5culptures Aspen An Museum on Loan Benedict Trail land*aoinE Sr.,'.t'rral wrll <.rilntrrr. 49 Rotatjng Exhibitions paantangs on Loan Snowmass Chapel Rotalins Exhibitions Ceramic Art on Loan Viceroy LounEe Bronze- The Landmark Enrique Martinez celaya Anderson Ranch Berbara Sorensen TOSV Cumrltfu in Town Hall uhtila ltretion can be found Slo.ooo 15 Hand created triangle tiles- Peaks 1 0-16-1 7 TC Packet 24 Page 51 ol 207 O',r<id. rh. G:11.ru:nd Gifi Sh^h 50 Appendix F Fb6dhCab 1 0-16-1 7 TC Packet ArtTrail Map 3 AFTIST LOCATIOT\ISi +/IFTIA.D\,I'C'EYao,ancl SN 59 IV'( o MA.'CFI NC'AEA T*1Fbl *toFFtEh r:\llJlEl-Eh Estrot{, dgt!rce 2.4 ml6 tuffi!-@td.+.ryihE@l 8.sCm€kFto.d- O#l Creek Fo!d- Hdllln tud *-..",",.....,,..,.,.,.,, s@sr'dtto8dM WbfirE/Brka PottE MAT L'EIAI'rE Sffis Od I@ 9*q{::F**rP,.,rs c"ggv: W4. Tryn Hdl Villag6 Msrl AdeBn Bsnch kts Cents @oo @o @ @o o o an @o @6 Bsd Hot6 tlMMde BaG EdG tYlt6lo@tift,Hffi&ircw 6cait Ci!d6 (ts ot Ftm Tmill AfrmGrdqt S.wrnE AntB Advryy Bor! Pre Sm gf,Etrd Ste Belrd MiclEel Cllppe Forirg Fagr, LLC J.ffi SrlB Gail ar€ddl. Flyng Hrlm StLdGAfiroer Fhrch A-t C6t- JofnOffMmhl Gf,dgr t&nry LMrdln TIEAft Tljm|.VIrcAT6s ?s Page 52 of 207 51 -x{ \..\i dilj h I l,f:8NlllrfilMEhs mlt DftIK(NbrtmIhk ofh!htrsil.ln SffilhrCL0Srilr Etlhiddtu0.l,rd !mvenflltlkr6 tutx{ I m:itrd1$mqhif tu6rlt*nlqw Illf, !r.6EtindEfr E*stilt*sa ftrei !r b.d ldd fid t$lri4 tt.f kaEikir aotfi ir$d !rlifilitr& t ml8iira(i(let D&l{k.xq ll0.ffidrItrrld a Ittt f,rr6.*rmhke lltllir6rtt iibde 6 ir S.qfd ld bdEr ht txP .d &lilFrtIi*rlf, hrml,!J. I lmlmlhld &iffibrd,frrtrm nghinfrdhiHdn m(omt l*dBfGillti{ilhbt r oltmlflE.ttrrreolldqbH*coaEti-l hflumB*.rr4dt lI.hr5frc!fE&rul 0oilOlA. 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IIE:lr$tlllt ffind6Kidc lkL*shrrdrei odsigtoietNcloll[|t lBlEtu hlu?,&rilr? iE*5r&,ollndo Sat0.trrd kldft39te, lEirl*i&' r.ns8ft H! o, llmff4Cl46ol dmo !t fi.dtEaffiHrdrod llledbn,rhelhltr.Shdd.O lom ,r liid 9s Nfi tif hra BdrBlld h l0O I lllE:oai,lt h mLlt&m ffiiSru$4lhdEol,F(mt redslsdt, h! rEtt! f6rr$ n EG Hg{irRdrds&d c{onProtar€ trle rde lbfibrffrG[rpd{tu ,|effiMturqirdG'€tH I,l'triu,i IU}MT s€tolmffill!t {.Fm rd..d Fi6, rBtEfd{ crt rn r5{h0r Lt troilJo{rcn ol fiDo*i(EsBtrcrihr ,b&(* tu lEr gh)rl} nl E Itlf lds fthr ,{@C Cdi6 I mf:iuxl lfirHi mmllokrdrl*m !lr$h. t5l[:Eirf6tlldft!{Elm Btnd$(lrtdrfmq nmsrthrcdttrlll8. dx butolmd r&HB(qk r'rtiuB.aEa riiEmhffirirtF.tr .i6dJIoEt[ I lmg:Yrb6 Ilfr,h€H[u]dn{ 1 0-16-1 7 TC Packet 26 Page 53 of 207 T I t#L-_ , rl 52 Appendix G. 10-16-17 fC Packet 2002 Art Walk Master Plan (Provided for Historical Record Only) 27 Page 54 of 207 53 Town of Snowmoss Art Wolk Mqster Plon Produced for: Snowmoss Arls Advlsory Boord Posl Office Box 5010 Snowmoss Villoge, Colorodo 81615 T 974.923.5524 F 970.e23.1861 Produced by: bluegreen 555 North MillSlreet Aspen, Colorodo 81611 T 970.42?.7499 t 970.920.7899 09 December2002 10-16-17 TC Packet -s @ Page 55 of 207 54 Toble of Conlents Intent Purpose of plan Process used to develop community based plan Project Goals Programmatic Elements Major Components and Themes Self-Guided Experienoe Programmed Events and Tours Physical Elements Route Location of Art Connectivity Translt System Operational Elements Maintenance of Wdk Maintenance of Art Art Selection RotationalArt Phasing Easements Funding Sources Responsibilities Next Steps Responsibilities Illustrations Art Walk Master Plan Graphic Appendices List of Participants Opportunities for Additional Art lnnovative ldeas for Maximizing Public Art Resources Art Walk Master Plan 10-1 6-17 TC Packet .>6 Page 56 of 207 p.2 ( i( P 55 lnlenl Cilizens padicipating in tho Ad Walk Chanettd Purpose of plan This plan outlines programmatic, physical and operational components of the Town of Snowmass Village Art Walk and a variety of implementation strategies that will enhance, expand and improve the public art program as directed by the Snowmass Arts Advisory Board (SAAB). This document specifically addresses topics including funding strategies; guidelines for art selection, location, rotation and maintenance; and includes a graphic illustration that identifies the route of the Art Walk and general project locations. Process used to develop community based plan The Art Walk master planning process included five components. These componenls direcled the creation of the Master Plan and recommendations set forth in this document. The Master Plan was reviewed and modified throughout several meetings with key stakeholders including the SAAB, members of the Trails Committee, the Town Managsr, and the Public Works Director. A complete list of participants is included in the Appendix, The following components contributed to the planning process: Research A review of several existing Town plans and documents occuned and included the Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan, Land Use Code, Greenway Master Plan and the BTA Plan. Focus Group Discussions Several group discussions, led by the SAAB, were held throughout the months preceding the development of the Master Plan. These discussions directed both the content of the document as well as the master planning process, Public Art Charrette A halfday community workshop/charrette was held and atlended by a diverse cross-section of lhe community. This workshop allowed for the arliculation and documentation of ideas and goals as they relate to the Art Walk. These ideas were directly incorporated into the Master Plan. Art Walk Master Plan 10-1 6-17 TC Packet I at Page 57 of 207 p.3 56 Publa fut at @mnunitY Pa* bY NancY LovaNall Key Person Interviews One-onone discussions were held with key stakeholders, community leaders and advisory board members to discuss and improve the Master Plan. Snowmass Arts Advisory Board The SAAB reviewed, edited and revised the Master Plan for final adoption by the Town Council. Project Goals The intent of this Art Walk Master Plan is to build upon lhe Town's current vision and approved planning documents, including the Comprehensive Plan, Greenway Master Plan and BTA Plan, to contribute to tho fulfiltment of lhe community's vision as articulated in these documents. The Art Walk Master Plan specifically seeks to: Use public art to provide connectivity between existing and proposed amenities in Snowmass Villago. Use public art to enhance the identity of the Town locally, regionally & nationally. Recognize the international population of Snowmass and create public art pieces that celebrate and welcome that diversity. Use public art as a means to foster the community's sense of spirit, pride, and community values. Use public art to express the Town's history, geology, ecology and cultural heritage, Use public art to enhance the individual's experience of public spaces. Recognize public art's contribution as an economic catalyst. Provide opportunities for emerging local artists. Ensure that public art and processes are accessible to all individuals including those with special needs. Provide an Art Walk that rvill be a Town of Snowmass destination and sustainable attraction in and of itself. Arl Walk Master Plan t I a 10-16-17 TC Packet 1r>€ e Page 58 of 207 p.4 57 Melamorplrosis a I May Fly Part< by adist, Ken Reiley, John Hollman & Joe Budeigh Progrommolic Elements Major Components and Themes A halfday cornmunity charrette was held in order to establish specific direction for the Art Walk including major components, themes, location, etc. The chanette parlicipants identified the following concepts for inclusion in the Art Walk. One or more concepts may apply to any individual piece or work. These include art that: . Creates the opportunity for interaction and play, . Can be experienced by all people induding those with impairments, . Accenluates the natural environmenl, . References the local geology, biolbgy, ecology, history or environment, . Uses materials that are, or reflect, the naturally occurring lextures, colors, pattems found in the immediate area, . Radiates familiarity and a sense of "home', . ls ephemeral, . ls dynamlc, . ls living- such as a garden and/or landscape design, . ls rneditative or reflectivs in nature, . lncludes water and/or storm waler management practlces, . Provides restoration to streams, landscape, etc, . Provides orientation or has directionality, . lnvolves/Embraces our children, . ls educational, and ' ls particularly engaging in the evening/dark. Self-Gulded Experience The Ad Walk can be experienced in a number of ways. The Art Walk is envisioned to be primarily a self-guided experience. An Art Walk brochure and map will.be created that will assist visitors in navigating through the project and will highlight the planned special events. lt is recommended that postcards be created and maibd to residents, lodges, and past Town guests when new art is placed along the path to promote the new aflraction. The exisling Snowmass Village Resort Association mailing list and the Pitkin county Assessors database will be good sources for creating this mailing list. Art Walk Master Plan 10-16-17 TC Packet - q aP Page 59 of 207 p.5 58 The brochure and map will be distributed by both the Snowmass Village Resbrt Association (svRA) and the Aspen chamber Resort Association (ACRA) and tocated throughout the Town, and adjacent to the Art Walk. This is a process similar lo the how the Town's recreational trails maps are currenUy distributed' Programmed Events and Tours The Art Walk can also be experienced as part of special events such as art shows, festivals, community events and other temporary uses. Programmed special events are recommended to occur throughout the year along the Art Walk and should be coordinated with the newly created Town Marketing and Special Events Advisory Board and with the retail or merchants' associations of the Mall, Snowmass Center, and proposed Base Village. lt is recornmended that as each piece of artwork is completed, an opening reception will be held to celebrate tha new installation and to educate the community about the arlist, artwork, meaning and its importance to Snowmass. Programmed events can also occur more frequently. Performers and enlertalners can be located along the Art Walk tO add another layer of art to.the experi'ence. Art Walk Master Plan 10-16-17 TC Packet -fo o Page 60 of 207 p.6 { { 59 Pttbilc Nt al ll:o SrPwnass Wage TansllSlathn Physicol Elernenls Walk Route The Art Walk is intended to be a meandering path connecting existing and proposed gathering places, embracing existing public art located throughout the Town and providing connectivity between existing and proposed amenities. The Art Watk is planned to connect the Tovln's cornmercial centers of the Mall, the Snowmass Center and the proposed Base Village to strengthen pedestrian connections and to add vitality to the pedestrian experience. This reinforces a major goal of the Town Council and staff to strengthen the three commercial areas into a cohesive Town center. The Art Walk is designed to maximize the use of the existing lrail system, such as the Benedict Trail, Brush Creek Trails, and May Fly Trail, as well as establish new connections where missing. A Master Plan graphic illustrating the general route and art locations is included in this document. This graphic can be incorporated into the proposed Art Walk brochure ?nd map. Key locations throughout the Town and along the path have been identified for the creation of several loops and include the Mall, Base Vlllage, Snowmass C'enter, Anderson Ranch and The Rodeo/Entryway. These public spacos provide context for orientation and an engaging interface between art, commercial/retail and various other services. Basic public facilities such as restrooms, drinking fountains and seating are available at these locations and are complimentary components contributing to the success of the Art Walk. The Art Walk also provides another reason for residents and guests to visit these commercial areas. All members of the community are encouraged to interact with and enjoy the Art Walk. The designed route will provide access to as much of the Art Walk as possible, but due to the steep, sloping nature of this mountaln resort, only portions of the Art Walk will be completely accessible. The Master Plan graphic identifies those areas of the Art Walk that are accessible, The course of the path has been designed such that it has a relationship to the existing transit system and can be experienced from any number of starting points and, loo, can be finished in any location. The loops create opportunities to experience shorter lengths of the Art Walk. Art Walk Master Plan 10-16-17 TC Packet -il-Page 61 of 207 p.7 60 Location of Art The Art Walk route and planned artwork locations were designed based on a combination of lhe lollowing criteria: . Context (developed-Mall, Basely'illage, natural-Brush Creek/yarrow Park) . Facilities (comfortlrestroom, food,skiing) . Special Features (views/Photo opportunilies, sun exposure, activity crossroads, kid-sPecifl c) . Route (exisling, proposed, ownership, proximity to transit and parking) . Art (existing, proposed, proximity/relationship of arl along route) . Access (transil, parking areas, level of diffrculty-steps and/or steep slopes) The Master Plan illustrates the Art Walk route and proposed general art locations and is included in this document. The intent is to prepars a more detail€d analysis of each sub-area of the Art Walk to specifcally locate adwork. bne of the firct efforts identiRed as a next stap lor implementation of lhe Master Plan is to prepare a detailed analysis of lhe Mall Loop-the ldentilied first phase. The detailed analysis of lhe Mall LoOp, and subsequent phases of the Art.Walk, should include a more detailed identification of the above criteria, including determining the frequency of art locations, encouraging elements of"discovering" art along the route, and opportunities for events programming. connectivity to Existing Trails and Tra nsit The Art Walk is designod lo provide connections between existing and proposed destinations within the Town. By using the existing trail system and connecting lo the established transit system, the Art walk will be tamiliar and accessible lo most of the community. There are sevsral locations at which the lransit system accesses the prdect and are identitied on the Masler Plan graphic. Slgnage and Orientation A system of signage is proposed for the Art Walk to ideniify the walk roul€, to descdbe lhe artworks located along the rout6, and to assist ln wa!,finding and orientalion. Ihe design of thls system is identified as an early effort for lhe Art Walk implemenlation. Art Walk Mastar Plan 10-16-17 TC Packet -p .D Page 62 of 207 p.8 Opportuniiies i)r the inclusion of art exist ln olh€r areas of the Town, not identified in this Master Plan, and should be considered lhroughout the planning and design ol other Town projects. A list can be found in the Appendix. 61 Pubtic Art, an Alpine Gsdcn localed along BenedidTnil Operotionol Elemenls Maintenance of the Walk The pedestrian path for the Art Walk will to continue to be repaired and maintained by the Town Parks and Trails Staff as currently exists. Funding allocated in the General Fund to the Trails Committee line item Irails accommodales this work. Maintenance to the path will be provided in accordance with guidelines already in place for the maintenance of the existing trails system. Maintenance of Art Reliable, longterm maintenance for the artwork will be provided. The art should be maintained in accordance with the maintenance guidelines provided by the project artist. Approximately ten percent of the SAAB budget should be allocated for ongoing survey and maintenanCe of the collection to ensure that the art is regularly and properly maintained. Routine maintenance of public artwork will be funded by the Art Walk Maintehance budget and staff will be provided through the Town Public Works Department. The SAAB will conduct a maintenance survey of the entire collection at least once every two years' lt will be important for SAAB to gain a clear agreement from each artist relinquishing rights to SAAB and the Town for lhe maintenance of Tow+owned artworks. This will protect SAAB and the Town from potential liabitity claims by artists. Art Selection The most important decision in implementing the Art Walk is the selection of the artists. lt is imperative that all goals established in the Master Plan and allgoals defined for each particular project are understood and embraced by the artist. Opportunities to involve the broader community in the art selection process can also be identified. A variety of methods available for the artist selection process are listed below. Any single method or combination of methods can be used. Open Competition An Open Competition is an art selection process that allows any artist to submit their qualifications, description and imagery of past work and credentials to the SAAB and be eligible for the projecl. The "Call to Artists,' Art Walk Master Plan 10-16-17 TC Packet *13,Page 63 of 207 p.9 62 or competition adverlisement, v,/ill provide a detailed description of the plciect that allows artists to determine whether their work is appropriate to the proiect. Invitational ComPetition An lnvitational Compelition invites a very small number of artists (usually between lhree and five) to submit their qualifications, desctiption and imagery of past work and credentials to the SAAB and be eligible for the proiect. Direct Selection Direct Selection is when a specific artist is selected for a particular project' This process is generally discouraged, bul can be used when circumstances such as project timeline, communlty considerations and/or client demand occur. An ongoing list of eligible artists, pre-approved by the SAAB, should be used in ths case of a Direct Selection projocl' criteria for Artist and/or Artwork Selectaon All of the following musl be c.onsidered in the Process of s€l€cling an artist or piece of art for the Art Walk. Qualr'fcatrbns-Arlisls will be selecled based on their qualifications as demonslraled through the following items: appropriateness of artwork medium and concepts as they relate 1o project goals end setling, past artwork, and exp€rience collaborating with the community' QualitfThe design capabilities of the artist and the inherenl quality of thsk past artwork is of the hlghest importance. Retalionship-Arlwork designs should be approPriate in scale, material, form and content for the immediate commuoity and ihysical envlronments with which they relate. Art Walk Master Plan 10-16-17 TC Packet N-Page 64 of 207 p.1o lrregrdA-Conslderation will be given to structural and surlace integrity and protection oflhe propossd artwork against then, vandalism, weathering and excessive maintenance and rspair cosls. ( 63 Public Liability-Safety conditions or factors that may bear on public liability should be considered in selecting an artwork. DiversityThe SAAB will strive for diversity of style, scale, media and artists, including ethnicity and gender of arlists selected. Rotation of Art Some of the artwork to be located along the Art Walk should be rotated in order to provide a variety of art to be experienced throughout the lifetime of the Walk and to create a draw for visitors to retum each year. This will provide for a cross- section of art, reflecting the Town's history as well as its contemporary times, to always be included in the Art Walk. An agreement between the artist and the SAABffown should be negotiated to establish the term of the art, lt is . recommendgd that the term be as short as one year and be no longer than ten years, though conlract renewal could be available. Opportunities for providing yearly draws to the Art Walk should also include sp6cial events, such as a yearly arts and crafts show, and a changing variety of entertalners and performers, Phasing The Art Walk will be accomplished in phases. The phases are created to be large enough to be self-sustaining and provide an exciting experience, but also small enough to be realistically completed. Phase One is recommended lo include the Malt Loop because the trail system is already in place and it is an existing center of pedestrian activity. A Phase One-A is proposed for Year 2003 as a way to implement a portion of the Mall Loop with a minimum of funds. The intent is to quickly build community awareness for the Art Walk through the following efforts: Develop a special events/performers/entertainers program for the summer and fall, in conjunction with the Mall Merchants and the Markeling and Special Events Board, Create an information packet for local media and Aspen and Snowmass Chamber Resort Associations that includes a summary of the Master plan and map, and describes the events planned for summer and fall. This can also be completed in coordination with the Marketing and Special Events Board. SAAB members ffin meet with the newspaper editorial boards and Art Walk Master Plan Public kl at Yarcw Parl< by adist James Surle a a 10-16-17 TC Packet -ls O Page 65 of 207 p.11 64 Chamber representatives to generate media and guest interest in the Art Walk, Fabricate and instatl Art Walk directional signs to mark the Mall Loop. Phase Two ls recommended to include the Base Village Loop and the needed trail connections between Base Villaoe and the Mall. The Base Village Loop will need to be created in coordinalion wilh the phas€d Base Village coostruction. The Base Village Loop illustrated on the Master Plan graphic reflects the preliminary plans for th€ developmenl. Phase Three is recommended lo include the Snowmass Center Loop, Redevelopm€nl preliminary plans for the Snowmass Center are under Town review, though the construction schedulo is uncertain. There is slillan opportunity to create the Snowmass Center Loop with the currenl Center even if the redevelopment plans are not oxeouted. Phasos Four and Five-Anderson Ranch Arls Center and the Enlryway Loops, respectively-will be the final phases for implemantation of the Art Walk. ThB proposed phasing is illusirated on the Master Plan graphic. Easements and use agreemenls are ths most popular option that wlll allow the Art Walk to occur on private lands. With an easement and use agreemenl, the prop6rty o,.vner continues to own the land, while lhe easemenuagresment allows activities to occur within a designsted portion of lhat land. There are several lypes of easements such as a n?ht ofpublic access eassment, which allows public access within a defined podion of lhe property or a loint use aasemenl, which allows multiple uses, such as a sewer line and a trailalignment. Eitherof these can be used in the case of the Art Walk. Art Walk Master Plan 10-16-17 TC pack"t - l(e- p.12 Route Acquisition / Use Agreements / Approvals Some po ons ol the designated Art Walk route are not currently owned by lhe Town, nor do they have lhe necessary easemenls and/or use agrBsmen'ts that will allow for activities and uses associated with lhe proposed Art walk to occur. Mechanisms for establishing rights of way through parcels nol owned by lhg Town in order to make continuous connections for the Ad Waik include purchase, dedicalion, land swap, or most commonly lhrough an easement dedication. A purchase, which results in full rights to the property, is tho mosl expensivs way to acquire land for the Art Walk, and is generally discouraged. Anolher option lo acquire full rights io a piece of property is through a dedication procsss. Page 66 ot 207 65 A land svrap is another oplion if lhe potential project partner is willing to exchange their land for land owned by the Town. Condemnation ofth€ property could also be considered as a tool for land acquisition but should be avoided because, allhough for a public purpose, creates negative publicity and can stifle public support for the Ait Walk. The Town Attomey can assist lhe SAAB and/or the Trails Committee in selecting the appropriate means for route acquisition and use agreements. Some activities and special events proPosed for the Art Walk will require a 'special use permit.' Typically these permits are granted on a per-event, one- time-only basis by the Town Planning Director and/or Planning and Zoning Commission. lt is recommended lhat a "blankef' special use permit be pursued to cover all activities and special events, including the placement of artwork. This permit would be initially approved by thB Planning and Zoning Commbsion and would be valid in perpetuity. A provision should be incfuded in the permit language that would allow a review of lhe permit if the Town or adjac€nt property owners believe the SAAB is in'violation of any permit provisions. Other Land Uss Code changes may be required to allow for the sale of food and/or goods in public rights of way. This should be researched as an initial step in the Master Plan's implementatlon. It is recommend€d that the owners and Merchants/Retail Associstions for the Mall, the Snowmass Center, and proposed Base Village be coordinated with as the Masler Plan is implemented. Becaus€ the Art Walk is locatsd wlthin lheir properties and/or jurisdictions lhey will be an imPortant parln€r throughout lhs impl€mentation. Funding sour€es The following funding oplions should be pursued by the SAAB in ordar to sustain annual funding for lhe Art Walk, The Art Walk funding will be provided through a combination of the b€low.d€scribed funding options and will supplement lhe SAAB line item in the General Fund. The funds will be allocal€d by the SAAB to an Art Walk line ilem that 'rvill oover the short-term and long-term capital, operations, and maintenance costs. The funding chart found on the following page illustrat€s lhe model recommended in this Master PIan. The model maximizes the use of existing Art Walk Master Plan 10-16-17 TC Packet -.1? -Page 67 of207 p.13 66 budget line ilems and the overall budget frame$'rork while creating new line items for the Art Walk under the existing SAAB line item A po(ion of the SAAB budget received from lhe General Fund will be allocated to the AIl Walk line item The SAAB will divide this allocalion among the CaPital, Opeations and Maintenance budgets. lt is requested that five percent of the Town Landscape Architect's time be dedicated to ofiedng operational support to the Art Walk, including grant writing, design efforts, and easemenuuse agreement research' Opporlunitiss to build the Ari Walk's Capilal budget include benefils from applicants gained through the Town's Land Use review proc€ss, successful grant writing efforts and Private funds. The existing Irail Srgns line item budgel can be tapped Ior additional wood signs. Each potential capital tunding source is more fully descdbed below. Opportunilies to build lhe Maintenance budget include grant writing efforts and private fund8. The exisling frails and Confacl Services- Lal?dscaps line item budgets can be tapped for trail 6nd landscape maintenance' Each pot8ntial mainlenance funding source is more fully described belgw The following potential funding opportunities include sources other than the Town's General Fund and RETT Fund. The SMB understards lhat in order for the Art Walk to succeed private, non-profit and othar govemm6nt funding sources must be created. All funds achieved lhrough these sources will b€ collected and earmarked for dePosit into ths Art Watk line item in lhe Town's budget. The following funding sources are recommended: Percent for Art A Perc€nt for Art program can be created for the purpose of setting aside a smalt percentage (one percent) of the conslruclion budget of proiects initialed by the Town of Snowmass Village for development of art works in accordance with the Masler Plan. These public art pieces may be located in immediate proximity to the development poect but will always be located along lhe Art Walk route. Art Walk Master Plan 10-16-17 TC Packet l(-Page 68 of 207 p,14 67 Community Purpose Funds tor the Art Walk can be achieved through a private developeis Iulfillmenl of Community Purpose as de{ined in'the Town's Land Use Code. Developers can receive variances from dimensional limitations established for their property by achieving one or more Community Purposs. The Arl Walk is recommended to be considered a Community PurPose under tho definition'Develop necessary public facilities"' Real Estate Transter Tax The Real Estale Transfer Tsx (REID line items rails 400.50{5, Ira,i Stgrs 4OO.50-51 and Contact Se?ices- Landscape 400.50-56 are rscommended 10 be used tor the Art Walk. These are existing line items in lhe Town's budgoL Sponsorships/ Donations Sponsorship or donations for public art can be directed towards a specific artist and/or location along the Art Walk or can be allocated as determined by lhe SAAB, whichever is prelerred. Contributions from eiiher prlvale groups or individual6 are recommended and are an important means to realizing lhe Art Walk. Contributors can be anonymous or identified wlth an art plaque. A sponsor/donor program will be created as a key next step ln the implementalion oflhe Master Plan, The benefits to a potential sponsor/donor program includs the ability lo make taxdeductible contributons. Ths Anderson Ranch Arts Center is a non-prolit organizauon thst can accept tax- deductible contributions. The creation of the sponsoBhip/donor program will lnclude working with the Town Attorney to determine the best way to provido this benefit to the Art Walk. Art Walk Master Plan 10-16-17 TC Packet fl-p.'15 Pu D /su bd ivisi on/ Cond ominium Condition An ordinance could be adopted to amend the Town's Land use Code to specifically require public art as a component of a pro.ie61 undergoing a Planned Unit Development, Subdivision or Condominium Land Use approval. This requirement can be included as a condition of approval and can take the form ot a provision of art on the Art Walk or a casEinJieu payment. Page 69 of 207 68 Art Loans Funding, in the form of an art loan, t/yill also be pursued by lhe SAAB. Art can be placed along the Art Walk and included in the project for a defined period of time via a loan. An agreement betweeo the SAABIIown and the arl londer, in accordance with this Master Plan, should be negotiated to accommodate this arrangement, including maintenance. Another typ€ of art loan which can also provide funds to lhe Art Walk is art placed within the An Wak that is for purchase. The artwork woold go through the SAAB selection process described above and $,ould be offered for sale with a discrete sign, A percentage of the sales commission would be given to SAAB tor the Arl Walk proiect. Colorado Council on tha Arts Grants to Arlists and Organizations will be available January 2003 creat Outdoors Colo'ado (applications generally due ln tho fall) Local Government Grant open Space Grant Trails Grant Forest Service Urban For€sUNEA Grant Environmental Protection Agency 319 Grant (Environmental A( improving water quality) National Endowment for the Arls (applicalions genenlly due in the apnng) C reativity/Org anizational Capacity Grant Roaring Fork Outdoor Volunteers (applicatlons generally ctue in the fall) Trail maintenance and consuuction assislance through work days of volunteers. Art Walk Master Plan 10-16-17 TC Packet ?10 Page 70 of 207 p.16 Grants Grants and/or matching grants should be sought from national and local foundations, arts organizations and oth6r organizalions. Sources for grants include: 69 Funding Process The SAAB will prepare a work plan and budget annually for the Art Watk. This plan and budget will be based on a five-year budget horizon, similar to those prepared by each of lhe Town',s divisions. The sAAB will work with the Town's Finance Director to include the information in the Town's budget review process. This will include SAAB's presenlation to the Town Council. Art Walk Master Plan 10-1 6-17 TC Packet %,1t &Page 71 of 207 p.17 70 Next Sleps 2903 Action Items Resoonsibility Q1; Review and Adopt Master Plan Town Council Q1: Establish Funding Line ltems in 2003 Budget Finance Director e1: Draft Land Use Code Amendments Planning Department Q1: Adopt Land Use Code Amendments . Town Council/P&Z Q1 : Develop Sponsorship/Donor Program SAAB Q2: Begin Fundraising: Sponsorship/DonorProgram SAAB/LandscapeArchitect & Grant Writing (O2-A4) e2: lmplement Phase One-A Art Walk Special Events SAAB/Public Works/Landscape program,Media/ChamberAwarenesseffort, Architect Signage ,o2-Ail Q3: Prepare 2004 Work Plan/Budget Ps'Aq SAAB Q4: Participate in Annual Town Budget Process IAAB, Finance Director & Town Council Q4: Conduct Art Selection Process SAAB Q1 - F,rst Quarler of 2003 January through March Q2 - Second Quader of 2003 April through June Q3 - Third Quarter of 2003 July thraugh September Q4 - Fourth Quafter of 2a03 October through December Art Walk Master Plan 10-16-17 TC PackeLJ;-Page 72 of 207 p.18 71 Responslbilities The Town Council will: . Review and approve lhe AnnualWork Plan presented by the Snowmass Arts Advisory Board. . consider ths SAAB Work Plan during their annual budget process The Snowmass Arts Advisory Board (SAAB) will: . Advise Town Council on all matlers related to the Art Walk, including the acquisilioo and Placement of works of art as well as the maintenanc€' removal, rotation, relocation, or alteration ot existing works of art in lhe Town's poss€ssion and perform all duties with raspect to implementing the Art walk as described ln this Master Plan . With Staff, develop the AnnualWork Plan and recommend to th€ Town Council for approval . Monitor lhe Arl Walk to onsure its practices reflect lhe adopted guidelinos and policies contained in this document' . Monilor the condillon and maintenance of the Art Walk colleclion' . Establish a pool of potential artists for consideration for lhs Art Walk and/or other potential Proiocts' . Oversee the aesthetic and technical considerations ot individual projects from artist selection through proiect compl€lion' . Based on recommendalions brought foMard by Stafi, periodically review and recommend changes to the A,l Walk guldelines, policies and procedurss' The TOSV Landscape Architec't will: . Provide leadership and vision in the development of the Art Walk and Art Program. . Negoliate contracls between the selected artists and the Town. . S€rve as a catalyst for increasing private sec{or lnvolvement in public art' . Assist SAAB in developing the Annual Wotk Plan' . Prepare budgets based on lhe Annual Work Plan. . Research route acquisition and use agreemenl needs. Art Walk Master Plan 10-16-17 TC Packet -a3 ,L p.19 Page 73 of 207 72 The Town Attorney will; . Assist the SAAB and Trails Committee in selecting the appropriate means for route acquisition. . Assisl the SAAB to determine the best means to provide a tax-deductible sponsorship/donor Program. The Town Planning Director will: . Draft the recommended PUDlSubdivision/Condominium Land Use Code amendments and gain Town Council approval- . Draft the recommended "blanke{' special Use Permit to allow the Art Walk and its uses to operafe as an Actual Annual Temporary Use. The Finance Director will: . Work with the SAAB to include the Art Walk budget in the Town's budget review process. . Process payments and invoices forSAAB. Artists will: . Submit credentials, visuals, proposals and/or project rnaterials as directed for consideration by the SAAB review panel. . Conduct the necessary research, including attending project orientations and touring project sites, when posslble. . lf selected, execute and complete the artwork or design work, or transfer title of an existing artwork to the Town in a timely and professional manner. . Work closely with the project manager, design architect, andlor olher design professionals associated with the project. . Make presentations to the SflAB and others at project mllestones as required by contract. . Provide warranty and maintenance documentation for their projects Art Walk Master Plan 10-16-17 TC Packet a{5 Page 74 of 207 p,2A { { 73 llluslrolions Art Walk Master Plan Graphic Art Walk Master Plan 10-16-17 TC Packet -J.S Page 75 of 207 p.21 74 Appendices Appendix One List of Participants Snowmass Arts Adv't$.orv Board Members Carol Balchelder, Chair Karen Andrews Judy Clauson David FiEgerald Jan Grenda Lisa Henkel Megan Bty Humphrey Shirley Millard Lols L. Sando Carol Strickman Ail Walk Charrgtte Farticioants Gary Suiter, Facilitator Carol Batchelder, SAAB Chair Valerie Alexander, Coordinator' Jen Dolecki, Coordinator Karen Andrews Jim Bakar Mary Beth Blake Amanda Boxtell Doug Casebeer Judy Clauson Jan Grenda Larry Ladin Bob Purvis Paul Shepherd Mike Segrest Barbara Sorenson Nancy Stevens Allison Stewart Craig Thompson Lois Upper Robert Voigt Other Acknowledoments Linda Sandels, Art Committee Head Fran Suiter, Visionary Founder Ben Wood, Architect / Auth or, BTA PIan- A Road, a cnek and a Communtty in Maturation -Consuttant Bluegreen Sheri Sanzone, Principal Valerie Alexander, Associate Art Walk Master Plan (i 10-16-17 TC Packet -cQtr aP Page 76 of 207 p.22 t 75 Appendix Two opportunities for Additional Art The following items idenfify additional opportunities for the inclusion of ar1 throughoul the Town of Snowmass, These opportunities include: . Major Traffic Corddor Entries/lntersections . lndividual Neighbofiood Enhies/lntersections . Town Center Entry . Town Hall Entry . Transit Statlons . Pedeslrian Enlries and Passagaways . Pedaslrianlntersections . Stree0ights,Lighting . Traffic Signals . Fences and/or gates . Eenches . Signage, Way-tinding Elements and/or Directional Art . Unifylng Planlings Schemes andror Medlan Design . Landscape Design . Pavlng Patams . Children's Play Equipment . Exercise Facilitles . Drinking Fountains . Water Fealuras . Clocks . Manhole Covgrs . Trash R€ceptacles . Buildlng Exterior Facadss . Building Exterior Plaza Design . lnterior Floors . lnterior Walls . lnterior Sculptutg . lnlerior Lighting Design Art Walk Master Plan 10-16-17 TC Packet -J7 Page 77 of207 p.23 76 Appendix Three Innovative Ideas for Maximizing Public Art Resources . Select artists early and include them on the project design team in the beginning of a capital project so that the artist's component of a project may be partially funded through the base construction budget' I Provide a "pre.approved" artist list to developers, designers, etc to eliminate multiple efforts over the lifetime of the Art Walk' . Artists should design basic components of the community infrastructure such as street furniture, bus shelters, traffic lights and manhole covers, signage, etc. . Consider development incentives and regulations that permit variations of building or lot standards in order to provide public art amenities. Art Walk Master Plan 10-1 6-17 TC Packet AE I Page 78 of 207 p.24 t (. 77 Art Wolk Funding Chort a o I O) I { -{o ! o)oxo t s ! o)(oo !(o o N)o! R€.T.t. FUND lntuTr{tl si8o! MdnleDnE lrudusc Rc{lw{ i"qui.d (?ma otltcn." Cxtsr,.. a ArtWdk EPA-3]9 78 Appendix H. 2016 SAAB S.W.O.T. Analysis Stren8ths . Professional Contacts through other community involvement . Passion for community and the arts . TOSV support . Willing arts partners weaknesses . Time to work on projects o Adequate funding . Need more Board members . Lack of visibility in the community Opportunities Pursue mission and achieve Town Beautification lncreased connectivity Enhance shoulder Build community Strengthen Threats Residents don't like what Possibility of stepping on leaders Overextension - setting SAAB up 1 0-16-1 7 TC Packet a a a 28 Page 80 of 207 79 Appendix l. PUBLIC ART DIAGRAM Base village Arts Location Map \ ) I I I I t" I I I a & 1 0-16-17 TC Packet ffi n LEOIXO: em& --4--< sNOWTT SS SASt Vru.AGE MAiCH ts. ?016 , PUD vrtt.AcE wDl ExH,EIIS CrElr lul U TRELATEo Q lffi P62l 29 Page 81 of 207 tr5ll EEI 80 AppendL.l Tczne/ SNOWftfASS ?'&z/e Public Art Solicitation and Sel€ction Policy ANOWMAEIE! VILI-AGE AFITEI AtrlVIAOFIY BOAI=ID S A EI 30 10-16-17 TC Packet Page 82 of 207 81 ART ACQUISITION POLICY Revised October 16, Explore ++Be PURPOSE VISION POLICY GUIDELINES PROCESS OF ART PUBLIC ART ACQUISITIONS a. Permrnent Art Acquisitions 1 0-16-1 7 TC Packet l. ) 3. {. 3l Page 83 of 207 TABLE OF COI,{TENTS 82 b. Donations rnd Bequests c. Loans ART ACQUISITION & SELECTION CRITERIA l. Artistic Merit 2. Site J. lnstallation 1. FinancialObligations 5. Time Allowances 6. SpecialConditions EXCEPTIONS TO THIS POLICY REVISIONS TO THIS POLICY Appendix A Methods of Solicitation Appendir B Sample Callto Artish Appendir C Artist Release Form Appendix D Art Acquisition Application I. PURPOSE To provide leadership in the supprt and development ofarts and culture in the Town ofSnowmass Village. To develop a body otart ofcultural value that will enhance and management of temporary and permanent artworks in the Town's colleclion. 11 will be the dul,v of Snowmass Arts Advisor-v Board (SAAB) to advise fte Torvn 32 1 0-16-1 7 TC Packet Page 84 of 207 6. 7. 8. 83 Council inconnectionwithmattersrelatingtopublicartdevelopmentandto implementthePolicy'withinthescopeoftheArtsStrategicPlanwhichprovidesalramework andrvorkingvisionfortheacquisitionandexhibitionofsitespecificobjectsolarl andarthappeningsinspeciticTownlocations. 2. VISION The Town ofSnorvmass Village is committed to achieving a dynamic collection ofartworks of outstanding caliber and artistic merit that is recognized as an asset to the Town. Objects will be installed and displayed in accessible, visible locations in Town buildings, parks, gardens, on trails and walkways, near amenities and/or on public propertl. This Policy recognizes art in the public domain as an essential compnent olcrealing a vibrant community, stimulating economic viability and fostering conneclivity and civic pride. The conlemplation oltemprary- and permanent art installations throughout the Town will provide opportunites for arl experience and give residents and visitors new ways to connect rvilh one anolher and the environment. 3. POLICY GUIDELINES Artworks considered for acquisition and commission as well as art projects and programs initiated by SAAB will be evaluated according to the following guiding principles: o Acquisitions and programs must enhance the identity of a world-class resort destination and reflect and uphold values befitting a welcoming mountain community o Artwork must be deemed suitable for exhibition in public space The collection will be without gender or ethnic bias and will strive to reflect the diversity of the local population and sunounding area Opportunity to support is encouraged and preference may be given towards artists and/or artwork demonstrating a relevant connection to the Town and local area Acquisitions and commissions will be considered in an ethical, accountable and transparent manner The collection will illustrate a wide variety of medi4 philosophies and techniques Programs and artwork will enhance the experience ofpublic spaces and engage all ages and abilities JJ 10-16-17 TC Packet Page 85 of 207 I a a a 84 a Will ideally foster connectivity betrveen existing and proposed amenities Should be appropriately placed in specific locations for largest visual and experiential impacta {. PROCESS OF ART SOLICITATION SAAB shall assume authority for decisions concerning the acquisition of public art as guided by the Policy guidelines and will make recommendations to Town Council on such acquisitions, whether the objects are donated/bequests, loans, rotational exhibits or commissions (through open competition, invitational competition or direct selection). The Board may determine and adopt a method of art solicitationbest-suitedforaprojectt0createthedesiredoulcome. SeeAppendixASampleCalltoArtists.Any formofartsolicitationadoptedbySAABwillbe guided by review criteria for art acquisition as stated in this Policy, unless otherwise determined by SAAB or as directed by the Town Council. s. PUBLTC ART ACQUISITIONS All Art Acquisitions ln order for an artwork to be considered for acquisition as part of the Town's collection, the potential artist, donor or representative is required to submit an application to SAAB addressing the Art Acquisition and Selection Criteria (see #6 below and Appendix D Art Acquisition Application). In making a determination on acquiring a piece of permanent artwork, SAAB may solicit public input from Snowmass Village residents and visitors. To this end, public education regarding the object under consideration should be promoted. This may include prominent online postings which provide an opportunity for public comment and community attendance at SAAB meetings no less than 14 days prior to the date of SAAB's decision, photos or renderings ofthe proposed object, along with any available artist commentary and materials, at www.tosv.com. Additionally, relevant information may be distributed for publication in the local newspaper. Related SAAB meeting notices should also be published online and advertised to allow for public discussion and community feedback regarding the piece. SAAB may elect - but is under no obligation - to hear comments from "industry experts" in appropriate art and trade fields (such as architecture), experienced professionals from art entities, collection curators or artists or individuals who are not participating in the project under consideration. After reviewing the artist's submissions, available public opinion and possibly expert commentary, as well as other related materials. SAAB will vote to make a recommendation to Town Council to: l) request more information or,2) accept the object for acquisition, or 3) decline the object for acquisition. 34 1 0-16-1 7 TC Packet Page 86 of 207 85 a. Donations and Beouests Artwork may be offered to the Town as a donation or bequest. At certain times, SAAB may also solicit donated art. Prior to being acquired by the Town, SAAB will evaluate the potential gift according to the review criteria set forth in this Policy and subject to the following: o The Town Council and SAAB are not obligated to accept gifu o Where artwork is offered to the Town as a gift, the object will be considered for the collection by SAAB under the guidelines and criteria set out in this Art Acquisition Policy as well as the framework of the Arts Strategic Plan with a recommendation to the Town Council o The display location may be recommended by SAAB to Town Council . A contract between the Town and the donor is required where both the donor's and the Town's responsibilities regarding the piece are stipulated . Conditions regarding site location, installation, public exhibition, ongoing conservation and maintenance requirements, valuation, responsibility for repairs of damage, as well as other matters may be deemed necessary and require approval by the Town Attorner b. Calls to Artists . The Town Council and SAAB are not obligated to accept solicited artwork through a Call to Artists r Where artwork is solicited by the Town, the object will be considered for the collection by SAAB under the guidelines and criteria set out in this Art Acquisition Policy as well as the framework of the Arts Strategic Plan with a recommendation to the Town Council o The display location may be recommended by SAAB to Town Council 35 1 0-16-1 7 TC Packet Page 87 of 207 86 A contract between the Town and the artist is required where both the artist's and the Town's responsibilities rsgarding the piece are stipulated Conditions regarding site location, installation, public exhibition, ongoing conservation and maintenance requirements, valuation, responsibility for repairc ofdamage. as well as other matters may be deemed necessary and require approlal by the Torvn Attome, c. Loans SA]\B ma] solicl and accept artworli and inslallations lor tempmq, displal- as rgred with lhe donor, artist or npr€sentalive. In many instances, sile localio0 willbc pre-selected. Wilh lown Council appr0val, lhe Board shall havg discretion lo accepl art rvork on loan lora limited priod oftimt. with the undcrslanding thal lhe objecl ma) b€ sold b) the artisl and/or relocaled elsewherB in To\tn. l. Shon-Tun Shorl-term artwork displal and its installalion is inte0ded to be non-tsrnuEo! visually stimulating and creale minimalfinancial impact. The object may be exhibited for a lired dumtion. a season and or a spetial erent or comptition. 2. Long-Tern Lorg lerm loans include an) artwork officiall) loaned t0lheTom for exhibitbn as stated ud s$cifiod in 0n Agreemenl fol Placemenl ofArtwork. Details of payment, mainbnance cosls, liability, etc., musl be descriM in a contracl htwet[ the donor and TowL Long term loan art is generdlly considered lo be on display for a minimum oflwelvg months. d.@!s!4!$!!is Rohtional art displays may & long or slrc -lerm, puchasd or or loan. For example, sculptures may be displayed for a spcific armunt of time aod lhen mlaled to different locations and/or n€w obje.is may be inlrcducsd. 6, ART ACQUISITION & SELECTION CRITERIA Whether lhe Town acquies a gifl or commissi0ns an alt object vill be guided bv the Policy acquisilion criltria and SAAB s professional erpcrlise. Consideration 0f artwork submissions will h subject l0 the following rBview crileria: 1. Artistic Merit a. Arlislic m.ril and technical comp.lcnc€ ofllE artworli. including consideration ofits arlistic, social. gcogmphical and/or historical sigificance (which may- irrludeawrinen description, dmwings andlor maquene of tlc proposed artwork) b. Qualifications 0f lhd aflilt(which mar includr image o[ pashrork, resune. referenfts, and publislNd rcviews) l6 10-16-17 TC Packet Page 88 of 207 87 . Artists must have a sustained visual arts practice as well as demonstrated exhibition and/or collection history o Emerging artists will be considered where a strong professional potential is demonstrated c. Artw'orb will be intrinsically sound in condition as rvell as reasonably immune to deterioration in routine operations, display, packing and transporting d. Must demonstrate compatibilitl and relevance of the work of art within the context of Snowmass Village e. Wananty of originality and authenticiry- of the work of art (only original work or limited editions shall be considered) f. Provenance (origin) ofexisting artwork 2. Site a The object's physical condition is excellent and is suitable to the propsed site with respect to its general social audience and physical environmenl b. Scale, form, content, color and design ofthe artwork in relation to tk site (NOTE: Some neighborhoods/villages, such as Base Village, West Village and Snowmass Center may have spacific design criteria or special conditions) C. Ecological impact (e.g., prcentage of Impervious cover) d. Accessibility to the public, including prsons wilh disabilities B. Texl compnents (i.e., signage and/or plaques) 3. Installation a. Site-spccificrequirementslorinstallation(e.g.,electricit_r',lighting,waterandsewereasements,orotherservices) b. Dcsired methodiprocessslstcm c. Storage requirements, ifany d. Maintenance requirements, both immediate and long term e. Saltty standards f. Proposed timeline for the project 4. Financial Obligations a. Allcostsassociatedwithfabricationandinstallation(includingsitepreparation,nameplaquedesignandunveiling/dedicationevent,ifany') b. Sourceoffundinganddalefundsareavailable.(Moniesmustberaisedthroughprivatetundraisingortownfundinghforetheartworkmaybe fabricated) c. Estimated ongoing maintenance and conservation costs d. Statementofvalueofartworkforinsurancepurposes(i.e.,artist'scommissioncontractamountorprofessionalwrittenappraisalofexistingartu,ork) e. Council musl have suflcient resources t0 care for and safeguard the objecl to industry standards 10-16-1 7 TC Packet Page 89 of 207 37 88 5. Liability a. Suxeptibilitv of the artwork(s) to normal wear and to vandalism b. Potential risk to the public c. Public access, if necessary, as well as compliance with ADA d. Special insurance requirements 6. Timeliness a. Allolance olsufficient time for a complete review process to involved b. Timely and appropriate respnse from the artist, donor or 7. Special Conditions &. Any conditions oithe artwork impsed by the b. Artwork that contains logos 7. EXCEPTIONS TO THIS POLICY Due to lhe unique nature ofand exceptions should consider the 8. REVISIONS TO The Snowmass Arts Advisory Board 1 0-16-1 7 TC Packet and recommendalions for revision as needed to the Town Council for adoption. Page 90 of 207 by SAAB, the any other boards or neighborhood associations materials or information is required and/or SAAB mav in cerhin cases favor exceptions to this policy. Any' framework. 38 rcvlew 89 Appendlr A Methotls of Solicitation l. 0pen Competition An Open Competition is an art selection process based on criteria identified in a specific Call to Artists. Artists would submit their qualifications and credentials, along with other required materials, to SAAB in order to become eligible for the project. The Call to Artists or competition description provides detailed information about the project, including the type ofinstallation expected, location for the artwork, technical requirements, audience for the project, budget, timing of submissions, prize (if any) for the winning submissions, etc. A sample Call to Artists is provided in Appendix B 2. InvitotionalConpdition An Invitational Competition approaches a select group of artists to submit their qualifications and credentials to SAAB, along with other required materials as outlined in an invitation, to become eligible for a project The invitation is constructed similarly to the Call to Artists, described above. 3, Direct Seleclion Direct Selection is when a specific artist is selected for a project. This process can h used when circumstances such as por response to open competition, project timeline,communityconsiderationsand/orclientdemandoccur. ltwillhuptothediscretionoftheSAABtodecideifDirectSelectionisappropriate. IfDirect Selection is chosen, the SAAB will h respnsible for guiding the artist 0r piece selection based on the Review Criteria herein. 39 10-16-17 f C Packet Page 91 of 207 90 AppendLr B Sanple Coll to Arlists %/Qe Snowmass Arts Advisory Board Snowmass Yillage, Colorado httn:iico-snow massv i Ilagc.civicrrlus.comibids.aspr CALL FOR OUTDOOR TRAIL ART SUBMISSIONS DESCRIPTION OF PROJECT: The Snowmass Arts Advisory Board (SAAB). in conjunction with Snowmass Tourism, invites Colorado artists to creatively ignite Snorvmass Village's newest hiking and biking trails with public art. Installation(s) will open to the public in June 2017, accompanied by a kickoffcelebratory event. This is the first of a series of projects that express the SAAB's theme: "Explore.Connect.Be Inspired", Imagine hiking or pedaling along a trail on a glorious summer day. You turn a comer, expecting to climb or descend another hill, but you encounter something unexpected: a permanent art installation alongside the trai[. An already exhilarating experience in nature becomes more remarkable-a moment that lingers in the mind well after your ride is finished. The Town of Snowmass Village is seeking to create just such experiences, in four different locations along the 24-mile Snowmass Loop trail. From a list of submissions that must be received by December 1,2016, ajury made up of Snowmass Arts Advisory Board (SAAB) members and Snowmass Tourism staffwill select up to four pieces of art (sculpture, kinetic, environmental pieces, etc.) to be acquired by the Town of Snowmass Village. Either existing sculptures within an artist's inventory or proposals for a site-specific new 40 10-16-17 f C Packet Page 92 of 207 *rr.-4@ sltowftlAss 91 piece rvill be considered. In either case, sculptures should be sturdy enough to withstand life outdoors, year-round, rvith consideration on how the artist will permanently install the piece, given the remoteness of the trail segments where the art rvill be placed. Please see attached map and description oflocations that have already been selected, and suggested t)?es ofart that may be appropriate in those locations. The installation may be a single statement, a flew objects, or many repeating elements that might be clustered or aligned with biking and/or nature in mind. They may be found or recycled objects. They may add a unifying color, add light, be kinetic, invoke the mountains and/or biking as metaphor. The installations should encourage locals and visitors to walk and bike, search and seek out the different installations on the Snowmass Loop trail. At the bottom of this Call to Artists are links to articles about similar trail art programs. A. About Snowmass Village and this project: With a population ofjust under 3,000 year-round residents, Snowmass Village, Colorado Is locakd in the Brush Creek Valley about 5 miles southwest of CO 82, and 9 miles southwest of Aspen. Originally built as a ski resort, Snowmass-at-Aspen, in 1967 in unincorporated Pitkin County, the Town of Snowmass Village was incorporate d in 1977 and today is a year-round community with one of the best ski resorts in North America. Visitors come from all over the world to enjoy the world class ski slopes, hike and bike trails, and festivals. Because of the Town's cultural heritage involving the arts with the historical Anderson Ranch Arts Center, the caliber of intemational visitation on a year- round basis, and the local appreciation of arts and culture, the Snowmass Arts Advisory Board seeks to place more emphasis on public art throughout the community, and specifically on the Snowmass Loop trail. B. Opportunities, Goals and Mission The Snowmass Arts Advisory Board (SAAB) invites Colorado artists to creatively embellish the Snowmass Loop with public art. The installation(s) will be promoted through press rrleases, traditional and social media outlets, locally, regionally, nationally and internationally. Project goals are to: l. Strengthen Snowmass Village's identity as a premier mountain biking/hiking community2. Create a discovery experience through art on the Snowmass Loop3. Invite interaction among all trail users 4. Encourage users to explore, connect and be inspired SAAB Mission: 4l 1 0-16-1 7 TC Packet Page 93 of 207 92 "The mission of the Snowmass Village Arts Advisory Board is to demonstrate how the arts can contribute to the unique cultural identity of Snowmass Village. It is the Board's betief that the arts are intrinsic to the values, culture and heritage of our community. It is hoped that enhanced arts programming will promote a cultural consciousness, stimulate economic viability and foster a sense of community pride." C. Budget: $10,000 is all-inclusive (e.g. design, fabrication, installation and travel) for up to four installations averaging $2,500 each. These funds are derived from the Town of Snowmass Village's Tourism Department. D. Location: Specific locations for the installations have been chosen by the Town. Please see attached map and suggested types of themed art. E. Selection Process: (Note: this will be as set forth in the Art Acquisition Policy) l. SAAB's Selection Panel will evaluate the applications. This panel is composed of SAAB members representing artists, the Aspen Skiing Company and Anderson Ranch, together with Snowmass Tourism staff. 2. Up to four pieces/designs will be selected as art installations based on SAAB's goals in Section A above and the criteria in Section H below. 3. Finalists will receive $500 each to further develop project proposals. 4. Contractswill beawardedtotheselectedartistsfordevelopmentoftheartpieceandsite-specificinstallationbyJune4,20lT. F. Timeline: September 12,2016 - Request for Proposals (RFP) rcleased October 14,2016 - Deadline for submitting questions by email to: iuoocls'rirtosv.conr December l, 2016 - Deadline for art proposal submission December 15,2016 - Selection Committee selects up to four art proposals January 13,2017 - Town oflers contract to artists to produce and install the art February 1,2017 - Artists sign contract June 4, 2017 - Artist completes creation of the art piece and installs in the designated location. G. Eligibility: Professional visual artists at least l8 years of age residing in the state of Colorado are eligible to apply. Full-time, permanent Tou'n of Snorvmass Village employees, Torvn consultants, and SAAB members are ineligible. SAAB will select an artist without regard to race, gender, religion, sexual orientation, or disability. 42 10-16-1 7 TC Packet Page 94 of 207 93 H. Selection Criteria: (Note: this will be as set forth in the Art Acquisition Policy) l. The Artist The artist's statement of qualifications should demonstrate the ability to: L Be imaginative, creative, with freedom of approach b. Execute a public art project, including transport, fabrication, and installation c. Deliver projects on time and on budget d. Address engineering constraints, fabrication expertise, and quality construction (as applicable) 2. The Art and its Installation SAAB seeks installation(s) that: a. Help identiff Snowmass Village's identity as a premier mountain bikinglhiking community commitment by integrating biking and the arts within its trail system b. Are environmentally sound (e.g. do not damage natural areas) c. Express the theme: "Explore*Connect+Be Inspired" d. Are accessible and interesting to a diverse range ofpeople e. Do not compromise public safety or ADA standards (if required) f. Withstand the elements for a minimum of five years (or change [e.g. degrade] according to the artist's concept) g. Can be readily installed and maintained with limited use of heavy equipment l. Application Requirements Up to three pieces per artist may be submitted. Use the submission requirements listed here for each individual piece. Applications should be submitted electronically only, preferably as a single pdf file. Applications must include: --Artist's name, address, telephone, and e-mail address -Artist's bio and qualifications (see H.l . above) --A description of the art itself (see H.2. above) and why it would be a good addition to the Snowmass Loop bike trail in terms of its artistic intention, its appropriateness for Snowmass, etc. (500-word max). -Up to five photos of the sculpture if it already exists, or scaled renderings of the proposed art piece if it does not exist. Submit PDF format, resulting in the best image quality where the total file size remains under l0MB. Label photos and./or other attachments with your name, not the name of the project. For example: Jones.Johnjhotolof5.pdf. -The rveight and dimensions of the sculpture -A list of the materials used 43 10-16-1 7 TC Packet Page 95 of 207 94 --An explanation ofwhat is required to install the piece on the trail and how the artist rvill transport it to its designated location on the Snowmass Loop trail (keep in mind that vehicles and heavy equipment cannot be used in most locations). --A maintenance schedule ifneeded Note: The Selection Committee reserves the right to select as many or few pieces within the given budget or reject any or all submissions ifit feels the proposals do not meet their goals and expectations for the project. J. Deadline: 5 PM, December l, 2016 by pdf to email:jwoods@tosv.com K. Questions regarding the project should be submitted by e-mail only by 5 PM, October 14,2016 and directed to: Julie Ann Woods, FAICPA4LA Community Development Director Town of Snowmass Village iwoods ii losr'.com L. Submission: Submit applications to the Town of Snowmass Village at: http://co-snow massvill age.civicolus.cornlbids.aspx -lpoendix C ,-lrtist Release Fornt PTiBLIC ART AGRf,f,]UENT ThisPublicArtAgreement(the..Agreement'')ismadeandeffectivethis-dayof-byandbetweentheTownofSnowmass Village, a Colorado home-rule municipality ("TOSV") and _ (the "Artisf'), for the purposes and on the terms and conditions set forth below. Recitals 44 10-16-1 7 TC Packet Page 96 of 207 95 WHEREAS, public art contributes to the cultural and economic vibrancy and traditions of TOSV; WHEREAS, under this Agreement, public art includes works of visual art, as defined by the federal Visual Artists Rights Act of 1990, l7 U.S.C. $ l06A el. seg. ("VARA"), including paintings, drawings, prints, sculptures, or still photographic images in a single copy or in a limited edition of 200 or fewer copies or casts, as the case may be, signed and consecutively numbered by the artist or bearing other identiling mark ofthe artist-but not including posters, charls, maps, technical drawings, diagrams, applied art, motion pictures, audiovisual works, books, magazines, newspapers, periodicals, electronic publications, advertisements, promotional materials, and any works made for hire. WHf,REAS, Artist's work constitutes a work of visual art, defined above (tlre "Work"); WHEREAS, the legal instrument of ownership transfer of the Work to the Town, including any gifting or donation of the Work lo the Town, is attached herelo as Exhibit A. WHEREAS, the Town seeks to accept, display, maintain, relocate, and remove the Work on Town-owned or managed property while also honoring Artist's rights in the Work; and WHEREAS, the Town and Artist wish to enter into lhis A$eement in order to set forth each party's respective rights and responsibilities beginning with acquisition of the Work and continuing lhrough removal of the Work. Terms & Conditions NOIV THEREFORE, in consideration of the mutual promises contained herein, the Torvn and Artist agree as follows: l. Visual Artists Rights Act (VARA). Artist understands and agrees that, as !o his or her rights in the Work, the provisions of this Agreement shall control over the provisions of VARA, as amended, and shall constitute a waiver by the Aflist of any rights in the Work set out in or otherwise granted by VARA, as amended. Accordingly, Artist hereby acknowledges that: a. Modification ofthe Work which is a result oftlrc passage oftime or the inherent nature ofthe materials is not a distortioq mutilatiorL or other modification descn*O,n Y4P,A; and b. Modification ofthe Work which is the result ofconservation, or ofthe public presentation, including lighting and placement, ofthe Work is not a destruction, distortion, mutilation, or other modification described in VARA unless the modification is caused by the Town's gross negligence. 2. Droit Moral. All other rights in and to the Work, including but not limited to all rights in the nature of "Droit Moral" in regard to any continuing interest the Artist may have in the maintenance or modification ofthe Work, are expressly waived by the Artist and, insofar as such nghts are transferable, are assigned to the Town. 3. Display Period. [n its sole discretion, the Town may determine to display the Work, the location of such display, and whether not display the Work for a given period, in which case, the Work wrll be stored in a proper manner. 45 1 0-16-1 7 TC Packet Page 97 of 207 96 4. Maintenance and Repair. In its sole discrelion and after consultation with a professional conservator selected by lhe Town, the Town shall have the right to determine when and ifmaintenance, repair, and restoration to the Work will be made. To the extent practical, the Town shall give the Artisl the opportunity to consult on significant repairs or reslorations. 5. Relocation, Removal, or Retum. In its sole discretion, the Town shall have the right to relocate the Work, remove the Work, or retum the Work to the Artist. In the event the Town seeks to remove the Work, the Town shall provide, by first class mail using the address below, advance written notice to the Artist of such removal and the option for the Work to revert to the Artist. Artist's Address: 6. ColoradoOpenRecordsAct(CORA). TheArtistherebyacknowledgesthatlheTownissubjecttotheprovisionsoftheColoradoOpenRecordsAct, Colo. Rev. Stat. $ 24-72- 20 I e/. reg. ("CORA"), under which public records are open for inspection by any person, unless otherwise exempted from such inspeclion. 7. Illodifications. This Agreement shall not be amended, except by subsequent written agreement ofthe parties. E. Invalid Provision. lf any provision of this Agreement shall be determined to be void by any court of competent jurisdiction, then such determination shall not affect any other provision hereof, all ofwhich other provisions shall remain in full force and effect. It is the intention ofthe parties hereto that, ifany provision ofthis agreement is capable oftwo constructions, one ofwhich would render the provision void, and the other of which would render the provision valid, then the provision shall have the meaning which renders it valid. 9. Governing l,aw. The laws of the State of Colorado shall govem the validity, performance, and enforcement of this Agreement. Should either par!" institute legal suit or action for enforcemenl of any obligation contained herein, it is agreed that the venue of such suit or action shall be in Garfield County, Colorado. I 0. Entire Agreement. This is the entire agreement between the Town and the Artist regarding the Work. I l. Counterparts. This Agreement may be executed in counterparts, which taken together, shall be deemed to constitute a complete original. TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE, a Colorado home-rule municipality Markey Butler, Mayor ATTEST: 46 1 0-16-17 TC Packet Page 98 of 207 By 97 Rhonda B. Coxon, Town Clerk 1 0-16-1 7 TC Packet ARTIST: 47 Page 99 of 207 98 Exhibil A to Public Art Agreement kgal Instrument of Ownenhip Transfer of the Work to the Town Attach Bill of Sale 1 0-'16-1 7 TC Packet 48 Page 100 of 207 99 .lppendix D Art .lctluisition ,-lpplicotion tuoc/@ silowmAss sln alB EiNOV\/MAEIS VILLAG'E AFITB ADVIBOFIY BOAFIE'@, ART AC UISITION APPLICATION Note: Applications should be submitted electronically only, preferably as a single pdf file, to cfilrcl ,ij tosr.corrr For more inflormation, contact Julie Ann Woods, FAICP/MLA, Community Development Director at970-923-2254 x 637 Artist's Name Today's Date Mailing Address E-mail Address Proposed Location for Artwork SELECT ACOUISITION TYPE Calls to Artists Donations and Bequests Loans E Rotational Art 10-16-1 7 TC Packet Shorl-Term Long-Term 49 Page 101 of207 tr 100 Please attach a narrative including the following criteria: --Artist's bio and qualifications --A description of the art itself and why it would be a good addition to Snowmass Village, its appropriateness for Snowmass Village, etc. (500-word max). -Up to five photos of the sculpture if it already exists, or scaled renderings of the proposed art piece if it does not exist. Submit PDF format, resulting in the best image quality where the total file size remains under l0MB. Label photos and/or other attachments with your name, not the name of the project. For example: Jones.John3hotolof5.pdf. -The weight and dimensions of the sculpture -A list of the materials used -An explanation of what is required to install the piece and how the artist will transport it to its designated placement (keep in mind that vehicles and heavy equipment cannot be used in some locations). --A maintenance schedule ifneeded Note: The Selection Committee reserves the right to select as many or few pieces within the given budget or reject any or all submissions if it feels the proposals do not meet their goals and expectations for the project. After reviewing the artist's submissions, available public opinion and possibly expert commentary, as well as other related materials, SAAB will vote to make a recommendation to Town Council to: l) request more information or,2) request acceptanceoftheobjectforacquisition,or3)declinetheobjectforacquisition. ThiswillnecessitateTownStalTschedulinga time on a regular Town Council Agenda for consideration and approval or disapproval. 50 1 0-16-17 TC Packet Page 102 of 207 101 SELECTION CRITERIA Whether the Town acquires a gifl or commissions an art object will be guided by the Policy acquisition criteria and SAAB's professional expertise. Consideration ofartwork submissions will be subject to the following review criteria: 2. Artistic Merit a. Artisticmeritandtechnicalcompetenceoftheartwork,includingconsiderationofitsartistic,social,geographicaland/orhistoricalsignificance (which may include a written description, drawings and/or maquette ofthe proposed artwork) b. Qualifications ofthe artist (which may include image ofpast work, resume, references, and published reviews) . Artists must have a suslained visual arts practice as well as demonstrated exhibition and/or collection history o Emerging artists will be considered where a strong professional potential is demonstrated G Artworks will be intrinsically sound in condition as well as reasonably immune to deterioration in routine operations, display, packing and transporting d. MustdemonstratecompatibilityandrelevanceoftheworkofartwithinthecontextofSnowmassVillage e. Warranty oforiginality and authenticity ofthe work ofart (only original works or limited editions shall be considered) f. Prouenance (origin) ofexisting artwork 2. Site f. The object's physical condition is cxcellent and is suitable to the proposed sile with respecl to its general social audiencc and ph.vsical environment $. Scale,form,content,coloranddesignofthea(rvorkinrelationtothesiteINOTE:Someneighborhoods/villages,suchas[]aseVillage,West Village and Snowmass Center may have specific design critcria or special conditions) h. Ecological impact (e.g., percentage of Impewious cover) i. Accessibility to the public, including persons with disabilities j. te*t components (i.e., signage and,/or plaques) 4. Installation a. Site-specificrequirementsforinstallation(e.g.,electricity,lighting,waterandsewereascments,orotherservices) b. Desired method/process/system C. Storage requirements, if any g. Maintenance requirements, both immediate and long term h. Sat-ety standards i. Proposed timeline for the project 6. Financial Obligations 5l 1 0-16-17 TC Packet Page 103 of207 102 a. All costs associated with fabrication and installation (including site preparation, narne plaque design and unveiling/dedication event, ifany) b. Source of funding and date funds are available. ( Monies must be raised through private fundraising or town funding before the artwork may be fabricated) C. Estimated ongoing maintenance and conservation costs d. Statement ofvalue ofartwork for insurance purposes (i.e., artist's artwork) amounl or professional written appraisal ofexisting e. Council must have suftlcient resources lo care for and safeguard the 7. Liability O. Susceptibility ofthe artwork(s) to normal wearand to b. Potential risk to the public C. Public access, if necessary, as well as compliance with ADA d. Special insurance requirements 6. Timeliness a. Allorvance ofsufficient time for a complete review by Town and any other boards or neighborhood associalions involved b. Timely and appropriate required for additional materials or information is 7. Special C. Any conditions by d. nrnvorkrhat 1 0-16-1 7 TC Packet Page 104 of 207 or not 52 103 Projects Timeline Responsibl€ Party lHi8fi M5ibililyl Works ofart that are situated in public Satherinsareas and alonS main roads. 20r7 2017 and on-going 20t7-2014 loyce Schenk 2071 207A 20L9 2018-2019 SAAB Board MusicalswinE set or feature on the Mall lPaths ot Discoveryl Trails and walkways throuSh the Village thar are enhanced by the presence of publicart and Enhanced Art Trail art on bike/hike trallsystem; artistic bike rack5 GPS mapfor Art Trail Trail Tunes day! PromotetheArtTrail and otheradivitiesonIOSVbuses 2016,2018 Completed 2018-2019 2018-2019 carolSetchelder MichaelMiracle Chase Anderson Labyrinth sculpture Garden 2019 lPeak P€rlormancesl High qualityevents in the performing arts and film. Suppon Snowmass Chapel Performances Dascovery Center + performance gpace Music at the busterminals SummerTheatre Film Feitiva l/Mu 5ic venue 2018 Will require further study lArt Happenln8sl Events that allow for en8agement a nd education throuBh thearts. Faceor Disaovery a nimal proiedions on Base VillaSe walls or lower skihill Pop-up o(h ibition(s) - Seasona I happ€ning5 2017-2074 2018 and Annually, winter & lnteractive group art projects wrap art: buildings, buses/ trees, sculptures 2018 and Annually, summer 2018-2019 Appendix K 10-16-17 TC Packet Arts stratesi.Adion Plan (workinr oo.um€nt) Table i. SAAB Projed Assitnm€nt and Timeline Sheet 5l Page 105 of 207 Upper roundabout sculpture Trash receptacle art sorhAnnive.saryCelebralionof SkiArear Snowand ice sculptu res / Winter tuminary installation tind location to reinstellPeaks by Barbar.Sor€nsen Snowmarr Center hallway "Art Gallet/ rnstallalion Ease village and Mallpublic art Large-scale public art piece atHwy 82 entrance CarolSatchelder 104 IPartnerchipsl Funding, Communication, lmplementation, Advocacy Housekeeping 1 0-16-17 TC Packet Fundraising-engraved bricks @ Base Village Phase 2 Launch Ambassador Program Create Snowmass Arts Coordinator position Plan aesthetic elements into new developments Support grant applications with letters of support and/or small match money where needed Research and pursue program funding options, including % for art Online 'Art About Town'calendar Promote all of the Town's public and performing arts programming under the headliner, Snowmoss Arts. Pursue Creative District designation through CCI Create a logo for Snowmass Arts Using the POSTR plan for guidance, identify locations alont Erush Creek Park where additional public art installations may be appropriate Develop program guidelines and policies regarding donations and gifts; Program guidelines and policies for a successfultemporary art donation program will require additional work by the SAAB Board. 20t7-2018 2018 20L9 On-going Annually 2017, then Annually 20t7 2018 2077-20L8 2077-20t8 20L7 Joanne Houck SAAB Board Planning Dept. / SAAB Board SAAB Board and Staff SAAB Board and Staff Snowmass Tourism Planning Dept. Parks Dept., Planning Dept., SAAB Board SAAB Board 54 Page 106 of 207 105 Table ii. SAAB lmplementation Calendar Proiects/Lead Spriry 2018 Summcr,/Fall 2018 ObiectiveFall ZO1T Wlnter 2018Focus Areas Hagh Visibility Art .lnstalltEsh 6ns ensure work is progressing . Evaluate sates .Reach 50% of fundraisinS tarBet oSolicit funding and COMPLETED promotion of event .Discuss ideas, .TEsh C.ns placed in high profile locations . RFP updated, approved, and 5ent out for4 morc .Re-install Peak Artwork TEsh Receptacle Art (loyce Shenk) .Send out Request for Submissions (9/17) .Launch: Finalize RFP (9/15) oSend out RFP (9/15) oRFP Submittal deadline: 10/19 .October SAAB MeetinS: Vote on Submi$ions .C@.din.te with PW on installation .Discuss.nd identify potentirl l@ations Reinstall Peaks by Earbara Sorensen Roundabout Sculpture (Joanne Houck) .Roundabout $ulpture in place Amiting desiSn of $ulpturc for . Rcach 100% of fundraising taEet .Coordinate with public Roundabout installation .List in ArtJ Calendar .Public ceremony and . Potentially team with AR; Solicit partne6 .Create unique celebEtion for incorporation of Snowmass Village artists .TBD 50h Anniversary Celebration of SkiArea:Snow and ice sculptures / Winter Luminary installation .Amnge meeting w/ A.tist .Di$us budSet with Est. Costs forTown oblitation .Submit P.oposal to Town Council for apprcval .5!t up restridld account for donations, posribly throuSh Sngwm.ss Communlty Foundation .lf needed, pl.n ior.nd Oiscovery Art on Bike/Hike TEils (MachaelMiracle) 10-16-1 7 TC Packet .Launch: Fini5h "Rcgu€5t Submi$ionf with m.p of locations lel76l .Take photos of locations .Promot. and manage Call for Artists . Artists sign contEcts .Set installation dates by )!ne L,2077 .Add art to.rt tEil and p.rk and rec m.p {March 2017) .Get marketing plan initaated (Tourism) .Check in on artids' progress .lnstallation .Publicity out .List in Art! Calendar .Launch an evenl on tEils to dEw .4 pieces installed on tEils 55 Page 107 of207 to 106 $hedule and detaals .Launch: SAAB Field trip GPS map for Art Trail .Create .ttention to them [tEil Tunes?] . Ensure artists are paid map is updated (to add art locations on Art Trail) .SAAB tojury .Oarify details of installations and maintenance .Get OK from TOSV PWRec Depts. on installation and maintenance issues w/ top proposals .Select up to 4 art works; notafu artists Enhanc€ the Art TEal (Details TgD) (Carol Batchelder) .lnstall minor anhancaments .List in Arts Calendar . Make plan for 2018 enhancements . Visible change due to addint.rtwork, t.ail sitnaEe, mapping, visibility, and routine maintenance neds of TEil (May) . ldentafy enhanccments neded .Oarifo detailt n4ds P.ovide activ! supportfor Sngwmass Chapel Pedormances (carol Batchelder) communitythrough media partneE, ctl. .List in Arts Calend.r .Attend events with friends and family community throu3h media partners, ltc. . ListinArtsCalendar . Att.nd events with friends and family .Chapel Music Director feels supported by the Town/SAAB .Attendance .P@ide support .Provide support friends and family of events Peak Pertormances . laqgh: Sct meeting with music dire.tor at SMC Chapel (9/1) planned and what rupport SAAB can tive .P@idc whatever support is po$ibL ocrt word out to the community . Launch: Contact GBvity Productigns 19/761 .Decide location for prciedions: Ski Slop€ or Base Village .Coordinate with Par[ners .Advertise .taunch Happening (Winter 2018) Art Happ€nints .Winter 2018.Fundraise . FundEise Happening P.oiections (Joyce Shenk) Partnr6hips Fundraising- engraved bricks @ Base Village Phase 2 10-16-1 7 TC Packet 56 Page 108 of 207 107 Housekeeping Policy development: selection / donations of art On-line Arts Calendar Percent for arts program Develop Snowmass Arts logo CCI Arts District Designation Arts Happening page on Town website Further Plan "mapping:' .Launch: Research exi*ing on]ine calendars {9/1) . Research existing TOSV/SMV calendars .Evalu.te optionr that meet our needs .Decide approach & budget .Coordinator with arts partnerr .Di$u$ and draft policies .Design an inteEdive calendar or prcmote ifone exists .Launch calendar .Get the wo.d out to list ofbusinesses, comhrges and guests eruicc people. [Jocelyn has the e-list at the Rec Centerl . Monitor updating of calendar (on-going) .Have policy in pl.ce foa acceptance of works of art .Easilv acc.ssibl€, interactive calendar of daily SMV activitics in thevisual and performint arts .lmplemrnt progEm for 2018-2019 CIP .U* new loto on all Snowmas5 Arts events and projects .5eek DrsiSnation for arts community recotnition/funding .Present to Town Council .Present to Town Council . Present to Town Council .Di*u$ and dEft polici.s .DEft code langua3e .Disu$ design ofiioE .Drvelop Desitn .Discuss and evaluate .Discuss with Travis Elliott .Develop Copy, add materials .Disu$.nd begin m.ppin3 .Continue mappint projects . Pursue application for submittal in lanuary 2018 .Paesent to Town Council .Finalize ch.nges to StrateSic Plan; present to Town Council activities more visible . Keep Strategic Plan current 10-16-17 TC Packet 57 Page 109 of 207 108 Future Yeaas Launch Ambasedor Program (Move to 2018) Create Snowmass Arts Coordinator position (Move to 2018-19) Native Plant signage (ltlove to future) 10-16-1 7 TC Packet .Launch: Assign SAAB members as ambassadors to pro.iect partners. (Oct. SAAB meeting) . Research possibilities for funding and {s01{cX3)) . Secure fundihg for PT position . Launch: SAAB field trip to view existing garden (Sept) .Talk to HOAr re: upkeep, plus making and payint for plant lD sitns .TalktoJanice Huggins rc: plant identifiEtion work, as needed eRefer knowledgeable plant peren to HOAto lD .nd list plant names for si3nage. .OR Talk to Park & Rec rbout m.kin3 and a list .Adbassadorscommunicate .Ambassadors with partners 1-3x communicate with panners 1-3x .Ambassadors communicate with partners 1-3x . Effective coordination with TOSV and art partners .W.ite job desription .Releae job notification .Clarify relataonshap of Arts Coordinator W/SAAB . Hire arts coordinator . Dwelop sEnat! design with Partner .Partne.storessi8ns .Partnerlnstallssigns .support efforts of Ads Coordinator o Snowmas Villate has a part-time aats c@rdinator .Native planls ac sitned/identified in Eenedict Garden .Garden is properly maintained 58 Page 110 of207 .lnteruiew candidates 109 Table iii. 5AAB Quarterly Action Calendar Project taunch (sept)october HighvisibilityArt TrashR€.€ptacle Art . RFP 5ubmilt.l deadline: 10/19 .o.lob€r SAAB Meeting: vote .Makesureall.rtists have pick€d up thet re.epta€le .Launch: Finish "Requert for Submistion{ with map of locationr (9/16) .Tak. photos of loc.tions . Promote and manage Call for .Findouttrcm Parkr &Rec when trail ftap b updated (to add.n locations on An Tr.il) .lury and Clrify details of installations and maintenance .Get O( otTOSv/Rer. Deptr. mainten.nce iseua3 w/top Trail lGPSMappintl .l-aunch: S,AAB rield trip to ars6s condition and . clarify detaih, needt .Chare And€rson to start work on GPS mappint .!e!_n!h: S€t meetins w(h murk di.ector at sMc chapel (9/1) .Meetto deiermine what ev€nts he is doint and what suppo.t saaS can give . P.ovade whatever support it community thrcu8h media [wi.ter H.ppenins] .!g!rE: Contact Gravity prcjections:5ki slope or Bare Mll.te .BareVillaae, Mallor Elt camp 59 10-16-17 TC Packet .Launch: rinalize RfP {e/15) .Male deririon on 2017 .Chare Anderson to pretent GPSmappinS Page 111 of207 110 Tabl€ iii. SAAB QuarterlyAction Calend.r taunch(s€pt.)october oecember summs 2017 .Launchr Decidewhether .tocate pot.ntial artistr and . Meet to brainstom ev.nt5 for 2017 summer se.so.j disc!rs cost5, bc.tions, sdlduling, . Review oppo.tunrtiet .Deride on f unding approach .Fundraise, if necetrary .Es!!r Rerearch calendal'{e/l) . Rerearch rrsfln8 IOSV/SMV .Evaluaie option3 !h.t meet .Me.t with partn€r! (quaneflY .t l.ast) .Decide approach & budSet .Coo,dinate witr artt partnert .Coordinate with arts partneB .Launchi Assi$ SAAB ambarsador5 to proiect patner5. {9/1s) {mav consider moviry back to 2017,18) .!is!r!: De.ide wh€ther to purrue this now or holdoffunt 20rS-19 .Research porsibilrties for frrndint and housing.n ads .R€te.rch po$ibilities for funding.nd housing.n.dt .Retearch possabilities for fundingandhousing.n.ns .ln!l!!!: 5AAB field tip to vier exbtin! larden (s€pt) and p.yinE for plant lD sifls (Y/N?) maintenance ofSarden .ORT.ll to P.rk & 8€. about makins 3i8nr, ands.ttins a .Talktorankeflu$intre: pla nt i den tification work, at .lf Yet, refer lnowledseible plant person to HoA to lD and lin plant namer for sitnate. OtherSAAB S.owmass Arts Loto !4!gh: Agree to pursu€ cr$tint . logo {9/r5) .Augustin G to create d€rigns 10-16-17 TC Packet Page 1 12 of 207 111 Table iv. SAAB Project Details . Turn info.mation on artists overtoTOSV Tourism . lnform newspapar reporter . Work with TOSV Tourism . Call for Artists send out . D.cide whrth.r to do mE trash r4cptachs o Rcqestfunds frffi TOSV . Btablish nstricted acct for donations . Rais mon.y from: o TOSV BrdSGt o PriEta DorcE o B6i!B DorcE . TOSVAttorney . TOSVTown Council o TOSV TEnsportation . TOSVTown Council . TOSVAttorney . lndividuldonors . Jury memblrs HighvisibilityArt TGshReceptacleArt . ArtidContEctv . TOSV-Public works . joyce Schenk (Ch) . SAABmembers . ToSV-Public Works o Joanne Houck (Ch) . Linda Rennick . Carol Batchelder . Darlene Fridstein Roundabout Sculpturc . Review art 5election Process . TOSVapproval .lnd.llation permit 4od anniversry . TOSVTourism . TOSV Public Works . Barb Peckler . TOSVPa*s&Rec . Tosv.ttorney . AspenSkiintCo. o TBD . TBDT8DTBD Paths of Discovery Art on the Bike Trails . TOSVTourism& Ma.ketlnt budget . TOSV Public Works . Newrpaper article . Add toTOSVTrail Map Enhance the Ad Trail IGPS Mapping +l . TOSV Public . TOSV Parks & Rec . Carol Batchelder (Ch) . Stephanie Parmalee . JimAnathan . Chase Anderon o Michael Miracle (Ch) . Linda Rennick . SAAB members . Planning Staff Call for artists Artist contrad lnstallation permits Local newspapers TOSV w.bsitrs SocialMedia Notify Me listseru list in Arts Calendar .NA . Ca.ol (Ambassador) . AmbassadorPeak Performances Support Snowma$ Chapel Arts ProSEms . SMChapel-Paul . TOSVTourism . AspenTimes 6l 10-16-1 7 TC Packet Page 113 of207 112 Table iv. SAAB Project Details Paatners o Local newspapers . Social media . Tosvwebsites . Radio ad . Poster/Flyer . List in Arts Cal€ndar . Local newspapers . Social media . Tosvwebsites . Radio ad o Banner on Bridge o Balloons . Poster/Flye. . Arts Calendar . TOSVTourism . ArtorBs: AAM, Aspen Film, Thund.r River, Aspen Th..tr!, Aspen Words, Aspen Skiing Co. Aspen Santa Fe Ballet...... Art Happenings . SAAS BudSet .NA .NA . Vendor contEct . TOSVspecial event Permit Winler 2016/2017 Art Happening IPeople Projections +] . My Bi8 Face . Aspen SkiinE Co, . TOSVTou.ism Summer 2017 Happening lcholklt Up +) . Vendor contcct . TOSV permit? . TOSVTourism . lndividual Donors . Bus. Sponsorships . GEnt . Event ticket 5ale5? . Joyce Schenk (Ch) . MichaelMiracle . Darlene Fridstein . Jim Anathan . Augustin Goba . Joyce Schenk (Ch) . MichaelMiracle . Darlene Fradstein . Jim Anathan . Augustin Goba Snowma5s Hospitality . A$i!n an Ambasdor for .ny new prcject . SAAE Budtet . Joanne Houck (Ch) . SAAB Members AmbasadorPro8ram o NA . All current arts partners . Facetofacemeetings . Retular phone calls Partnerships On-line An Calendar . NA . Radio ads . Nawspapcrarticl! . Podetr . Tosvwebsites . Notify Me listsry . SAAB budt€t . TOSVTourism budget o TBA {ch) . SAABmembers . TOSVTourism . TOSV Planning . Civic Plus App; advertising Snowmass Arts Coordinator po5ition Benedict Garden Native Plant signage . SMVFoundation . Anderen Ranch . Condo HOA'5 . TOSV Parks & Rec . Janice Huggins . Job description . Atreements with HOA'S o loanne Houck (Ch) . C.rol Eatch.ld.r (Ch) . limAnathan o On-toing tunding . Condo HOA or TOSV Tourism Aspen Skiing co. Civic Plus Snowmass Sun Local ans orgs . Local newspapaE . TOSVJob Board . LocalnewspapeE . Social media . Tosvwebsites lndividual Oonors GEnt HOA or Park and Rec FundEising 10-16-1 7 TC Packet 62 Page 114 of 207 113 Table v. SAAB Estimated Project Budget Focus Area Project considerations [Contracts, permits, promotion, fundraising, materials, software, partnershipsl Costs s High Visibility Art Trash Receptacle Art 4000.00 Roundabout Art 10000.00 Paths of Discovery Art on the Bike/Hike Trails Tourism Budget ltem Enhance the Art Trail Peak Performances Support Snowmass Chapel Activities 0 ArtHappenings PeopleProjections-Winter2017- 2018 Summer 2018 Happenings 63 1 0-16-1 7 TC Packet Page 115 of207 114 Table v. SAAB Estimated Project Budget Focus Area Considerations CostsProject Partnerships Snowmass Arts logo: Total Budset: 10-16-1 7 TC Packet 64 Page 116of207 s 115 Table vi. SAAB Arts Ambassador Projects Proiects Next steps Timeline Amba$adors Potential Community Partners Support Snowmass Chapel performance schedule Contact music director to find out how SAAB Annually can assist with promoting events Carol Eatchelder Snowmass Chapel Native plant signage for genedict Arrange now for possible 2017 install Garden Music on the Mall Arrange now for 2017 summer protram 2077-20L4 20L7-2078 Carol Batchelder & Jim Anathan TBD Condo HOA, TOSV Parks and Rec Aspen Music School, TOSV Tourism Bike Rack Art Research costs and potential artists TOSV Parks and Rec, SMV bike shops, Ski Corp, TOSV Tourism Snowmass Rodeo AssociationArt projects for rodeo kids Need art teacher, helpers Educational Art Exhibitions lnfluence installation themes at venues around town. SugSested themes: lvild ot Heorf; Natural History/Discovery; Seasons/femporal Art on temporary or permanent walls in Base village; seltrt site(s); ask Glenwood muralist or others for proposals + costs Research costs & designs (lce Age animals, Wild at Heart, etc.) Discovery Center, Anderson Ranch, Little Red School House, Related's vlK proSram Murals of people are havinS Snowmass-style fun Related, Aspen Skiing Co., TOSV Tourism Bus Art - external sticker traphics TOSV Dept. of Transportation Movies: Summer and Winter; lndependent films Set up a conference room with loveseats, sell drinks, good snacks Viceroy or Westin Art workshops on the trail: phototraphy/painting Suggest photography and painting classes on trails, with locals' discount. Need instructors & supplies Anderson Ranch, TOSV Rec Center 65 1 0-16-1 7 TC Packet Page 117 of207 116 Table vii. SAAB Annual Protram Evaluation a.complirhmEnls a.d Ch.llentes . Rou.drbout anrtallatio. complete .Irash can! are decorated . RFP updated, approved, and sent out for 4 (oetaikIBD) . Visiblecha.gedueto.ddrnganwo.ls,t.ail siSoage, mapping, vEibihty, and maintained . 4 pie(es inrtalled on desisnated trails ' Paulf€els suppofted byTown/SAAB. Atte.dance donations coveraotts 0f€vents Art Happenings People Proietions . A winter 2015/2017 Happe.int . A summer 2017 Happenint . Easilv accesrible, interactive calenda. of dally SMV aciivitres in thevisu.la.d . Effective coordination with IOSVandother . Snowmass Viliage has a p.n-timeartt ritnag. . Native plants !re sjgned/adentified in . G.rden ir adequately maintained 66 10-16-17 TC Packet Page 118 ot 207 117 PUBLIC ART PROGRAM N + POLICY 2016 I e,1 J $t 4,d!dq { :,r ri, ,t. I I t II t, ,t ,i ' Page 119 of 207 Breekenridge Creative Arts 10-16-17 TC Packet 118 CONTENTS PART II PUBLIC ART MASTER PLAN 1.O lntroduction 1.1 Art in Public Space '12 Types of Public Art ,l.3 What is a Public Art Master Plan? 2.O Community Context 2.1 Breckenridge Past + Present 3.O Breckenridge Public Art Program 3.1 Breckenridge Public Art Collection Overview 3.2 History of the Public Art Coilection 3.3 Future of the Public Art Collection 3.4 Temporary + Ephemeral lnstallations 3.5 Public Art Programming 4.O Breckenridge Creative Arts 4.,] Overview of BCA Venues + Programming 4.2BCA Collaboration + Advocacy 4.3 BCA Vision. Mission + Goals 4.4 BCA as Public Art Program Manager 5.O Guiding Prrnciples + Strategies for the Public Art Program 5.1 Vision for Public Art in Breckenridge 5.2 Key Strategies, lnatiatives + Opportunities 1 0-16"4.7t,I-C FAek@[,;r r le, r( rf.]i t,k,.)r"k^rv PART 2: PUBLIC ART POLICY 6.0 Governance Tools for the Public Art Program 6.1 Breckenridge Public Art Code 6.2 Public Art Master Plan + Pohcy 6.3 Roles + Responsibilities 6.4 Public Art Advisory Commattee (PAAC) 70 Funding Resources 7.'l Permanent Acquisitions 7.2 Maintenance + Program Costs 8.0 Project Planning 8.1 Five-Year Project Plan 8.2 Annual Operational Plan 9.O Site + Artwork Selection Criteria 9.1 Srte Selection Criteria 9.2 Artwork Selection Criteria 9.3 Creative Zones lO.O Public Art Project Processes + Gurdelines 1Oj Selection Processes for Permanent Public Artworks lO.2 Call to Artists Process for Commissions over $'|O,OOO 1O.3 lmplementation Process for Commissions over $lO,OOO 1O.4 Special Guidelines by Prolect Type 1l.O Maintenance of the Collection 1.].1 l.4aintenance + Restoration '1,].2 Deaccessioning + pg1...,1.t Public Art PART 3: BRECKENRIDGE PUBLIC ART COLLECTION Breckenridge Public Art lmage Gallery Map of Public Art in Breckenridge APPENDICES A. BCA/PAAC Goals + Strategies B. Credits + Acknowledgements Page 120 of 207 PASE MASTER PLAI.I + POLICY 20]6 o1 119 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Breckenridge Public Art Program engages passersby from all walks of life, incating conversation around topics that are quintessentially Breckenridge, from the picturesque mountatn environment to rich local history. Pieces in the permanent collection occupy carefully-selected pubhc spaces throughout town, and are thoughtfully curated to enhance the collectrve aesthetic experience of locals and visitors alike. In addition to the permanent collection, temporary and ephemeral installations bolster the experience of Breckenridge as a haven for creatavity high in the Colorado Rocky I'4ountains. Formerly managed by the Town of Breckenridge, the Breckenridge Public Art Program is now run by Breckenridge Creative Arts (BCA). a nonprofit organization that began operating in 2015. BCA spearheaded the creation of this 1 0 - 1 614 rt..'iIG,,FACkQf, rir, xrri r rn,:E r,,-.; Br r( Ap r lk. )(i ii+M Public Art Program Master Plan + Policy, which builds on the Town's 2006 "Art in Public Places Master Plan" with input from community representatives to chart the course of public art in Breckenridge. The document is divided into three major parts. Part 1 is the Public Art f4aster Plan, which gives creative direction to the Breckenridge Public Art Program. Part 2 is the Public Art Policy, which outlines the specific policies and procedures that guide day-to-day operatrons required to put the plan into action. Part 3 offers a visual tour of the Breckenridge public art collectron as it stands today, representing rich stories of local lore, captivating vistas, environmental stewardship. and all the other aspects that make each piece uniquely Breckenridge. Page 121 of207 oz PAGE I"IASTER PLAN + PCLICY 2OIt5 120 rl I 7t I I l 16-17 t I \ \In \* t 121 Public art comes in many shapes, sizes, and textures. Artworks can take on more traditional forms, such as sculptures, paintings, or mosaics, or they can utilize contemporary multrmedia tools to produce transitory soundscapes, lighting installations, and proJections. Some public art is representational meaning the subject matter is recognizable-for example, a sculoture of a child reading or a horse and rider headed off into the distance. Other art is abstract, giving viewers the opportunity to interpret the artist's meaning, and to draw their own meaning from a piece as well. Public art can be fashioned by a sole author with a singular voice, or many collaborators offering a multiplicity of viewpoints. The best public art responds to the physical. cultural, natural, historical, or social context of a location and its community, honoring the beliefs its members hold dear while providing opportunities for engagement and social interaction. Through 1 0- 1 6"fl ,7, +[@^pssftgf, .,, PART 1: PUBLIC ART MASTER PLAN !.O INTRODUCTION l.l Art in Public Space What is public art? Public art can be defined as art that is located in the public realm-whether a large-scale. site-specific sculpture that forms the centerpiece of a community gathenng place, a thoughtful piece perched inconspicuously along a public trail, or detail work integrated into functional items lke benches, walkways, retaining walls, and architectural treatments. Works of public art often animate outdoor spaces, or they can enhance the interior spaces of communtty facilities like bus shelters, recreation centers, and government offices. public art, a sense of place and belonging can be created, and the diversity and creative aspirations of a community reflected. Thus a thoughtfully curated public art program is essential, for it not only represents a community's heritage, but also the future it envisions for itself-contributing in a symbolic and visually stimulating way to the evolution of a community's sense of identity. Around the world, public art is used as a tool for beautification and economic development, with many cities integrating it into their planning processes as a way to revitalize public spaces. Well-considered public art enhances a community's physical appearance and strengthens its identity, drawing residents and businesses as a result. A town that invests in public art shows that it is forward-thinking, and committed to fostering creativity by making cultural experiences available to all segments of the local and visiting community. ln private development, public art can also be a beneficial investment-the enhanced aesthetic value leading to increased rentals or property values while improving a developer's public image. ln addition to permanent works of public art, events featuring temporary or ephemeral installations by renowned or emerging artists can also help to grow the local economy by driving creative tourism. MASTEF'pi..i., i loi r,rPage 123 Of 207 Oa PAG€ BRE(-^KENRIDGE PT'BI"IC ARi PROGF]AI"1 122 1.2 Types of Publlc Art The Breckenrrdge Public Art Program considers public art to be any art that is located on public or private property which is visible or accessible to the public. Public spaces include parks, road allowances, tunnels, streets, courtyards, squares, and bridges. as well as building exteraors. foyers, and significant interior public areas of municipal buildings. Pnvate properties located in visible or publicly accessible areas can also host public art. Each site provides an opportunity to enhance our shared spaces in a way that honors and reflects our character-whether on a long-term or fleeting basis-wrth the potential to confer economic benefits as well. The Breckenridge Public Art Program focuses on three types of public art projects: . Permanent - Permanent artworks are generally constdered to be made from materials and construction methods that have a lifespan of at least lO years. . Temporary - Temporary artworks are pieces that have a defined lifespan of no more than five years and often much less. including seasonal exhibitions. . Ephemeral - Ephemeral artworks are works with a very short lifespan, such as environmental installations, street art, and performances. 1 0- 1 6"fl ,7, i[QlBae[q6[i .,r,BRECKETIRIDGE PUBL IC ART PROCRAI,I Within the above project types, public art falls into a wide variety of categories that include: . lconic - A standalone or significant work, where the artist's approach is largely independent of other considerations. ln other words, this is "art-for-art's-sake." Examples include sculpture, water features, lighting, and multimedia. Often site-specific. . Site-specific - Works designed specifically for, and responsrve to, a particular site through scale, material, form, and concept. Could apply to all listed categoraes. . Functional - Works or design elements in which the primary purpose is utilitarian, such as benches, bicycle racks. bus shelters, fences, and gates. Can also be decorative, integrated, or site specific. . Decorative - Works in which the pramary purpose is to aesthetically enhance an environment or structure, such as incorporated imagery or sculpture, paving elements, and lighting. Can also be functional, iconic, integrated. or site-specifrc. . lntegrated - Works that are fully incorporated within the design of the built or natural environment. lntegrated works may include bridges, retaining walls, walkways. and buildings. Can also be decorative and/or functional. MAsrE. r,iii, ,',.i ,'Fage 124 Of 207 OS PAGE 123 TEMPORARY PUBLIC ART IN BRECKENRIDGE I {;;; I "tq dQe 125 t _l t I I tL H l-.' :r b-- I I I+lt* {) L "l , Ib ts'lt tI \t, ! F 1 1 124 1.2 Types of Public Art continued . lnterpretive - Works in which the primary purpose is to describe, educate, and comment on issues, events, or situations. Examples include signage, pavement inlays, sculpture, seating, landscaping, murals, and text-based work. Can also be funct;onal, decoratave, iconic, and site specific. . Commemorative - Works in which the primary purpose is to acknowledge and recall an event, activity, or person important to the local community and rts visitors. Examples include sculpture, murals, pavement details, and gardens. Could apply to all hsted categories. . Participatory or community-based - Works in which the pramary purpose is to engage artists and the general public in the creation of an artwork. These collaborations provide communities with the means to positively impact their envrronment and develop pride and ownership over their parks, streets, and public institutions. Could apply to all listed categories. t.3 What ls a Publlc Art Master Plan? A Public Art Master Plan is a visioning piece that establishes the creative direction for a public art program. lt is distrnct from Public Art Polrcy, a set of specific procedures that guide daily work. ln a Master Plan, the underlying beliefs and strategies are intentionally broad, seated deep in a community's identity and reflective of the character rt hopes to exhibit through public art. A Master Plan rs a tool used to guide strategic decision-making by arts managers and committees of public representatives as they pursue opportunities for public art experiences, from the selection of new permanent public artworks to the programming of festivals, activaties, and installations. The Breckenridge Public Art Master Plan starts by looking at who we are-how our history, pastimes, values, and aspirations combine to create the community identity of Breckenridge. It is from this sense of collective identity that our current Public Art Program emerged. From this strong foundation we then chart a course for the future of the Breckenridge Public Art Program by establishing meaningful, collectively generated, creative guidelines. Decisron-making within the framework of the Master Plan ensures that the Breckenridge Public Art Program enhances our sense of place while positioning Breckenridge as a destination for creativrty. 10-16lr{,7ri[@apg6Jq6[Lar., BRE(.KEI.JRrDcEpr]r3rcARTppo(jFrAi.l M.a.sirirpi.,.ir , r,o,,, p.6gg 126 Of 207 ;; 125 4A.,- -*. 1l Itfr 2.O COMI.IUNITY CONTEXT To move forward with a publrc art program that reflects the unique character of our mountain town and the diverse individuals who live, work, and play here, we first need to take stock of who we are and how we got here. 2.t Bieckenrldge Past + Present The Town of Breckenridge is a place of great historical importance with significant cultural assets, environmental features, and strong economic arowth and potential. The distinctive attributes of Breckenridge hold considerable value to those who live, work, and play in this beautiful mountain destination. Breckenridge is located high in Colorado's Rocky Mountains at a base elevation of 9,600 feet. Flanked by vast stretches of National Forest, it offers recreation opportunities to today's outdoor enthusiast from hiking, biking, and fly-fishing to winter snow sports. The town lies nestled in a forest of lodgepole pine and aspen trees beneath high mountain meadows that burst with wildflowers each summer, making for a striking and colorful contrast to the craggy, snow-covered Tenmile Range behind it. Once a summer hunting ground for the Ute people, the area drew its first wave of permanent settlers with the discovery of gold in '1859. The Town of Breckenridge was founded that same year. Early settlers made a living from the earth, seeking gold in area waterways and hard rock deposits. The mining era saw several population booms-with the arrival of the railroad and advent of hard rock minrng rn the 1880's, and dredge boats in the early l9OO's-followed by busts in which the population declined. 1 0-1 6'fl ,7, ilC,'Paoket,BRE(]KEI.IRIDGE PL'I RT PRO(;F]AI MASTER PL4I',I 'Fage 127 of 207 rlf: o8 ffi : t 126 2.1 Breckenridge Past + Present continued Those were rough-and-tumble years for the emerging town. in which the contrasts of the Old West-saloons and outlaws set against stringent Victorian values-were evident. The architectural style that emerged in this period is described as "simple Victorian vernacular," less ornate than the detail work and bric-a-brac of traditional Victorian architecture. The hunt for gold and other precious metals spurred wealth and development in Breckenridge, but damaged some of the area's natural and cultural resources. The next wave of settlement in Breckenridge came with the openrng of Breckenridge Ski Resort in 196]. The early days were again characterized by a pioneering, make-do attitude as ski bums took up residence in abandoned mining shacks; and a quirky, independent spirit that materialized an the form of the raucous annual celebration, Ullr Fest, which contrnues to this day. ln more recent history, Breckenridge has been the scene of a growing creative community. Some of the first cultural organrzations include the Breckenridge Backstage Theatre, a local community theater troupe that incorporated in 1976, the Breckenridge Film Festival (1981), the Breckenridge Music Festival Orchestra (chartered in 1981), and the National Repertory Orchestra (founded in 1960, and moved to Breckenridge in 1993). Today the Town of Breckenridge is home to a mix of local residents whose families were among the area's early pioneers, and full-time and part-time residents who came later seeking the healthy lifestyle and opportunities for outdoor recreation that the high country offers. Although the year-round population is much smaller, Breckenridge accommodates tens of thousands of people during peak seasons when out-of-town visitors come to ski and snowboard: to enJoy other winter activities like Nordic skiing, dog sledding, and snowshoeing; or to take part in summer activities like fishrng, hiking, road cycling and mountain biking, goll history tourism, shopping, music and art festivals, and other events. Breckenridge residents value local history, with local restorations and preservations occurring on a grand scale. Those, along with the many museums, historic sites, and educational tours offered today, contribute to the perception of modern Breckenridge as a Victorian mountain town alive with history. Residents and guests are likewise concerned wrth preservrng, rehabilitating, and protecting the straking natural resources for which the area is known. A number of Town policies have been enacted with that goal in mind-one major example being the Blue River Reclamation Project, in which more than 3OO,OOO tons of rock and cobble were removed from a mile-long stretch of the Blue River in the early 199O's to allow the river to flow through town in the open air once more. Steeped in culture and heritage, the Town of Breckenridge provides a unique mix of creative opportunities for people of all ages and interests. Generations of artists, makers, musicrans, and writers have chosen to live in or visit this beautiful Rocky Mountain destination, its inspiration reflected in their work. Through visual and performing arts, heritage and museum actavities, craft education, culinary and healing arts, design. film, and literature, the community offers a scenic mountain environment with diverse opportunities for individual self-expression and cultural exploration. 1 0- 1 6*fl ,7r +[@;,ps6ft6fi,r,BRECKENRIDGE PUBL.IC ART PROGRAI.l r'4ASrEp prAri 1 po|\rFlage 128 Ol 207 o9 PAGE 127 3.O BRECKENRIDGE PUBLIC ART PROGRAM The Breckenridge Public Art Program consists of three ma,or components-a permanent public art collection, primarily outdoor sculptures, installed in public aathering spaces over the past two decades: events and festivals featuring installations of temporary or ephemeral public art including seasonal exhibitions: and public art-related programming such as tours or hands-on activities aimed at showcasing or invrting community participation in public art. 3.1 Breckenrldge Public Art Collectlon Oyervlew The Breckenridge Public Art Program currently has 31 pieces rn its permanent public art collection, including one work under commission from contemporary sculptor Albert Paley that rs slated for installation in 2017. The artworks occupy gathering spaces and public throughways around town, where they engage both residents and guests, inspiring dralog around topics that are quintessentially Breckenridge, from the picturesgue mountain environment to rich local history. Some sculptures memorialize local historical features and events, such as Robin Laws' bronze sculpture of two burros, laden with gold pans, which commemorates the role of pack burros in the region's mining history; or Richard A. Jagoda's steel sculpture of the Norse god Ullr, seen as the bringer of snow, who has been celebrated since the 196O's in the boisterous annual Ullr Fest event. Other pieces pay homage to the natural environment, such as Steuart Bremner's "Colorado River Rock Bridge" over Cucumber Creek, which bears stones representing tributanes of the Colorado Rrver; and Jack Hill's "Kachina Steel." a steel-and-stone rendition of a kachina doll that contains sacred spring water insade it. MASTFn pi .,r.j , r,t)i r,rPage 129 Of 207 lO1 0-1 6'fl 7,,[Q..Ps6]q6fi'r,BRECKENRIDGE PUBL IC: ARI PROGRAI.l I -t -t I t* A ou, 128 3.1 Breckenridge Public Att Collection Ovsrview continued The collection includes four interior pieces-a watercolor painting of historic Main Street by Ann Weaver at Town Hall; a local landscape rendered in oil on canvas by Stephen Day, located at the Riverwalk Center; a large-scale, translucent collage suspended from the ceiling at the Breckenridge Recreation Center by David Griggs; and a commemorative quilt in mixed media fiber art by Summit Guilters, which hangs in the new Breckenridge Grand Vacations Community Center & South Branch Library. The majority of the pieces in the collection are outdoor installations, specifically designed to weather the elements as they animate public spaces. Several, like the abstract sculpture by Chaz della Porta in front of the Stephen C. West lce Arena that commemorates former local firefighter Chris Ethridge, are hewn with weathering steel, which evolves to form a stable, rust-like appearance. Others are cast in bronze. Seth Vandable's bronze sculpture of historical figure Tom Groves features a giant "gold" nugget that is intended to be interactive; as visitors rub the nugget for luck, it will take on a new polish and shine with the passing years. There are 22 representational artworks in the collection, and nine that can be considered abstract, includrng Paley's forthcoming piece-a 24-foot-tall, cobalt blue, steel sculpture of intersecting convex and concave planes intended to evoke the irregular contours of the mountains, and study how they interplay v/ith natural light. The Paley piece, entitled "Syncline" after the geological feature of the same name, will be the first 10-16,tr 7 {Q,,Ps6[qsf ,-,, permanent installation in Colorado by the renowned contemporary sculptor. lts commission has inspired a great deal of pride and is seen as representing the community's willingness to take risks, to collaborate, to face controversy, and to follow a public process that is thoughtful, respectful, and open. lt also represents an interest in continuing to expand the Breckenridge public art collection with high quality works. 3.2 Hlstory of th€ Public Art Collection The existing collection spans more than 20 years, starting in 1994 with the installation of Robert Tully's sculpture series, "A Miner's Dream," in the Blue River Plaza area. which includes a polished stone slide and a replica of a miner's cabin sunk into the earth so kids can crawl in the attic, among other pieces. Breckenridge Town Council commissioned the work as part of a Town effort to create an artful walkway along the river. Commissioning the first piece of public art was a learning experience, however, which led the Town to form a committee of employees and catizens to create the first "Art in Public Places Master Plan," adopted in 1996 (and updated in 2006) to gu,de future selections. The plan served as a blueprint for the Town of Breckenridge Community Development Department, which managed public art commissions and donations for almost two decades. Also in 1996, Town Council established the Breckenridge Publrc Art Commission (BPAC), a group of local representatives with a passion for and background in the arts, to advise the Council f4ASTEF pr..l'i'.'or,,-pggg 130 0f 207 l1 PAGE BRECKEI.IRIDGE PUBLIC ART PROGRAI"l 129 3.2 History of the Public Art Collection continued around public art. The past two decades saw commissions of new public artworks made on a project-by-project basis, with project themes selected based on site locations. For example, pieces chosen to occupy niches in the Breckenndge Historic District tend to speak to area history, such as Emanuel N4artinez'three-ttered bronze sculpture of Barney L. Ford, an escaped slave who became a wealthy Breckenridge businessman and leading Colorado civil rights activist. Each commission followed a set process that involved a call to artists. from which three frnalists were selected to submat drawings and/or maquettes of their proposed pieces. Afterwards the public was invated to submit input on the proposals, upon which the BPAC made a recommendation to Town Council. Other pieces were acquired for the collection through donations by arts enthusiasts and patrons, many by way of Sculpture on the Blue, an annual sculpture-on-loan exhibition initially launched by Summlt County Arts Council, which the Town took on in 2OO4. Spearheaded by a group of dedicated and passionate volunteers, local philanthropists were invited to view and purchase pieces in the exhibition to donate to the publac art collection. Among the works procured in this way were "Gone Fishing," a flat-panel steel fisherman by Steve Puchek who casts his line in the Blue River in perpetuity, and 1 0- 1 6*{,7r ili@..Bgs}q6fL,'r r BRECKETIRIDGE PUBLIC ART PROGRAI,I "My Book," a bronze figure of a child poring through a picture book, by Jane Rankin, that now graces the South Branch Library's new location on Harris Street. One of BCAS major initiatives has been the Breckenridge Public Art Program Master Plan + Policy 2016, which constitutes a significant expansion of the previous master plan. One of the features of the 2016 plan is a well-defined set of criteria for the selection of public artworks, both for permanent and temporary installations. These criteria are based on a careful consideration of who and what Breckenridge represents, and are encapsulated in a set of thematic narratives that emerged from a visioning session between PAAC members and BCA staff. The goal was to identify the components of our local identity that combrne to build a strong sense of Breckenridge as a place, so that future artworks continue to represent the beliefs, values, and ideals that the Breckenridge community holds dear. MASTEp pr Al., i polr\rFlage 131 of 207 1, PAGE advises Town Council. 130 EPHEMERAL PUBLIC ART IN BRECKENRIDGE .T ! ?.I.a t I trt' nl ;."r t I 10*:l$alxjfQ,Paeket & e \ , r 1 L"\ ul r$r'*1 I 7 t ! -r tr 131 3.3 Future of the Publlc Art Collectlon Thus, future public art selections will continue to reflect community ideals by taking creative direction from carefully constructed thematic narratives, which remove any guesswork for managers and policy-makers on how to proceed with selectrng and implementing public art. Using the thematic narratives as guidelines. BCA and its advtsory committees will pursue curatorial balance by seeking out pieces that exemplify those narratives that are less represented in the current collection, and enhance the diversity of mediums, artists, and perspectives. New artwork selections wrll engage viewers, inspire conversation. and provide opportunities for interaction or education whenever possible. While it is likely that the thematic narratives w,ll change over time as the Breckenridge communtty continues to redefine itself, the process of selecting artworks in keeping with a defined set of guiding principles is now established through the 20'16 Master Plan. lt provides a means for the ongoing selection of permanent artworks that strengthen the collective message about urho we are and who we want to be, acknowledging diversity while building on our formative past to interpret and nurture the strong sense of place that continues to evolve in Breckenridge. 3.4 Temporary + Ephemeral lnstallatlont ln addition to the permanent collection. the Breckenridge Public Art Program includes temporary and ephemeral installatrons that enlrven public spaces for a limited period of time, often as a part of festivals and events or seasonal 1 0- 1 6.fl 7L +[@^pssf6[1,.r,BREC},.ENRIDGE PUtsLIC ART PROGRAI,l exhibitions. One example is Sculpture on the Blue, a rotating outdoor sculpture exhibition near the Blue River that has provided a vibrant sculpture garden for visitors and the local community to enjoy throughout the summer for more than a decade. Temporary artworks can have a lifespan of up to five years, but are often exhrbited for much less time. One example is "The Blue Trees" by world-renowned artist Konstantin Dimopoulos, in which aspen trees in town were colored a brilliant blue as part of the Breckenridge lnternational Festrval of Arts (BIFA) in the summer of 2015. lntended to fade with the seasons, the natural pigment provided a changing contrast with the brightly colored fall leaves, and later the brilliant whiteness of snow as it gradually drsappeared from the landscape. Another example is QUACK: An Artful Duck Exhibition, which was presented in 2015 in partnership with the Summit Foundation during the 28th Annual Great Rubber Duck Race. The temporary exhibition featured seven oversized fiberglass ducks, each hand-painted by a local artist. on display throughout downtown Breckenridge. Ephemeral artworks are much more fleeting. Examples include the chalk murals created at the Street Arts Festival. a celebration of street, pavement, and graffiti arts that takes place throughout the Breckenridge Arts District during the Town's July Fourth weekend celebration. Misriri,i..rr.r,)ir,Page 133 0f 207 ;z 132 3.4 Temporary + Ephemeral lnstallations continued They can also include performances and installations like those featured in the Trarl Mix series-in which classical musicians performed seemingly at random, and artists constructed ephemeral installations of visual art-on Breckenridge-area trails; or "Australia's The Fruits," an open-air act featuring performers perched atop flexible, swaying poles. Both acts took place at the Breckenridge lnternational Festival of Arts, an event whrch in and of itself could be considered ephemeral art. Other festivals fall into the classification of ephemeral art too- including the winter Fire Arts Festival, which features flaming sculptures and fire performers; the new spring festival, WAVE: Light + Water + Sound, which juxtaposes modern digital media with the historic backdrop of Breckenridge; and the summer Street Arts Festival. 1 0 - 1 6,tr,7,,{@" Pesft s[,,.,,BRECKET.IRIDGE PUBLIC ART PROGRAI..l 3,5 Publlc Art Programmlng The final component of the Breckenridge Public Art Program is the programming of events and activities that pertain specifically to public art-whether their intent is to raise awareness, educate, or encourage communrty partrcipation. Examples include guided tours of the permanent collection, and hands-on activities rn which the public is rnvited to partrcipate in the installation or creation of pubhc artworks. There is often some overlap between the larger program of cultural arts events and activities managed by Breckenridge Creative Arts. and those which can be considered to have a public art focus. An example is the Dia de los Muertos celebration and exhibition in the Breckenridge Arts District, which is presented by BCA in partnership with Metropolitan State University Denver's Department of Chicana/o Studies and the Colorado Folk Arts Council. The two-day event features hands-on workshops, art installations, and a community altar made by local participants. Within that lineup, the art installations and collectively made altar can be considered public art. i.4ASrFF.pi r.f i i PL)r r,,FAge 134 Of 207 PAGE 15 133 4.O BRECKENRIOGE CREATIVE ARTS ln an era of declining investment in the arts, the Town of Breckenridge has gone above and beyond to embrace arts and culture by building up rts existing cultural organizations, renovating and establishing new arts facilities, giving voice to artistic visionaries, and supporting contemporary festivals to breathe life into a burgeoning creative culture. A major vehicle in this effort has been Breckenridge Creative Arts (BCA)-or BreckCreate for short-an independent, nonprofit organization formed by the Town to take over management of its existing arts venues and resources while also raising the level of programming. BCA incorporated as a Colorado nonprofit corporatlon rn November 2014 and began operations in January 2Ol5 with experrenced arts executive Robb Woulfe at the helm. ,t recerved its 501(c)(3) designation in March 2015. The Town provides BCA with an annual operating budget of just under $2 million. The model is unique to Breckenridge and takes the place of hiring an outside firm or continuing arts operations through a Town department. Benefits include enhanced opportunities for outside funding as well as organizational transparency. MAsil:F, pL..rr i F,ori,rPAge 135 Of 207 161 0-16*f ,7,,[@lp66ft6[i r,,BRECKEI.]RIDGE PUBLIC ART PROGRAI"] il li = {fril m nr--t-- I T a a \ i ,' ,r .t I aaau,t, o aa I fr .!. \ I Er ,-i ih--J 134 4.1 Overylew of BCA venues + Programmlng One of BCAs primary responsibilities is to manage the Town's five cultural arts venues, including: . The Riverwalk Center, which hosts the entire summer repertoires of the Breckenrjdge I'1usic Festival Orchestra and the National Repertory Orchestra, in addition to a full schedule of visiting bands, musicians. and multimedia events . The Breckenridge Theater, home to the resident theater troupe, Breckenridge Backstage Theatre, while also servrng as an intimate performance space for a variety of other cultural arts offerings . The Breckenridge Arts District, a campus of renovated historic structures that accommodate a year-long schedule of multidisciplinary arts and craft classes, and serve as studio space for local and visiting artists . Old Masonic Hall, a recently renovated historic buildrng on N4ain Street that serves multiple functions as an exhibition space and location for visual and performing arts classes . The Speakeasy Movie Theate( housed in the recently renovated brick schoolhouse that now serves as the Breckenridge Grand Vacations Community Center & South Branch Library 1 0- 1 6*fl ,7r +[@..Bs6[q6[L "r,BRECKENRIDGE PIJBLIC ART PF]OGRAI'1 These venues are used by a number of longstanding cultural organizations in the Breckenridge creative community, including the Breckenridge Backstage Theatre, Breckenridge Film Festival, Breckenridge Heritage Alliance, Breckenridge Music Festival, and National Repertory Orchestra. ln recent years the Town of Breckenridge has rnvested more than $25 million into these venues. including building out the Breckenridge Arts District campus; converting the historic schoolhouse into the new Breckenridge Grand Vacations Community Center & Summit County South Branch Library, which includes the Speakeasy Theater; acquiring and renovating Old Masonic Hall; upgr.s(ing the Riverwalk Center facility and equipment: and renovating the Breckenridge Theater. To maximize these assets, BCA plans additional programming for the Town's venues, both in partnership with and independent of the cultural partners who use these spaces. BCA aims to present multidisciplinary work that cuts across music, dance, frlm, spoken word, literary and visual arts, education, and the creative and technology sectors. lt seeks out bold, relevant programming that engages its community as a creative partner, offers artistic experiences that reflect its time and place, invites audience co-creation and hands-on involvement, and showcases Breckenridge's global identity. MASTEFTpla.ri' por(rPAge 136 Of 207 PAGE 17 135 4.1 overview of BCA venues + Programming continued Core program activities offered by BCA rnclude: . Fine Art + Studio Craft curriculum, focusing on year-round education and enrichment on the Breckenridge Arts District campus, including classes, workshops, and open studios in media such as painting, textiles, ceramics, metalwork, silversmithing, and more . Artist-in-Residence, a program designed to offer artists the time, space, and community to encourage growth and experimentation in their respective practice. Guest artists are chosen on the basis of artistic merit. and live and work on the Breckenridge Arts District campus for two to four weeks. Additionally. BCA offers affordable studao space to local artists. . BCA presents. a series of ticketed concerts, lectures. and performances with national and international talent at the Riverwalk Center . BCA Culates, a program of temporary exhibitions, installations, and pop-up art events in studios and creative spaces within the Breckenridge Arts District; the acquisition, conservation, and preservation of the growing Town of Breckenndge public art collection; and festivals, exhibitions. and special events that feature curated content Within these core program activities, the Breckenridge Pubhc Art Program falls into BCA Curates. 1 0 - 1 6 "tr,V, +li@,' p gglq6f , +,RRF'l<FI.IRID(;E PI.JI.}T I(- ART P'ROGRAI'1 4.2 BCA Collaboratlon + Advocacy An underlying tenet of BCA programming is accessibility-an ethos reflected in the numerous free events, affordable tlcket pricing policy, scholarship opportunities, and broad geographic reach. Audiences include a wide cross section of the greater Summit County community, including children. teens, young adults. families. and senior citizens; as well as the many tourists and day visitors who travel to Breckenridge each year. BCA seeks to provide artistic experiences that are relevant to its diverse audjences, and to forge bonds between individuals and institutions to help create a community that is engaged in creative actrvity across the board. Drawing on the strengths of its peer creative community. BCA undertakes frequent collaborations with local artists. organizations, and businesses. These community-based alliances foster diversity, inclusion, and growth. Examples of programming collaborations include co-presentations with resident companies and/or member organizations within the Breckenridge Cultural Coalition, including Breckenridge Film Festival, Breckenridge Music Festival, and Breckenridge Tourism Office. ln addation, BCA partners with other regional and statewide nonprofits including Summit County Arts Council, Colorado Art Education Association, St. Anthony Summit Medical Center, and the Brarn lnjury Alliance of Colorado. The BCA planning team also works closely with the Community Engagement and Publlc Art Advisory Committees, two .IAsr''prA, ' r,()Lri:PAge 137 Of 207 tg PACE 136 f9ctuNfvlSuS Nt stvn U_sll luv lnEnd AuvuodhfrNol T tJ Jf. L Iti a I -.d a.tl Iilf, )r. t (t ,. i ':'T:r -,- ,. tl , 'ri $i ,.d l e rir f\!. ,l_ t ,- ,'rlll Itl t ,.1 ffi.p*#$', 137 4.2 BCA Collaboration + Advocacy continued volunteer-based groups comprised of local artists, educators, and creative entrepreneurS, to ensure that the organization achieves a balance between presenting the best national and international programming to Breckenridge audiences, and incubating opportunities for local artists and cultural organizations. 4.3 BCA vlilon, Misslon + Goals Ultimately Breckenridge Creative Arts serves as an umbrella and advocacy organization to grow and leverage artistic and creatrve resources throughout Breckenridge. lts vision is to see Breckenridge become a world-leading creative destination, and its mission is to promote Breckenridge as a vibrant, year-round creative destination by developing inspiring collaborative experiences that attract visitors and enrich the lives of its citrzens. BCA acts in partnership with the Town and in alignment with the Town's vision, leading the creative economic development of Breckenridge by: . Cuitivating the Town's cultural assets and promoting the community as a leading year-round creative destination . Supporting and collaborating with local artists. organizations, and businesses that are mission-aligned and foster mutually beneficial relationships . Maintaining exceptional venues for resident companies, special event partners, promoters, and rental groups . Presenting high-quality performing arts events and visual arts exhibitions '1 0- 1 6'fl ,7r t[Q^pssft6[, ^r, Providing education and community engagement opportunities with a focus on art-making experiences and opportunities for creative play Curating and organizing pubhc art projects, culture walks, studio visits. and residency programs To achieve these aims, BCA has established five primary goals in its Strategic and Operational Plan: . To extend and enhance the experience of the "recreation visitor" through creative offerangs that differentiate Breckenridge from other recreational destinations . To attract the "creative visitor" to Breckenridge who has not considered the town as a destination . To enhance the creative experience of our residents . To optimize the Town's investment in the creative assets we manage and maintain . To build an independent, financially sustainable organization PAGE BRECKET{RIDGE PUBLIC ART PROGRAt,l l4ASiEr pL.'.r.: i poir,:P6ge 1 39 Of 207 ZO 138 4.4 BCA as Publlc Art P7ogtam ilanaEeT When BCA formed as a nonprofit entity to handle management of the Town's cultural assets and arts programmtng, the Breckenridge Public Art Program was among the programs it took on. Thus the guiding principles of the Breckenridge Public Art Program fall under, and are aligned with, the overarching vision, mission, and goals of BCA. While we offer a description of BCA in this plan, note that the principles, policies, and procedures outlined in the Breckenridge Public Art Program Master Plan + Policy 2016 pertain specifically to the Breckenridge Public Art Program, and not the other programs under BCA',s direction. That said, because they fall under the same larger vision. mission, and goals. there are many commonalities between the Breckenridge Public Art Program and the other programs and resources under BCA's purview BCA promotes artistic experiences that are in keeping with the beliefs, values, and ideals of the Breckenridge community, in an effort to honor and strengthen the sense of Breckenridge as a place. Thus BCA programming often highhghts the striking natural beauty of the high country, or juxtaposes contemporary themes wrth the histonc backdrop of Breckenridge. lt seeks to interpret environmental themes, or invite collaboration between audrences of all ages and cultural backgrounds. These thematic narratives underlre all BCA programmrng. 1 0 - 1 6"tr'Vr i[@.. ps6ft6ftr ^ r,BRECKET.IRIDGE PUBLIC ART PROGRAt"l MASir:' pL,.r.r , polr('lzag e 140 Of 207 iT 139 te 1 0- 1 6*fl ,7, fi@aps6@fr al 5.O GUIDING PRINCIPLES + STRATEGIES FOR THE PUBLIC ART PROGRAM To establish the future direction of the Breckenridge Public Art Program, the Public Art Advisory Committee joined Breckenridge Creative Arts staff members for a visioning and strategic planning session led by Art Management & Planning Associates (Al.4PA) in July of 2015. By focusing on positive organizational attributes-including strengths, opportunities, aspirations, and results-the group of representatives came to a common understanding of where the Public Art Program should be headed based on a shared assessment of what is most important to the Breckenridge community. Specrfically, the session resulted in a bold visioning statement for the Breckenridge Public Art Program-in alignment with and directly supporting the vision of Breckenridge Creative Arts-as well as key strategies required to achreve it. These guiding principles form the conceptual framework within which Breckenridge Creative Arts staff members plan and implement initiatives for the Pubhc Art Program, so that all work is undertaken with a common purpose reflective of the community's vision for public art in Breckenridge. 5.I vlslon lor Public Art ln Ereckenrldge The purpose of the Breckenridge Public Art Program is to integrate a wide range of artwork into public spaces in the community. and reflect the diversity of the region's artists, artistic disciplines, and points of view The program promotes education about the arts through its collection and related programming, and serves to raise the public's awareness of their environment and to expand their knowledge and understandrng of the arts. Thus our vision for public art in MASTEFT pL Ar.i i f,orri:p4g$e 141 Of 207 22BRECKEITRIDGE PUBI.IC ART PTiOGRAI.I {'kt I 8' ' ,tt\ ' ilj ,t I 140 5.1 vision for Public Art in Breckenridge continued Breckenridge, which resulted from the strategic planning session. is as follows: Vision: The Bieckenridge Public Art Program enga9es, incites conversation, and is an integral part of the Breckenrid ge expeilence. 5.2 Key St?etegles, lnltlatlves + Opportunitles The group also collaborated on the following strategies, which are key to achieving the vision for publc art in Breckenridge. For each strategy we list current rnitiatives that are either underway right now or already completed, as well as future opportunitres under consideratton. Strategy #l: Developing thematic narratives that provide context for the existing and evolving collection; and curating and commissioning public art based on those narratives to extend the sense of Breckenridge as a place By studying and describing thematic narratives that reflect the history and character of the Breckenridge community, we gtve context to the existing collection whrle inspirrng future publac art selectrons that are self-interpretive but grounded tn a c ear understanding of who we were in the past, who we are today. and who we hope to be in the future. Public artworks selected rn this spirit will enhance and expand our sense of place in Breckenridge. 1 0-1 6*fl ,71 rli@..pssftgfL,.r, Current lnitiatives: Complete written and visual documentation of the 31 pieces in the existrng permanent art collection, including descriptions, photographs, and project details such as the location, installatron date, donor, and artist. This documentation serves as a starting point from which thematic narrataves can be identified and further developed, providing continuity in the future selection of public artworks. Also supports Strategy #2. (Completed, 2O16) Update and expand the Master PIan + Poilcles to describe thematic narratives that will guide decision-making about future permanent public art commissions, as well as temporary installations that enhance and expand the sense of Breckenridge as a place. By exploring the history and thoughtful processes followed to build the existing collection, the plan establishes how Breckenridge artworks reflect the character of the community, and ensures that the process for selecting future artworks continues to be relevant and thoughtful. Updated policies and procedures based on these narratives will guide the day-to-day work of program managers. (Completed,2Ol6) Seek out permanent and temporary public art installations that: 'l) leverage and comment on the spectacular mountain environment, 2) commemorate, invite conversation about, or create an interesting JUXtaposition with local history; 3) raise awareness about or comment on environmental topics: 4) explore drverse mediums while seeking balance between traditional and contemporary forms; 5) represent a balance of local, national, and international artists; PAGE BRE(IKEIIRIDGE PUBI.IC ART PROGRAT.,l MASTEp F,rAr, poir,rP,age 142 Of 207 23 141 5.2 Key Strategies, lnitiatives + Opportunities continued 6) encourage community and visitor engagement, interaction, and collaboration: 7) exemplify Breckenridge's willingness to take risks and face controversy while following a public process that is thoughtful, respectful, and open; and 8) differentiate Breckenridge from other mountain towns (Ongoing) . Create and implement cutting-edge arts festivals and programs that feature intensely place-based installations such as the Frre Arts Festival, WAVE: Light + water + Sound, Street Arts Festival, and Breckenridge lnternational Festival of Arts (BIFA). Some of these festivals make use of alternative venues that are unique to Breckenridge, such as the Blue Rivel used for light proiectaons in the WAVE festival, and hiking trails, used for the BIFA Trail Mix senes, which includes pop-up classical music performances and environmental visual art installations. Also supports Strategy #3. (Ongoing) . Schedule temporary installations that comment on the envrronment, such Konstantin Dimopoulos"'The Blue Trees," and Erin V Sotak's "My Your Our Water" (Ongoing) . Commission permanent artworks that represent the future of Breckenridge. such as Albert Paley s "Syncline," a contemporary sculpture intended to illustrate the interplay of light on the intersecting convex and concave planes of the mountains. The piece also represents the community's willingness to take risks and face controversy through an open and honest public process. (Commission completed, scheduled for installation in 2O'17) 1 0- 1 6*{,7i i[@..ps6@f, ., Future Opportunities: . Seek out permanent and temporary public art installations that continue to tell the story of Breckenridge, its history, people, and culture, and where we are headed as a community . Continue to showcase the town as a place of beauty, emphasizing its landscape and natural elements such as water, mountains, trees, and sky . Continue to develop and refine the thematic narratives that describe and extend the sense of Breckenridge as a place . Engage the community in workshops, forums, and/or surveys to understand how they see Breckenridge. to discover how they perceive the public art already in town, to find out the opportunities and priorities they see for new public artworks, and to learn what they feel is missing from the story told through public art in Breckenridge. Also supports Strategy #5. . Seek out permanent installations that commemorate more recent historical events. in ahgnment with the goal of the Breckenridge Heritage Alliance, a cultural partner, to tell the more recent history of Breckenridge . Develop relationships with national art centers and other public art programs to participate in art-on-loan programs, and to explore opportunities for co-commissioning new work to exhibit at partner venues . Study existing public art locales to plan Creative Zones for future public art that will expand and connect the collection, serve as icons for wayfinding, and promote a more walkable, pedestrian-friendly town PAGE BRECKEINRIDGE PUBLIC ART PROGRAI.l ivAsi!:i:'pl..ri , r,i,, r.-pggg 143 0f 207 24 142 5.2 Key Strategies, lnitiatives + Opportunities continued Strategy #2: Building educational/interactive components to inform or initiate the conversation Through educational outreach we can increase understanding of public art and placemaking and how they contribute to the social, cultural, and economic well-being of the town. Current lnitiatives: . lmplement uniform plaques for the permanent public art collectron; as well as signage, post cards, mobile app tours, and other anformational pieces for temporary and ephemeral installations; to educate viewers about project themes, social relevance, and other aspects of publc art installations. Also supports Strategy #3. (Ongoing) . Recruit and hire a Director of Learning + lnnovation to lead strategic initiatives in education, research, and outreach in order to connect BCA programs, including the Public Art Program, to a wide variety of audiences on campus, online, and offsite (Completed, 2O16) Future Opportunities: . Create docent-led and selFguided tours of public art, as well as an educational video that showcases the collection, highlights some of its artists, and illustrates the installation process. Also supports Strategy #3. . Utilize digital media such as podcasts, educational videos, blogs, listservs, and e-newsletters to create public education materials. Also supports Strategy #3. 1 0- 1 6*'f, ,7t i[@rps6fq6[i,:r,BRE(]T.Ef.IRIDGE Pt]BLIC ART PROGRAI"l Host innovative educational events around the Public Art Program including lectures by participating artists, community workshops, adult and children's classes, and hands-on collaboratrve art activrtres. Also supports Strategy #3. Create technology-rich, interdisciplinary curricular materials, programs. and workshops around public art for pre-K to 12th-grade teachers and students, and reach out to public art teachers, public and private schools, and Summit School District to: l) encourage participation in public art tours and activities: 2) seek representation by public art teachers on the PAAC: 3) garner input on how to further support educational initiatives around public art and related programming; and 4) strengthen overall collaboration with the school district and other educational agencres Establish opportunities for the participation of Breckenridge youth rn hands-on public art projects Recruit and train volunteers, docents, interns, and instructors to directly assist with all educational and outreach programs Establish a system to assess opportunities for creative engagement to ensure maximum educational impact and that educational program goals are being met iyAsi'r'p, 4r: ' poi,,rpage 144 Of 207 iE 143 5.2 Key Strategies, lnitiatives + Opportunities continued Strategy #3: Expanding PRlmarketing/relationship sttategies to develop awareness Through targeted marketing efforts, we can increase awareness about the Public Art Program in all segments of the local and visiting community, thereby stimulating the Town of Breckenridge's reputation as a creative destination while growing support for future projects and the program as a whole. Current lnitiatives: . Develop a modern, mobile-responsive website that offers easily navigable online access to the Publrc Art Program for locals, visitors, and future visrtors. The site rncludes a complete inventory of the Town's public art collection with an interactive map, links to current calls to artrsts (under Opportunities), a regularly-updated calendar of events, and other relevant information about the program and its prolects. .Also supports Strategy #2. (Completed, 2O16) . Utalaze socaal media tools including Facebook and lnstagram to raise awareness about public art festivals and programs, and to attract additional visitors to the BCA website (Ongoing) . Launch a quarterly online magazine to expand awareness about the creative community in Breckenridge, including the Public Art Program, Each issue of /krl'al/ includes a section called "Objectified" featurtng a local oblect of art, and describes events that showcase temporary and ephemeral installations. Also supports Strategy #2. (completed, 2015) 1 0-'1 6*f ,7r {@"ps6ft6[, ol Promote Public Art Program events and installations in mailings such as BCA's quarterly event catalog (Ongoing) lmplement measurement strategies to capture BCA's impact, specifically as it relates to the Public Art Program, including collecting and analyzing demographic and market-related data regarding its audience (Ongoing) Future Opportunities: . lnclude a marketing and communications component in the Annual Operational Plan to guide future awareness-raising efforts about the Public Art Program. Specific opportunities listed below will be ranked according to priority and integrated into the annual plan by BCA stafi . Create a digital and print pamphlet for the existing public art collection that can be used for self-guided art tours while documenting public art installations. Also supports Strategy #2. . Create digital and print pamphlets for public art programs, such as Sculpture on the Blue, WAVE, and temporary and ephemeral installations. Also supports Strategy #2. . lntegrate the public art narrative, with links to Public Art Program tours and opportunities, into the Town of Breckenridge website . Produce communications materials in both Enghsh and Spanish, to expand awareness about the Public Art Program. Also supports Strategy #2. . Explore additional opportunities for expanding awareness of the Public Art Program in events such as Art Around Town and quarterly Creatavaty Crawls to encourage the community and visitors to explore the collection. Also supports Strategies #2 & #5. rvASrr:F',pi.Ar, r,orr,:p6gg 145 of 207 26 PAGE BRECKEI.IRIDGE PUBLIC ART PROGRAI'1 144 - t a 3J,V,\,\uno unoA Ahf t tf, f cctuNfvlf u8 Nl luv lllSnd Auol.vdlllluvd + fn lllvuflNl lD ao * " $\a # III i T I \-.-- I H q) L InIII Y ? t d IIt \ \.D , a a Ll*l , L t 4I/-.LI SFJq "? LJ !{-,td 7 145 Future Opportunities; Current lnitiatives: Update the Art in Public Places Master Plan to be renamed as the Breckenridqe Public Art Program Master Plan + Policy. The updated document will guide the creative decision-making and day-to-day work of the Breckenridge Public Art Program while educating stakeholders and raising awareness about the program. Also supports Strategies #2 & t3. (ln progress, 20'16) Work with Town Engineering on the schedule and site planning for the installation of the Albert Paley sculpture. "Syncline" (ln progress, 2016) The designation includes a funding package benefitting BCA projects such as the Public Art Program, opens doors to additional funding through foundations and other supporters of pubhc art, and supports marketing and education efforts. 1 0- 1 6"f 7, i[@^pss[q6[. ol BRECKETJRIDGE PUBLIC ART PROGRAI'1 5.2 Key Strategies, lnitiatives + Opportunities continued AIso supports Strategies #2 & #3. (Submitted and received, 2016) Create a Public Art Collection Maintenance appropriation within BCAs annual budget. national funding Start a dialogue and develop training for Town staff, to educate them on the value of public art, and to encourage consideration of public art opportunities. projects are rdentified. BCA stalf will then initiate conversations with the appropriate staff from the Planning and Engineering Departments to look at opportunities to incorporate public art into public projects. Annuai identification of opportunities allows for the integration of public art in a thoughtful way. Such capital projects may include open space development, transportation sites such as bus stops, parking facalitres, lighting, and pedestrian MASTE' pLAr + por.r(rFlagf e 147 Of 207 2g PAGE selected and funded. 146 5.2 Key Strategies, lnitiatives + Opportunities continued wayfinding projects. The funding for public art within capital projects shall have a separate budget line item. ln addition, the integration of public art into capital proiects will not cause any changes to the proiects timeline nor impact any future maintenance operations. . ln general, the Capital lmprovement Proiect budget process will be used for new acquisitions or for larger budget maintenance requirements to the collection. When a new acquisition is associated with a public project, there will be a separate capital budget and the proiect will be managed by BCA staff. . BCA staff will work with the Town Clerk to develop and maintain a list of all public art pieces in the collection, their locations and values whereby the Town can adequately insure the public art collection at its estimated value Stiategy *5: lnvolving the local community and businesses in extending and advocating for the Public Art Progtam By engaging local community members and busrnesses in public art commissions and activities such as hands-on arts events and tours, we can inspire the communlty to take ownership of public art projects, thereby growing the reach and positive perception of the Breckenridge Public Art Program. Current lnitiatives: Create a Public Art Advisory Committee made up of key community stakeholders to advise and oversee the integration of visual artworks into public spaces (Completed, 2O15) Create a Community Engagement Committee made 1 0 - 1 6"7'7,, tliQ;,ps6146[, o,, up of diverse community members and business owners (Completed, 20l5) lnvite the community to participate in the creation or installation of temporary or permanent works. A recent example was "The Blue Trees" by renowned artist Konstantin Dimopoulos, in which volunteers helped color aspens in town blue to spread an environmental message. (Ongoing) Future Opportunities: . Continue to increase community participation in public art through celebrations that feature interactive or participatory installations, such as WAVE: Light + Water + Sound and the Breckenridge lnternational Festival of Arts . Schedule joint meetings between the Public Art Advisory Committee (PAAC) and the Community Engagement Committee (CEC) so that the CEC remains informed of pubhc art programs, and the PAAC can hear community questions, concerns, and desires relating to public art . Develop a database of artists, arts organizations, private interests, community and civic leaders, and residents with an interest in public art to initiate a listserv for targeted communications and e-blasts about public art news and events . Schedule forums and other educational outreach events with community leaders and residents, elected officials and policy makers, artists, project managers, art and desrgn professionals, and other parties involved in public art programming and prolects, to include presentations, open discussions, and progress reports on public art r.1,r.sri:i:r,i/\ri t r,\)i ,Fage 148 Of 207 Zg PA6E BRECKEI']RIDt]E PIJBLIC ART PROGRAI"l 147 5.2 Key Strategies, lnitiativ€s + Opportunities continued commissions. Also supports Strategies #2 & #3. . Serve as a resource and clearinghouse for information about the public art field . Engage current and potential partners in the private sector-including businesses, groups, and individuals-to team with BCA on funding and developing future pubhc art pro,ects . Encourage businesses to host exhibitions, either in therr front windows or within their spaces, to grow participation and thereby enhance public art programming . Explore opportunities to partner with local galleries in a way that advocates for public art and related programming while also benefiting the galleries . Engage current and potential partners for public art projects-including cultural partners, universities and colleges, K-l2 schools, neighborhood organizations, transit departments. and other public agencies-to team with BCA on funding and developing future public art projects. Also supports Strategies #2. #3, & #4. These strategies are the essence of the Breckenridge Public Art Program Master Plan, set forth in Part I of thrs document. They provide creative and planning guidance to BCA's staff and advisory committees, policy makers, and stakeholders to ensure that all initiatives contribute toward the collective vision of the Public Art Program. 1 0-16.1,7' TC Paeket, -'BRECKEI.IRIDGE PTJBLIC ARi PROGRAT'I MASTE'pL qrii pr)rr,rPAge 149 Of 207 SO PA6E 148 ENVIRONMENTAL PUBLIC ART IN BRECKENRIDGE a [q t L \ , I I, , I gr 5r-,'Y {no- l Err 149 PART 2: PUBLIC ART POLICY The Public Art Policy section outlines the specific policies and procedures required to put the Master Plan into action. It includes detailed information about the Breckenrtdge Public Art Program's governance, funding, oversight. management. prolect planning. and implementation. These policres and operating procedures guide the everyday work of policy makers and program managers, from commrssronrng new permanent and temporary pieces, to managing the existing permanent collection. 6.0 GOVERNANCE TOOLS FOR THE PUBLIC ART PROGRAM The Breckenridge Public Art Program is governed by a series of ordinances adopted by Town Council as part of Breckenradge Town Code, including the Master Plan as a correlative document to the Development Code and Town Code. The public art policies are administered, and updates recommended, by a tiered legislative and advisory structure consisting of the Breckenradge Town Council, the Breckenridge Creative Arts Board of Directors (BCA Board), and the Public Art Advasory Committee (PAAC), with BCA and Town staff acting in a management capacity. 6.1 Breckenrldge Publlc Art Code Breckenridge Tovrn Council frrst adopted a series of resolutions and ordinances pertaining to public art in 1996, in which public art was defrned as: "A work of art located on public or private property which rs accessible to the public. Public art includes, but is not limited to painting, sculpture, graphic arts, tile, mosaics, photography, earthworks, environmental installations, and decorative arts." 1 0 - 1 6*tr V,.,.iliG,Paoket The resolutions and ordinances provided for: . Establishing a Public Art Commission to provide guidance to the Town on the Public Art Program . Adopting the first "Art in Public Places Master Plan" as a correlative document to Title 9 of Breckenridge Town Code, known as the Breckenridge Development Code . Amending the Breckenridge Development Code for public art within the Historic District (Class C development application) and outside the Historic District (Class D development application) ln 2006, Town Council amended the Breckenridge Development Code to state the purpose and goal of public art: "The placement of art in public places enriches, stimulates, and enhances the aesthetic experience of the Town. The Town's Public Art Program is designed to complement the visual experience that is the cornerstone of the Town's identity. The Town recognizes and rewards the efforts of applicants who place art in publicly accessible areas on private property by providing an incentive as hereafter provided in this Policy." The incentive took the form of a positive points program for developers installing public art projects. Such projects were to be privately owned, insured, and maintained, and conform to site and artwork selection critena outlined in the "Art in Public Places Master PIan." PACE BRE(--KEI.]RIDGF PL'BLI(, ART PROGRAM ilI.:iTF,ri 'LAN r i:'oL r!-\, -,r,r,,pagg 151 0f 207 32 150 6.1 Breckenridge Public Art Code continued Town Council also adopted an updated "Art in Public Places Master Plan" in 2006. ln 2O15, after Breckenridge Creative Arts incorporated and took on the management of the Public Art Program, Town Coun- cil passed a resolution to dissolve the Public Art Commissron. The move was the first step in amplementing the new advisory structure outlined below. Work on an updated, comprehensive Master Plan commenced, resulting in the "Breckenridge Public Art Program Master Plan + Policy." 5.2 Publlc Art Master Plan + Pollcy Upon adoption by Breckenridge Town Council, the "Breckenridge Public Art Program Master Plan + Policy 2016" becomes a correlative document to the Town Code and Development Code. replacing the "Art in Public Places Master Plan" that was originally adopted in'1996 and updated in 2006. All works of public art will then become subiect to the creative guidelines established in the Breckenridge Public Art Program Master Plan (Part 1 of this document) and the terms and conditions in the Public Art Policy (Patl2). This includes all permanent and temporary public art installations, whether commissioned through a Call to Artists protocol; purchased directly from an artist, agent, gallery, or other source; or received as a donation in the form of a bequest, gift, or sponsored acquisition. lt includes all public art as defined by Breckenridge Town Code, whether funded by the Town's general fund, co-sponsored or funded through a partnershrp between the Town and other agencies, funded through grants or donations, or funded privately by businesses or individuals. 10-16,trV, ';FG.Faoket BRECKETIRIDGE PUBt.IC ART PROGRAM 6.3 Roles + Responllbllltles Upon establishment of Breckenridge Creative Arts as the manager of the Breckenridge Public Art Program, a new structure was put in place to oversee the program, and to develop and refine policy. This section outlrnes the roles and responsibilities of the legrslative, management, and advisory bodies: showcase them. Breckenridge Town Council - Breckenridge Town Council is the leg slative body for the Public Art Program. This seven-member group of elected officials, including the mayor of Breckenridge, votes on ordinances and resolutions to adopt or amend pubhc art policies within the Breckenridge Development Code. a subsection of Breckenridge Town Code PAGE ilASTER nr AN + i-{ir rLry:/.'rrPage 152 0f 207 33 diverse local ohilanthrooists. the 151 6.3 Roles + Responsibilities continued . Breckenridge Creative Arts staff - Breckenridge Creative Arts is the primary manager of the Public Art Program. Staffed by an experienced team of arts administrators, curators, and educators, BCA works with its Board of Directors, Town administration, Town Councrl, the Public Art Advisory Committee. resident companaes, and other stakeholders to advance the Public Art Program. . Breckenridge Town staff - Town of Breckenridge staff members also play a managerial role for the Public Art Program. All development permits, includrng those for public art installations, go through the Town of Breckenridge Community Development Department, which oversees all aspects of public and private development. Breckenridge Town staff and BCA staff work closely to ensure that public art projects are in keeprng with Town Code, and to collaborate on suggestions regarding public art policy changes. BCA staff and the Public Art Advisory Committee will provide assistance to Town staff on the review of all applications to locate pubhc art within Breckenridge to ensure that they satisty the cnteria outlined in the l.4aster Plan + Policy. . Public Art Advisory Committee (PAAC) - The Public Art Advasory Committee serves an advisory role as one of the standing committees of the BCA Board. An appointed group with no term limits, the PAAC consists of up to two directors of the Board along with invited community members, arts professionals, and a BCA staff member The purpose of the PAAC is to oversee a thoughtful process of integrating visual works of art into public spaces, and to advise the BCA Board on pubhc art 10-16"1V,TG Facket RF]ECKEI'IRIDGE PLIBLI(- A R I PR()I;R AM projects while acting as stewards of the Breckenridge Public Art Program's vision and Master Plan. 6.4 Public Art Advisory Committee (PAAC) The Public Art Advisory Committee assists with aesthetrc enrichment of the town through public art by: . Developing a public arts vision statement . Advising on the creation of a comprehensive Master Plan for the Public Art Program . Providing input on the development of a timeline and strategies to meet Master Plan objectives annually . Contributing to the visual character and texture of the town in a way that reflects the community's past, present, and future . Advising on public art programs that provide opportunities to engage and encourage public dialog . Advising on efforts to make public art and artistic experiences accessible to residents and visitors The committee also advises on public art policy by: . Providing input on the creation of a public record that catalogs the Breckenndge public art collection and reviews the collection annually to consider relocation, deaccession, renewed community engagement, and maintenance concerns . Advising on the creation ol and adminastering comprehensive policy guidelines for, the selection and installation of public art purchased with Town, private, donor, or grant/foundation funding . Providing input on a periodic review of new public art policy r1..:TER i L AN I ii-,t r,:r :,,,r.p29€) 153 0f 207 aA'ta 34 152 5.4 Public Art Advisory Committee (PAAC) continued Last, the PAAC advises on public art programs by: . Helping to identify funding sources for public art acquisition to promote the Town's cultural and economic health . Advising on the development of public art partnerships within Town projects, private developers, the Breckenridge Arts District, and community arts and cultural organizations . Advising on the use of public art to promote a more walkable town using public art as a wayfinding tool and with guided "art walks" or other options . Providang jnput on efforts to broaden the community's knowledge and education about Breckenridge's public artworks and programs PAGE 1 0-16,1 7,TG-Facket BRECKENIRIDGE PUBLI(- ART PROGRAM 1,..>r{:ri:r ;,N } pi,)Lr,-\ .,r,r.pggg 154 Of 207 35 I b-- ; rybhik' ,::4 ks.'q 7 ,AI I ffi;i-, t !! - t,I\,r\ 153 7.O FUNDING RESOURCES The Town of Breckenridge is the primary fundrng source for the Breckenridge Public Art Program. Public funds are used to support the acquisition of new permanent pieces for the collection, as well as the ongoing maintenance of existing artworks. Operational costs related to permanent and temporary public art installations, including programs and festivals designed to raise awareness about the Public Art Program, are also supported by the Town. Funding for the Breckenridge Public Art Program can be bolstered by grants, partnerships, collaborations, fundraising, and individual and business sponsorships. Such supplementary funding makes it possible to purchase or commission additional pieces for the collection, or support the Publrc Art Program rn other ways like sponsoring education initiatives or creative marketing. Public artworks can also be acquired through private sector incentive programs, gifts, and loans. By pursuing opportunities for collaboration and supplemental funding, BCA can enhance the Public Art Program and contribute toward its long-term sustainability. The PAAC wrll meet annually to prepare estimated costs for fiscal year public art programming, maintenance. and growth of the collection. Budget recommendations will be shared with the BCA Board in a timely manner to be considered for fiscal year budgeting. 10-16"trV,.'FG Saoket 7.t Permanent Acqulsltions Public art is acquired to grow the permanent collection through a number of different funding or donation mechanisms: . Town budget - The Town of Breckenridge provides funding support annually, as budgets allow, through a public art fund for projects located on Town property or private property with a public easement. This is the primary source of funding for Breckenridge public art projects. . Partnerships + co-sponsors - Partnership projects are those that are funded rn part by the Town's general fund and in part by an outside source. Partnership prolects can be located on Town property, pnvate property wrth a public easement, or private property that is visible to and benefitting the public. . Private donations - Privately funded prolects are those that are funded by an outside source other than the Tou/n's general fund. Pnvately funded projects can be located on public property owned or managed by the Town; on pnvate property on which a publrc easement has been granted; or on private property that rs accessrble to and utrlrzed by the publrc. Outside fundrng sources may present themselves in the form of monetary donations from private indrvrduals or businesses, donattons garnered as part of a developer incentive program, or ex sting artworks. . Developer incentive program - Developer incentive programs, in which the Town encourages private developers to contnbute in whole or part to public art projects, can be used to raise funds for new acquisitions. il..srF:Fi rLAN + irolr,-\::,,ropggg 155 Of 207 36BRECKEI.IRIDGE PUBLIC ART PROGRAM 154 7.I Permanent Acquisitions continued . Fundraising - Community fundraising can be used to fund public art projects, whether in whole or combined with Town funds as approved. . Grants - Grants can be used to fund public art proiects, as specified in each individual grant application, when applicable to the Breckenridge Public Art Program. 7.2 Malntenance + Progtam Costs The Town of Breckenndge also allocates an annual budget to Breckenridge Creative Arts, which is responsible for managing the Breckenridge Public Art Program, among other duties. Operating costs in the BCA budget that are assocrated specifically wrth the Public Art Program include: Maintenance of the collection - This includes all expenses and staff time required for the ongoing maintenance of pubhc art pieces in the permanent collection. Public Art Program costs - These include all expenses and staff time required to manage the Breckenridge Public Art Program, including the administration and costs associated with programs and festivals geared toward raising awareness, education, and marketrng the Public Art Program. Temporary and ephemeral public art installations are part of the Public Art Program costs subsumed under BCA's budget. The outside funding sources outlined above can similarly bolster maintenance and program costs, and are actively sought as a way to grow and sustain all aspects of the Breckenridge Public Art Program. Page 156 of 207 3710-16,tr7,FG-Paeket PAGE I{ Y,} L-l r F:t" t f I ERECKET.IRIDGE PUBTIC ART PROGRAM 155 8.O PROJECT PLANNING Planning a public art project is a long-term process. lt begins with big-picture planning that looks at what is best for the community and how proposed proJects relate to organizational and program goals, as well as the strategies and criteria set forth in the Breckenridge Public Art Program Master Plan + Policy. Proposed permanent installations are evaluated to see how they relate to the existing collection, both in terms of physical location and thematic narratives. Temporary installations and public art programming too should be based on the strategies and thematic narratives, and are also evaluated in terms of how they relate to the year-round calendar of cultural events in Breckenridge. From there, staff can engage in the detailed planning work that each year, and each individual project, entails. The following tools are used to plan the broad work that the Breckenridge Public Art Program will undertake in a five-year perrod, narrowing to the work planned for a single year. 8.1 Flve-Year Ptoject Plan The Five-Year Project Plan, currently under development, is a long-term planning tool that establishes what is on the horizon for the Breckenridge Public Art Program. A fluid document that narrows in scope as each year approaches, it allows managers to envision the program five years out, and then work with the board, committees, stakeholder groups, and Town Council to come to agreements about upcomtng projects years in advance. 10-16,trV,,TG.Facket 8.2 Annual Operatlonal Plan Each year's work for the Breckenridge Public Art Program is guided by the Annual Operational Plan, developed by BCA staff in the fourth quarter of the previous calendar year. Projects that have been priorrtized for a given year move from the Five-Year Project Plan into the Annual Operational Plan, which is based on the public art budget and any outside sources of fundins available. The Annual Operational Plan includes any and all components affecting the Public Art Program, from new commissions, donations, and acquisitions to maintenance, restoration, relocation, deaccessioning, and funding opportunities to be pursued for future pieces. Marketing components, metrics to assess program success, public art programming inrtiatives, and temporary and ephemeral installations are also included in the Annual Operational Plan. The Annual Operational Plan should align with any public art initiatives outlined in BCA'S Strategic + Operatronal Plan. Ultimately it describes a consensus on what and how projects should be prioritized for a given year. As such, the Public Art Advasory Committee advises on the Annual Operational Plan with input from other stakeholder groups. PAGE BF-IECKEI'IF]IDIiE Pt,!tsLIC ARI PRO{]RAI.4 |;.:ltrfrit.trN t tlrl ,, r:r,,r,,P?9e 157 Of 207 38 156 9.O SITE + ARTWORK SELECTION CRITERIA All public art acquisitions are subject to the creative guidelines and terms and conditions outlined in the Breckenridge Public Art Program Master Plan + Policy. The following criteria inform oblective decisions about v/hat projects to pursue and select, and where to locate them, based on the thematic narratives and strategles identified in the Master Plan. Adherence to these criteria makes it possible for the Public Art Program to continue to grow a diverse collection that appeals to a broad audience while strengthening the sense of place in Breckenridge. 9.1 Site Selection Criterla ln selecting a srte for public artwork, the following cnterra should be prioritized: . Locatrons that are highly visible, easily viewed, and broadly accessible to the public . Locations with multiple uses that are centers of actrvity . Locations that are enhanced by public art, such as those currently void of visual interest, or in which the addition of artwork would complete the location's visual experience . Locations that provide a meaningful context for the art and strengthen the location's sense of place . Locations that allow for wayfinding opportunities . Locations that allow for reflection and provide a break from social activity . Locations that encourage social interaction, participation, and dialog about artworks . Locations that avoid excessive visual clutter . Locations that do not create any obstacles for Town infrastructure or maintenance operations 1 0-1 6,trV',lliG.Paeket BRECKEI.IRIDGF PUBLIC ART PROGRAM Town Council should approve all proposed sites for public art in advance of an artwork's selection if it is to be installed on Town of Breckenridge property. 9.2 Artwork Selectlon Crlterla ln selecting public artwork, the following criteria should be prioritized: . The proposed artwork should suggest a relationship to one or more of the thematic narratives identified in the Master Plan by: o Leveraging and commenting on the spectacular mountain environment o Commemorating, inviting conversation about, or creating an interesting juxtaposition with local history o Raising awareness about or commenting on environmental topics o Exploring diverse mediums, materials, colors, and content matter while seekrng stylistic balance between traditional and contemporary forms o Representang a balance of local, national, and rnternational artists o Encouraging community engagement, interaction, and collaboration o Exemplifying Breckenridge's willingness to take risks and face controversy while following a public process that is thoughtful, respectful, and open o DiFferentiating Breckenridge from other mountain towns i l/\srEri iri jN l ir{.ri rr,'y:,olbP?ge 158 Of 207 39 157 re' S9ClUNfylfUE Nl SNOlrvllv]-sNl flNVNUOlUfd + SfllVl-lfds l-UV lll8nd I , Grr-91-01LL \ \ I "{l ta I t- hh"\ n 'l d I s, 2 ! ,d il tir il; ! t:! 158 9.2 Artwork Selection Criteria continued . The proposed artwork should be identified as a priority rn the Annual Operational Plan. . The proposed artwork should have adequate funding. . The proposed artwork should meet both site selection and artwork selectron criteria. . The proposed artwork should meet the intent of the proiect descriptron in the Call to Artists process. . The proposed artwork should be considered to have high artistac merit. . The proposed artwork should further the mission of BCA and the vision of the Public Art Program. . The proposed artwork should be considered from a marketing perspective on the basis of the ability of the artist or presentation to attract a broad audience, the potential for the artist or presentation to secure underwriting, and competition in the marketplace. . The physical and conceptual permanence of a proposed artwork should be considered on the basis of maintenance, resistance to vandalism, safety concerns, and timelessness. . The proposed artwork should be compatible with the selected site location, such as compatibility with the Historic District or Creative Zone. Basic elements to consider include scale, materials, existing/proposed landscaping. and existing/proposed lighting. . The proposed artwork should be consrdered in the context of nearby works including how the proposed piece contributes to the overall context of the collection in a glven location or Creative Zone, and how it contributes to the thematic narratives. 10-16,trV, TG'Facket BREL-KET.IRIDGE PLIBLIC ilRT PROGRAM 9.3 Creatlve zones The layout of Breckenridge lends itself to the establishment of "Creative Zones" in which a particular character or set of attributes, aligned to the thematic narratives, can be emphasized in order to strengthen that zone's sense of place or add functionality such as wayfinding. For example, pubhc artworks proposed for installation within the Historic Drstrict are considered in terms of how well they support, showcase, enhance, or interpret local history themes. The following are examples of Creative Zones that might be established to support placemaking and wayfinding initiatives in Breckenridge: Breckenridge Historic District - The Town s historrc center, as defined by Town Code, with a focus on N4ain Street and primary hubs of activity running north/south through town Breckenridge Cultural Corridor - A spine of cultural activity that runs east,/west from the Riverwalk Center at its western edge, through Blue River Plaza and up Washington Avenue to the Arts District, and terminating at the Breckenridge Grand Vacations Community Center & Summit County South Branch Library at its eastern edge. The Breckenridge Cultural Corridor rntersects the Historic District and includes performance and exhibition spaces, art studios, theaters, museums, and historrc landmarks. i l-:- iFt! ; L .\N + r'{,t i,. , ., r,tt,pggg 160 Of 207 PAGE 41 159 <.#d #3j I tl I 9.3 Creative Zones continued The Riverwalk + Rec Path - To include walkways fronting the Blue River in the center of town, including the lawn and grounds around the Riverwalk Centet continuing along the Rec Path north to the Breckenridge Recreation Center grounds, Kayak Park, and the public trails along the Blue River to Valley Brook Road and beyond The Recreation Center - The hub of outdoor recreational activities that includes the Breckenridge Recreation Center grounds, Kayak Park, the bike path, and public trails fronting the Blue River at the north end of town Transportation + Parking - To include any walkways, routes, and landmarks connecting Town parktng lots to downtown Breckenridge Town of Breckenridge Trail Systems - To include popular trails near town used for hiking, biking, and other outdoor recreation When public art can serve as a wayfinding tool, it is a benefit. PA'E 10-16"tr7, TG €aaket 6RECKEI.IRIDGE PUBLIC ART PROGRAM ,,,r , \..(,i,,Page 161 Of 207 +Z II _Lf I 160 rO.O PUBLIC ART PROJECT PROCESSES + GUIDELINES This section outlines the processes by which public artworks should be selected and implemented, as well as guidelines for specific project types. IO.l Selectlon Proce3ses lor Permanent Publlc Artworks There are two major processes by which new permanent public artworks can be selected: . Call to Artists - All permanent public art projects with a budget greater than $1O,OOO are commissioned through the Cal! to Artists process outlined in Section 1O.2, and should be approved by the BCA Board and Town Council. A similar Call to Artists process may be implemented for permanent projects funded at $1O,OOO or less, but require only BCA Board approval in order to proceed. . Direct Purchase - Existing artwork can also be purchased directly rf the total value of the piece is $1O,OOO or less, providing it fulfills the site and artwork selection criteria outlined in the Master Plan + Policy. Limited editions should be sought, taking into consideration where other editions are located to avoid selecting pieces already on display wrthin a given radius from Breckenridge. The PAAC should reach a majority consensus on the purchase of existing art for the permanent collection before making its recommendation to the BCA Board. lf the project budget is $IO,OOO or less, BCA Board approval is sufficient for the project to proceed. 10-16"1V,TG Packet BRECKET'IRIDGE PUBLIC ART PROGRAM lO.2 Call to Artlsts Pioces3 for Commlsslons over tlO,OOO Once BCA staff and the PAAC have reached consensus on a Town Council-approved installataon site, and on a concept that fits the artwork selection criteria outlined above, all permanent public art commissions with a budget greater than $1O,OOO utilize the following selection process: . Project lntent - The PAAC works with BCA staff to produce a project intent document, which includes background on the Breckenridge community, a description of the proposed project's intent, and the allotted budget. . Artist Recruitment - A Call to Artists is then issued, in which artists are invited to submit applications including their resumes and information about past works. There rs some flexibility in who is invited to submit applications, and the target group may vary from piece to piece. Some Calls to Artists will focus on local artists, or aim for diversity. Others may be advertised more broadly rn order to solicit well-known artists on the national and internataonal scene. ln some cases, specific artists may be invited to submit applications, such as artists who have an established reputation and therefore whose work may attract attention and creative tourism to Breckenridge. . Finalist Selection - with input from BCA stafi the PAAC selects three frnalists from the field of applicants based on past works, and how well an artist's style fits the project intent and Breckenridge community. PAGE |,..: rLlr r |;N t i,{I ,,,, .,.,,r,P€lge 162 Of 207 43 161 lo.2 Call to Artists Process for Commissions over $to,ooo continued . Proposal Submission - The three finalists are then invited to submit proposals of what they will do to fulfill the project intent. with a concept design including maquettes or drawings of the proposed works. These proposals should be evaluated by BCA and Town staff for feasibility, in terms of enganeering, ability to meet a proposed timeline, and other proiect planning components. . Public lnput - Once the final proposals are vetted for feasibility, the public is invited to comment on the proposed works. Methods for gathering public input can include public forums and educational displays with project drawings and questionnaires. Both methods should feature thoughtful questions, such as how well the proposed protect fulfills the project intent, and how well it represents the community. . Proposal Selection + Approval - The PAAC then reviews the public comments, comes to a majority consensus about which proJect best meets the project intent and fulfills community desires, and makes a recommendation to the BCA Board. The BCA Board votes to approve the project, and then makes a recommendation to Town Council for approval. All permanent public art projects with budgets over $'IO,OOO should be approved by Town Council before the project can proceed. 10-1G"1,7 TG Facket BRECKENIRIDGE PUBLIC ART PROGR.AM 1O.3 tmplementatlon Process tor Commlsslons over llO,OOO Once a proiect is approved by Town Council, the following implementation process is utilized: . Artist Contract - BCA staff oversees a contract with the selected artist/s, to include the project scope, fee, timelane, and terms and conditions if applrcable. The project scope generally includes the final design and engrneering, artwork fabncation, insurance, transportation, and installation. Once the contract is signed, the artist receives an initial deposit of the agreed upon fee to begin work. . Final Design - The artist should develop final design and engineering drawings, to be reviewed by BCA stafl and Town planning and engineering departments as appropriate. lf there is a substantive change from the original concept design, the PAAC should also revrew the final design. . Fabrication - The artist proceeds with fabrication upon approval of the final design, or as outlined in the contract. Upon approval of a midway project update from the artist-to include photos and other project status documentation-BCA issues a midway payment. . lnstallation - The artist is responsible for the installation of the artwork, with coordrnation by BCA staff and assistance from Town staff as necessary, unless otherwtse specified in the contract. . Communications - BCA staff should plan and implement a communications strategy to provide the public with real-time project updates, and to educate and raise awareness about finished projects. PASE I rcsTr,R i.i AN * r,oL r(t\ 2ort Page 163 of 207 44 162 1o.3 lmplementation Process for commissions over $lO,OOO continued . Project Documentation - The artist should submit copies of all finrshed plans, including final drawings and a maintenance and conservation plan, prior to project closeout. . Proiect Closeout - Once all conditions of the contract are met and the above steps are completed, BCA staff should proceed with project closeout and final payment. lO.4 Speclal Guldellnes by Prorect Type The following additional gurdelines pertain to specific project types: . Art in public development - Upon rdentification of public projects that are appropriate for public art as noted in Section 5.2, BCA staff will work with PAAC to review the public project and make recommendations on how public art can be ancorporated into the project. BCA staff will work with Town staff to make sure that the public art component of the project will not hinder the timeline or create any maintenance or operational issues. Public art may be incorporated in the form of architectural enhancements such as railings or tile details to creative designs for bus shelters and pedestrian way finding projects. Public art is not just textiles, paintings and sculpture. . Art on public open space and trails - All public art proposed on the Town's open space and trarls shall be reviewed and approved by the Town's Open Space and Trails Divisron. 10-16"7tr,[G,Faeket Art on private property - lf a landowner wishes to install public artwork on private property, whether the artwork is privately funded in full or in partnership with the Town, the landowner should either: 'l) grant a public easement to the Town for the site on which the artwork will be located; or 2) agree to take financial and physical responsibility for the maintenance, restoration, or deaccessioning of the artwork in perpetuity via a covenant. To plan a public artwork in private development, developers should follow the Town's Development Code requirements. Town staff should share those applications to install public art on pnvate property with BCA staff for review by the PAAC to ensure they satisfy the criteria outlined in the Master Plan + Policy. Public artwork installed on a public easement becomes the responsibilrty of BCA to maintain in perpetuity. following the guidelines set forth in the Master Plan + Policy, unless otherwise specified in an agreement between the Town/BCA and property owner. Donations of public art - All donations of pubhc art to the permanent collection should meet the criteria outlined in the Master Plan + Policy, and be approved by a majority consensus of the PAAC and BCA Board. All donations with a value greater than $1O,OOO should also be approved by Town Council. Not all proposed donations will be accepted. To propose a donation, patrons should contact BCA administrative staff who will research and prepare a recommendation to the PAAC. Accepted donations become the responsibility of BCA to maintain in perpetuity, as outlined in the Master Plan + Policy, unless otherwise specified in an agreement between the Town/ BCA and donor. PAGE BRECKETTRIDGE PUBLIC ARI PROGRAM r i,..: ir:rr i i rr.\j r i.i-.\ri,-\ .,l,r,,p3gg 164 Of 207 45 163 '1O.4 Special Guidelines by Proiect Type continued . Loans of public art - Loaned artworks can be displayed as part of a temporary or ephemeral exhibrtron, such as the Sculpture on the Blue program. Artu/orks can be loaned by rndividual artrsts. curators, and/or cultural organizatrons. Loans of public art can be obtarned through a Call to Artists process, or drrect selectron by BCA staff with rnput from the PAAC. ln either case a location is identified, artworks are selectecl based on feasibrltty and the criteria. . Temporary + ephemeral artworks - Temporary and ephemeral artworks can be obtained through a Call to Artists process, or drrect selection by BCA staff with input from the PAAC. BCA staff rs responsible for the curation of temporary and ephemeral artworks. . Developer incentive guidelines - The Breckenridge Development Code includes a positive points program, adopted by Town Council in 2006, through which development permit applications are eligible to receive o PAAC review: The PAAC wrll review all projects eligible for a positive point to ensure they meet the criteria for site and artwork selection outlined in the Master Plan + Poilcy. o Town Planning Commission review: The Planning Commission may award a positive point if it finds the project is of value for the receipt of positive points and meets the following criteria: 'l) The internal circulation of 10-16"trV,,lliG .Faeket BRECXEI\IFIDGE PUBLIC ART PROGRAM the site is adequate; 2) The placement of the art does not have a negative impact on the point analysis of the property's development permrt (for example, it would have unacceptable consequences for circulation considerations, landscaping requirements, or some other planning reason); 3) All applicable Development Code provisions are complied with, including Building and Fire Codes; 4) The Property owner makes adequate assurances that the artwork is to be privately owned, maintained, and insured. PAGE l'1.'.srER l.i ;\N r ;r,, \i i,-\ :r.rtf,Page 165 Of 207 46 164 ,/ TI.O MAINTENANCE OF THE COLLECTION All permanent public artworks owned by the Town of Breckenridge are the responsibilrty of BCA staff to maintain. All approved public art on private land without a public easement is the responsibility of the landowner to maintain, restore, or deaccession. This section outlines policies regulating the maintenance, restoration, relocation, and deaccessioning of pubhc art. ll.l Malntenance + Restoratlon BCA conducts annual maintenance reviews of all pieces in the public art collection to determine maintenance needs for the pieces themselves and for plaques, landscaprng. and lighting around the pieces. ln the case of damage or wear, restoration may be recommended. Restoration is defined as bringing a piece back to its former condition. Depending on the scope of the work required, marntenance needs such as landscaprng can be performed by the Town Public Works Department. For specialized restoration work, BCA staff generally engages the services of an experienced contractor. It is recommended that BCA acquire the services of a consultant to create a comprehensive inventory and maintenance plan for the entire collection. including a schedule for the specific type of maintenance required for individual pieces; and a timeline, an observation form, and recordkeeping techniques to help BCA staff systematize the maintenance review process and track projects. PA6E 10-16"trV,iFG tracket ERECKEI'IRIDGE P[,]BLIC ART PROGRAI4 rr...:rriri r.\N, i-(,r,, r.,,,ii,pggg 166 0f 207 47 \n L.- :xIit F E \J \''q 165 l1.I Maintenance + Restoration continued The public art collection should also be appraised every 5-'lO years in order to obtain the appropriate amount of insurance as the collection increases in value. ll.2 Deaccessionlng + Relocatlng Publlc Art Public art selected and placed is not necessarily going to remain there in perpeturty. Public art may be deaccessioned for the following reasons: . oamage - The art has been damaged, and rs deemed by BCA staff and the PAAC or the property owner as not berng cost effective to repair. . Safety - The art has become potentially hazardous to the public. . Maintenance - The cost to maintain the artwork has exceeded projected expectations of BCA staff and the PAAC or the property owner. . Reconfiguration of land - The property owner desires to change the way he/she uses the property on which the art is located. and the art therefore becomes an obstacle to plans. . Flexibility + changing tastes - As time passes and the community grows, its tastes may change, therefore the opportunity will be reserved to deaccession public art that is no longer compatible with community values. 10-1$"trVlltiG Faoket BRECXEI.IRID(iE PUBLIC- AR r pROGRAM ln the event the decision has been made to deaccession an artwork, the piece may be: l) relocated to another public space: 2) stored indefinitely until another suitable location is found; or 3) returned to the artrst or donor if such an arrangement had been agreed upon prior to installation or donation. ln the event that none of the above occurs, the piece may be: 1) sold throush a public bid process; 2) traded for other art; or 3) destroyed if the artist cannot be contacted. Unless other arrangements were made at the time of placement, proceeds from the sale of deaccessioned art should be returned to the public art fund to further the Public Art Program. Public art may be relocated from its original installation site to a new, Town-approved location at the recommendation of BCA staff with the consensus of the PAAC and BCA Board. PAGE r i...:r6 R i,r iN r ':,i_,1 rlry irrrt p!l$Q 167 of 207 lg 166 PART 3: BRECKENRIDGE PUBLIC ART COLLECTION Title: Syncline Artrst: Albert Paley Location: Riverwalk Center lawn N4edium: Steel Source: Commissioned by the Town of Breckenridge lnstallation date: To be installed in 2017 Title: Toro Artist: Fred Zietz Location: Blue River Plaza f4edium: Upcycled steel Source: Donated by the partners at Downstairs at Eric's lnstallation date: To be installed in 2O16 Title: Prowlin' Artist: Parker McDonald Location: Fuqua Livery Stable Medium: Steel and moss rock Source: Purchased by the Public Art Comm'ssion lnstallation date: To be installed in 2O16 ; I Title: Sack Race Artist: Jane Rankin Location: Behind the Welcome Center along the riverwalk Medium: Bronze Source: Donated by the Bunchmans in memory of Pat and Harry Bunchman lnstallation date: 2Ol6 Title: Just the Two of Us Artist: Guilloume Location: Breckenridge Grand Vacations Community Center & South Branch Library Medium: Bronze Source: Donated by Judy and John Goebel lnstallation date: 2015 Title: The Library Ouilt Artrst: Summit Ouilters Location: Breckenridge Grand Vacations Communrty Center & South Branch Library Medium: lt4ixed media fiber arts Source: Donated by Summit Quilters lnstallation date: 2O15 PAGE 1 0-'1 6.fl '7',,FG,pssftisfrorr BF]ECKEI.IRIDGE F'{ 'BT IC ART PFOGRAM i..4r\,:rli:ir rrL.\r.r i F,orr,:pggg 168 Of 207 ag "d\ / -rd- t :r'.rt N. II I I i ffir 167 I l, I I I Title: Tom's Baby Artist: S€th Vandable Locatron: Prospector Park l',ledium: Bronze Source: Funded by Anna and Mike Dudick and commrssioned by the Town of Breckenridge lnstallation date: 2O15 Title: Throne Artist: Chaz della Porta Location: Breckenrrdge Arts District campus Medium: Stone, steel, and glass Source: Commissioned by the Town of Breckenridge lnstallation date: 2014 Title: Popsicle Artist: Doyl€ Svenby Location: Vista Point Park N4edium: Powder-coated steel Source: Purchased by the Town of Breckenridge lnstallation date: 2O11 Title: Steel Drawing for Cooper Artist: Steuart Bremner Location: Breckenridge Arts District campus Medium: Steel and stone Source: Donated by Cooper and Dave Walsh lnstallatron date: 2O1l; reinstalled 2014 Title: Cattails Artist: Doyle Svenby Location: Breckenridge Arts District campus Medium: Found steel Source: Donated by Doyle Svenby lnstallation date: 2O1O Title: Outcropping House ll Artist: Albert Belleveau Location: Breckenridge Arts District campus Medium: Steel and stone Source: Purchased by the Town of Breckenridge lnstallatron date: 2009,/lo PAGE 1 0- 1 6"fl '7'EG Sssftsf ,,r BRECKET.,IRID(JE PIJBT.IC ART PROGRAM i.lr.:irifiF'Lii..r ,F,(-)r rlPage 169 Of 207 SO CT .I $lr t ,r l,l ri J V ll,l ,l L tr . {- ,,1} T a". ! 168 Title: Main Street Sunset Artist: Ann Weaver Location: Town Hall Medium: Watercolor Source: Donated by Ann Weaver lnstallation date: 2OO9 Title: The Swing Artist: Victor lssa Location: Tamberline Learning Center Medium: Bronze Source: Donated by the Anilionis girls-Keri. Kristen, Katie, and Kelsie lnstallation date: 20O9 Title: Mister Barney Ford Artist: Emanuel Martinez Location: Barney Ford House f4useum Medium: Bronze Source: Commissioned by the Town of Breckenridge I nstallatron date: 2OO7 \- Trtle; Through the Eye of the Needle Artist: Rik Sargent Location: Alpine Bank Medium: Bronze and stone Source: Commrssioned by Alpine Bank and the Town of Breckenridge lnstallation date: 2OO7 Title: My Book Artist: Jane Rankin Locataon: Breckenndge Grand Vacations Community Center & South Branch Library Medium: Bronze Source: Donated by the family of Anne and Jim Pinion lnstallatron date: 2OO7: reinstalled 2015 Title: Athena First Flute + Lydia First Violin Artist: Michael Adams Location: Riverwalk Center Medium: Bronze and red slate Source: Donated by the Breckenridge Music Festival lnstallation date: 2006 PAGE 1 0- 1 6.1 7 TC Faoket,,'MASTER PLAN r"-, ,'Psgs 170 of 207 5l 7 { BRECI(ET..]RIDGE PUBLIC ART PROGRAT4 169 Title: Gone Fishin' Artist: Steve Puchek Location: ln the Blue River, east of the Riverwalk Center Medium: Steel Source: Donated by Pat and Jack Thomas lnstallation date: 2O05 Title: Kachina Steel Artist: Jack Hill Location: On the bike path by the Breckenridge Recreation Center Medium: Steel and stone Source: Donated by Susie and Rick Grossman lnstallation date: 2O05 Title: Colorado River Rock Bridge Artist: Steuart Bremner Location: Kayak Park Medium: Wood. steel. and stone Source: Commissioned by the Town of Breckenridge lnstallation date: 2OO4 1 0 - 1 6"tr 7,'[@,$ ssftsf ,,,,., Title: As Seasons Change Artist: Stephen Day Location: Riverwalk Center Medium: Oil on canvas Source: Donated by Susanna Chlipala lnstallation date: 2OO4 Title: Chris Ethridge Memorial Artist: Chaz della Porta Location: Stephen C. West lce Arena Medium: Stone, steel, and bronze Source: Commissioned by the Town of Breckenridge lnstallation date: 2O03 Title: Soldiers of the Summit Artist: Robert J. Eccleston Location; South of the Riverwalk Center I.4edaum: Bronze Source: Project and fundraising launched by Marietta and Don Carlson, completed in collaboration with the Town of Breckenridge lnstallation date: 2OO3 BRECKEI.]RIDGE PtJBLIC ART PROGRAM r1{sr.Rr,lAN,' r,oil,rPagg 171 of 207 52 fln I 170 Title: Double Axle Artist: David Griggs Location: Breckenridge Recreation Center Medium: Alumrnum-framed acrylic panels layered with Duratrans film Source: Commrssioned by the Town of Breckenridge lnstallation date: 2O02 Title: The Nest Artist: Chapel Location: lntersection of 14ain and Ridge streets Medium: Bronze and stainless steel Source: Commissioned by the Town of Breckenridge lnstallation date: 2OOO il Title: Ulll Artist: Richard A. Jagoda Location:5OO S. Park Ave. Medium: Stainless and mild steel Source: Purchased by Atlas Development Corporation lnstallation date: 2OOO Title: Going Home Artist: Willie Morrison Location: Carter Park Medium: Steel Source: Purchased by the Town of Breckenridge lnstallation date: 1998 PAGE 1 0-1 6llfl 7,,TG,$ssftsf,,,r'r BF]ECIlEI.IRIDGE PI.]BL IC- ARI PROGRAM ri,\:rri:R lir.,.\r\.r , r,,-,1r,-pggg 172 of 207 53 .:t:It t, 171 Trtle: Three Cowboys Artist: Stephen Hansen Location: Breckenridge Heritage Alliance office Med um: Bronze Source: Commissioned by the Town of Breckenndge lnstallation date: 1997 Title: A Miner's Dream Artist: Robert Tully Location: A collection of pieces in Blue River Plaza, along the riverwalk, and in the river itself Medium: Stone, steel, and wood Source: Commissioned by the Town of Breckenndge lnstallation date: 1994 Title: A Friend to Lean On Artist: Robin J. Laws Location: 224 S. Main St. Medium: Bronze Source: Donated by the family of f4aureen and Jim Nicholls lnstallation date: 1995 1 0-16ir'{ 7,EG,$ssftsf ',r BRECKEI.IRIDGE PUBLIC ART PROGRAM NrsTi:R r,r an1 . r,,-.r1i,:p!t$ e 173 Of 207 54 P46E 172 MAP OF PUBLIC ART IN BRECKENRIDGE 1 0 -1 621'7,T9 Peckgt. r ( )N BRECKENRIDGE PUBLIC ART PROGRAl.4 @ Gone Fishin' @ Kachina Steel @ Colorado Rrver Rock Bridge @ As Seasons Change @ Cnris Ethridge Memorial @ Soldiers of the Summit @ Double Axle @ The Nest @ uttr @ Going Home @ three Cowboys @ A Miner's Dream @ a rriend to Lean on PAGE r4;.:rFi:.rt.i;,N 1 r,,,Pg'99,174 Of 207 55 @ Syncline @ loro @ Prowlin' @ Sack Race @ Just the Two of Us @ rfre Library Guilt @ Tom's Baby @ throne @ Popsicle @ Steel Drawing for Cooper @ cattaits @ Outcropping House ll @ vain Street Sunset @ rhe swing @ vister Barney Ford @ fhrough the Eye of the Needle @ vy soot< @ ntnena First Flute + Lydia First Violin o, @@ @ lr iI @ : l! I { @ @ 173 BCA/PAAC GOALS + STRATEGIES GOALS o @ o @ o To extend and enhance the experience of the'recreation' visitors through creatrye off erings that differentiate Breckenildge from other recreatron destinations STRATEGIES To attract creative visitors to Breckenridge who have not consrdered the town as a destination To enhance the creative expenence ot our residents To optimize the Town s anvestment in the creative assets we manaqe and maintain To burld an rndependent, f inancially sustainable organization cccoeo00 Delavenng Deepening innovative creatrve community programming engagementthrough that entertains, en- accssible riches and entertaining educates programming SUPPORTING GOALS Marntaining facilrties and systems at or above industry standards lmplementing economic models that lead to profitable opertions Expandinq a vrbrant public arts program Building organizational capacity by implementrng planning. leadership development and fundraisang infrastructure Building the Nounshing positive reputataon of relationshrps with lo Breckcreate with cal. reqronal & nation Creative Thought al creative partners Leaders oo @ o oo ooo oo 10-16*4"7.'r,1-C PaGkgtNFirDGE p.r{:Jr r( AF(T I'ROGRAIr ooooo ooooo pA5€ MASTER PLAN + POLICY 20]6 Page 175 of207 s6 174 CREDITS + ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The Breckenridge Public Art Program Master PIan + Po[cy 2016 represents the culmination of more than 20 years of investment in public art by the Town of Breckenridge, its representatives and residents. The process began in 1994 with Town Council's first sculpture commission, followed by its 1996 adoption of the first "Art in Public Places Master Plan" and establishment of the Breckenridge Public Art Commission (BPAC). ln 20'14, the Town of Breckenridge formed Breckenridge Creatrve Arts (BCA) as an independent nonprofit entity to take over management of its Public Art Program and related programming, supported by a Public Art Advisory Committee (PAAC) and BCA Board. This Master Plan, developed under BCA's auspices, owes a debt of gratitude to all of the following groups and individuals who contributed to and laid the groundwork for today's Public Art Program in Breckenridge over the last 20 years. THANK YOU FOR 20 YEARS OF DEDICATION TO PUBLIC ART: Breckenridge Town Council Town of Breckenridge Staff + Departments Senior Leadership Public Works Department Engineering Department Community Development Department Parks Department volunteer Commissions + Councils Breckenridge Public Art Commission (BPAC) Summit County Arts Council CURRENT STAFF + COMMITTEE MEMBERS Public Art Advisory Committee (PAAC) Marsha Cooper, Co-chair Amy Evans, Co-chair Janis Bunchman Darci Hughes Tom Kramer Donna Miller Carl Scofield Mara Sobeck Tony Wilson 1 0- 1 6"i}.7c,[C Pa6kg.triRr.rcE p,.]p-r( qRT i'ROcFr;\ t r BCA Board Michael Lundin, Chair Marsha Cooper, Vice Chair Deb Kelleher Spiers, Secretary + Treasurer Lindsay Eland Amy Evans Rick Holman, Ex-Officio Felice F. Huntley Elisabeth Lawrence Bob Lowe Kenneth Nelson Robb Woulfe, Ex-Officio BCA Senior Staff Robb Woulfe, President + CEO Jenn Cram, Director of Public Programs + Engagement Saam Golgoon, Director of Operations + Facilities Neal M. Kerr, Director of Production + Technical Services Susan Lyon, Director of Administrataon + Sales Becca Spiro, Director of Learning + lnnovation PAGE MASTER PtAN } POLICY 2016 Page 176 of 207 57 175 Donors + Fundraisers Alpine Bank The Anilionis girls Atlas Development Corporation Breckenridge Music Festival The Bunchman Famrly I\4arietta and Don Carlson Susanna Chlipala 1 0- 1 &4.l7..-ilC Pagkgtlro,i,,;. r,, rBLr( ART i,fiocF?i| | Downstairs at Eric's partners Anna and Mike Dudick Judy and John Goebel Susie and Rick Grossman The family of Maureen and Jim Nicholls The family of Anne and Jim Pinion Summit Quilters Summit School District Doyle Svenby Pat and Jack Thomas Cooper and Dave Walsh Ann Weaver PLAN CONSULTANTS Kate Hudnut, Graphic Designer Erica Marciniec, Content Writer Deana Miller, AMPA (Art Management & Planning Services) Deb Kelleher Spiers. Strategist PHOTO CREDITS Clockwise from top left, photo credits in parentheses Cover: 'Cattails'by Doyle Svenby (Liam Doran) Page 3: 'Ullr'by Richard A. Jagoda, 'Colorado River Rock Bridge' by Steuart Bremner, 'Cattails' by Doyle Svenby, 'Gone Fishin" by Steve Puchek, 'Kachina Steel' by Jack Hill,'Main Street Sunset'by Ann Weaver, 'Through the Eye of the Needle' by Rik Sargent,'My Book'by Jane Rankin,'Double Axle'by David Griggs, 'Three Cowboys'by Stephen Hansen, 'Chris Ethridge Memorial'by Chaz della Porta,'A Miner's Dream' by Robert Tully (Liam Doran) Page 5: 'The Swarm by Tasha Lewis, part of BIFA (Liam Doran); 'Toga' by David Marshall, part of Sculpture on the Blue (Liam Doran): 'Van Duck' by Amy Evans, part of QUACK: An Artful Duck Exhjbition (Liam Doran) ARTISTS + DONORS Contributing Artists Michael Adams Albert Belleveau Steuart Bremner Chapel Stephen Day Chaz della Porta Robert J. Eccleston David Griggs Guilloume Stephen Hansen Jack Hill Victor lssa Richard A. Jagoda Robin J. Laws Emanuel Martinez Parker McDonald Wrllie Morrison Albert Paley Steve Puchek Jane Rankin Rik Sargent Summrt Hrgh School students Summit Quilters Doyle Svenby Robert Tully Seth Vandable Ann Weaver Fred Zielz PA'E MASTER PI,AI.J } POLICY 20]6 Page 177 of207 58 176 PHOTO CREDITS continued Page 8: J.R. Hodges Tin Shop (Liam Doran); Pup's Glrde Shop (Liam Doran): Breckenridge waterfall (Liam Doran) Page lO: 'The Nest' by Chapel (Liam Doran); 'The Library Quilt' by Summit Ouilters (Liam Doran): 'Tom's Baby'by Seth Vandable (Liam Doran) Page 13; Musician Russick Smith, part of BIFA (Liam Doran); chalk artist Naomi Haverland, part of the Street Arts Festival (Liam Doran): lighted sculptures. part of the lnternational Snow Sculpture Champronships (Carl Scofield); graffrti artist Emit. part of the Street Arts Festival (Lram Doran) Page 16: Paper flower-making, part of Dia de los Muertos (Jenise Jensen); 'Melt: Encaustic Assemblage' by Victoria Eubanks + Jenn Cram (Liam Doran): Breckenridge Arts District entry sign (Liam Doran) Page 19: 'Light Origami' anterior by KAZ Shirane, part of WAVE (Liam Doran); 'The Burning Pink Organ' by Alvin Sessions + Jamie Vaida, part of Fire Arts Festival (Carl Scofield); 'Projected Visions at the Blue River'by Ryan Patrick Griffin, part of WAVE (Liam Doran): 'Gillaptourous Corvus'by Orion Fredericks, part of Fire Arts Festival (Liam Doran); 'Light Origami'exterior by KAZ Shirane, part of WAVE (Liam Doran) Page 22: 'Going Home'by Willie Morrison (Liam Doran); 'Cattails'by Doyle Svenby (Liam Doran): 'Throne' by Chaz della Porta (Liam Doran) Page 27i'My Your Our Water' by Erin V Sotak, part of WAVE (Liam Doran); The Pool' by Jen Lewin, part of WAVE (Liam Doran); 'The Blue Trees'by Konstantin Dimopoulos, part of BIFA (Liam Doran) 1 0- 1 6"-4..7,TC Pagkgd ,rt. i .,1 i,: ii: ! /\r{ r i ii( ,r jFr.'f r Page 5l:'The Glorietta'by Amy Scofield, part of BIFA (Carl Scofield); 'Hume's Guillotine' by Steuart Bremner + Terry Talty, part of BIFA (Carl Scofreld); 'Two Roads' by Konstantin Dimopoulos, part of BIFA (Lram Doran) Page 35: 'Through the Eye of the Needle' by Rik Sargent (Liam Doran); 'Chris Ethridge Memorial' by Chaz della Porta (Liam Doran); 'Steel Drawing for Cooper' by Steuart Bremner (Liam Doran) Page 37: 'Popsicle'by Doyle Svenby (Liam Doran); Athena First Flute' by Michael Adams (Liam Doran); 'The Swing' by Victor lssa (Liam Doran) Page 40: 'Australia's The Fruits,' part of BIFA (Carl Scofield): 'Saurus'by Close-Act Theatre, part of BIFA (Joe Kusumoto): STREB Extreme Action Company, part of BIFA (Joe Kusumoto): 'STX'by Close-Act Theatre, part of BIFA (Joe Kusumoto) Page 42: Riverwalk Center (Liam Doran); fence detailing outside Old l.4asonic Hall (Liam Doran); 'Lodgepole Pine Fan' by Ben Roth, part of BIFA (Joe Kusumoto) Page 47i 'As Seasons Change'by Stephen Day (Liam Doran): 'Double Axle' by David Griggs (Liam Doran); 'Main Street Sunset'by Ann Weaver (Liam Doran) Pages 49-54: Rendering of'Synclrne'by Albert Paley (Albert Paley Studios): all other photos (Liam Doran) MASTER PLAI'] + POLICY 2016 Page 178 of 207 ;ii 177 Town of Snowmass Village Agenda ltem Summary DATE OF MEETING October 16,20'17 AGENDA ITEM: Resolution No. 35, Series of 20't7 (Revised) Considering the Adoption of an Arts Acquisition Policy PRESENTED BY: Julie Ann Woods, FAICP/MLA, Community Development Director At the Town Council's August 21"1 meeting, Town Council considered the draft Arts Acquisition Policy and draft Resolution No. 35, Series 2017. With feedback from Town Council, Staff has modified the policy (with track changes as noted) to clarify the 4 types of acquisitions (donations/beq uests, calls to artists, loans and rotational exhibits), and to reiterate Town Council's role as final decision-maker. Staff also added as Appendix D an Arts Acquisition Application which will be used for all acquisitions. lf adopted, the Arts Acquisition Policy will be incorporated into the Arts Strategic Plan which will also be considered by Town Council as Resolution No. 36, Series 2017 on this agenda. The adoption of the Arts Acquisition Policy does not have a cost associated with it. APPLICABILITY TO COUNCIL GOALS & OBJECTIVES: 10-16-17 TC Packet rll BACKGROUND: FINANCIAL IMPACT: Community Building A major component of community building is creating more community oiented spaces and gathering places. ln addition, the Town needs to increase utilization of existing community spaces by programing them with community focused activities and exptoring paftnerships with organizations, such as pitkin County Library, that create vitality. These community places need to be convenien y connected such that "a ftow" between them is evident and high levels of vitality can be enjoyed throughout thevillage. This community building initiative should further include cultural activities including pertorming and visual arts. Finalty, the Town needs to ctearty define the Town Park project and complete a master plan design so that improvemeits can be set into motion for this community oriented space. (Emphasis added) Page 179 of 207 178 COUNCIL OPTIONS: 1 . Adopt, modify or deny approval of Resolution 35, Series of 2017 , Considering the Adoption of the Arts Acquisition Policy. STAFF RECOMMENDATION: Staff recommends that Town Council adopt Resolution 35 adopting the Arts Acquisition Policy as presented. ATTACHMENTS: Resolution 35, Series of 2017 Adoption of the Arts Acquisition Policy With Attachmenl l Arts Acquisition Policy dated October 16, 2017 1 10-16-17 TC Packet Page 180 of 207 179 Attachment 1 Reso. 35, Series 201 7 TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL RESOLUTION No.35 SERIES OF 2017 A RESOLUTION APPROVING THE RECOMMEDED SNOWMASS ARTS ADV|S|ORY BOARD (SAAB) ARTS ACQUtStTtON pOLlCy. WHEREAS, lhe Snowmass Arts Advisory Board has been charged with providing direction and leadership for future cultural arts initiatives and acts as a cultural arts advocate and consultant to the Town Council; and WHEREAS, pursuant to the municipal code Section 2-174. - Responsibilities, the SAAB shall "Process, review and make recommendations to the Town Council on arts-related and cultu ral-related issues"; and WHEREAS, during the process for acquiring the Double Black Diamond sculpture for the new roundabout, the Town Council sought the advice of the SAAB; and WH EREAS, it became evident that there was no adopted policy by the Town or the SAAB regarding the acquisition of donated or solicited artwork and Town Council provided direction to the SAAB that a clear arts acquisition policy should be developed; and WHEREAS, the SAAB considered a draft policy at their regular meetings on May 18, 2017, June 15,2017, and at a special meeting on July 7, 2017 to formulate a clear process for the solicitation of art or the donation or loan of art to the community; and WHEREAS, at their regular meeting on August 21,2017 the Town Council directed staff to make some additional modifications to the drafl Arts Acquisition Policy. NOW, THEREFORE, BE lT RESOLVED, by the Town Council of the Town of Snowmass Village, as follows: on One:. Town C isition P tc 10-16-17 TC Packet cil Ado of Arts Page 181 of 207 I 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 l0 ll t2 l3 t4 l5 t6 t7 l8 l9 20 2l 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 3l 32 JJ 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 4t 42 43 WHEREAS, at their regular meeting on July 27,2017 the SAAB voted to recommend approval of the draft Arts Acquisition Policy, as amended, by a vote of S to 0; and 180 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 5l 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 6l 62 63 64 65 66 Attachment I to Staff Report dated Octobe|16, 2017 TC Resolution 35, 2017 Page 2 ot 2 The Town Council accepts the draft Art Acquisition Policy and herby adopts the policy as set forth in Attachment A to this resolution. Section Two: Severabilitv. lf any provision of this Resolution or application hereof to any person or circumstance is held invalid, the invalidity shall not affect any other provision or application of this Resolution which can be given effect without the invalid provision or application, and, to this end, the provisions of this Resolution are severable. READ, APPROVED AND ADOPTED, by the Town Council of the Town of Snowmass Village on October 16,2017 upon a motion by Council Member_ the second of Council Member _, and upon a vote of _ in favor and _ against. TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL Markey Butler, Mayor ATTEST: 67 Rhonda B. Coxon, Town Clerk APPROVED AS TO FORM:68 69 70 7t 72 t.t John C. Dresser, Jr., Town Attorney Attachment A: Art Acquisition Policy with Appendices 10-16-17 TC Packet Page 182of207 181 ENOW]\,LABA VILLAGEA{TB ^T\.[fVIElOFIYpnAFt6 Attachment A to Reso. 35, Series 2017 %/@e S A El ART ACQUISITION POLICY Fevised October 76, 2O77 Explore + Connect + Be lnspired Deleled:2077 Formatted: Font: 14 pt 1 10-1 6-17 TC Packet Page 1 83 of 207 6an 182 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. TABLE OF CONTENTS PURPOSE vtst0N POTICY GUIDETINES PROCESS OF ART SOLICITATION PUBTIC ART ACQUISITIONS a. Permanent Art Acquisitions b. Donations and Bequests c. Loans ART ACqUISITION & SETECTION CRITERIA 1, Artistic Merit 2. Site 3. lnstallation 4. Financial0bligations 5. Time Allowances 6. SpecialConditions EXCEPTIONS TO THIS POLICY REVISIONS TO THIS POLICY 6. 7. 8. Appendix A Methods of Solicitation Appendix B Sample Gllto Artists Appendix C Artist Release Form Appendix D Art Acquisition Application 2 10-1 6-17 TC Packet Page 184 of 207 183 1. PURPOSE To provide leadership in the support and development of arts and culture in the Town of Snowmass Village. To develop a body of art of cultural value that will enhance the community's unique identity and result in the beautification of public spaces. This Policy provides guidelines for the acquisition, solicitation, commission, display and management of temporary and permanent artworks in the Town's collection. lt will be the duty of Snowmass Arts Advisory Board (5AA8) to advise the Town Council in connection with matters relating to public art development and to implement the Poliry within the scope of the Arts Strategic Plan which provides a framework and working vision for the acquisition and exhibition of site specific objects of art and art happenings in specific Town locations. 2. VrStoN The Town of Snowmass Village is committed to achieving a dynamic collection of artworks of outstanding caliber and artistic merit that is recognized as an asset to the Town. Objects will be installed and displayed in accessible, visible locations in Town buildings, parks, gardens, on trails and walkways, near amenities and/or on public property. This Policy recognizes art in the public domain as an essential component of creating a vibrant community, stimulating economic viability and fostering connectivity and civic pride. The contemplation of temporary and permanent art installations throughout the Town will provide opportunites for art experience and give residents and visitors new ways to connect with one another and the environment. 3. POLICY GUIDEI.INES Artworks considered for acquisition and commission as well as art projects and programs initiated by SAAB will be evaluated according to the following guiding principles: . Acquisitions and programs must enhance the identity of a world-class resort destination and reflect and uphold values befitting a welcoming mountain community Artwork must be deemed suitable for exhibition in public space The collection will be without gender or ethnic bias and will strive to reflect the diversity of the local population and surrounding area Opportunity to support is encouraged and preference may be given towards artists and/or artwork demonstrating a relevant connection to the Town and local area Acquisitions and commissions will be considered in an ethical, accountable and transparent manner The collection will illustrate a wide variety of media, philosophies and techniques a a a 3 10-16-17 TC Packet Page 1 85 of 207 184 a Programs and artwork will enhance the experience of public spaces and engage all ages and abilities Will ideally foster connectivity between existing and proposed amenities Should be appropriately placed in specific locations for largest visual and experiential impact a a 4. PROCESSOFARTSOLICITATION SAAB shall assume authority for decisions concerning the acqulsition of public art as guided by the Policy guidelines and will make recommendations to Town Council on such acquisitions, whether the objects aredonated/bequests, loans. rotational exhibits or commissions (throueh open competition. invitational competition or direct selection). The Board may determine and adopt a method of art solicitation best-suited for a project to create the desired outcome. See Appendix A Sample Coll to Artiits. Any form of art solicitation adopted by SAAB will be guided by review criteria for art acquisition as stated in this Policy, unless othenvise determined by SAAB or as directed by the Town Council. 5. PUBLICARTACqUISITIONS AllArt Acquisitions ln order for an artwork to be considered for acquisition as part of the Town's collection, the potential artist, donor or representative is required to submit an application to SAAB addressing the Art Acquisition and Selection Criteria GeC_f6 below and Apoendix D Art Acquisition Application). ln making a determination on acquiring a piece of permanent artwork, SAAB may solicit public input from Snowmass Village residents and visitors. To this end, public education regarding the object under consideration should be promoted. This may include prominent online postingawhich provide an opportunity for public comment and community attendance at SAAB meetings no less than 14 days prior to the date of SAAB's decision, photos or renderings of the proposed object, along with any available artist commentary and materials, at www.tosv.com. Additionally, relevant information may be distributed for publication in the local newspaper. Related SAAB meeting notices should also be published online and advertised to allow for public discussion and community feedback regarding the piece. SAAB may elect - but is under no obligation - to hear comments from "industry experts" in appropriate art and trade fields (such as architecture), experienced professionals from art entities, collection curators or artists or individuals who are not participating in the project under consideration. After reviewing the artist's submissions, available public opinion and possibly expert commentary, as well as other related materials, SAAB will vote to make a recommendation to Town Council to: 1) request more information or,2) accept the object for acquisition, or 3) decline the object for acquisition. Deleted: gifts Formatted: Font 14 pt Bold, Underline, Font coloc Custom Colo(RGB (49,49,49\\ Formatted: Norrnal, lndent Left 0.25", No bullets or numbering Deleted: Deleted: Permanent Deleted: See 10-16-17 TC Packet Page 1 86 of 207 185 a. Donations and Bequests Artwork may be offered to the Town as a donation or bequest. At certain times, SAAB may also solicit donated art. Prior to being acquired by the Town, SAAB will evaluate the potential gift according to the review criteria set forth in this Policy and subject to the following: o The Town Council and SAAB are not obligated to accept gifts Where artwork is offered to the Town as a gift, the object will be considered for the collection by SAAB under the guidelines and criteria set out in this Art Acquisition Policy as well as the framework of the Arts Strategic Plan -with a recommendation to the Town Council The display location may be recommended by SAAB to Town Council A contract between the Town and the donor is required where both the donor's and the Town's responsibilities regarding the piece are stipulated . Conditions regarding site location, installation, public exhibition, ongoing conservation and maintenance requirements, valuation, responsibility for repairs of damage, as well as other matters may be deemed necessary and require approval by the Town Attorney b. Calls to Artists o The Town Council and SAAB are not obliqated to accept solicited artwork through a Call to Artists o Where artwork is solicited bv the Town, the oblect will be considered for the collection bv SAAB under the quidelines and criteria set out in this Art Acquisition Policv as well as the framework of the Arts Stratesic Plan with a recommendation to the Town Council o The displav location mav be recommended bv SAAB to Town Council o A contract between the Town and the artist is required where both the artist's and the Town's responsibilities regarding the oiece are stipulated. o Conditions resarding site location, installation. public exhibition, ongoine conservation and maintenance requirements, valuation, responsibilitv for reoairs of damage. as well as other matters mav be deemed necessarv and require approval bv the Town Attornev. c. Loans SAAB may solicit and accept artwork and installations for temporary display as agreed with the donor, artist or 5 ! a a Deleted: and make Formatted: FonI 12 pt Formatted: Font 14 pt Bold, Font color: Custom Colo(RG8(49,49,49)), Character scale: 80% Deleted: Formatted: Font 14 pt Bold, Font color Custom Colo(RGB(49,49,49)) Formatted: List Paragraph, lndent Left 0.5" Formatted: lndent LefE 0.25" Formatted: lndent Left: 0.5", No bullets or Formatted: FonL Bold, Not Highlight Formatted: List Paragraph, Numbered + Level: 1 + Numbering Style: a, b, c, ... + Start at 1 + Alignment: Left + Aligned at 0.25" + lndent at 0.5" Formatted: Font 14 pt Bold, Font color Custom Colo(RG8(49,49,49)), Not Highlight Formatted: Bulleted + Level:1 + Aligned at 0.25" + lndent at 0.5" 10-1 6-17 TC Packet Page 187 of 207 186 representative. ln many instances, site location will be pre-selected. With Town Council approval, \he Board shall have Jiscretion to accept art work on loan for a limited period of time, with the understanding that the object may be sold by the artist and/or relocated elsewhere in Townr 1. Short-Tern Short-term artwork display and its installation is intended to be non-permanent, visually stimulating and create minimal financial impact. The object may be exhibited for a fixed duration, a season and/or a special event or competition. 2. Long-Term long term loans include any artwork officially loaned to the Town for exhibition as stated and specified in an AgreementforPlacementofArtwork. Detailsofpayment,maintenancecosts,liability,etc.,mustbedescribedina contract between the donor and Town. Long term loan art is generally considered to be on display for a minimum of twelve months. d. @alErhiltl Rotational art displays may be long or short-term, purchased or on loan. For example, sculptures may be displayed for a specific amount of time and then rotated to different locations and/or new objects may be introduced. 6. ART ACqUISITION & SELECNON CRITERIA Whether the Town acquires a gift or commissions an art object will be guided by the Policy acquisition criteria and SAAB's professional expertise. Consideration of artwork submissions will be subject to the following review criteria: 1. Artistic Merit a. Artistic merit and technical competence ofthe artwork, including consideration of its artistic, social, geographical and/or historical significance (which may include a written description, drawings and/or maquette of the proposed artwork) b. Qualifications of the artist (which may include image of past work, resume, references, and published reviews) o Artists must have a sustained visual arts practice as well as demonstrated exhibition and/or collection history o Emerging artists will be considered where a strong professional potential is demonstrated c. Artworks will be intrinsically sound in condition as well as reasonably immune to deterioration in routine operations, display, packing and transporting d. MustdemonstratecompatibilityandrelevanceoftheworkofartwithinthecontextofSnowmass Village e. Wananty of originality and authenticity of the work of art (only original works or limited editions shall be considered) f. Provenance (orlgin) of existing artwork 2. Site a. The object's physical condition is excellent and is suitable to the proposed site with respect to its general social audience and physical environment b. Scale,form,content,coloranddesignoftheartworkinrelationtothesite(NOTE:Some Deleted: T Deleted: complete Deleted: at the SAAB'5 sole discretion Formatted: Font Not ltalic, Underline Formatted: Numbered + Level: 1 + Numbering Style: a, b, c, ... + Start at 4 + Alignment Left + Aligned at 0.25" + lndent at 0.5", Tab stops: 0.69", Left Formatted: Underline 6 Page 1 88 of 20710-1 6-17 TC Packet 187 neighborhoods/villagel such as Base Village, West Village and Snowmass Center may have specific design criteria or special conditions) C. Ecological impact (e.9., percentage of lmpervious cover) d. Accessibility to the public, including persons with disabilities e. Text components (i.e., signage and/or plaques) 3. lnstallation a. Site-specific requirements for installation (e.9., electricity, lighting, water and sewer easements, or other services) b. Desired method/proces/system c. Storage requirements, ifany d. Maintenance requirements, both immediate and long term e. Safety standards f. Proposed timeline for the project 4. Financial 0bligations a. All costs associated with fabrication and installation (including site preparation, name plaque design and unveiling/dedication event, if any) b. Source offunding and date funds are available. (Monies must be raised through private fundraising or town funding before the artwork may be fabricated) c. Estimated ongoing maintenance and conservation costs d. Statement of value of artwork for insurance purposes (i.e., artist's commission contract amount or professional written appraisal of existing artwork) e. Council must have sufficient resources to care for and safeguard the object to industry standards 5. Liability a. Susceptibility of the artwork(, to normal wear and to vandalism b. Potential risk to the public C. Public access, if necessary, as well as compliance with ADA requirements d. Special insurance requirements 5. Timeliness a. Allowance of sufficient time for a complete review process to be conducted by 5AAB, the Town and any other boards or neighborhood associations involved b. limely and appropriate response from the artist, donor or representative to SAAB and staff requests for additional materials or informatlon is required 7. Special Conditions 8. Any conditions of the artwork imposed by the applicant b. Artlvork that contains advertising or corporate logos will not be considered 7 10-16-17 TC Packet Page 1 89 of 207 188 7. EXCEPTIONS TO THIS POTICY Due to the unique nature of and methods for acquiring art, the Town Council, Town Manager and/or 5AAB may in certain cases favor exceptions to this policy. Any exceptions should consider the guidelines and intent of this Policy and the Arts Strategic Plan framework. 8. REVTSToNS T0 THrS PoLTCY The Snowmass Arts Advisory Board shall regularly review this Policy and make recommendations for revision as needed to the Town Council for adoption. 8 10-16-17 TC Packet Page 1 90 of 207 189 Appendix A Methods ol Solicitotion 1. 0pen Competition An Open Competition is an art selection process based on criteria identified in a specific Col/ to Artrsts. Artists would submit their qualifications and credentials, along with other required materials, to SAAB in order to become eligible for the project. The Coll to Artists ot competition description provides detailed information about the project, including the type of installation expected, location for the artwork, technical requirements, audience for the project, budget, timing of submissions, prize (if any) for the winning submissions, etc. A sample Call to Artists is provided in Appendix B 2. lnvitationol Competition An lnvitational Competition approaches a select group of artists to submit their qualifications and credentials to SAAB, along with other required materials as outlined in an invitation, to become eligible for a project. The invitation is constructed similarly to the Coll to Artists, described above. 3. DirectSelection Direct Selection is when a specific artist is selected for a project. This process can be used when circumstances such as poor response to open competition, project timeline, community considerations and/or client demand occur. lt will be up to the discretion of the SAAB to decide if Direct Selection is appropriate. lf Direct Selection is chosen, the SAAB will be responsible for guiding the artist or piece selection based on the Review Criteria herein. 9 10-1 6-17 TC Packet Page 1 91 of 207 190 Appendix B Somple Collto Artists ?f#aVe Snowmass Arts Advisory Board Snowmass Village, Colorado http://co-snowmasl@ CALL FOR OUTDOOR TRAIT ART SUBMISSIONS DESCRIPTION OF PROJECI: The Snowmass Arts Advisory Board (SAAB), in conjunction with Snowmass Tourism, invites Colorado artists to creatively ignite Snowmass Village's newest hiking and biking trails with public art. lnstallation(s) will open to the public in June 2017, accompanied by a kickoff celebratory event. This is the first of a series of projects that express the SAAB's theme: " Explore.Connect.Be lnspired". lmagine hiking or pedaling along a trail on a glorious summer day. You turn a corner, expecting toclimbordescendanotherhill,butyouencountersomethingunexpected: apermanentart installation alongside the trail. An already exhilarating experience in nature becomes more remarkable-a moment that lingers in the mind well after your ride is finished. The Town of Snowmass Village is seeking to create just such experiences, in four different locations along the 24-mile Snowmass Loop trail. From a list of submissions that must be received by December 1,2015, a jury made up of Snowmass Arts Advisory Board (SAAB) members and Snowmass Tourism staff will select up to four pieces of art (sculpture, kinetic, environmental pieces, etc.) to be acquired by the Town of Snowmass Village. Either existing sculptures within an artist's inventory or proposals for a site-specific new piece will be considered. ln either case, sculptures should be sturdy enough to withstand life outdoors, year- round, with consideration on how the artist will permanently install the piece, given the remoteness of the trail segments where the art will be placed. Please see attached map and description of locations that have already been selected, and suggested types of art that may be appropriate in those locations. The installation may be a single statement, a few objects, or many repeating elements that might be clustered or aligned with biking and/or nature in mind. They may be found or recycled objects. They may add a unifying color, add light, be kinetic, invoke the mountains and/or biking as metaphor. The installations should encourage locals and visitorsto walk and bike, search and seek out the different installations on the Snowmass Loop trail. At the bottom of this Call to Artists are links to articles about similar trail art programs. A. About Snowmass Mllage and this project: 10 *^-u@ sNowrlAss 1 0- 1 6-17 TC Packet Page 192 of 207 191 With a population of just under 3,000 year-round residents, Snowmass Village, Colorado ls located in the Brush Creek Valley about 5 miles southwest of CO 82, and 9 miles southwest of Aspen. Originally built as a ski resort, Snowmass-at-Aspen, in L957 in unincorporated Pitkin County, the Town of Snowmass Village was incorporated in 7977 and today is a year-round community with one of the best ski resorts in North America. Visitors come from all over the world to enjoy the world class ski slopes, hike and bike trails, and festivals. Because of the Town's cultural heritage involving the arts with the historical Anderson Ranch Arts Center, the caliber of international visitation on a year-round basis, and the local appreciation of arts and culture, the Snowmass Arts Advisory Board seeks to place more emphasis on public art throughout the community, and specifically on the Snowmass Loop trail. B. Opportunities, Goals and Mission The Snowmass Arts Advisory Board (SAAB) invites Colorado artists to creatively embellish the Snowmass Loop with public art. The installation(s) will be promoted through press releases, traditional and social media outlets, locally, regionally, nationally and internationally. Project goals are to: 1. Strengthen Snowmass Village's identity as a premier mountain biking/hiking community 2. Create a discovery experience through art on the Snowmass Loop 3. lnvite interaction among alltrail users 4. Encourage users to explore, connect and be inspired SAAB Mission: "The mission of the Snowmass Village Arts Advisory Board is to demonstrate how the arts can contribute to the unique cultural identity of Snowmass Village. lt is the Board's belief that the arts are intrinsic to the values, culture and heritage of our community. lt is hoped that enhanced arts programming will promote a cultural consciousness, stimulate economic viability and foster a sense of community pride." C. Budget: S10,000 is all-inclusive (e.g. design, fabrication, installation and travel)for up to four installations averaging 52,500 each. These funds are derived from the Town of Snowmass Village's Tourism Department. D. Location: Specific locations for the installations have been chosen by the Town. Please see attached map and suggested types ofthemed art. E. Selection Process: (Note: this will be as set forth in the Art Acquisition Policy) 1. SAAB's Selection Panel will evaluate the applications. This panel is composed of SAAB members representing artists, the Aspen Skiing Company and Anderson Ranch, together with Snowmass Tourism staff. 2. Up to four pieces/designs will be selected as art installations based on SAAB's goals in 11 10-16-17 TC Packet Page 1 93 of 207 192 Section A above and the criteria in Section H below. 3. Finalists will receive 5500 each to further develop project proposals. 4. Contractswill beawardedtotheselectedartistsfordevelopmentoftheartpieceandsite- specific installation by June 4,20L7. F. Timeline: September 72, 2016 - Request for Proposals (RFP) released October L4, 2016 - Deadline for submitting questions by email to: December L,20L6 - Deadline for art proposal submission December L5,2016 - Selection Committee selects up to four art proposals January L3,2Ol7 - Town offers contract to artists to produce and install the art February 7,2OI7 - Artists sign contract June4,2077 - Artist completes creation of the art piece and installs in the designated location. G. Eligibility: Professional visual artists at least L8 years of age residing in the state of Colorado are eligible to apply. Full-time, permanent Town of Snowmass Village employees, Town consultants, and SAAB members are ineligible. SAAB will select an artist without regard to race, gender, religion, sexual orientation, or disability. H. Selection Criteria: (Note: this will be as set forth in the Art Acquisition Policv) 1. The Artist The artist's statement of qualifications should demonstrate the ability to: a. Be imaginative, creative, with freedom of approach b. Execute a public art project, including transport, fabrication, and installation c. Deliver projects on time and on budget d. Address engineering constraints, fabrication expertise, and quality construction (as applicable) 2. The Art and its lnstallation SAAB seeks installation(s) that: a. Help identify Snowmass Village's identity as a premier mountain biking/hiking community commitment by integrating biking and the arts within its trail system b. Are environmentally sound (e.g. do not damage natural areas) c. Express the theme: "ExploretConnect*Be lnspired" d. Are accessible and interesting to a diverse range of people e. Do not compromise public safety or ADA standards (if required) f. Withstand the elements for a minimum of five years (or change [e.9. degrade] according to the artist's concept) E. Can be readily installed and maintained with limited use of heavy equipment l. ApplicationRequirements Up to three pieces per artist may be submitted. Use the submission requirements listed here for each individual piece. L2 10-16-17 TC Packet Page 194 of 207 193 Applications should be submitted electronically only, preferably as a single pdf file. Applications must include: -Artist's name, address, telephone, and e-mail address -Artist's bio and qualifications (see H.1. above) -A description of the art itself (see H.2. above) and why it would be a good addition to the Snowmass Loop bike trail in terms of its artistic intention, its appropriateness for Snowmass, etc. (500-word max). -Up to five photos of the sculpture if it already exists, or scaled renderings of the proposed art piece if it does not exist. Submit PDF format, resulting in the best image quality where the total filesizeremainsunderl0MB. Label photosand/orotherattachmentswithyourname,notthe name of the project. For example: Jones.John_photo1of5.pdf. -The weight and dimensions of the sculpture -A list of the materials used -An explanation of what is required to install the piece on the trail and how the artist will transport it to its designated location on the Snowmass Loop trail (keep in mind that vehicles and heavy equipment cannot be used in most locations). -A maintenance schedule if needed Note: The Selection Committee reserves the right to select as many or few pieces within the given budget or reject any or all submissions if it feels the proposals do not meet their goals and expectations for the project. J. Deadline: 5 PM, December L, 2015 by pdf to email:jwoods@tosv.com K. Questions regarding the project should be submitted by e-mailonly by 5 PM, October 14, 2016 and directed to: Julie Ann Woods, FAICP/MLA Community Development Director Town of Snowmass Village N-v o_ad ! g.! S!y._c a r_n [. Submission: Submit applications to the Town of Snowmass Village at: hllpJ1co-snowmassvltta :pl 10-1 6-17 TC Packet 13 Page 1 95 of 207 194 Appendix C Artist Releose Form PUBTIC ART AGREEMENT This Public Art Agreement (the "Agreement'') is made and effective this _ day of by and between the Town of Snowmass Village, a Colorado home-rule municipality ("TOSV") and (the "Artist"), for the purposes and on the terms and conditions set forth below, Recitals WHEREAS, public art contributes to the cultural and economic vibrancy and traditions of TOSV; WHEREAS, under this Agreement, public art includes works of visual art, as defined by the federal visual Artists Ri8hts Act of 1990, 17 u.S.C. S 1064 et seq. ("VARA"), including paintings, drawings, prints, sculptures, or still photographic images in a single copy or in a limited edition of 200 or fewer copies or casts, as the case may be, signed and consecutively numbered by the artist or bearing other identifying mark of the artist-but not including posters, charts, maps, technical drawings, diagrams, applied art, motion pictures, audiovisual works, books, magazines, newspapers, periodicals, electronic publications, advertisements, promotional materials, and any works made for hire. WHEREAS, Artist's work constitutes a work of visual art, defined above (the "Work"); WHEREAS, the legal instrument of ownership transfer of the Work to the Town, including any gifting or donation of the Work to the Town, is attached hereto as Exhibit A. WHEREAS, the Town seeks to accept, display, maintain, relocate, and remove the Work on Town- owned or managed property while also honoring Artist's rights in the Work; and WHEREAS, the Town and Artist wish to enter into this Agreement in order to set forth each party's respective rights and responsibilities beginning with acquisition of the Work and continuing through removal of the Work. Terms & Conditions NOW THEREFORE, in consideration of the mutual promises contained herein, the Town and Artist agree as follows: 1. Visual Artists Rights Act (VARA). Artist understands and agrees that, as to his or her rights in the Work, the provisions of this Agreement shall control over the provisions of VARA, as amended, and shall constitute a waiver by the Artist of any rights in the Work set out in or otherwise granted by VARA, as amended. Accordingly, Artist hereby acknowledges that: Modification of the Work which is a result of the passage of time or the inherent nature of the materials is not a distortion, mutilation, or other modification described in VARA; and 74 10-1 6-17 TC Packet Page 1 96 of 207 195 b. Modification of the Work which is the result of conservation, or of the public presentation, including liBhting and placement, of the Work is not a destruction, distortion, mutilation, or other modification described in VARA unless the modification is caused by the Town's gross negligence. 2. Droit Moral. All other rights in and to the Work, including but not limited to all rights in the nature of "Droit Moral" in regard to any continuing interest the Artist may have in the maintenance or modification of the Work, are expressly waived by the Artist and, insofar as such rights are transferable, are assigned to the Town. 3. Display Period. ln its sole dlscretion, the Town may determine to display the Work, the location of such display, and whether not display the Work for a given period, in which case, the Work will be stored in a proper manner. 4. Maintenance and Repair. ln its sole discretion and after consultation with a professional conservator selected by the Town, the Town shall have the right to determine when and if maintenance, repair, and restoration to the Work will be made. To the extent practical, the Town shall give the Artist the opportunity to consult on significant repairs or restorations. 5. Relocation, Removal, or Return. ln its sole discretion, the Town shall have the right to relocate the Work, remove the Work, or return the Work to the Artist. ln the event the Town seeks to remove the Work, the Town shall provide, by first class mail using the address below, advance written notice to the Artist of such removal and the option for the Work to revert to the Artist. Artist's Address: 6. Colorado Open Records Act (CORA). The Artist hereby acknowledges that the Town is subject to the provisions of the Colorado Open Records Act, Colo. Rev. Stat. I 24-72- 20L et. seq. ("CORA"), under which public records are open for inspection by any person, unless otherwise exempted from such inspection. 7. Modifications. This Agreement shall not be amended, except by subsequent written agreement of the parties. 8. lnvalid Provision. lf any provision of this Agreement shall be determined to be void by any court of competent jurisdiction, then such determination shall not affect any other provision hereof, all of which other provisions shall remain in full force and effect. lt is the intention of the parties hereto that, if any provision of this agreement is capable of two constructions, one of which would render the provision void, and the other of which would render the provision valid, then the provision shall have the meaning which renders it valid. 9. Governing Law. The laws of the State of Colorado shall govern the validity, performance, and enforcement of this Agreement. Should either party institute legal suit or action for enforcement of any obligation contained herein, it is agreed that the venue of such suit or action shall be in Garfield County, Colorado. 15 10-1 6-17 TC Packet Page 197 of 207 196 10. Entire Agreement. This is the entire agreement between the Town and the Artist regarding the Work. 11. Counterparts. This Agreement may be executed in counterparts, which taken together, shall be deemed to constitute a complete original. TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE, a Colorado home-rule municipality Markey Butler, Mayor ATTEST: Rhonda B. Coxon, Town Clerk ARTIST: 16 10-1 6-17 TC Packet Page 198 of 207 o!,. 197 Attach Bill of Sale Exhibit A to Public Art Agreement Legal ,nstrument of Owne6hip Transfer of the Work to the Town 10-1 6-17 TC Packet 17 Page 1 99 of 207 198 Appendix D Art Acquisition Aoplication tuuoc/@sNowtlAgs sla, ^lB ANO\A,MASS VILI-AG,E AFITEI AE'VIElclFTY BOAFIE' ?ftrafe ART ACQUISlTlO N APPLICATION Note: Applications should be submitted electronicallv onlv, preferably as a sinele pdf file, to cford@tosv.com For more information, contact Julie Ann Woods, FAICP/MLA, Community Development Director at 970-923-2254 x 637 Artist's Name Todav's Date Mailine Address E-mail Address Telephone Proposed Location for Artwork SELECT ACQU ISITION TY PE E calls to Artists l-l Donations and Bequests l-'l RotationalArt Please attach a narrative includine the followins criteria: -Artist's bio and qualifications --A description of the art itself and whv it would be a eood addition to Snowmass Villaee. its 18 10-16-17 TC Packet Page 200 of 207 199 appropriateness for Snowmass Villaqe. etc. (500-word max). --Up to five photos of the sculpture if it alreadv exists, or scaled renderinss of the proposed art piece if it does not exist. Submit PDF format. resultinq in the best imase qualitv where the total filesizeremainsunderlOMB. Label photosand/orotherattachmentswithvourname,notthe name of the proiect. For example:Jones.John ohotolof5.pdf. --The weisht and dimensions of the sculpture --A list of the materials used -An explanation of what is reouired to install the piece and how the artist will transport it to its desiqnated placement (keep in mind that vehicles and heaw eouioment cannot be used in some locations). --A maintenance schedule if needed Note: The Selection Committee reserves the right to select as manv or few pieces within the given budeet or reiect anv or all submissions if it feels the proposals do not meet their goals and expectations for the proiect. After reviewing the artist's submissions. available public opinion and possiblv expert commentarv, as well as other related materials, SAAB will vote to make a recommendation to Town Council to: 1l request more information or, 2) request acceptance of the obiect for acquisition. or 3l decline the obiect for acquisition. This will necessitate Town Staff scheduling a time on a regular Town Council Agenda for consideration and approval or disapproval. SELECTION CRITERIA Whether the Town acquires a sift or commissions an art obiect will be guided bv the Policv acouisition criteria and SAAB's professional expertise. Consideration of artwork submissions will be subiect to the followins review criteria : 2. Artistic Merit a. Artistic merit and technical competence of the artwork. including consideration of its artistic. social. seosraohical and/or historical sipnificance (which mav include a written description, drawinss and/or maouette of the oroposed artwork) b. Qualifications of the artist (which mav include imase of past work. resume. references, and published reviewsl . Artists must have a sustained visual arts oractice as well as demonstrated exhibition and/or collection historv . Emerginq artists will be considered where a strone professional ootential is 19 10-1 6-17 TC Packet Page 201 of 207 200 demonstrated C. Artworks will be intrinsicallv sound in condition as well as reasonablv immune to deterioration in routine ooerations, displav. packing and transoortins d. Must demonstrate comoatibilitv and relevance of the work of art within the context of Snowmass Villaee e. Warrantv of orisinalitv and authenticitv of the work of art (onlv orisinal works or limited editions shall be considered) f. Provenance (orisin) of existins artwork 2. Site f. The obiect's phvsical condition is excellent and is suitable to the proposed site with resoect to its Reneral social audience and phvsical environment 9. Scale, form. content. color and desisn of the artwork in relation to the site (NOTE: Some neighborhoods/villases. such as Base Villaee. West Village and Snowmass Center mav have soecific desisn criteria or soecial conditions) h. Ecoloeical imoact (e.g.. percentase of lmpervious cover) i. Accessibilitv to the oublic. includins oersons with disabilities i. Text components (i.e.. siqnase and/or plaouesl 4. lnstallation a. Site-specific reouirements for installation (e.q.. electricitv. liqhtinq. water and sewer easements, or other services) b. Desired method/process/svstem c. Storage reouirements. if anv g. Maintenance requirements, both immediate and lonq term h. Safetv standards i. Proposed timeline for the proiect 6. Financial Oblisations a. All costs associated with fabrication and installation (includins site preoaration, name olaque design and unveiling/dedication event. if anv) b. Source of fundins and date funds are available. (Monies must be raised throueh private fundraisins or town funding before the artwork mav be fabricated) C. Estimated onqoing maintenance and conservation costs d. Statementofvalueofartworkforinsuranceourposes(i.e..artist'scommissioncontract amount or professionalwritten appraisal of existing artwork) e. council must have sufficient resources to care for and safequard the obiect to industrv sta nda rds 7. Liabilitv a. Susceotibilitv of the artwork(s) to normal wear and to vandalism b. Potential risk to the oublic C. Public access. if necessarv. as well as comoliance with ADA reouirements d. Soecial insurance reouirements 20 10-1 6-17 TC Packet Page 202 of 207 201 6. Timeliness a. Allowance of sufficient time for a comolete review process to be conducted bv SAAB. the Town and anv other boards or neighborhood associations involved b. Timelv and appropriate response from the artist, donor or representative to SAAB and staff reouests for additional materials or information is reouired 7. SpecialConditions C. Anv conditions of the artwork imposed bv the apolicant d. Artwork that contains advertising or corporate losos will not be considered 27 10-1 6-17 TC Packet Page 203 of 207 202 Town of Snowmass Village Agenda lte m Summary DATE OF MEETING: October 16,2017 AGENDA ITEM: Review of the Tourism Budget PRESENTED BY: Rose Abello, Tourism Director BACKGROUND: This will be a presentation of the Marketing Group Sales and Special Event Boards budget for 2018 FINANCIAL IMPACT: 2018 Budget APPLICABILITY TO COUNCIL GOALS & OBJECTIVES: N/A COUNCIL OPTIONS: Listen to presentation and provide feedback STAFF RECOMMENDATION: N/A ATTACHMENTS: A PowerPoint Presentation will be presented by Tourlsm Director 10-16-17 TC Packet Page 204 of 207 203 Town of Snowmass Village Agenda ltem Summary DATE OF MEETING: October 16,2017 AGENDA ITEM: Budget Discussion PRESENTED BY: Clint Kinney, Town Manager Marianne Rakowski, Finance Director BACKGROUND: Discussion of any items by the request of the Town Council from the Friday, October 13, 2017 Budget Meeting. FINANCIAL IMPACT: 2018 Budget APPLICABILITY TO COUNCIL GOALS & OBJECTIVES: N/A COUNCIL OPTIONS: Discussion of any items from the Budget meeting. STAFF RECOMMENDATION: N/A ATTACHMENTS: N/A 10-16-17 TC Packet Page 205 of207 204 Town of Snowmass Village Agenda ltem Summary DATE OF MEETING October '16. 2017 Executive Session PRESENTED BY Clint Kinney, Town Manager BACKGROUND The Town Council has reason to convene in executive Session. To convene in executive session, state law requires that the specific motion written in staff recommendations section requesting the executive session be passed with 2/3 of the governing body voting in the affirmative for said motion. FINANCIAL IMPACT N/A APPLICABILITY IO COUNCIT GOALS & OBJECTIVES COUNCIL OPIIONS Convene in Execulive Session Choose not to convene in Executive Session STAFF RECOMMENDATION: It is the recommendation of the Snowmass Village Town Staff that the Council make and approve the following motion 1. Town Council will now meet in Executive Session pursuant to C.R.S. 24-6402(4) and Snowmass Village Municipal Code Section 2-45(c), to specifically discuss one item: 10-16-17 TC Packet Page 206 o'f 207 AGENDA ITEM: 205 a) Personnel matters, except if theemployeewho isthe subject of the session has requested an open meeting, pursuant to C.R.S. 24-6-402(4)(f)(l) and Snowmass Village Municipal Code Section 245(c)(6); Provided, there is an affirmative vote ot two{hirds of the quorum present at this meeting to hold an Executive Session and for the sole purpose of considering item (a) above. Provided further, that no adoption of any proposed policy, position, resolution, regulation, or formal action shall occur at this Executive Session. ATTACHMENTS 10-16-17 TC Packet Page207 o'f 207 206