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January 2018 DRAFT Comp Plan.pdfINTRODUCTIONIINTRODUCTIONREFLECTIONSPRINCIPLESPLAN FRAMEWORK TAKE ACTION THE PUBLIC PROCESSPUBLIC DRAFT | JANUARY 2018 TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO COMPREHENSIVE PLAN Britta GustafsonCharles HessMarilee Upton-SpatzJim KehoeKenan FormanStacey KellyThomas A. De NapoliTim McMahonTyler Barletta PLAN SNOWMASS THINK TANK Markey Butler, Mayor (Think Tank Member)Tom GoodeBill Madsen (Think Tank Member)Alyssa ShenkBob Sirkus TOWN COUNCIL Planning CommissionPatrick Keelty (Think Tank Member)Doug Faurer Jim Gustafson James KnowltonThomas Fridstein (Think Tank Member)Teri HooperMone (Jim) Anathan PLANNING COMMISSION Clint Kinney, Town ManagerTravis Elliott, Assistant to the Town ManagerJulie Ann Woods, Community Development DirectorJim Wahlstrom, Senior PlannerBrian McNellis, PlannerDavid Peckler, Transportation DirectorAnne Martens, Public Works DirectorAndy Worline, Recreation DirectorRose Abello, Tourism DirectorMarianne Rakowski, Finance DirectorBrian Olson, Police ChiefJoe Coffey, Housing DirectorKathy Fry, HR Director TOWN STAFF Lead: Town Planning & Urban Design Collaborative (TPUDC)Sub-Consultants: City Explained – Toole Design Group (TDG) – Ricker|Cunningham CONSULTANTSACKNOWLEDGEMENTS INTRODUCTIONIIIINTRODUCTIONREFLECTIONSPRINCIPLESPLAN FRAMEWORK TAKE ACTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS Special thanks to out talented photographers who have provided images for the document: Matt Hobbs, Jeremy Swanson, Blaine Harrington, Catherine Aeppel, Elizabeth Winn, Mar Naibi, and Brad Kriebel In March of 2015, the Town Council formally adopted a goal, and set the direction in motion to start the required update of the Village’s Compre-hensive Plan. The Town Council not only desired to meet the municipal code requirement for the update, but it also wanted the update to help meet the Council’s overarching goal to have sustain-ability remain as a primary objective that guides town projects. The Council clearly understood that because the Town of Snowmass Village is such an incredibly desirable place to live, work and play, that it will always face development pressure. As such, the strategies and policies found in the 2010 Comprehensive Plan needed to be discussed and re-embraced in order to continue to conserve and enhance the aspects of the Town that make the Village special to residents and visitors. The Common Vision for Snowmass Village iden-tified in the 2010 Comprehensive Plan is to “be the leading multi-season, family-oriented inclusive resort community. We will do this by creating, mar-keting, and delivering distinctive choices for fun, excitement, challenge, learning, and togetherness. All this is done amidst our unique, natural splen-dor…as part of a memorable Aspen/Snowmass experience. Further, we wish to be seen by others as welcoming, dynamic, convenient, and success-ful. We will always be responsible stewards of our environment, economy, and society. When suc-cessful, Snowmass Village will have achieved the quality of life and economic vitality that will assure our future as a sustainable resort community.” Through the 2018 Comprehensive Plan update process, this vision remained almost identical. Once again, the debates about Snowmass Village primarily being a resort or a community persisted. Through the planning process, a consensus was developed that concluded that this age old debate is misrepresented at best. It was determined that the debate should not be about the Village either being a community first or a resort first; rather, Snowmass Village should be recognized as a community that encompasses a world class resort. Community and resort are not, and do not need to be mutually exclusive. We are proud of our com-munity and the resort in our community. Stewardship Vibrant Genuine Active & Healthy Balanced Connected Inclusive With this consensus gained, in order to help guide the development of the vision, the community devised a set of seven guiding principles on which the entirety of the 2017 Comprehensive Plan is based. The approach to conservation and develop-ment presented in the PLAN FRAMEWORK portion of the plan re-affirms the community’s feeling that redevelopment of existing development sites or buildings should happen first to protect the natural environment and ensure that the carrying capacity of existing infrastructure is carefully addressed and not exceeded. This lines up directly with the agreed upon approach that ensures that the Village should not grow unnecessarily (growth for growth sake) and unambiguously be “Just Big Enough”. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY “You can control your path or your outcome, but not both. Decide on one, and then be open to either how you get there or where you end up.” MAJOR RECOMMENDATIONS The Comprehensive Plan presents a series of new actions that can be taken by the community to help meet the Vision and Guiding Principles as well as the challenges presented in the REFLECTIONS section of the document. Here are some of the most significant recommendations: • Make Snowmass Village More Walkable, Bikeable & Hikeable• Prioritize Walking and Safety Improvements• Manage Parking and Transit• Connect Base Village to the Mall and to Snowmass Center• Focus New Housing within the Nodes• Continue to Provide Employee Housing and support alternative affordable housing options• Bring an Aging Care Facility and/or Senior Housing to Snowmass Village• Develop a ‘Public Realm Plan’ for Snowmass Village that Organizes Future Infrastructure Investments• Monitor Water Storage Capacity in Snowmass Village & Coordinate with SWSD Officials if Improvements are Needed JUST BIG ENOUGH The inception for the JUST BIG ENOUGH concept in Snowmass Village was originally developed in the context of the 2003 Snowmass Village Community Forum and was again discussed during the prepara-tion of the 2010 Comprehensive Master Plan. While originally a quantitative approach to assess growth management, a revised description of the Just Big Enough Concept is proposed in the 2018 Comprehen-sive Plan. The updated definition of “Just Big Enough” incorporates a more qualitative approach which attempts to protect those aspects of the community valued by the residents and visitors, while pursuing economic success for the purpose of ensuring sus-tainability. Fundamentally understanding this obligation to only grow as necessary and only be “Just Big Enough”, the 2018 Comprehensive Plan requires the Town to priori-tize conservation first and to carefully control develop-ment. The fundamental goal of the 2018 Comprehen-sive Plan is to recognize the intimate connection the Town has with the environment, to preserve the natural beauty of the town, to focus on conservation first, then redevelopment of specific areas, and then consider new development while still meeting the fundamental infrastructure needs of the community such as afford-able housing. The redevelopment areas that should be focused on have been identified as the Town Park area and the Village Core (comprised of the Snow-mass Center, Base Village, the Mall, and the remain-der of the in West Village). By focusing on conser-vation first and then on redevelopment/development of the existing nodes, including the addition of new affordable housing units, a balance of conservation and development will be maintained. This approach reaffirms the community’s sentiment that development should be controlled to protect the natural environ-ment simultaneous to building adequate infrastructure, such as affordable housing, to ensure that the Village is a truly a sustainable community. We believe this is especially true in community devel-opment as well. You cannot set out a goal for a specif-ic end-state and then limit the paths you take to arrive there. Success will be measured in your accomplish-ment of the goal, not the series of course amendments required to pave your way. Visit the TAKE ACTION section of the Plan for more information on these and other recommendations that are presented in this Comprehensive Plan. SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 2018VIINTRODUCTIONREFLECTIONSPRINCIPLESPLAN FRAMEWORKTAKE ACTIONSurrounded by many of Colorado’s most beautiful mountain peaks, this still- small town is home to some of life’s biggest experiences. Legendarily, much of the best ski and snowboard terrain in North America is found here. CONTENTS REFLECTIONSRegional ContextPopulation & DemographicsBuilt Environment & Urban DesignBusiness, Tourism & Economic SustainabilityHousing & NeighborhoodsOpen Space & RecreationArts & CultureEnvironmental Resources & SustainabilityTransportationCommunity Facilities & Services 7 INTRODUCTIONWhy Plan?A Case of Proactive PlanningHow to Use the Plan 1 PRINCIPLESVisionGuiding Principles 93 PLAN FRAMEWORKWhy a Framework for Conservation & DevelopmentConservation & Development MapConservation SectorsDevelopment SectorsComprehensively Planned Areas 97 TAKE ACTIONFeature All Things Green & HealthyPromote Mixed-use Activity Centers & Grow the EconomyExpand Housing Choice & AffordabilityPreserving Snowmass Village’s Unique CharacterPromote Transportation Choice & MobilityPOSTR Master Plan, Projects & RecommendationsProvide Reliable Services & Municipal Transparency 119 THE PUBLIC PROCESS 159 APPENDICES 166 5 HOW TO USETHE PLAN 3WHY PLAN? INTRODUCTION1INTRODUCTIONREFLECTIONSPRINCIPLESPLAN FRAMEWORK TAKE ACTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS INTRODUCTION In 2016, Town officials kicked off “Plan Snowmass”, a community-wide initiative to update the Town’s Comprehensive Plan. This Plan represents the official blueprint for long-term, responsible change in Snowmass Village, supported by grassroots initiative to include residents, business owners, property owners, local interest groups, and elected officials throughout the planning process. SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 20182 WHAT IS Plan Snowmass? The Comprehensive Plan is the official adopted statement for future development and conservation in the Town. It establishes a vision and guiding principles, analyzes existing conditions and emerging trends, describes and illustrates a plan for future development and supporting infrastructure, provides the Town with strategies for sustainable growth, and outlines steps for implementation. It will serve as the foundation for determining effective public policy and making land use decisions for the future, and will provide an ongoing framework for informed and directed public investment and private development. The long-term horizon for the Plan keeps the document somewhat general. However, the broad range of development issues and Town services addressed makes it a true blueprint for smart, sustainable growth that reflects the priorities, values, and requirements of Snowmass Village’s residents, safeguarding the town’s history and sense of place but stimulating the conditions for short- and long-term needs and desires of Snowmass Village. All municipal governments in the State of Colorado derive authority to enact land use control measures from the general municipal authority granted in the Colorado Constitution and by state legislation. The specific authority for a statutory municipality to plan and zone is contained in Title 31, Article 23 of the Colorado Revised Statutes (CRS). These statutes clearly specify the provisions pertaining to planning and zoning activities for municipal governments and also extend to home rule municipalities. In addition, the jurisdiction of the Comprehensive Plan, pursuant to CRS §31-23-212 includes land within three miles of the boundaries of the Town located in unincorporated areas of Pitkin County. As a Home Rule Municipality, the Town may enact legislation that conflicts with state legislation provided that the Town’s legislation is of a purely local concern. The authority of the Snowmass Village Town Council to adopt a master plan arises specifically from Section 1.7 of the Town of Snowmass Village Municipal Charter, which states, “The council shall adopt and maintain a comprehensive master plan of the Town.” In addition, the Planning Commission is charged with conducting a review of the Plan according to Code. Building on past planning efforts, especially the 2010 Snowmass Comprehensive Plan, this new Plan Snowmass seeks to implement a vision that preserves the character of the Town of Snowmass Village, still perceived by some as a rural community, while addressing growth in a way that provides, protects and improves upon the high quality of life of all residents. This Plan focuses on sustainable development — measured by environmental stewardship, economic prosperity, and an equitable distribution of community resources — that reflects the community’s unique character and local values. The Plan Snowmass document provides a vision and a policy framework from which the zoning ordinance, site and subdivision regulations, capital improvements plan, and annual budget are guided. It also helps manage municipal service areas and influences other planning documents. It should be used by elected officials and appointed board members to evaluate development applications, amend ordinances, and plan future expenditures. Together, the Plan and its implementation tools ensure future decision-making regarding development that is consistent with the community’s vision and residents’ expectations for a higher quality of life. Ultimately, Plan Snowmass’s relevance will be measured by its use during everyday decision-making. Monitoring the Plan’s implementation should be an open and ongoing process that examines performance, measures achievement, and reflects changes generated by the Plan. INTRODUCTION3INTRODUCTIONREFLECTIONSPRINCIPLESPLAN FRAMEWORK TAKE ACTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS West Village at NightTucked high in the Brush Creek Valley, the Town of Snowmass Village is an extraordinary place to live, work, and visit. While creating this resort, the founders of the Town also created a strong community. Snowmass Village residents value its rural character and small mountain town charm, while enjoying the amenities that come with also being a resort community. Many recreation and sporting opportunities within a stunning mountain environment significantly contribute to the quality of life enjoyed by current residents and appeal to visitors. Additionally, residents and visitors from around the country and the world enjoy the luxuries of Snowmass’s high-end resort facilities. Despite all of these amenities, Snowmass Village is facing some challenges going forward. With a limited amount undeveloped land still available, the Town needs to be very deliberate in its approach to future development, ensuring that the needs of the community and visitors will be met while remaining a small mountain town. The Town’s long-standing goal of housing 60% of in-town workers, on its own, brings a number of challenges. Where will those units be provided? How will they be funded? The redevelopment of certain areas, such as the Mall and Snowmass Center, might present opportunities to create some of this much-needed housing via private sector partnerships. Protection of the stunning natural environment that surrounds Snowmass Village is also essential to its long-term viability. Being a good steward of this incredible resource means paying consistent attention to the environmental impact of both residents and visitors, and continuing to develop and implement innovative strategies that contribute to its protection. The previous Comprehensive Plan is now seven (7) years old. As with many of the planning documents written in the past, the current Comprehensive Plan is text and data heavy, and therefore uninviting for the general public to read. This new version of the Comprehensive Plan, while providing a high level of detail, aims to be more reader-friendly and help spur the imagination and interest of the reader. WHY PLAN? SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 20184 10%40%47% <1% UNDEVELOPED 2%1%NOTE: This information is based on GIS data provided by the Town of Snowmass Village and may not be fully accurate.A CASE OF PROACTIVE PLANNING... Most every town has a finite amount of land and this is especially true for Snowmass Village, given its orientation as a high mountain valley. It is critical for citizens to understand how this land is occupied today, what is possible in the future and what needs to be protected today. Broken into five categories, land in Snowmass Village ranges from fully developed (47% of land area) to completely protected open space areas (10%). In both of these cases, change is unlikely to occur unless redevelopment within the fully developed areas happens. Only 2.4% of remaining land in Town is undeveloped, while a small amount is available for potential redevelopment (less than 1%). This portion of Town, while minimal, represents a critical opportunity since it is also the more densely and intensely developed area of Town. Which leads to an important question... WHAT SHOULD HAPPEN TO THE UNDEVELOPED LAND? REDEVELOPABLE DEVELOPEDOPEN SPACE PROTECTED OPEN SPACE RECREATION RIGHT-OF-WAY Over the years, the Town of Snowmass Village has maintained a “build out chart” as part of its Comprehensive Plan. The most recent update to the chart reflects that only 6% of all remaining single family lots are available for development (see Appendix B). This reflects approximately 53 lots, which may seem like a lot, but are likely the more marginalized lots (steep slopes, odd shapes, challenging soils, etc.) which tend to be developed last. With 94% of the community built out, the community can expect to see more remodels and “scrape and replace” units, and less new home starts. As a maturing community, there is less need to track build-out, except that the Municipal Code has been written to reference this chart in at least two previous Comprehensive Plans. It is expected that upon adoption of this Comprehensive Plan, that Chapter 16A Land Use and Development Regulations will likely need to be updated to reflect the direction set by the plan, and the need for the build out chart will be addressed at that time. INTRODUCTION5INTRODUCTIONREFLECTIONSPRINCIPLESPLAN FRAMEWORK TAKE ACTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS Be a champion of the Plan even if you don’t like ALL of the ideas.The Community Vision and Guiding Principles in this Plan reflect the ideas of an entire community and include many differing points of view — a bit of something for everyone. We don’t have to love everything in the Plan, but rather consider the big picture and whether the Plan as a whole takes Snowmass Village in the right direction. Be a champion of the Plan even if all of your ideas aren’t included. This Plan is the culmination of an extensive and transparent community planning process. It is possible that not all ideas were included in this document because (A) there was disagreement on the topic and the decision was made to go with the consensus of the community, (B) the idea was tested and deemed to be unrealistic at this time, or (C) there was simply not enough room to include ALL the good ideas. Remember, there is something for everyone! Respect the Rule of the Golden Ticket. A recurring theme throughout PlanapaloozaTM was how to make sure the planning work is palatable to those who aren’t participating. Agreement was reached among participants that if you don’t make the effort to get involved then you don’t have the right to complain. In Snowmass Village, it is easier than in most places to stay informed. The Town maintains a high level of transparency by providing on-line video of all council and many board meetings and quickly and efficiently posting meeting minutes. But it’s not just a right for people to be informed. It’s everyone’s duty to participate. Take responsibility and be a part of the implementation team. Although we all wish our tax dollars bought us unlimited Town services, the reality is there is more work to be done than staff to do the work. All of these great ideas take time, money, and capacity. For this Plan to become a reality, a large number of people must decide that they care enough to get involved and help execute the Plan. Understand the element of time. At first glance, the Plan can seem ambitious, daunting, and even a little frightening. Included are some big ideas that would bring about transformative change. It is important to understand that not everything in this Plan will happen at once, or happen at all. Some things will happen right away; while other ideas will take years or even decades to come to fruition. Ultimately, the success of this Plan will be measured by its implementation. We challenge our elected and appointed officials with making the community vision a reality. HOW TO USE THE PLAN BUILT ENVIRONMENT& URBAN DESIGN 54 ARTS &CULTURE 14 REFLECTIONS7INTRODUCTIONREFLECTIONSPRINCIPLESPLAN FRAMEWORK TAKE ACTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS REFLECTIONS A focus on existing conditions, emerging trends, and priority issues raised by the community set the stage for where the Town needs to go in the future. The technical analysis, insights, and recurring themes discussed during PlanapaloozaTM formed the foundation on which the rest of this Comprehensive Plan was based. The follow-ing insights touch on community character, regional forces, housing and mobility, and a number of other elements that all directly influence the Town’s development and sustainability over time. Map 1: Pitkin County in the State of Colorado SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 20188 REGIONAL CONTEXT Snowmass Village is centrally located in Colorado, within Pitkin County, one of 64 counties within the State of Colorado. Snowmass Village is located in the larger Roaring Fork Valley, where many of Snowmass Village workers live and commute from. Its proximity to world-renowned Aspen (only 9 miles away) is considered a strength as it brings prestige and name recognition to Snowmass Village as well. The Snowmass Ski Area is part of the Aspen/Snowmass ski resort with Snowmass Mountain being the largest of the four ski areas (Aspen Mountain, Highlands and Buttermilk being the other three) offering various terrain from beginner to expert level. Within the larger region, Snowmass Village is known as a more intimate and family-oriented area, bringing visitors in search of a quieter environment and slower pace. This is also what attracts residents to the community. Snowmass Village encompasses 25.6 square miles and was incorporated as the Town of Snowmass Village in 1977. It was established as a Home Rule Municipality. Snowmass Village shares several services with neighboring communities and special districts, such as the Aspen School District and the Snowmass Wildcat Fire Protection District, which now is in the process of consolidating some roles and responsibilities with the Basalt and Rural Fire Protection District. The Roaring Fork Transportation Authority (RFTA), established in 1983, is another great example of cooperation between communities in the Roaring Fork Valley. RFTA provides regional bus service to Snowmass Village and all of the other communities within Pitkin, Eagle and Garfield Counties. SV Map 2: Pitkin County and Surrounding Counties REFLECTIONS9INTRODUCTIONREFLECTIONSPRINCIPLESPLAN FRAMEWORK TAKE ACTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS EAGLE SUMMIT LAKE CHAFFEEGUNNISON DELTA PITKINSV SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 201810 Snowmass Village is conveniently located just off of State Highway 82 and a few miles from the Aspen-Pitkin County Airport (Sardy Field), which provides more regular service from major carriers than any other regional ski town airport in North America. As the busiest mountain resort airport in Colorado with over half a million passengers served within the last 12 months, the airport is a true regional asset. The second largest ski resort in Colorado (in terms of skiable terrain) and one of the largest in the country in terms of acreage and vertical drop, Snowmass Mountain has the largest share of skier days in the Roaring Fork Valley. Snowmass Village hosts many annual events, including food, hot air balloon and music festivals happening year round. To name only a few, the summer FREE Concert Series on Fanny Hill brings over 20,000 people to Town; the JAS Aspen Snowmass Labor Day Experience takes place at Town Park and sees attendance of more than 25,000 music lovers; and the Snowmass Rodeo brings a significant number of visitors every Wednesday evening during the summer. To remain a cornerstone in the region, Snowmass Village needs a clear vision that supports and builds on the Town’s municipal advantages and prepares the community for a long and sustainable future. Maintaining Snowmass Village’s reputation as a family-oriented community and an intimate place to live for residents who enjoy a more rural lifestyle, while providing affordable housing opportunities for workers, is of critical importance for planning the Town’s future.JAS Aspen Snowmass Labor Day Music Festival at Town Park Figure 01 Population by Age - Town of Snowmass Village REFLECTIONS11INTRODUCTIONREFLECTIONSPRINCIPLESPLAN FRAMEWORK TAKE ACTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS As of 2014, approximately 2,889 people live in Snowmass Village, but it is important to remember that there are many part-time residents and seasonal employees that participate in community life and are not counted in this total. On top of that, Snowmass Village receives tens of thousands of visitors every year and these visitors also use Town services, facilities and infrastructure during their stay. Snowmass Village saw its population grow steeply at the end of the 1990s, followed by a decline until 2006, right before the Great Recession. Since that time, there has been increasing population growth, with a steady increase through 2014. Population projections predict that Pitkin County’s population will continue to grow at a slow pace of 1.5% per year until 2035. According to the State Demographer’s Office, Pitkin County’s population growth is forecast to fall short of job growth from 2015 to 2020 and then will outpace job growth from 2020 to 2030. The transition in job growth from higher to lower reflects short-term economic development and longer term population aging, As the population ages, labor force growth will slow. All age groups increased between 2000 and 2010, but there has been a considerable shift in the age distribution. Most notable is the incredible growth in the over-55 cohort, which represented a much smaller share of the population in 2000. As discussed further in this plan, the increase in the older age cohorts will have an impact on housing choices and other services for the retired and elderly. The median age in the Village is 40, a few years younger than that of the County at 43.4 years old, but older than the State of Colorado average of 36. POPULATION & DEMOGRAPHICS Snowmass Village is overwhelmingly white with only about 8% of its population other races or ethnicities. The Town is less diverse than the County or the State of Colorado as a whole. The Hispanic population has more than tripled between 2000 and 2010, but still only represents 6% of Snowmass’s population.Source: U.S. Census 20102000 2010CENSUS YEAR AGE < 9 10 - 17 18 - 24 25 - 34 35 - 44 45 - 54 55 - 64 65 >POPULATION0 100 200 300 400 Figure 02 Total Population by Race/Ethnicity Figure 03 Educational Attainment - For 25 & Older SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 201812 Snowmass Village has a much higher share of its population with a bachelor’s degree or higher compared to the state, while the County has a larger percentage of people holding a graduate degree. More than 80% of Snowmass Village residents over 25 years of age have at least some college education. 300 children living in Snowmass Village attend the Aspen School District, which has a total enrollment of 1,756 students. This represents 17% of the District’s student population. In 2010, The Aspen School District constructed fifteen (15) units of teacher and employee housing (known as Owl Creek Grove) located adjacent to Anderson Ranch. Source: U.S. Census 20102,826 1,822 TOTAL POPULATION BY RACE / ETHNICITY WHITE BLACK / AFRICAN AMERICAN 3 7 AMERICAN INDIAN / ALASKA NATIVE 1 2 ASIAN 13 20 NATIVE HAWAIIAN / OTHER 1 OTHER 5 1 TWO OR MORE 1823 HISPANIC 48 170 2000 2010CENSUS YEAR 1,734 2,602 Source: ACS 2013 5 Year FileColorado Snowmass Village Town Bachelor’s Degree Graduate or Professional Degree Some College or Associate’s Degree High School Graduate (Or GED) Less than High SchoolPOPULATION0 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT Figure 04 Total Households Figure 05 Town Household Types REFLECTIONS13INTRODUCTIONREFLECTIONSPRINCIPLESPLAN FRAMEWORK TAKE ACTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS HOUSEHOLD TYPENUMBER OF HOUSEHOLDSHouseholds Family Households Family Households w/ Under 18 Non-family Households Non-family Households Living Alone Non-family Households Living Alone Over 65 0 500 1,000 2000 2010CENSUS YEAR The household size has remained practically the same in the last decade in Snowmass Village, increasing only slightly from 2.09 to 2.12. The types of households have also stayed constant with family households representing just shy of 48% of the population. The median household income, estimated to be $81,035 in 2015, has dramatically increased from the beginning of the century when it was around $57,059. Snowmass Village median income is also much higher in comparison to the State of Colorado median of $63,909.Source: U.S. Census 2010Source: Census 2000 and 2010TOTAL HOUSEHOLDS 2000 Census 864 2010 Census 1,226 2.6%Change Between 2000-2015 SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 201814 Because the Town of Snowmass Village is such a desirable place to live, work and play, it will always face development pressure. Strategies and policies focused on the built environment that have been in place for over the last three decades, will continue to help conserve and enhance the aspects of the Town that make it so special to residents and visitors. Principles such as walkability, connectivity, density, scale, and mixed uses need to continue to be embraced if Snowmass Village is to retain its desirability. BUILT ENVIRONMENT & URBAN DESIGN The term “walkability” has become a buzzword in recent years without much effort to provide definition. As a result, it is often misunderstood to mean a pedestrian-only place. In fact, the term describes an environment where there is balance between many modes of transportation. Most importantly, it describes an environment in which people feel comfortable walking. In Snowmass Village, topography and climate often make it challenging to travel on foot, but walkability is nonetheless a goal the community aspires to, based on the community feedback received during the input process. In order to understand how to best achieve this community goal, the fundamentals of walkability are explained below. The constituent elements of walkability are referred to as “The 3 D’s”: Distance, Destination, and Design. When each of these elements is addressed, people are more likely to walk. Walkability Principles of Good Planning and Design That Should be Embraced by Snowmass Village The Snowmass Mall (West Village) REFLECTIONS15INTRODUCTIONREFLECTIONSPRINCIPLESPLAN FRAMEWORK TAKE ACTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS People will tend to walk more if they have somewhere meaningful to go. Meaningful destinations include civic spaces and commercial areas where daily or weekly shopping needs can be met. Often these destinations, when centrally located, become the “heart” of the community. In Snowmass Village, Snowmass Center acts as the center for both locals and visitors, with Base Village and the Mall as additional destinations. It is critically important that these three areas are better connected and walkable. Destination Typically, the average pedestrian is willing to walk up to one-quarter of a mile (1320 feet) or roughly five minutes to a destination. This ¼ mile walk from a neighborhood to a meaningful destination at the center is called a “pedestrian shed”. For most Americans, trips requiring more than a five-minute walk will typically be made in a car rather than by walking. In most parts of the country, challenging topography such as that found in Snowmass Village would make most people less likely to walk the ¼ mile distance. However, because Snowmass Village residents and visitors are typically more active, fit, and accustomed to the altitude than the average American, the five minute walking increment is still appropriate. Distance An interesting streetscape, and pedestrian safety and comfort are critical for a walkable environment. Typically, narrow driving lanes, street trees, sidewalks and on-street parking all act as effective psychological cues, helping to slow automobiles and, in turn, enhance pedestrian comfort. The design elements of buildings themselves also provide visual interest and diversity of experience along the way. In Snowmass Village, there is a varying degree of comfort level for walking, depending on the location. While the recreational trail system is exceptional, sidewalks along the main roads, usually used by commuters/transit users are non-existent. There is a lack of cohesive streetscape and proper pedestrian facilities in many areas that detracts from walkability in Snowmass Village. However, the natural beauty of the surrounding environment helps to offset some of these negative factors. Design Snowmass Center SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 201816 Connectivity means that all streets are connected to other streets, maximizing the number of routes to and from a destination. By avoiding dead ends and cul-de-sacs and creating an interconnected street network instead, drivers, cyclists, pedestrians, and emergency services can choose from a number of different options. Having greater connectivity allows for traffic to disperse, minimizing congestion by providing multiple ways to get from point A to point B. Snowmass Village’s topography makes such an interconnected network of streets more difficult to achieve, exacerbating traffic on the few major roads in and out of town. The local transit services have played a key role in reducing single occupancy vehicles impact on the traffic. Whether ride hailing or transit service in the future, they are expected to be key components of mobility withinSnowmass Village. Participants in the Plan Snowmass process often discussed connectivity in terms of increasing pedestrian and cyclist access throughout the community, along streets, with sidewalks, paths, and trails. Of particular concern was the ability to move to and from the three primary nodes of West Village (the Mall), Base Village and Snowmass Center, and from residential areas to these nodes. To encourage locals and visitors to move around by foot, seamless and easily-accessed connections are necessary. Of particular note is the lack of any safe and direct connection between the employee housing complexes on Upper Brush Creek Road and the Snowmass Center. Connectivity Whenever possible, activity centers should include a mix of commercial (retail, restaurants and offices), residential, recreational, and civic uses. This mix should be well-balanced, incorporating both vertical and horizontal mixed-use within the area and the building. An ideal mix allows residents and visitors to meet all of their daily needs within a short walking distance. When this occurs, the number of automobile trips per household is substantially reduced. This mix of uses is optimized when commercial establishments have residential dwelling units above them to help promote active streets. In Snowmass Village, the resort nature of the community and its suburban residential style of development outside of the main commercial nodes limits the potential for a true mix of uses throughout the community. However, Snowmass Center, Base Village and West Village offer opportunities for added integration of more mixed uses. Mixed-Use REFLECTIONS17INTRODUCTIONREFLECTIONSPRINCIPLESPLAN FRAMEWORK TAKE ACTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS Scale refers to the size of buildings and their relationship to their occupants, nearby pedestrians and the other buildings around them. The term human-scale refers to a size that feels comfortable to people. Both short and tall buildings can be human-scale, and having variation is important. The proportions of doors and windows, the height of each story, and the relationship between details of the building and the way a building relates proportionally to the spaces that surround it where people walk and gather all impact whether a building is at a scale that feels right to a person. It is important in the design of walkable places to create a sense of enclosure and human-scale by locating buildings closer to the street and minimizing large expanses of asphalt (parking) that can make a pedestrian feel exposed and out of place. The most important aspect of creating buildings that are scaled appropriately is the design of the first floor and how it relates to the sidewalk and pedestrian areas adjacent to it. Snowmass, the resort (aka West Village), was ideally designed and scaled for pedestrians (sans automobiles) with direct access to the ski slope and shopping/après ski on the Mall. As Snowmass, the community, evolved, a more open and rural character emerged on the wooded mountainsides and near the golf course. In between the two, the Base Village and Snowmass Center have grown into the “Village core” with mixed uses serving both residents and visitors. This is also where the highest scale and most intense development has occurred and is expected to occur in the future. Though large in scale (3 to 9 stories), the Base Village Phase 2 development (currently under construction) will provide additional plazas and gathering spaces with mixed uses that will make it successfully scaled. The Snowmass Center, by contrast, is proposed to be redeveloped at a lower scale (2-3 stories), but with new residential uses mixed in. Essentially, Snowmass Village transitions from an open and mostly rural character from its entrances on both Brush Creek and Owl Creek Roads, and transitions near the intersection of these two roads into medium density residential, before arriving to the higher-density Village core near the Wood Bridge. These three different “sectors” are further explored in the Plan Framework. Scale Base Village - Source: Viceroy Website SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 201818 Visible parking lots in front of and beside buildings has a detrimental effect on people’s willingness to walk. If a pedestrian has to walk past large gaps in the streetscape, especially when it is covered with asphalt parking lots, they lose the comforting sense of enclosure and visual interest making the walking experience less desirable. This begins to make them feel less likely to walk this route in the future. Fortunately, the design of West Village included landscaped terraces of small parking lots (owned by the Town) that serve the lodges and make a short walk to Fanny Hill. Base Village is built on top of a large parking structure that will be hidden by the new condominium buildings facing Wood Road. The Snowmass Center redevelopment will also incorporate a parking garage in its design to enhance the pedestrian experience. Any new redevelopment that occurs in the Village should likewise minimize the impacts of the automobile on the pedestrian experience. The redevelopment of the terraced (numbered) parking lots and some existing buildings in West Village presents opportunities to hide parking either under buildings or within parking structures that are lined with buildings. Garages should incorporate wayfinding and smart parking technologies to maximize their efficiency and ease of use, and should also accommodate space for bike lockers and alternative EV charging stations. Hidden Parking Developing in a more compact pattern in strategic locations, where multi-story buildings are located closely together, can minimize air and water pollution, preserve open space, and enhance social interactions and a sense of community. Development intensity is an integral component of environmental stewardship and sustainability of all types as well as its role in the creation of neighborhoods that offer convenience, value and a high quality of life. In addition, more compact development patterns are likely to reduce Vehicle Miles Traveled (VMTs) by enabling more people to walk or bike to work or to run errands. Clustering of development also makes transit service more efficient and accessible. This is true of local and regional transit services. Density can also produce reductions in energy consumption and CO2 emissions both directly and indirectly. In Snowmass Village, the Mall and the Snowmass Center present opportunities for added development intensity so that the natural environment and open spaces can be better preserved elsewhere in the community. Balancing the desire for more sustainable development that focuses on conservation with the community desire to maintain the small-scale rural resort character of the Village will be one of the biggest challenges in the future. Intensity REFLECTIONS19INTRODUCTIONREFLECTIONSPRINCIPLESPLAN FRAMEWORK TAKE ACTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS The inception for the JUST BIG ENOUGH concept in Snowmass Village was originally developed in the context of the Base Village development approximately 15 years ago, in an attempt to determine how much commercial space was needed in order to keep the Snowmass Ski Area a successful resort. Lessons learned from other resort communities showed how a critical mass of food/beverage, retail and entertainment facilities are necessary to benefit a successful resort development. The Town worked to develop a policy framework that would balance the concerns of community members that wanted development versus community members that were concerned about the impacts of that development. The Town Council at the time worked to create a framework that would provide “just enough” commercial space in the resort core (West Village and the Base Village) so that the resort core could be competitive with other resorts; but the community would not need to allow more development than necessary and would be no bigger than it absolutely needed to be. In the context of this town-wide comprehensive planning effort, Just Big Enough is a qualitative and character-focused concept rather than a quantitative exercise driven by a mathematical formula. This plan will work to comprehensively take into consideration all aspects of the systems and qualitative desires that comprise this well respected and agreed upon philosophy. Development for development’s sake is not the goal. Rather, development/evolution is to be closely guided to meet specific community needs. Just BIG Enough! The new suggested definition of “just big enough” is a planning approach which attempts to protect those aspects of the community valued by its residents and visitors, while pursuing economic success for the purpose of ensuring sustainability of both. With this modified definition, the following criteria could now be used to measure success:• Jobs mix (by wage rate and industry group)• Housing inventory (by target lifestyle segment and price point)• Cost-of-living (in terms of housing affordability and disposable income)• Fiscal balance (in terms of desired community services and facilities and operational cash flows)• Increases in property values (in terms of their ability to remain insulated from economic cycles)• Breadth and depth of commercial offerings (daily needs)• Accessibility of medical services• Infrastructure load (capacity)• Health of natural resources• Access to cultural venues• Business development and entrepreneurship “You can control your path or your outcome, but not both. Decide on one, and then be open to either how you get there or where you end up.” We believe this is especially true in community development as well. You cannot set out a goal for a spe-cific end-state and then limit the paths you take to arrive there. Success will be measured in your accom-plishment of the goal, not the series of course amendments required to pave your way. SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 201820 With suburban style residential neighborhoods scattered throughout the mountains and along the valley floor, Snowmass Village also has a central core of activity made up of three distinct nodes: West Village (the Mall and surrounding areas), Base Village and Snowmass Center. Each of these nodes has their own unique character, but their detachment from one another exacerbates the topographically-induced lack of connectivity and makes it difficult to find a discernible center of the community. Merging together West Village and Base Village (Resort core) and Base Village and Snowmass Center (Village core) into a larger, more cohesive center will give the community a stronger sense of place while reinforcing the distinct character of Snowmass Village.Nature is prevalent everywhere in Snowmass Village and it is essential to preserve and enhance natural areas and water features such as Brush Creek and Benedict Trail (which is privately owned). Making connections with nature by incorporating topography, vegetation, and water into the design of the built environment will help enhance and reinforce the connection with the natural mountain environment. Taking advantage of views and view corridors by adjusting building massing will ensure preservation of these most scenic views from public places, Preserving views of Mt. Daly in particular and enforcing ridgeline preservation requirements will also help to preserve Snowmass’s unique character. There are a few historic structures left in Snowmass Village that add to the charm of the Town. These include the Little Red School House, buildings on the Anderson Ranch campus, and the remains of the small sheep herder’s log cabin by Town Hall. There are also some Fritz Benedict-designed homes and perhaps the Mall’s Clock Tower that could be considered historic. With the resort celebrating its 50 years of history, the time seems to be right to inventory potential historic structures that could be worthy of local designation, to ensure their future within the history of Snowmass Village. Preserving the Town’s Unique Character Mount Daly - Source: Destination Hotels Website REFLECTIONS21INTRODUCTIONREFLECTIONSPRINCIPLESPLAN FRAMEWORK TAKE ACTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS The Lower Brush Creek Valley is located along Brush Creek Road between Highway 82 and Town Park. It is the main entrance into Snowmass Village and is a critically important scenic resource to the Town. Lower Brush Creek provides the first significant view of the Village’s ranching heritage. Approaching the Town, ranch-lands and stables introduce the Town’s heritage. The open character of undeveloped lands emphasizes Snowmass Village as a community, separate and distinct from other communities, in the Roaring Fork Valley. The Lower Brush Creek Valley is a picturesque, high-quality visual and wildlife resource. Existing residential development is low density and does not add sig-nificantly to the traffic on Lower Brush Creek Road, as much of the traffic heads toward Aspen via Owl Creek Road. Preserving the area’s open character has been a priority in the Lower Brush Creek Valley, which has been preserved through con-servation easements in Pitkin County. Lower Brush Creek Valley Influence Area Owl Creek Road was the original access to Snowmass Village. The Owl Creek Valley’s rural character provides an important separation between Snowmass Village and Aspen. It also supplements the Lower Brush Creek’s goal of empha-sizing Snowmass Village as a distinct and separate com-munity. Though Aspen and Snowmass Village are distinct communities, they are well-con-nected by seasonal Nordic and bike trails that serve as import-ant recreational assets for both communities. Owl Creek Valley Influence Area The Divide Influence Area lies at the far west and upper end of Snowmass Village, at the head of the upper Brush Creek drainage area and the Snow-mass Creek drainage area, Unlike lower Brush Creek Valley which is open and ranch-like, this area is heavily wooded with steep mountainsides with large single-family homes tucked in off private roads. At the crest of the “divide” is an important trailhead that leads to the Ditch Trail which connects to the bottom of Snowmass Mountain and crosses into National For-est Service lands. This is one of Snowmass’s least strenuous trails for hikers, and is a favorite among families and dog-walk-ers. Near the top of the Divide across from the trailhead is Town-owned land that is leased by Krabloonik’s, a dog-sledding operation that offers sled rides and dinner, popular among visi-tors to the Village. Divide Influence Area There are three influence areas within or adjacent to the Town that emphasize the rural character and setting of the Town of Snowmass Village: the Lower Brush Creek Valley, the Owl Creek Valley, and the Divide/Snowmass Creek Valley. These areas typify the rural and natural landscape, providing remarkable and natural gateways into the Village. Influence Areas SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 201822 The Town’s Role in the Built Environment One of the unique features of Snowmass Village is how architecture sits quietly in the landscape. The landscape is not the backdrop, but is in the foreground, which creates a natural and rural-like character while screening homes from Brush and Owl Creek Roads. In seeking to preserve the beauty of the landscape throughout the community by ensuring that the scale and pattern of infill development remain harmonious with existing conditions, the Town’s role is to set guidelines and policies that will guide future redevelopment to the limited development areas while also providing necessary public facilities and infrastructure. With its commitment to creating a vital Village core and providing housing for its employees, Snowmass Village needs to carefully guide development, ensure that it remains appropriate and helps preserve the natural beauty of the Town. Many of the buildings in Snowmass Village are in condominium ownership, which requires a vote and funding by the many owners to make modifications and updates to the exterior of the buildings. This results in buildings frozen in time with exteriors in the architectural aesthetic of the 1960s. This makes it difficult to provide the experience that discerning, design-focused residents and guests are looking for compared to other resorts around the country. The Town has recently worked on updating the employee housing developments it owns, setting an example for others to follow suit. Encouraging and incentivizing condo associations to do the same will enhance the appearance of Snowmass Village and increase property values overall, but may lessen the affordability of free-market housing units. Dated Appearance of Buildings Snowmass CenterSnowmass MallWest Village Lodge REFLECTIONS23INTRODUCTIONREFLECTIONSPRINCIPLESPLAN FRAMEWORK TAKE ACTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS Population projections anticipate that Snowmass Village will grow at a slow annual rate of about 1.5% between 2015 and 2035 (approximately 1,000 more residents over the next 20 years). This means a steady increase in population that will be manageable for the years to come and will allow the Town to ensure that the carrying capacity of infrastructure is not exceeded as the Town matures. A limited number of newcomers will also reduce the impacts on quality of life for existing residents. However, the Aspen Ski Company (SKICO) Master plan calls for 13,000 more skier-days* in the future which means there may be a need for more employees, more housing for employees and more accommodation needs for visitors. The Ski Company recently received approval for new bike/hike trails, facilities and activities in the vicinity of Elk Camp Restaurant. These include a mountain coaster, climbing wall, and zip-line canopy tours. The coaster and climbing wall are expected to operate summer and winter. These new activities will provide more to do in Snowmass Village, and could help the Ski Company reach its skier-day goal. Any new employees generated by these new activities are expected to be housed at the Club Commons complex near the Snowmass Club. SKICO employees wishing to live elsewhere in the Village are likely to compete with other employees for Town-owned or deed-restricted housing. *Skier-Days is defined as one-skier per day. How Many People Do We Want?Skiing on the Big Burn SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 201824 During the planning process, there has been some discussion about building height. While many are not concerned about this issue, those who are worried about it focused most of their comments on the preservation of important view corridors, the fear of feeling too urban (due to development in our commercial nodes), and concerns about concentrating density in some areas, thereby taxing existing infrastructure. From a design perspective, building masses should be stepped back from view and visual variety should be encouraged with towers, cupolas, chimneys, and other features to vary the skyline. There is some feeling in Town that the height of new or redeveloped buildings should be related to the prevailing scale, form, and proportion of surrounding buildings to avoid overwhelming or dominating the character of the area. It is important to remember that for new development or redevelopment projects to occur, a certain density and height of buildings will be necessary to make the projects financially viable. Good building design, façade articulation and varying cornice lines can create the appearance of a collection of smaller, more intimate buildings. Incorporating offsets or projections on the façade allow for breaks in the rhythm of the structure, reducing its visual impact on the surroundings. These design strategies, along with a reasonable approach to height and careful consideration of view corridors can lead to an excellent outcome that is not one-size fits all and accomplishes everyone’s goals, from those interested in additional intensity, to those concerned about the impacts of development and the developers who need the project to make sense financially. These are the factors and considerations that need to be considered in any potential future public/private partnerships. How Tall Is Too Tall? According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, “development that is guided by smart development principles can minimize air and water pollution, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and preserve natural lands (https://www.epa.gov/smartgrowth/about-smart-growth), ” while building low and spreading out has a detrimental impact on the environment and uses land that has scenic and environmentally sensitive habitat value. Designating areas where development and redevelopment should occur is another important role of the Town in planning for the future in order to ensure the reduction of potential environmental impacts. By guiding developers to build or redevelop in areas specifically chosen by the community, and restricting development elsewhere, many environmental benefits can be achieved and the Towns stewardship goals accomplished. The key redevelopment areas have been identified as the Snowmass Center, the Mall area, and the numbered lots in West Village, in addition to the Town Park area. Environmental Impacts of Development REFLECTIONS25INTRODUCTIONREFLECTIONSPRINCIPLESPLAN FRAMEWORK TAKE ACTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS The Private Sector’s Role in Solving Community Needs Because private interests construct most of the built environment, except for public facilities and infrastructure and Town-provided employee hous-ing, the development community will play a crucial role in providing solutions to meet the needs and desires of the community. If it weren’t for the vision and investment of developments of the past, there would not be a town right now. There are many projects and goals that the community has asked for through the community input process that the private development community could help the Town make a reality such as: The original master plan for Snowmass Village called for seven different “villages” or access points to Snowmass Mountain. Because of the decentralized layout of this design, the Village has evolved into three separated commercial nodes: the Mall area, Base Village and the Snowmass Center. Because of the decentralization, the Town of Snowmass Village does not have a high-quality “commons” or central gathering place where locals and visitors alike can interact socially. The addition of the new public plaza and the publicly-owned Building 6 Environmental Center in Base Village will help tremendously. Working with private development interests to create small central gathering spaces through redevelopment will help the Town provide its residents and guests with important amenities that would help build an even stronger sense of community. • The redevelopment of the Snowmass Center should incorporate small plaza areas and meeting spaces well-defined by highly activated mixed-use buildings that include residential units. This will provide off-season options for year-round residents to have places to meet outside of Base Village. • The space should provide opportunities for a multitude of events and activities throughout the year. • The space should provide easy pedestrian access (by way of pedestrian bridges and improved SkyCab connections) from both the Snowmass Center and the West Village to Base Village. Creating a “Heart” for the community Snowmass Center SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 201826 From the 2010 Comprehensive Plan, the Town of Snowmass Village has a lofty goal of providing housing for 60% of all employees working within the community. In order to help the Town achieve this goal and bridge the gap or deficit in the amount of employee housing provided, partnerships between the private and public sectors should be developed. Between the projected job growth in the Town and an increase to a peak skier day of 13,000 on the mountain, it is clear that without serious attention and commitment to building additional employee housing, it will be extremely difficult for the Town to meet this goal on its own. The Town’s most recent housing analysis projects the need for approximately 383 new employee units. Meeting the Employee Housing Goal Without private developers, the Mall, Snowmass Center and the numerous buildings under condominium ownership might not be improved. The private sector, in partnership with the Town, can play an important role in updating the Town’s built environment to create more vibrant nodes of activity and ensure that services and amenities are provided to meet both locals’ and visitors’ needs. One consideration may be to provide for an increase in redevelopment “credit” for condominiums to upgrade, allow some small commercial space to lease, or other incentives to spark upgrades. Redevelopment and improvement of certain areasAspen Skiing Company’s Club Commons Employee Housing REFLECTIONS27INTRODUCTIONREFLECTIONSPRINCIPLESPLAN FRAMEWORK TAKE ACTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS The primary purpose behind economic development is typically to achieve new gains in the economic growth of a community. This most often means creating business activity and jobs that reduce unemployment and increase the earnings of residents which will, in turn, be reinvested in the community. Most any community dependent on a single industry or source of revenue for its sustainability will experience highly volatile economic cycles of growth and decline. In most communities, diversification of their economic base through the attraction of primary industries, expansion of revenue-generating industries and public support of economic development “infrastructure”1 is essential for long-term health and viability. As a community with a major resort as its economic engine, the Town of Snowmass Village (the Town) continues to face the challenges of a seasonal economy – balancing visitor desires with resident quality of life needs and navigating the “peaks” and “valleys” of economic activity throughout the year. Despite these challenges, the community has low unemployment and in fact, has more jobs than people to fill those positions. The community’s primary concern today is adequate staffing to ensure that visitors and guests have a memorable experience and will spread the word about its family-friendly resort within the community. While the Town spent its early years serving as a sort of “bedroom community” to its larger neighbor, Aspen, the region’s primary center of economic activity, the last several decades have seen it evolve into more of a self-sufficient, multi-season community. The Town clearly depends on the draw of “Aspen’s allure” but is gaining its own traction and identity as a destination. The Town’s foremost economic challenge over the next couple of decades will be to stabilize and diversify its employment base to maintain a balanced community, from both a resident and visitor perspective. This Business, Tourism and Economic Sustainability chapter is one of many important tools for identifying a path forward for the Town of Snowmass Village that takes advantage of regional economic development, preserves community quality of life and ensures a diverse economic development infrastructure. This document will help Town leaders make important decisions regarding economic development initiatives for the community, which will impact the Town’s infrastructure, municipal services, overall quality of life and economic resiliency. BUSINESS, TOURISM & ECONOMIC SUSTAINABILITY 1 - Economic development infrastructure = people + infrastructure + sites and buildings + incentives + business climate + quality of life. SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 201828 The top three challenges facing the Town in terms of growth and development were identified as: 1. Providing job opportunities with adequate pay for its residents (seasonal and primary)2. Delivering financially attainable housing options3. Sustaining its small town character Question 1: In terms of growth and development, what is the Town’s greatest challenge? As part of the planning process, an ongoing, informal online survey was posted on the www.plansnowmass.com website. Sample responses from questions regarding development growth and economic development are summarized as follows. 1. Diversity of housing options2. Formal and informal community venues3. Commercial space for local retailers Question 2: What type of development is most needed? 1. Recreation and tourism2. Commercial growth and diversification3. Construction and development Question 3: What do you think the top economic development priority of the Town should be? While anecdotal, these responses underscore residents’ desire for the Town to not only continue to build and enhance its market share of regional recreation and tourism, but to build a more balanced local economy. This could include efforts to enhance the community’s economic development infrastructure, such as providing more housing options, commercial space targeted to local retailers and affordable office space for primary employers. Clearly, the desire for affordable housing is a priority. To provide a range of alternative housing product types, the local “delivery system2 ” plays a key role in understanding how to access appropriate financial resources (state and federal tax credits, loan pools, local public funds, tax increment financing) and having the tolerance to endure what can be lengthy entitlement delays. 2 - Represents all of the various entities which help to bring a project to the market (e.g., property owners, developers, lenders, investors, regulatory agencies, etc.) REFLECTIONS29INTRODUCTIONREFLECTIONSPRINCIPLESPLAN FRAMEWORK TAKE ACTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS Area 2005 2010 2016 Pitkin County Labor Force 11,083 10,879 10,837 Employment 10,641 10,000 10,470 Unemployment 442 879 367 Unemployment Rate 4.0%8.1%3.4% Northwest Colorado Labor Force 35,848 35,634 34,671 Employment 34,445 32,338 33,575 Unemployment 1,403 3,296 1,096 Unemployment Rate 3.9%9.2%3.2% Source: Colorado Dept of Labor and Employment and Ricker | Cunningham. State of the Economy The Town is part of the larger Pitkin County labor force, which is also part of the larger 5-county Northwest Colorado region 3. For most economic indicators, Town and Pitkin County data (where available) provide the most valid comparisons. Table 01 summarizes labor force characteristics for Pitkin County and Northwest Colorado. As shown, job growth in both Pitkin County and Northwest Colorado has rebounded from the Great Recession years, nearly reaching pre-Recession levels and stabilizing at near full employment. Labor Force and Employment Table 01 Labor Force Characteristics Not surprisingly, both Pitkin County’s and the Town’s employment bases are dominated by resort-related industries (accommodations/food service, real estate, arts/entertainment/recreation, and retail). 3 - Includes Eagle, Summit, Jackson, Grand and Pitkin counties. SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 201830 Pitkin County TOSV Industry Number of Employees % of Total Number of Employees % of Total TOSV Employment % of County Agriculture/Mining 141 1%0 0%0% Construction 1,092 5%99 4%9% Manufacturing 137 1%0 0%0% Wholesale Trade 122 1%0 0%0% Retail Trade 1,536 8%74 3%5% Transportation/Utilities 258 1%25 1%10% Information 226 1%0 0%0% Finance/Insur/Real Estate 2,605 13%495 20%19% Prof/Scient Mgt 2,542 12%99 4%4% Education/Health Care 994 5%49 2%5% Arts/Entert/Recreation 2,474 12%643 26%26% Accommodation/Food 4,360 21%717 29%16% Other Services 1,606 8%99 4%6% Government 2,270 11%173 7%8% Total 20,363 100%2,473 100%12% Source: U.S. Census; Colorado State Demographer; and Ricker | Cunningham. As shown in Table 02, the Town comprises 12% of Pitkin County’s total employment, but has higher than average shares of the resort-related industries noted above. The Town has increased its share of County economic activity primarily in the real estate, lodging and arts/entertainment/recreation industries. With down valley communities such as Basalt and Carbondale, Snowmass Village continues to provide increased competition for employees who might otherwise work in Aspen. Principal employers in Snowmass Village include: Aspen Skiing Company; Westin/Wildwood Inn; Destination Resorts; The Snowmass Club; Snowmass Hospitality/Viceroy; Snowmass Lodging Company; and the Town of Snowmass Village. Table 02 Employment By Industry REFLECTIONS31INTRODUCTIONREFLECTIONSPRINCIPLESPLAN FRAMEWORK TAKE ACTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS As noted in the survey responses above, providing a diversity of affordable housing options to serve employees is a significant challenge for the Town in particular and for Pitkin County in general. A measure of a community’s ability to provide housing for employees is its jobs to housing ratio (total jobs / occupied households). Most experts believe that a ratio between 0.75 and 1.5 is “beneficial for reducing vehicle miles traveled” and is more illustrative of a well-rounded local economy. A resort economy will likely remain at the high end of this range, due to the seasonality of employment (and the impact of part-time jobs) and its effects on local housing dynamics. Table 03 compares Pitkin County ratios to other areas of Colorado. Jobs and Housing The ratios for both the Town and Pitkin County are the highest of those shown, illustrating the challenge of housing workers in a seasonal and resort-based economy. Eagle and Summit Counties have lower ratios, but still higher than average for most communities, indicating that they have been somewhat more successful at “closing the gap” in employee housing. Additionally, these counties rely on a portion of employees commuting from the Front Range of the Denver metro area -- a locational advantage that the other areas shown do not share. According to the 2016 TOSV Community Profile, “just 8% of all jobs in Snowmass Village are held by Snowmass residents, with the balance, or 92%, held by people who live outside of town. Similarly, 15% of Snowmass Village’ labor force works in town, while 85% are employed outside of town.” This means that nearly 90% of workers are commuting into Town, while approximately 85% of the Labor Force in Snowmass Village commutes outside of the Village each day. While this condition certainly has far-reaching transportation and environmental impacts, it illustrates the necessity for local workforce housing, a critical element of the Town’s economic development infrastructure. Table 03 Jobs to Housing Ratio (2016) County Jobs Households Jobs to Household Ratio Eagle 29,692 17,840 1.66 Grand 6,992 5,250 1.33 Summit 19,296 10,143 1.90 Jackson 542 616 0.88 Pitkin 14,895 7,570 1.97 TOSV 2,473 1,261 1.95 NWCCOG* Subtotal 71,417 41,419 1.72 Grand Junction MSA 60,081 59,215 1.01 Colorado Spgs MSA 279,700 245,287 1.14 Denver Boulder MSA 1,409,700 1,042,103 1.35 * Northwest Colorado Council of GovernmentsSource: Colorado State Demographer and Ricker | Cunningham. SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 201832 Household Type Hourly Wage 1 Adult $12.59 1 Adult 1 Child $27.65 1 Adult 2 Children $32.48 1 Adult 3 Children $40.81 2 Adults (1 Working)$20.37 2 Adults (1 Working) 1 Child $25.58 2 Adults (1 Working) 2 Children $28.13 2 Adults (1 Working) 3 Children $32.62 2 Adults (1 Working Part Time) 1 Child*$30.22 2 Adults $10.19 2 Adults 1 Child $15.11 2 Adults 2 Children $17.59 2 Adults 3 Children $21.04 Note: All values are per adult in a family living situation.Source: Massachusetts Institute of Technology Living Wage Calculator Directly related to jobs and housing is the community’s top response to challenges facing the Town in terms of growth and development -- “providing job opportunities with adequate pay for its residents (seasonal and primary)”. Anecdotal evidence suggests that a majority of jobs, particularly seasonal, have hourly wages ranging between $10 and $15, just above the current Colorado minimum wage of $9.30 per hour. It is likely that actual incomes are at the higher end of this range, because many service workers also receive income from tips. Table 04 presents 2016/2017 estimates for Pitkin County generated by the “Living Wage Calculator”. These are the range of wages necessary to support basic household needs. Income and Wages These figures have far-reaching implications for not only housing choices in Snowmass Village, but for overall quality of life. They clearly show that even a $12.59 an hour wage is only going to support a single-earner household. The addition of a child with the associated day care expenditures more than doubles the required hourly rate. The higher end of the wage range shown would likely be able to qualify for deed-restricted ownership housing, but could certainly not find market-rate housing in Snowmass Village. Most other household types would likely only have rental housing options available to them. This shortage of housing units available to a wide range of workers is one of, if not the biggest challenges facing the Town in establishing a well-rounded community. Table 04 Pitkin County Living Wages (2017) The living wage model is an alter-native measure of basic needs. It is a market-based approach that draws upon geographically specific expenditure data relat-ed to a family’s likely minimum food, childcare, health insurance, housing, transportation, and other basic necessities (e.g. clothing, personal care items, etc.) costs. The living wage draws on these cost elements and the rough effects of income and payroll taxes to determine the minimum employ-ment earnings necessary to meet a family’s basic needs while also maintaining self-sufficiency. Living Wage Calculator Source: Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) REFLECTIONS33INTRODUCTIONREFLECTIONSPRINCIPLESPLAN FRAMEWORK TAKE ACTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS As a community that has a resort as its primary economic engine, tourism, most notably the ski industry, will continue to drive the Town’s economy. Table 05 summarizes Snowmass’ skier day history over the past 12 seasons. Skier visits over the past few years have shown a somewhat erratic increase, yet nearly reaching pre-Great Recession levels. Tourism While the Town continues to bolster its winter business, it has significantly increased its summer business in the past few years. Table 06 summarizes Snowmass’ seasonal lodging occupancy rates and revenues per available room (RevPAR) over the past five seasons. As shown, both winter and summer seasons have exhibited significant average annual increases. Taking into account “shoulder” seasons, Snowmass’ current overall annual occupancy rate is estimated at approximately 40%. The Town’s sales and lodging tax revenues have exhibited similar significant increases. Table 05 Snowmass Skier Days Ski Season Total Skier Days % Increase 2003/2004 724,753 -- 2004/2005 747,303 3.1% 2005/2006 768,010 2.8% 2006/2007 769,570 0.2% 2007/2008 771,455 0.2% 2008/2009 694,773 -9.9% 2009/2010 725,709 4.5% 2010/2011 737,066 1.6% 2011/2012 731,786 -0.7% 2012/2013 est 756,532 3.4% 2013/2014 est 754,882 -0.2% 2014/2015 est 745,311 -1.3% Average Annual 743,929 0.2% Source: Aspen Ski Company SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 201834 Occupancy Rate RevPAR* Year Winter Season Summer Season Winter Season Summer Season 2011/2012 47%26%$168 $34 2012/2013 52%30%$189 $41 2013/2014 54%39%$205 $55 2014/2015 61%48%$238 $67 2015/2016 61%49%$234 $76 2016/2017 N/A N/A N/A N/A Avg. Annual Increase 5.4%13.5%8.6%22.3% *Revenue per room available. Source: Snowmass Tourism Certainly the Town has, as many other ski resorts in Colorado, substantial capacity to increase summer and shoulder season activity. These increases will not only raise occupancies and revenues, but will move the Town closer to becoming a multi-season community. . Table 06 Snowmass Seasonal Occupancy Rates TOTAL JOBS County 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Avg. Annual Growth Eagle 39,762 45,385 50,243 55,265 59,902 64,619 2.0% Grand 9,559 10,664 11,334 12,130 12,834 13,608 1.4% Jackson 739 725 721 711 689 667 -0.4% Pitkin 20,367 22,656 23,346 24,342 25,336 26,583 1.1% Summit 25,667 29,233 30,867 33,086 35,225 37,697 1.5% Northwest Colorado 96,094 108,382 115,961 124,716 132,920 141,866 1.6% Source: Colorado State Demographer Northwest Colorado in general, and Pitkin County in particular, are expected to experience steady job growth over the next 25 years, as shown in Table 07. Eagle, Summit and Grand Counties are expected to grow the fastest, followed by Pitkin County. If the Town maintains its current share of Pitkin County employment, it would result in approximately 720 new jobs by 2040. Economic Growth Table 07 Northwest Colorado Job Growth REFLECTIONS35INTRODUCTIONREFLECTIONSPRINCIPLESPLAN FRAMEWORK TAKE ACTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS Market Opportunities An analysis of current and future market trends for various land uses was completed to provide both a baseline for the planning process and a roadmap for identifying future opportunities. The purpose of the market context analysis was to: • Assess current and future market conditions in the Snowmass Village /Pitkin County area; • Evaluate the Town’s current and future attractiveness for various land use types within the surrounding region; • Ensure planning and investment decisions for the Town are grounded in market and economic reality; and • Provide an independent, third-party story to tell potential developer and investor audiences.Snowmass Ski Area in summer SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 201836 The supply and demand analysis summarized herein focused on identifying market opportunities within trade areas representative of various nonresidential land uses. A trade area is the area from which a project(s) or area will draw the majority of its residents (housing), patrons (retail) and employees (office)—the area that will likely be a source of competition and demand. The boundaries of the trade area are often irregular as they are influenced by the following conditions: Market Supply and Demand Concentrations in an area which could translate into more population and households to support the project (density and “rooftops”). Proximity to Population and/or Employment Concentrations The inventory of potentially competitive developments which could diminish the market share available to the project. Location of Possible Competition The presence of certain physical barriers including mountains, topography, highways, arterials and significant structures which influence driving and shopping patterns. Physical Barriers Habits and patterns that have been established which could impact the project’s ability to capture market share (or require re-education). Drive Times, Spending and Commuting Patterns A restrictive or favorable regulatory environment which will influence a developer’s interest in delivering projects in one location vs. another. Zoning Conditions which will set sale and lease prices, influence a developer’s interest or impact the project’s revenue potential (value). Market Factors REFLECTIONS37INTRODUCTIONREFLECTIONSPRINCIPLESPLAN FRAMEWORK TAKE ACTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS Retail Supply and Demand • The Snowmass Village retail market primarily consists of space within three nodes: the Mall; Snowmass Center; and the developing Base Village. • The Mall and Base Village areas primarily serve visitor traffic, while Snowmass Center primarily serves local residents and employees (with its grocery store, liquor store and post office). Retail lease rates in Snowmass Village generally range between $15 and $25 per square foot, well below rates in neighboring Aspen ($70 up to $200+). Retail space serving visitor/tourist markets is at the high end of this range, while space serving the local market is at the lower end of the range. The overall retail vacancy rate is estimated at below 10%, but is affected by the seasonality of some retail operations. In most communities, a vacancy rate below 10% would be low enough to spur new construction, however, resort economy dynamics add a layer of complexity. • Older retail space in the market, particularly in the Mall, appears to be providing a reasonable return for property owners, despite the relatively low lease rates. • Demand for new retail space is determined by future retail spending potential of projected new households, some recapturing of retail spending that is currently lost to nearby communities or areas, referred to as “leakage” or “retail void”, and spending from visitors. The current amount of “leakage” from the Town could potentially support approximately 100,000 square feet of retail space. There will always be some level of “leakage”, as residents spend retail dollars outside their community, but this represents a significant opportunity to enhance the Town’s commercial offerings and increase spending locally, so this figure represents 100% of “leakage”. Future household growth in the Town and new visitor spending over the next 20 years will support approximately 60,000 square feet of retail space. Therefore, the Town’s potential market opportunity for retail space over the next 20 years totals 160,000 square feet. • Depending on the level of “leakage” that can be effectively recaptured, the Town could expect to add between 60,000 and 100,000 square feet of new retail space over the next 20 years. The Stewpot on the Snowmass Mall SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 201838 Office/Employment Supply and Demand • The Snowmass office market is limited to local service space interspersed with existing retail concentrations within the three subareas noted above. As such, these spaces reflect similar lease and occupancy rates as more traditional retail space. Current office users are primarily real estate companies and government and/or nonprofit entities. On an anecdotal basis, the Town is aware that there is high demand for office space in the community with few options for professional service tenants. • Trade Area (Pitkin County) employment space, sometimes referred to as office/industrial or “flex” space, is concentrated near the Aspen/Pitkin County Airport. The Aspen Business Center is home to a variety of employment and retail/service companies and addresses the current and near-term market for “flex” space users. More traditional office space, for professional service tenants, is extremely limited and is not addressing “pent-up” demand. • Demand for new office/employment space is derived from two primary sources: expansion of existing industry; and the relocation of new companies into the market. Employment projections by industry classification for Pitkin County were used to estimate demand over the next 20 years. Assuming an overall 1.1% sustained annual employment growth rate, the County should add approximately 4,900 new jobs over the next 20 years. Assuming differing levels of space needed across various industry categories, the analysis revealed demand for nearly 480,000 square feet of new office/employment space over this period. Should the residents desire it, the Town of Snowmass Village is well-positioned to compete for a reasonable 10%-12% share of the market, or approximately 50,000-60,000 square feet of new space, which could equate to between 170 to 200 new workers. Aspenwood Lodge in West Village - Source: Real Estate-AspenSnowmass REFLECTIONS39INTRODUCTIONREFLECTIONSPRINCIPLESPLAN FRAMEWORK TAKE ACTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS Market Implications The findings of the market analysis suggest several strategies the Town could undertake to ensure a more diverse market but not over-building to accommodate the significant market demand reflected herein. • The challenge will be to balance the Town’s three retail nodes so that they complement, not compete with one another. • Snowmass Center’s redevelopment into a mixed-use commercial area could provide a viable, vibrant destination for local residents. A mix of retail, service and office uses ranging between 50,000 and 60,000 square feet should provide a sustainable commercial concentration. This would include new space, as well as available existing space that is not obsolete or not adaptable for a new user. • The Mall and Base Village areas will be more difficult to “separate” in terms of theme and orientation, because both primarily serve the visitor/tourist market. • The potential redevelopment of the Mall should be focused on a mix of retail, entertainment and recreation uses, complemented by office/employment space for local users and additional residential units. In this way, the Mall’s target market should be expanded to include local residents and employees, while still serving a segment of the visitor/tourist market. Depending on the redeveloped format of the Mall, a mix of retail, restaurant, service and office uses ranging between 100,000 and 120,000 square feet should provide a sustainable commercial concentration. Like the Snowmass Center, this would include new space, as well as available existing space that is not obsolete or not adaptable for a new user. It is likely that Base Village will become the center for visitor/tourist activity, with the Mall playing a complementary role. The greater the mix of land uses in a redeveloped Mall, the greater the prospects for success will be. • Base Village represents the more traditional resort commercial area, with supporting lodging and residential space. As such, its focus will continue to be on serving the visitor/tourist market. The current Base Village development program includes approximately 60,000 square feet of new retail/restaurant space, which should provide a viable concentration of commercial activity. The ultimate mix of retail/restaurant users in the Base Village will have a direct impact on the mix of uses in the Mall. • High levels of community character should be preserved in order to maintain and attract higher-end retail product types. Community character in this context is related to the building design, use of materials, density, and other physical conditions. It would also include public spaces and amenities which complement these physical attributes. • There are opportunities for sustainable product types designed with evolving workforce trends and user values in mind (green construction, smaller work spaces, larger community spaces) within or proximate to existing and future commercial centers. • The Town’s demographics can support a unique environment for the “creative class” or knowledge-based workers within mixed-use centers. Resort areas are becoming attractive places to locate for the obvious amenities. Opportunities may exist for small business incubation or live-work spaces addressing these demographic shifts. • Future land use decisions should carefully consider placemaking elements that ensure these environments support ever-changing market desires while holding their value. • Flexibility in the development and design of live/work/shop/play/learn areas will foster uniqueness, spread risk and maintain property values. SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 201840 Snowmass Village benefits from the presence of distinct neighborhoods nestled throughout the Brush Creek Valley as well as a core of commercial activity within the resort tri-nodal area of the Mall, Base Village and Snowmass Center. While the Town has made great strides in providing employee housing, most of the market housing stock is out of reach for middle to lower-income residents and workers. Continuing to provide below market-rate housing options through the Employee Housing Program will be critical to Snowmass Village’s long-term success. HOUSING & NEIGHBORHOODS Neighborhoods Snowmass Village started out as a quiet ranching community in proximity to Aspen. Today, as one of the only ski mountains in the area that is truly ski-in/ski-out, it includes quiet neighborhoods of large homes as well as more affordable condominium housing options. Its residents are deeply committed to the community, with an appreciation for the mountain lifestyle and the stunning natural beauty that is so easily accessible in Snowmass Village. Even though Snowmass Village is a very “young” community, established as a Town in 1977, several of its neighborhoods are well-established, dating back to 1967, and provide a sense of community to full-time and part-time residents alike. Early on, it was understood that Snowmass would be both a world-class resort and a vibrant year-round community where harmonious and well-integrated development would occur. The neighborhoods are essentially subdivisions, some with multiple phases, encompassing about 2,700 housing units. Rodeo Place Employee Housing Figure 06 Tenure by Year Housing Built REFLECTIONS41INTRODUCTIONREFLECTIONSPRINCIPLESPLAN FRAMEWORK TAKE ACTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS Source: 2015 American Community Survey 5-Year EstimatesBuilt 2014 or Later Built 2010 to 2013 Built 2000 to 2009 Built 1990 to 1999 Built 1980 to 1989 Built 1970 to 1979 Built 1960 to 1969 Built 1950 to 1959 Built 1940 to 1949 Built 1939 to Earlier 1.0% 24.1% 28.3% 0.0% 0.0% 26.2% 10.7% 6.6% 1.3% 1.8% Housing Housing in Snowmass Village is largely composed of multi-family units concentrated closer to the Village core with single-family units scattered up the mountain sides. Three quarters of the housing stock in Snowmass Village has been built before 2000. Almost 25% of the housing was built between 2000 and 2009 with slowing growth after 2010. There are 431 units approved with 164 units currently under construction in Base Village. Figure 07 Vacant Housing Units - Town of Snowmass Village & Nation SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 201842 Source: 2015 American Community Survey 5-Year EstimatesSNOWMASS VACANT HOUSING UNITS Homeowners 5% Rentals 32% NATION VACANT HOUSING UNITS Homeowners 1.8% Rentals 6.9% According to the last American Community Sur-vey, Snowmass Village had an estimated total of 2,698 housing units in 2015, a 36% increase from the 2000 Census numbers. Of those total housing units, only 1,261 (46.7%) are occupied, which is easily explained by the resort nature of the Town and its large percentage of second homes that are infrequently occupied for short periods during the year. The vacancy rate of 32% is much higher than the national average of 6.9% for rentals and 1.8% for owner-occupied units in 2016, again rein-forcing the resort nature of Snowmass Village. The implications of this is that the Town must provide services for almost double its population, whether homeowners are year-round or seasonal.Timbers Club Employee Housing Figure 08 Housing Types REFLECTIONS43INTRODUCTIONREFLECTIONSPRINCIPLESPLAN FRAMEWORK TAKE ACTION THE PUBLIC PROCESSThe data included in this figure comes from the US Census and may not be fully accurate with a margin of error.Source: 2015 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates1-UNIT, DETACHED 1-UNIT, ATTACHED 2-UNITS 3 OR 4 UNITS 5 TO 9 UNITS 10 TO 19 UNITS 20 OR MORE UNITS MOBILE HOME 32.6% 9.5% 0.0% 7.0% 16.1% 13.2% 20.1% 1.4% Despite Snowmass’s reputation of being more affordable than its neighbor Aspen, market home prices and rental rates are largely above what most households can afford. While the Town’s Employ-ee Housing Program has greatly improved afford-ability, there is an ever-growing demand for lower priced housing options. Currently, a household of two adults needs to make between $200,000 and $250,000 annually in order to acquire a mar-ket-valued unit (median home value is $1,029,700) while an annual income of about $100,000 would suffice for a deed-restricted housing unit priced around $500,000 or less. The median household income of owner-occupied units (both single-family and multi-family units) in Snowmass Village was $101,369 in 2015, leaving a significant gap that easily demonstrates the lack of housing afford-ability in Snowmass’s market rate housing and the need for more subsidized housing through the Employee Housing Program. Renters had a me-dian household income of $50,714 in 2015, which provides them revenue for a rent of about $1,200. With the median rental unit cost at about $2,800 for a two-bedroom unit in 2015, rental properties seem to be much more affordable in general, although someone making less than the median income will quickly be priced out of the rental market in Snow-mass Village. SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 201844 A large detached building that may have an ac-cessory structure in the backyard. This building type typically incorporates a single residential unit. Housing Types Large House Small House A small detached building that may have an ac-cessory structure in the backyard. This building type typically incorporates a single residential unit. Multi-Family Units A building that consists of multiple side-by-side and/or vertically stacked units, typically with one or more shared entries. 2017-11-21, 11:39 AMRHAP architecture + planning » Architecture and Planning Page 2 of 4http://danielrotner.com/#prettyPhoto[3425-Rodeo%20Place]/5/ JULIAN ROW Denver, CO MAYFAIR ROW Denver, CO VELO PARK Boulder, CO GOOSE CREEK CONDOMINIUMS Boulder, CO PITCHFORK NEIGHBORHOOD Crested Butte, CO WASHINGTON PARK HOME Denver, CO MARTIN PARK REMODEL Boulder, CO NORTH HIGHLANDS HOME Denver, CO RODEO PLACE Snowmass Village, CO YARMOUTH WAY Boulder, CO 1000 ROSEWOOD Boulder, CO LEDGES Boulder, CO WORK All Commercial Mixed Use Multi-family New Construction Remodel Residential Rodeo PlaceRodeo Place6/9 Close A small to medium sized building that consists of two attached units, with separate entranc-es at least one of which faces the street. Both units, side-by-side, front-to-back or over and under, are contained within a single building massing. Duplex REFLECTIONS45INTRODUCTIONREFLECTIONSPRINCIPLESPLAN FRAMEWORK TAKE ACTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS Employee Housing Recognizing the necessity to provide more affordable housing for its workers as a critical element of its success, the Town of Snowmass Village created, in 1979, the Employee Housing Program, aimed at providing below market rate housing for people who work within the geographic boundaries of the Town. At the time, the Town adopted an ordinance requiring developers to address the Town’s employee housing needs. Today, the municipal code requires a 60% mitigation rate for housing accommodation of new employees generated with new development. The 2010 Comprehensive Plan states that the primary housing goal is to provide housing for 70 percent of full-time, year-round employees (60% of total employees). Developers may choose to build the units themselves or provide the Town with land dedication or cash-in-lieu that would be sufficient to cover construction costs for the project. In more recent times, the Town’s policy has been to require developers to provide the units rather than the Town accepting cash and taking on the obligation. The TOSV Employee Housing Program offers a wide range of housing to Village employees for rental and purchase. The program strives to provide housing for all levels of employment from entry-level to upper management. The Town manages a total of 176 deed restricted sales properties, of which 56 are single-family homes and duplexes, and 120 are condominiums units. The Town also owns and manages 247 rental apartments ranging from studios (at a starting rent of $510/month) to three-bedroom units priced at $1,725/month. Overall, the program houses about 895 employees and their families within a grand total of 423 Town-restricted housing units. Additional employee housing units exist in Snowmass Village and are owned and operated by lodges, special districts, and a few of the larger employers, such as the Aspen Skiing Company. The Town of Snowmass Village is proud of its accomplishments with the Employee Housing Program, allowing workers to find affordable options within the community, which in turn also helps reduce the amount of commuting into the Town. A minimum of 448 SF per full time employee generated is required for new development. Rodeo Place is the latest affordable housing complex completed by the Town in 2012 consisting of 21 single-family and duplex units. The Town purchased the land, installed the infrastructure and subsidized the homes to make them more affordable. The Crossings, located just behind Rodeo Place and constructed in 1994, provides 35 single-family homes on 15 acres of land. SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 201846 In 2008, RRC Associates completed a Housing Demand Analysis and these numbers were presented in the Town’s 2010 update to the Comprehensive Plan. At the time, the analysis determined that the Town needed an additional 474 housing units to meet its goal of housing 60% of the employees working within the Town of Snowmass Village. Town staff recently updated those numbers in order to better understand the current demand for housing within the community. There are a few changes to keep in mind since the last analysis: • Employment data and projections were taken at the height of economic activity before the Great Recession • The Town has added to its housing inventory since 2007 • Employment totals in Snowmass Village remain slightly below where they were in 2007 This results in a slight reduction to the overall demand for employee housing since the original analysis was conducted. As shown in Table 08 below, 383 additional units are still needed to respond to the current demand for employee housing. In addition to updating the 2007 report from RRC, Town staff also gathered additional insight to the current demand for Snowmass Village employee housing through the current rental waitlist and applications for deed restricted for-purchase housing. As of May 17, 2017, a total of 143 individuals were on the official Housing Office waitlist for rental units ranging from studio to 3 bedroom units. In addition, the number of qualified buyers that have applied to purchase deed-restricted units has increased substantially since 2010. To date in 2017, an average of 14.7 qualified applicants per property have applied for available deed restricted housing units in Snowmass Village. This is up from an average of 2.4 qualified applicants per property in 2010. These are interested buyers that meet TOSV housing requirements and have been financially qualified for the purchase price of the property. These increasing numbers support the updated demand analysis. To further verify the demand for employee housing, Town Staff further calculated expected demand based on build-out of commercial and residential properties. This analysis verifies the demand for 383 more employee housing units. Even through the conservative estimates used in the most recent analysis, it can be concluded that the demand for employee housing is still very significant. Meeting this demand for hundreds of new units is a lofty goal that will take concerted efforts of both the public and private sectors to reach, and options for workforce housing outside of the community may also need to be considered. **Note that the analysis for the employee housing units did not include jobs at the hospital, school district, RFTA, Sheriff’s department or others that exist outside the Village. Current Housing Needs 2010 Comprehensive Plan 2017 Update 474 Additional Units 383 Additional Units Source: 2017 TOSV Housing Opportunities and Updated Housing Demand Analysis Table 08 Total Employee Housing Demand in Snowmass Village REFLECTIONS47INTRODUCTIONREFLECTIONSPRINCIPLESPLAN FRAMEWORK TAKE ACTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS Aging in Place - Senior Housing Snowmass Village does not offer the elderly the opportunity to age in place unless they can afford to pay for at-home nursing or have friends and family to help them once they can no longer care for themselves. At this stage in life, many people have to move out of Snowmass Village because there is no housing option for those who can’t drive or care for themselves. With a population of nearly 294 residents (American Community Survey 2015) aged 65 and older, there is a clear shortage of housing options for this demographic. Many seniors move elsewhere in the Valley or even out of state, either by choice or because there are few specific housing choices, especially for those who no longer drive. Because of the lack of senior housing, others end up owning or renting homes that are bigger than they need and require more for upkeep and maintenance than they can afford. Senior housing needs will continue to grow as the population’s overall age increases. Snowmass Village can enhance its ability to attract and retain seniors by expanding available housing options close to services. As the Town and developers contemplate the redevelopment of the Mall and Snowmass Center, there should be serious consideration given to the creation of senior housing, which would be provided close to services.Source: Alternatives for Seniors - Windsor, CO Senior Housing SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 201848 Accessory Dwelling Units (ADUs) Accessory dwelling units (ADUs) are nothing new in the nation or in Snowmass Village. In fact, prior to WWII, most single-family homes in urban areas had separate “in-law” units where young families got their start or where elderly parents could live. Today, accessory dwelling units can provide a source of income or provide flexibility for families as they grow and their needs change. For instance, a family home with an ADU could use that unit as a long-term rental unit; for visiting guests; or for children returning from college. Multi-generational housing is becoming more of the norm again as families accommodate aging parents. The large family home may become too much for aging parents to maintain, but with an ADU, there is the option for parents to age in place in the smaller unit while their children raise their family in the main home. Flexibility is the key to a successful ADU program. There are two options for Accessory Dwelling Units (ADUs) in Snowmass Village: Caretaker Dwelling Units (CDUs) or Employee Dwelling Units (EDUs). As mentioned above, they present a great opportunity to provide lower cost housing for in-town employees and seniors alike, as well as providing a potential source of revenue for homeowners. ADUs for seniors can be built on their home property or that of their adult children. This is an excellent way to provide senior housing that is personalized, gives them security and privacy, and is accessible for future needs. In Snowmass Village, one Accessory Caretaker Unit (ACU) can be installed in a single-family unit or located above or below a detached garage on the property, and must fit within the allowable square footage on the property based on the zoning district regulations. The unit must be between 350 and 750 square feet in size and must have a separate exterior entrance to ensure that it is not simply built as additional square footage to the principal home. ACUs do not require housing of a Town employee and have no annual registration process required, although they do require an initial registration. There are currently about 85 ACUs in the Town of Snowmass Village. An accessory unit is a flexible space that shares ownership, site, and utility connections with the principal building on the lot, but has its own entrance. Usually situated over a garage toward the rear of the principal house, the outbuilding increases privacy. This privacy makes it well-suited for use as a home office, guest room, or rental property. In addition to providing a potential source of income for the primary mortgage holder, accessory units also provide additional low-cost housing options within the community. Figure 09 Accessory Caretaker Units (ACUs) & Accessory Employee Units (AEUs)REFLECTIONS49INTRODUCTIONREFLECTIONSPRINCIPLESPLAN FRAMEWORK TAKE ACTION THE PUBLIC PROCESSSource: Town of Snowmass VillageThe purpose of the Accessory Employee Unit (AEU) program was to allow accessory units in single-family homes, while ensuring that an employee working within the Town occupies the unit. The main benefit of choosing the AEU option was to receive a 10% bonus beyond the maximum floor area allowed under the appropriate zoning district. The main requirement of the AEU is that it must be occupied by a person working in town for a minimum of 8-months out of the year. Unfortunately, only a small percentage of homeowners have taken advantage of this opportunity, with only 12 units currently in the inventory. The last AEU was approved in 2009. The obligation of annual registration, inspection and maintaining an employee within the unit for at least 8 months are key reasons this program is not as successful as the ACU program is. Knowing that there is still a deficit in the employee housing demand, a lack of housing for “boomers” and the elderly, and understanding that only about 10% of the Town’s single-family homes currently have accessory units in place, the opportunity to help bridge the gap with the provision of ADUs is present. Town Staff has already begun the analysis and held work sessions with the Planning Commission regarding modifications to both the AEU and ACU programs to create a single ADU program. Because of some previous abuse of the AEU program and lack of enforcement, any program modifications will have to take into consideration the possible creation of new non-conforming buildings that exceed the allowable floor area. 85ACUs 12AEUs SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 201850 Current Amenities & Facilities The Town of Snowmass Village owns two parks that provide a variety of amenities and facilities to residents and visitors: Town Park and Cathy Robinson Park. Together they comprise over 13 acres of parkland that includes several playgrounds; a skateboard park; multi-purpose athletic fields; outdoor basketball, volleyball, and tennis courts; a seasonal ice rink; flexible spaces for special events and private rentals; and access to the Town’s trail system. The Snowmass Village Recreation Center, located within Town Park, boasts state-of-the-art fitness and recreation facilities including a year-round outdoor Aquatics Facility, an indoor bouldering and climbing wall, cardio and fitness equipment, and a multi-purpose gymnasium. The Recreation Center offers a number of fitness, recreation, and aquatics programs to appeal to a wide variety of interests and abilities. In addition to the Town parks, Snowmass Village boasts over 1,400 acres of open space throughout the community. Much of this area is available for long-term preservation and/or conservation, while other areas are available for future recreational opportunities. The Town manages 30 trails, comprising over 35 miles, throughout Snowmass Village. Most of the trails are multi-use, though there are some dedicated for equestrian or pedestrian-only use. While facilities are provided for a wide variety of users and abilities, there is a measurable lack of beginner- and expert-level trails, with most falling in the intermediate to advanced categories. The existing recreational, parks and open space facilities in the Town of Snowmass Village, while comprehensive and well-utilized, need some specific upgrades and improvements to continue to meet the needs of residents and visitors. The facilities and improvements needing upgrades are mentioned and highlighted in the POSTR Master Plan. The Town of Snowmass Village completed the Snowmass Village Parks, Open Space, Trails and Recreation [POSTR] Plan in 2016. It was formally adopted by the Town Council in October 2016. This long-range planning and implementation document serves to guide the future development of parks, open spaces, recreation and trails within the Town. It includes an inventory of current facilities, a resource analysis, and the identification of opportunities to improve service levels and adapt with the changing needs and desires of the Town. The POSTR Master Plan also includes goals, recommendations and guidelines that correspond to the community’s priorities and guide future development and project investment. As the POSTR Master Plan is intended to be a road map for the future of parks and open space in Snowmass Village, it should be considered, in its entirety, an integral part of this Comprehensive Plan. A summary of the current conditions, economic implications, future vision, and recommendations provided in the POSTR Master Plan is included in this document for reference. OPEN SPACE & RECREATION Snowmass Village Parks, Open Space, Trails and Recreation Plan Map 3: Open Space Map REFLECTIONS51INTRODUCTIONREFLECTIONSPRINCIPLESPLAN FRAMEWORK TAKE ACTION THE PUBLIC PROCESSSource: Town of SnowmassSource: Map Prepared by SE Group for the POSTR Plan.Town of Snowmass VillagePOSTR-Existing Conditions Map: Open SpaceLegendTownLimitsBoundariesParksOther Open SpaceTown Owned ParcelsScale 1:9,60002,2504,5006,7509,0001,125FeetWildcat RidgeCreeksideSky Mountain ParkRodeo Grounds/ Ice RinkHidden ValleyUpper North MesaTown Park & Recreation CenterCathy Robinson ParkEast RidgeSoftball and Soccer Fields SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 201852 POSTR Master Plan Market Assessment The POSTR process included a comprehensive market assessment that yields a number of key findings related to population demographics and seasonality, traffic, and recreation competition. In general, the Town, like many mountain resorts, has a relatively small population of full-time residents, but accommodates and serves a significantly larger population of second homeowners and visitors. The variation in population size during different times of the year presents a challenge when it comes to traffic fluctuations and demand for parks and recreation facilities. Snowmass Village is part of a larger region that includes other ski mountains, outdoor sporting opportunities and indoor/outdoor recreational amenities. Understanding how the Town’s facilities compare to others in the region (favorably, in most cases), allows Snowmass Village to stay at the forefront of recreation-based tourism that provides unique, high-quality amenities. The POSTR Master Plan recognizes that outdoor recreational opportunities are critical to the economic viability and development of the Town. Recreation improves quality of life, contributes to tourism and economic development, increases tax revenues and property values, and attracts residents, businesses, employees and visitors. The plan seeks to respond to the needs of residents while also identifying strategies to develop tourism-oriented recreation opportunities to attract additional visitors to the area. The Town recognizes that the economic contributions of visitors can offset the cost of providing resources and facilities to year-round residents of Snowmass Village, so it is important to consider the needs and wants of both demographic groups. The POSTR Master Plan includes three Economic Case Studies that explore the economic implications of three recreational draws to the area: the Rim Trail, the Jazz Aspen Snowmass Music Festival, and the Snowmass Doubles Volleyball Tournament. The results of these studies shine light on the importance of amenities and events that draw visitors to Snowmass Village, the total sales and taxes generated by each, and the number of jobs created. Improvements and upgrade to these facilities will help keep the venues and facilities in a competitive market. Example of a children playground REFLECTIONS53INTRODUCTIONREFLECTIONSPRINCIPLESPLAN FRAMEWORK TAKE ACTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS POSTR Master Plan Vision and Goals The following is a collaborative vision statement for the POSTR Master Plan, created with input from community members and other stakeholders: “To create a fun, diverse and connected system of parks, trails and open spaces within Snowmass Village that builds upon the vast potential of the Town’s already successful recreational environment and that considers a wide range of recreational experiences, programs and activities for all user groups.” The POSTR Master Plan identifies a number of goals intended to support the Vision, with clearly-described objectives for each. The goals are listed below. For specific objectives, please refer to the complete POSTR Master Plan document. 1. Provide safe and exciting recreation opportunities that reflect the interests and needs of all user groups and individuals within the community. 2. Provide amenities and facilities that offer progressive recreational opportunities and provide learning experiences to new recreational activities. 3. Engage the community throughout the development and on-going operation of the POSTR network to ensure dynamic community needs are being met and community resources are appropriately utilized. 4. Support the appeal and local benefits of multi-season parks, open space, trails and recreation within the context of a tourism-driven community. 5. Coordinate the development of POSTR components to build a cohesive network of recreational opportunities within the Town boundaries and connect those opportunities to recreation and values beyond the Town boundaries. 6. Establish and maintain an active partnership with the USFS, Aspen Skiing Company, Pitkin County and the City of Aspen that promotes collaboration and access to a broad system of recreational opportunities. 7. Utilize financial resources of the POSTR network efficiently and equitably. 8. Encourage environmentally sensitive design in order to minimize impacts to each site’s natural characteristics. 9. Promote projects and designs that expand access to the POSTR network. 10. Prioritize preventative maintenance and repair of existing facilities, trails and equipment over construction of new facilities to ensure they remain viable community assets long into the future. Please refer to the POSTR plan for more specific goals. Overall Poster Goals: SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 201854 Snowmass Village has numerous arts and cultural events and venues. From annual, headline events to smaller, more specialized performances, there are opportunities for people of all ages to get involved and be entertained. Nevertheless, many residents have expressed the desire for more nightlife, restaurants, and art events, especially in the Village core. Many see bringing these events and increasing the presence of public art throughout the community as a way to help revitalize the Village core and help Snowmass Village grow its artistic identity. The arts are the manifestation of human intellectual achievement. They are one way we define, challenge, and make ourselves distinct. An active arts community and unique local culture is essential to achieving a high “quality of life” and attracting people (residents and visitors alike) and businesses. Perhaps most importantly, a strong cultural identity empowers a community by nurturing self-respect and self-esteem, enhancing cultural sensitivity, and making the learning process more broadly accessible. Snowmass Village and Aspen share much of their arts scene and cultural identity. The two communities often collaborate on events. Snowmass Village hosts annual events and festivals such as the Summer of Free Music Fanny Hill Concert Series and the Anderson Ranch Art Auction. ARTS & CULTURE Snowmass Village Arts Advisory Board (SAAB) The SAAB was established in 1993 by a Town ordinance with the mission to demonstrate how the arts can contribute to the unique cultural identity of Snowmass Village. The Board believes that the arts are intrinsic to the values, culture, and heritage of the community. Therefore, the Board hopes that enhanced arts programming will promote cultural consciousness, stimulate economic viability, and foster a sense of community pride. The Board wishes to provide direction and leadership for arts initiatives, particularly as they impact the Town’s funding, acting as an arts advocate in promoting awareness and education as well as providing information and expertise on arts-related issues. The SAAB functions as recommending board to the Town Council. It works to liaison between the Town Council and the community while it makes recommendations to the Council on arts-related issues and propositions. The SAAB recently completed an Arts Strategic Plan which should help set the framework for achieving more public art within the community. REFLECTIONS55INTRODUCTIONREFLECTIONSPRINCIPLESPLAN FRAMEWORK TAKE ACTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS Visual Arts The visual arts are a key ingredient of Snowmass Village’s cultural life. The beauty and sweep of the natural environment provide a compelling backdrop for the exploration of these tangible elements of our artistic community, which is served by several key resources. The Ranch is a learning community dedicated to creativity and growth through making and understanding the visual arts. Its vision is to be a world leader in the development of the visual arts, in the international dialogue that inspires common humanity through art making, and in the creation of a campus imbued with a spirit of community, challenge, support, exploration, innovation, and discovery. The Ranch is open year-round, with a summer program that especially attracts artists from around the world. Anderson Ranch Arts Center Anderson Ranch Arts Studio SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 201856 The Snowmass Village Arts Advisory Board (SAAB) makes recommendations to the Town Council regarding the solicitation and placement of public art. The public art program remains a key element of the Board’s work and of the community’s cultural life. The Arts Strategic Plan includes an action item to consider the development of a 0.5% fee on new construction projects for an Art program that could help fund public art throughout the community. Public Art Program Snowmass Village’s Art Trail is a specific subset of the Town’s public art program. An Art Walk Master Plan, the precursor to the Trail, was adopted in 2002. The Art Trail’s purpose is to showcase local and national artists and their work; to establish places of beauty, stimulation, and reflection throughout the Village; and to provide connectivity between existing and proposed physical amenities. Snowmass Arts Trail REFLECTIONS57INTRODUCTIONREFLECTIONSPRINCIPLESPLAN FRAMEWORK TAKE ACTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS This internationally renowned producer holds its annual Labor Day Festival in Snowmass Village. In 2016, the festival, which is the largest of its kind in Town, had over 25,000 people in attendance over the course of 3 days. Jazz Aspen Snowmass (JAS) Performing Arts Snowmass Village enjoys a rich menu of cultural events produced by several local arts organizations. The Town supports such events both philosophically and, in many cases, through the generous use of its resources. The Town continues to seek opportunities to host such events to aid in the realization of its vision as a vibrant community. Run by the Town, this series of concerts has become a mainstay of the Roaring Fork Valley’s summer schedule of events, and brings over 20,000 people to the Village over the summer months. Fanny Hill Concert Series Theatre Aspen is an organization that offers professional, equity-based theatrical performances in Aspen’s Rio Grande Park during the summer season. In 2008, one of its family-friendly productions traveled to Snowmass Village with the help of underwriters and was shown on the Fanny Hill stage. Theatre Aspen Fanny Hill Music Stage SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 201858 Entertainment, Events, and Festivals In addition to the Fanny Hill Concert Series, the Town produces or otherwise assists with a comprehensive series of programs and events throughout the calendar year. Such events are intended to attract visitors to Snowmass Village and to augment activities for local residents. They include sports races, circus visits, the Snowmass Balloon Festival, the Snowmass Wine Festival, Mardi Gras Celebration and much more. The Snowmass Rodeo is supported by the Town with annual sponsorship dollars and the provision of the grounds themselves. The Rodeo celebrated its 44th season in 2017 and is touted as the longest running rodeo in Colorado, brings more than 10,000 people to Town on Wednesday evenings during the summer months. Another annual institution is the Snowmass Wine Festival, sponsored by the Snowmass Rotary Club. As its single fundraiser, the event has grown over the years, and includes both a wine dinner and a Grand Tasting. In 2016, the Club raised over $90,000 which was then distributed in the form of scholarships and grants to local non-profits in Snowmass Village and the Roaring Fork Valley. REFLECTIONS59INTRODUCTIONREFLECTIONSPRINCIPLESPLAN FRAMEWORK TAKE ACTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS Considering its status as one of Colorado’s most beautiful and natural communities, Snowmass Village benefits from a close and intimate connection to the natural environment. Like many mountain communities, the Town has dramatic views of the mountains and forests that surround its developed nodes and neighborhoods, and an extensive network of trails in place for everyone’s enjoyment. The mountains provide residents with easy access to rural and natural settings that have seen relatively minimal intrusion from man-made development, for the exception of the ski resort portion of the mountains. This combination of small village and wilderness provides the Town of Snowmass Village with a unique advantage for those looking for an outdoor experience. ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCES & SUSTAINABILITY Snowmass Environmental Advisory Board (EAB) The EAB was established by a Town ordinance with the mission to advise Town Council on environmental matters. The Environmental Advisory Board is a collaborative group committed to updating and accomplishing the goals of the town’s Environmental Sustainability Plan. The Board provides technical expertise and a broad community perspective in order to develop recommendations concerning projects, programs, policies, and operational practices that benefit the natural environment, the local economy, and community. They encourage community participation in these pursuits and manage relationships with other area environmental groups. Melton Ranch Subdivision SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 201860 Resource Protection Regulatory and non-regulatory measures have been taken to protect critical and important natural resources within the Town of Snowmass Village. Snowmass Village sits in a valley surrounded by the White River National Forest, one of the country’s top recreation forests and one of the biggest sections of the National Forest System. With 10 peaks over 14,000 feet, and eight Wilderness areas encompassing more than 750,000 acres, the Forest is also world-renowned for its scenery. The White River National Forest provides significant habitat for deer, elk, mountain sheep, mountain goat, bear, mountain lion, bobcat, lynx, moose, raptors, waterfowl, trout and many other species of wildlife. The National Forest Service manages the forest ensuring a balance of nature needed for air, water, plants and animals to thrive while also protecting water resources while allowing recreationalists access. The Snowmass Wildcat Fire Protection District (SWFPD) has taken on the responsibility of promoting Fire Management Practices in Snowmass Village. Some funding for this program has been provided by private donors, and each year SWFPD identifies areas where brush is cleared to reduce fire potential while maintaining as much forested land as possible. Given that our landscape is so critical to maintaining the high values within our community, the Town should consider creating a Town Forester position that would be charged with working on a Resources Management Plan that would address forest health, waterways, and wetlands. A tree removal permit program and review of re-vegetation plans should be part of the Town Forester’s responsibilities. Forests Maroon Bells: Source: liveandlethike.com/2015/09/20/maroon-creek-trail-white-river-national-forest-co/ REFLECTIONS61INTRODUCTIONREFLECTIONSPRINCIPLESPLAN FRAMEWORK TAKE ACTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS Water service within Snowmass Village is provided by the Snowmass Water & Sanitation District (SWSD). Water use efficiency and conservation is an important part of the work the District is doing, implementing water use efficiency techniques, encouraging installation of such measures and regulating the conservation of water within the Town. The District’s Rules and Regulations clearly highlight the procedures and restrictions placed on the Town and its residents in case of a water shortage. Part of the District’s mission is also to ensure that the quality of water supplied to the Town is to the highest standards, treating the water using filtration and disinfection to remove or reduce harmful contaminants. The Snowmass Water and Sanitation District is currently updating their treatment plant which is expected to take approximately two years. The SWSD is required to have the new plant operational by April 2020. The Waste Water Treatment Plant discharge permit was renewed in March 2015. The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment has issued a compliance schedule for the District to meet numerical limits for total inorganic nitrogen and total phosphorus. The existing plant cannot meet these new nutrient standards; it simply was not designed or configured to accomplish nutrient removal. Consequently, a major capital improvement project is necessary to incorporate both biological and physical treatment process changes. The Town’s Resiliency and Sustainability Plan also speaks to the need for water conservation and highlights various initiatives to help reduce water consumption around Town, specifically by increasing grey water systems, replacing top-load washers for more efficient front-load ones, requiring low-flow plumbing and mandating drought tolerant landscaping. Water Wildcat Reservoir - Source: aspensnowmasssir.com/residential/5941-Lake-Wildcat-Road-Snowmass-Village SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 201862 The Town of Snowmass Village has been active in assembling a patchwork of 1,451 acres of open space properties within the community. Some of this open space has been acquired through the efforts of the community itself. Other areas have been established as open space through the planned residential development process. Regardless of how it was established, the presence of open space in the Town strongly supports long-held community values and can enable future opportunities for conservation. Other land managers also administer open space in or adjacent to the Town of Snowmass Village, including Pitkin County Open Space and Trails, City of Aspen Parks, Trails & Open Space, the National Forest Service and the Aspen Valley Land Trust. Snowmass Village owns several parcels of land with conservation easements for permanent protection: Wildcat Ridge, North Mesa and the Snowmass Creek Valley. Snowmass seeks to conserve and preserve the land resources that define the Town’s “sense of place” and green infrastructure. Designing with nature is a commitment to understanding the ecological significance of place and to guide development in the community in a manner that respects and takes advantage of land resources while maintaining its rural character. The focus of the Town’s future development approach should not be development versus no development, but rather an approach that guides controlled growth and redevelopment in a manner that respects the environmental and conservation values of the community. Conservation Land Protection of wildlife has long been a value in the Town of Snowmass Village, although much of the development and recreational activities locals and visitors enjoy today have had a negative effect on wildlife. Wildlife migration corridors have been pinched to a fraction of what they once were, and reproduction areas and other important habitat areas have been affected tremendously. Development should be located and designed to minimize its impact to wildlife and wildlife habitat. Wetland and riparian communities are especially significant in this regard because they have the highest density and diversity of wildlife species. Conserving and enhancing the Brush Creek corridor is a priority, as identified in the POSTR Plan. Wildlife Areas REFLECTIONS63INTRODUCTIONREFLECTIONSPRINCIPLESPLAN FRAMEWORK TAKE ACTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS Protecting scenic views from certain public areas for future generations greatly contributes to the uniqueness and attractiveness of Snowmass Village and significantly contributes to the desirability of the resort and the value of local real estate. Although the protection of public views has no direct impact on environmental resources, it is highly valued from a quality-of-life perspective by residents. Views of Mt. Daly, for example, should be preserved to the greatest extent possible from major public ways and gathering places throughout the community. Continued enforcement of the Town’s ridgeline protection requirements will also contribute to the scenic views, rural character and community values. Scenic Views View of Mount Daly SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 201864 An air pollutant is defined as a substance in the air that, in high enough concentrations, produces a detrimental environmental effect. A pollutant can affect the health of humans, plants and animals. Many sources of air pollutants also are sources of greenhouse gases, including power plants and facilities associated with the production of oil and natural gas, and transportation. Strategies exist that can both reduce air pollution and the impacts of climate change. In Snowmass Village, air quality is an environmental resource that has been periodically and narrowly measured (primarily during periods of heavy development activity) through PM2.5 monitoring, designed to measure particulate matter important to public health and safety. Air Quality Monitoring Plans, requiring the most appropriate and up-to-date technologies available at a given time, are required on a project-by-project basis in order to ensure that the quality of our air is protected. Snowmass Village can also have a significant impact on maintaining or improving air quality by reducing the amount of vehicle miles traveled within the community and around the region by encouraging connections, bike lanes and a pedestrian oriented environment. Air Quality PM stands for particulate matter (also called particle pollution): the term for a mixture of solid par-ticles and liquid droplets found in the air. Some particles, such as dust, dirt, soot, or smoke, are large or dark enough to be seen with the naked eye. Others are so small they can only be detected using an electron microscope. Source: EPA REFLECTIONS65INTRODUCTIONREFLECTIONSPRINCIPLESPLAN FRAMEWORK TAKE ACTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS Addressing Climate Change and Its Impacts on Snowmass Village There is no doubt that climate change is real, that the earth is warming, a trend that will continue into the future, creating a range of impacts that include heat waves, drought, more frequent flooding and air pollution. The key question is the severity of these events, the impacts they will have on ski resorts, and what can be done to mitigate those effects and/or adapt the community to the changing climate. The Town of Snowmass Village has long recognized the importance of preserving its natural environment and why confronting climate change is essential to the future economic success and enjoyment of the resort amenities that the community offers. Snowmass Village has shown commitment to understanding, measuring and reducing its Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions since 2009 when it prepared its first ever GHG emissions inventory, which was then updated in 2014 to track progress towards meeting its goals. In Snowmass Village, almost three quarters (3/4) of human-caused GHG emissions result from the energy used to heat, illuminate and power buildings and structures, of which many are outdated and inefficient. Moving people in and around Town also generates 16% of the emissions created by Snowmass Village residents and visitors, of which passenger cars make up 86% while public transit only generates 6%. As buses have the ability to carry more passengers, they can be a more efficient use of fuel per person per mile.1 Also, a walkable community would result in less reliance on the personal vehicle. The community has significant opportunities to reduce emissions and air quality concerns from these sources through compact development patterns; energy efficient building siting, design and construction; promotion of multi-modal transportation alternatives; conservation of natural areas and resources and other initiatives and activities, many of which are listed and addressed in the Town’s 2015 Sustainability Plan. Many of these strategies are addressed in this plan and will allow the community to better adapt to our changing and warming climate. Whether someone believes that climate change is human induced or not, we do know that efforts to reduce GHG emissions also help diminish pollution, save money, improve long-term stability of the economy, and can make our community more livable – benefiting both residents and visitors alike. For example, by promoting a more compact development pattern closer to the existing major nodes of the Village as well as ensuring the construction of green buildings, we not only have the potential of reducing vehicle miles traveled (traffic congestion) but also gaining measurable savings in energy expenses. We also reduce air pollution. Throughout this plan, there are a number of interconnected strategies that will help the Town respond and adapt to climate change, and create a more vibrant and resilient Snowmass Village. This section is in no way meant to replace the 2015 Sustainability Plan Update but rather reinforce and supplement the great work (which is included in this plan by reference) that has been accomplished already. Please review the 2015 Sustainability Plan Update for more detailed strategies/initiatives. 1 – 2014 Snowmass Village Greenhouse Gas Emissions Inventory, CORE, 2016. SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 201866 Snowmass Village’s fabric already includes compact and mixed-use nodes at Snowmass Center, West Village and the soon to be completed Base Village. As the Town works to make the community and its fabric even better, there is potential to further reduce pollution and congestion, enhance social interaction, improve the efficiency and effectiveness of public service delivery, and create more vitality. Development in Snowmass Village is required to comply with state-of the-art energy efficiency standards through the use of adopted Green Building Code standards. In fact, increasing ways to support and encourage the development of more “green” buildings not only reduces life cycle costs, but also creates premium spaces for a variety of uses. Finally, the Town wants to be sure that it is not encouraging new development in places that have significant impacts on its pristine natural environment. Redevelopment and/or mixed-use, compact development in and around the existing nodes will help create a more vibrant and sustainable Snowmass Village. Compact Mixed-Use Development Given that a smaller percentage, only 16%, of the Town’s total GHG emissions come from transportation, Snowmass Village is doing well, but there is still an opportunity to encourage and facilitate more energy-efficient transportation choices. It’s all about reducing vehicle miles traveled (VMT), which comprise 86% of all transportation-generated emissions. Increasing compact mixed-use development patterns within the nodes, wherein complementary land uses would be located within easy walking distance from one another, could result in reduced reliance on vehicular transportation. Imagine more housing options over and around a redesigned and expanded Snowmass Center for example - creating more places where people can live, shop and work without the need to get into their cars. This type of development pattern in Snowmass Village can make it easier for people to reduce car ownership and reduce the amount of miles they drive every day. When we expand transit service, in Snowmass and throughout the region, and develop a better bicycling and walking network and facilities, we provide a greater menu of choices for how people get here and around the Village. With 22% of the General Fund dedicated to local transit services and the regional transportation authority being supported by a Snowmass Village with an effective tax rate of 1.164%, Snowmass Village has already invested significantly in transit alternatives. The Town currently supports the use of alternatively fueled vehicles by providing a network of public charging stations for electric vehicles. Car and bike sharing are options that can also reduce the need for car ownership and complement an existing transit system. An obligation of the Base Village development is the provision of a car share program. It should be a policy of the Town that new development contribute toward this new car share program or institute a bike sharing program to improve transportation choices. Transportation Choice REFLECTIONS67INTRODUCTIONREFLECTIONSPRINCIPLESPLAN FRAMEWORK TAKE ACTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS An important part of creating more “complete” streets is ensuring adequate facilities that meet the needs of all users regardless of ability – with a focus on pedestrians in a compact mixed-use environment. Thus the Town should ensure that we have a complete and inviting pedestrian environment throughout the three Village nodes so that residents, visitors and/or employees are encouraged to spend more time walking or biking rather than driving. This includes continuous sidewalks and trails, active uses at the street level, safer crossings, and quality lighting. Providing continuous pedestrian connections (e.g. a pedestrian bridge connection Base Village and the Snowmass Center and upgrading the Skittles SkyCab) between the three nodes, especially facilitating and dealing with the change in topography will ensure a quality pedestrian experience and further entice people to leave the car at home or at the hotel. Strategies identified in the Sustainability Plan such as winter maintenance of trails and prioritizing transit use will also continue to enhance the pedestrian experience in areas outside of the nodes. High Quality Pedestrian Experience, Better Connections & Complete Streets Comprehensive material resource management does not just include waste management, but also the management of waste generation and consumption patterns. While recycling is a big step in the right direction, it is insufficient by itself as a means of achieving sustainability, as it merely deals with a fraction of the resources involved in the current system of extraction, production, distribution, consumption, and disposal. In order to be truly sustainable, Snowmass Village must take more steps toward a closed loop or “zero waste” system of production. Such a system requires that Snowmass Village maximize its existing recycling and re-use efforts, while ensuring that products used by Town staff, residents and businesses are designed for the environment and have the potential to be repaired, re-used, or recycled. The Town’s Sustainability and Resiliency Plan further addresses waste management. Material Resource Management SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 201868 Climate Adaptation in Snowmass Village Climate “Adaptation” refers to the adjustments that societies or eco-systems make to limit the negative effects of climate change or to take advantage of opportunities provided by a changing climate. Adaptation can range from a farmer planting more drought-re-sistant crops to a coastal commu-nity evaluating how best to protect its infrastructure from rising sea level. Source: EPA Everyone has witnessed the extreme weather events in recent years. For communities that rely on the winter season for their economy, there have been all or nothing winters—blizzards in some places, only a dusting all season-long in others. These radically divergent weather patterns have been unsettling to those who thrive on the enjoyment of the great outdoors. For communities with resorts such as Snowmass Village, whose livelihood depends in large part upon a predictable winter season, such unpredictability and lack of snow or shorter ski season can translate into a precipitous fall in revenue. Climate change is already happening and its effects are seen every day. In the many U.S. resort communities that rely on winter tourism, climate change is expected to contribute to warmer winters, reduced snowfall, and shorter snow seasons. The estimated $12.2 billion dollar U.S. winter tourism industry has already felt the direct impact of decreased winter snowpack and rising average winter temperatures. Across the United States, winter temperatures have warmed 0.16 degrees Fahrenheit per decade since 1895. The rate of warming has more than tripled to 0.55 degrees Fahrenheit per decade since 1970.2 The damage to the environment goes hand in hand with damage to local economies and individual businesses, and Snowmass is not immune to this phenomenon. 2 – Climate Impacts on the Winter Tourism Economy in the United States, NRDC, POW, 2012. REFLECTIONS69INTRODUCTIONREFLECTIONSPRINCIPLESPLAN FRAMEWORK TAKE ACTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS All of this translates into less snow and fewer people on the slopes. December 2011 through February 2012 was the fourth warmest winter on record since 1896 and the third lowest snow cover extent since 1966, when satellites began tracking snow. The National Ski Areas Association (NSAA) reported for the 2011-12 ski season, the ski resort industry “experienced its most challenging season since 1991-92.”3 According to NSAA’s Kottke End of Season Survey, 50 percent of responding ski areas opened late and 48 percent closed early, with every region experiencing a decrease in overall days of operation. According to this research conducted for the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) and Protect Our Winters (POW), climate change spells trouble for all businesses dependent on winter weather, from snowmobiling, snowboarding, and ice fishing to snowshoeing and skiing. The shrinking numbers of winter sports tourists affects restaurants, lodging, gas stations, grocery stores, and bars. Without a more stable climate, the economies of mountain communities everywhere, and the valued lifestyle of winter will be gone. In the meantime, mountain resorts are adapting to survive. Some have started moving snow from parking lots and other spaces onto trails during dry spells. Others, including the Aspen Skiing Company, are expanding into year-round businesses. They are installing zip lines and ropes courses, a mountain coaster, downhill biking trails, Frisbee disc golf and hiking trails. Others have re-purposed their lodges for business conferences and weddings. Snowmass Village has already begun extending its offerings into summer and the shoulder seasons, attracting bikers, hikers and festival goers by the thousands each year. Continuing to diversify its economic base by exploring and developing complementary activities, uses and offerings will ensure a sustained economic future for Snowmass Village. Source: Flood - Rocky Mountain National Park Fire - Beaver Creek, CO - USFS photo by Alison Richards 3 – Climate Impacts on the Winter Tourism Economy in the United States, NRDC, POW, 2012. SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 201870 The Town of Snowmass Village can be accessed by Brush Creek Road or Owl Creek Road via CO 82. Within the Town, Brush Creek Road serves as the primary route, connecting Town Park, Snowmass Center, Base Village and the Mall at West Village. Carriage Way is another important route that connects Base Village to the Mall. Most other streets serve residential areas and generally follow the steep terrain that is characteristic of Snowmass Village. The Town has a long and successful history of creating a multimodal transportation system within a highly constrained environment. Steep terrain, weather, and concentrated activity patterns present challenges that are not easily solved. However, the Town has implemented a variety of travel demand management strategies that have provided Snowmass Village residents, workers, and visitors with a high degree of mobility. Additionally, the Town has set an excellent example for how to implement transportation infrastructure that fits into a rural setting. There are several distinct transportation user groups in Snowmass Village, including permanent residents, part-time residents, employees who live in other parts of the Roaring Fork Valley, and visitors. Each of these user groups has different priorities related to mobility, convenience, parking, and integration of transportation modes. Transportation needs also vary across seasons. For example, in winter, many visitors stay close to the Village and may not use their car for the duration of their stay, while in summer they are more likely to drive to nearby areas. Creation of a seamless and efficient transportation system that meets these needs is an evolving challenge. In 2016, the Snowmass Community Connectivity Plan (CCP) was developed, but not formally adopted. Based on input received from the public, the following vision for transportation in Snowmass Village was articulated and is carried through in the Comprehensive Plan recommendations: Snowmass Village will create a year-round, safe, complete and well-connected transportation network of walkways, bikeways, trails and public transportation for residents, visitors and the workforce to utilize. The complete transportation network will promote a walkable community and improve access to key destinations by making sure safe and convenient connections can be made between various nodes and destinations. The network will be used to increase year-round mobility for pedestrians, contributing to a high quality of life for residents and a great visitor experience. In this chapter of Plan Snowmass, the current state of the transportation system is discussed, followed by recommendations. The recommendations depend on continued investment in transportation infrastructure and operations, as well as coordination of transportation needs with future development. The state of the system evaluation and recommendations are informed by previous plans and studies, including the CCP. Additionally, transportation issues were discussed at length during PlanapaloozaTM in February 2017. NOTE: For more information on PlanapaloozaTM please visit the Public Process Section on page 172. TRANSPORTATION Map 4: Snowmass Transportation Network REFLECTIONS71INTRODUCTIONREFLECTIONSPRINCIPLESPLAN FRAMEWORK TAKE ACTION THE PUBLIC PROCESSBrush Creek RdOwl Creek Rd Kearns Rd Wood Rd Carriage Way Town of Snowmass High l ine Rd SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 201872 State of the System Snowmass Village and the rest of the Roaring Fork Valley are fortunate to have an excellent public transit system that is convenient and affordable for riders. The Town’s investment in public transit is noteworthy with a commitment of 22 to 25 percent of its annual general fund budget to transit. Connections between key destinations within Snowmass Village are provided and the system connects Snowmass to adjacent towns and cities, such as Aspen, Basalt, Carbondale, and Glenwood Springs, and now to Denver. In many ways, the transit system is an essential component of the Town’s success. Public Transportation The Town of Snowmass Village created a transportation department in 1980 to reduce traffic congestion through provision of transit and parking management. It operates the Village Shuttle, which is free to use and carries over half a million passengers per year. The shuttle system provides service to multifamily residential complexes, Base Village, Snowmass Center, Snowmass Mall, the Recreation Center, and the park-n-ride facility at Town Park.4 Through a seasonal arrangement with the Roaring Fork Transportation Authority (RFTA), the Town also operates buses from Highway 82 into the Town. Almost two-thirds of annual passenger trips on the Snowmass system occur from December through March, during which time capacity is often met at peak times. In a 2015 Community Survey, 78 percent of respondents indicated they use the shuttle. Along with the fixed route transit system, the Town subsidizes late night taxi service (12:45am to 2:00am) along with a Dial-a-Ride program that operates from 8:00am to 9:00pm. The Dial-a-Ride program provides service for single-family subdivisions, where operating fixed routes would not be efficient. Snowmass Transit System Village Shuttle at Town Park StationSource: snowmasstransit.com/ImageRepository/Document?documentID=2874 - Memo from David Peckler to Financial Advisory Board. January 11, 2017. REFLECTIONS73INTRODUCTIONREFLECTIONSPRINCIPLESPLAN FRAMEWORK TAKE ACTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS RFTA In addition to the Town’s transit system, RFTA provides service to and from Snowmass Village. It connects Snowmass Village to other cities and towns along Highway 82, between Glenwood Springs and Aspen. This service is critical for Snowmass Village employees as well as visitors who live in other parts of the Roaring Fork Valley. The RFTA Aspen/Snowmass route connects Aspen and Snowmass Village via the Brush Creek/Intercept Lot, which serves as a park-n-ride for many community employees and visitors. It runs at 15 minute intervals from 7:15 am through 11:45 pm seven days a week during the ski season with 30 minute headways during the summer months. During the off-season the headway is reduced to hourly service. The No-Fare service between Snowmass Village and Aspen has been a great success and it specifically targets tourist and worker movement between the two communities. RFTA also operates Four Mountain Connector Buses, which connect Aspen Ski Company properties: Aspen, Aspen Highlands, Buttermilk, and Snowmass. These buses run only during the winter months, contributing to headways between 7 and 15 minutes during peak times during those months. Transit Stations and Stops There are three major transit stations in Snowmass Village: Town Park Station, Base Village Transit Center, and Snowmass Mall Shuttle Stop. The Town Park Station serves as a major park-n-ride that provides primary access into the Town. Base Village Transit Center is another important transit hub, but was not intended to serve as a primary transit station and does not have sufficient capacity for expanded use. Integration of transit into future redevelopment of the mall has been studied to improve the functionality of the system. In addition to the major transit stations at Town Park, Base Village, and Snowmass Mall, the Town maintains an additional fifteen (15) bus shelters along fixed routes. However, buses typically will stop for passengers waiting along the roadway where formal stops do not exist. Gamble Way Bus Shelter on Owl Creek RoadSource: Toole Design GroupTransit shelters such as this one along Owl Creek Road are functional and fit into the Snowmass context. SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 201874 The Skittles SkyCab connects the Snowmass Mall and Base Village. Skittles lacks the peak load capacity needed to serve as a primary method of connecting these locations: the SkyCab is generally slower than walking when wait times are accounted for. As discussed in the draft Community Connectivity Plan, further study is needed to determine an appropriate solution for replacing and/or supplementing the SkyCab, such as a walkway or more advanced technology. Skittles Gondola As noted in the Community Connectivity Plan draft and in feedback gathered for the Comprehensive Plan, better connections to existing transit stations and stops would improve the overall usability of the system. Lack of sidewalks and/or walking paths along major roads such as Brush Creek Road and Owl Creek Road inhibits the ability for pedestrians to safely and comfortably walk to transit stops. Some stops are connected to the unpaved trail network. For instance, a gravel trail connects the Brush Creek Trail to the bus stop east of the Brush Creek Road/Owl Creek Road intersection. While this and similar connections are useful, they are typically unlit and covered in snow during the winter, which limits their functionality. The Community Connectivity Plan developed recommendations for adding sidewalks and/or walking paths, and relocating transit stops, which are summarized in the Recommendations section of this chapter. First and Last Mile Connections Skittles SkyCab on Fanny HillSource: i2.wp.com/www.ski.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/14-C-040_2100x1407_300_RGB.jpg?fit=1000%2C670&ssl=1 REFLECTIONS75INTRODUCTIONREFLECTIONSPRINCIPLESPLAN FRAMEWORK TAKE ACTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS Despite the hilly terrain, many Snowmass Village residents walk for their daily transportation needs. Many of the Town’s core destinations, such as Town Center, Base Village, and the Mall are within walking distance of each other. According to a 2014 travel pattern study conducted by the Roaring Fork Transportation Authority (RFTA), 29 percent of winter residents primarily walk for personal (non-commute) trips, compared to 19 percent for the entire region.5 Walking rates are lower in summer, but bike trips account for a higher share of trips then, suggesting these modes may be used interchangeably depending on weather conditions. Levels of walking in Snowmass Village are considerably lower for commute trips. Of particular concern is that walking declined from 16 percent of resident commute trips in 2004 to only 5 percent in 2014.6 This change may be linked to increased housing prices, which have made living in Snowmass Village out of reach for many community employees, thereby changing the composition of the resident population. Lack of comfortable places to walk likely also limits walking among employees, particularly those who live in the Town. While sidewalks exist on Carriage Way, unsafe walking conditions along Brush Creek Road and to a lesser extent in Snowmass Village neighborhoods, was cited as a common concern in the feedback received for this project. Among 55 PlanapaloozaTM attendees who filled out a transportation survey, three-fourths (75 percent) indicated they would not feel comfortable walking on Brush Creek Road, and over half (51 percent) stated they would not feel comfortable crossing Brush Creek Road (Figure 10). Walking Brush Creek Road near Lower Kearns Road - Source: Toole Design GroupMany streets in Snowmass Village do not have sidewalks, forcing pedestrians to walk in the road. 5 - Roaring Fork Transportation Authority. 2014 Regional Travel Patterns Update. 6 - Ibid. SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 201876 13%36%33%18% 9%16%36%38% How comfortable would you feel crossing Brush Creek Road? How comfortable would you feel walking on Brush Creek Road? Figure 10 Survey Responses Regarding the Level of Comfort for Walking on and across Brush Creek Road. Snowmass Village is known as a great place for bicycling. There is an extensive network of unpaved trails, with a paved trail along Brush Creek Road and parallel to much of Owl Creek Road. Biking within the Town occurs on shared roads or on off-road paths, as dedicated on-road bike facilities have not been implemented. Currently, biking in Snowmass Village is primarily viewed as a recreational activity, but many residents bike for transportation as well. In the summer, biking comprises 14 percent of personal trips and 11 percent of commute trips, both of which are higher than the regional average and much higher than the statewide and national averages.7 Bicycling in mixed traffic is challenging on many Snowmass Village roads as bicyclists operate at slow speeds, relative to motor vehicles, when going uphill. Greater investment in trails and on-road bicycle facilities, such as climbing lanes, would encourage more bicycling and improve interactions with motorists. Bicycling Very Comfortable Somewhat Comfortable Somewhat Uncomfortable Very Uncomfortable Source: Aspen Ski Company 7 - Ibid. REFLECTIONS77INTRODUCTIONREFLECTIONSPRINCIPLESPLAN FRAMEWORK TAKE ACTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS The 2014 RFTA travel patterns survey found that driving alone is the most common mode of travel for residents and employees. However, rates of driving alone are substantially lower in Snowmass Village than in the rest of the region and in most cities and towns in Colorado and nationwide (Figure 11). Employees in Snowmass Village are more likely to drive and carpool than residents, likely because many employees do not live in the Town. Providing more affordable housing in the Town would likely reduce the overall level of traffic in and around Snowmass Village. Motor Vehicle Traffic Winter Resident Personal Trips Region Snowmass Village Winter Employee Commute Trips 56% 32%41%36% 62% 42% 52%50% Figure 11 Rates of Driving Alone in Snowmass Village Compared to the Roaring Fork Region, 2014.8 Transportation professionals and communities typically measure the performance of a roadway by metrics such as travel time, vehicular delay, Level of Service (LOS), and/or person-trip capacity. LOS generally measures the delay experienced by motorists at an intersection (or a specific lane at an intersection) according to a scale of A (least delay) through F (most delay).9 The scale reads like a report card grade, with A being the “best” and F being the “worst.” However, roadways operating at LOS A have excess capacity that is not being used. While LOS C, D or E mean more delay for motorists, they also represent a more efficient use of the roadway space. Source: Roaring Fork Transportation Authority. Snowmass Village Travel Patterns Community Profile. 8 - Roaring Fork Transportation Authority. Snowmass Village Travel Patterns Community Profile. 9 - National Association of City Transportation Officials. Urban Street Design Guide: Performance Measures. http://nacto.org/publication/urban-street-design-guide/design-controls/performance-measures/ Summer Resident Commute Trips Summer Employee Commute Trips SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 201878 LOS Delay inSeconds A <5.0 B 5-15 C 15-25 D 25-40 E 40-60 F >60 In the 2010 Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan, the Town maintained its LOS C as its performance target for vehicle delay on its roads. For Brush Creek Road, LOS C is exceeded when traffic volumes are higher than 925 one-way vehicles per hour.10 This segment volume threshold is a measure of vehicle density (vehicles/hour/lane) which can be used as a simplified proxy for vehicle delay (seconds/vehicle). Delay in seconds per vehicle is usually influenced by intersection turning movements, and the presence of signals or stop signs. Since the completion of the Brush Creek/Wood Road roundabout, traffic delays at this intersection have been reduced. The Town is currently studying the feasibility of a roundabout at the Owl Creek Rd./Brush Creek Rd. intersection. As shown in Figure 12 below, the average one-way traffic volume on Brush Creek Road during the winter PM Peak time are well below the 925 vehicles per hour threshold for LOS C, suggesting that this somewhat conservative threshold is appropriate. Furthermore, of the 641 days with recorded traffic data since 2000, there have been only nine days with hourly peak one-way volumes higher than 925 (and none since 2006). These findings indicate the Town’s LOS standards are currently being met. However, the 2010 Comprehensive Plan included motor vehicle traffic projections for Brush Creek Road that suggested a potential doubling of traffic after approved land uses are constructed. Given that some development has occurred and traffic has not increased, future increases at that scale seem unlikely. Assuming traffic volumes are guaranteed to double, based on entitled development approvals, may lead to an investment in unnecessary capacity. Rather, committing to continuing and expanding demand management and transit strategies, monitoring traffic growth Table 09 Intersection Level-of-Service Standards over time, and re-evaluating the performance target as operations approach LOS C will allow the Town to best address motor vehicle traffic increases on their own terms. Transportation system performance measures should provide insight into whether the Town is achieving its community and transportation goals. It is important that the Town’s transportation performance measures reflect the desire for mobility for residents, visitors and employees, while preserving quality of life. In this sense, vehicle LOS during the peak hour provides an incomplete picture because it does not account for how many people are using the system at any given time or for what purpose. 10 - Town of Snowmass Village 2010 Comprehensive Plan. REFLECTIONS79INTRODUCTIONREFLECTIONSPRINCIPLESPLAN FRAMEWORK TAKE ACTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS Figure 12 Average Winter PM Peak Hour One-way Traffic Volumes on Brush Creek Road11 2000/20012001/20022002/20032003/20042004/20052005/20062007/20082008/20092009/20102010/20112011/20122012/20132013/20142014/2015AverageLOS C Data represent December through March. Traffic volume for winter 2006/2007 is not available. Source: Town of Snowmass Village 641 675 655 638 666 601 623 546 600 587 583 582 604 618 SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 201880 Vehicle parking in Snowmass Village is provided through private and public parking garages and lots, most of which are managed by the Town. Parking is closely monitored and managed in the winter, but historically there has not been a strong need to manage parking in other seasons. However, some participants in the planning process expressed that parking is becoming a greater concern in summer than winter as more people arrive by car in the summer. West Village parking lots are managed by the Town. Residents, guests, and some employees purchase a permit to park in these lots (during winter only), which are surveyed by license plate readers. Cars parked without a permit are subject to ticketing. Parking Management Table 10 Existing Public Parking Capacity by Location Location Spaces West Village 1,000 Base Village 22811 Divide 30 Town Park 275 Two Creeks 400 Rodeo Contestant Lot 150 Black Saddle 150 ASC Maintenance Facility 30 Highway 82 Intercept Lot 400 11 - Projected capacity upon completion is 375 spaces. REFLECTIONS81INTRODUCTIONREFLECTIONSPRINCIPLESPLAN FRAMEWORK TAKE ACTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS Throughout the year, free parking is provided at the Intercept Lot at Highway 82 and at Town Park. Both lots serve as park-n-ride facilities. Since the Intercept Lot is three miles farther from Snowmass Village than the Town Park Lot, providing transit service to the Intercept Lot is more expensive and current routes connecting to the Intercept Lot also do not have the capacity to serve additional transit riders during peak times. During the peak season, the Town Park Lot exceeds capacity on a regular basis. Counts conducted in March 2016 determined that the capacity of the lot was either met or exceeded on 23 out of 31 days. Additionally, daily parking has increased over time (Figure 13). The unpaved Rodeo Contestant lot serves as overflow parking for Town Park, the Recreation Center and skiers when it is full. Figure 13 Average Daily Parking at Town Park, 2010-2016 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 275 277 284 319 322 329 322 SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 201882 Community facilities and services (infrastructure) provided in Snowmass Village support the day-to-day operations of the Town. The type, location and capacity of infrastructure in the community -- its service delivery -- is critical to the Town’s ‘just big enough’ initiative, and its desire to offer a high quality-of-life for residents and memorable experience for year-round visitors to the mountain. Monitoring infrastructure investments in relation to future development depicted on the Conservation & Development Map will be critical to right-sizing the Town, and should acknowledge the tremendous effect new infrastructure investments have on the type, location, pattern and intensity of development that will (or will not) occur in Snowmass Village. A description of community facilities and services provided in Snowmass Village follows, including those provided by outside partners that residents, businesses and visitors use to meet their daily needs. COMMUNITY FACILITIES & SERVICES Town Facilities & Services The Town of Snowmass Village provides police protection from its headquarters in Town Hall. Ten sworn officers, two animal services officers, a records specialist, and a seasonal traffic control person staff the department. Animal services officers also staff an all-seasons Trail Ranger Program, which helps manage use conflicts, trail etiquette, and provides guest information. The Police Department also provides parking enforcement. The Police Department sponsors several community programs in town: home watch, alarm monitoring, pet registration and tags, and theft prevention (ski and bike). Resources of the Police Department were used to respond to 5,411 incidents in 2016. Circumstances at those incidents resulted in 55 arrests and 4,000 parking violation tickets (in the same year). Individuals arrested in Snowmass Village are transported to the Pitkin County Jail located in Aspen for processing. The Police Department has mutual aid agreements with Aspen, Basalt and Pitkin County. The four departments share a dispatch center and joint training center, and work together often, planning and managing large-scale, seasonal events in the area (e.g., the X-Games in Aspen). Police Protection REFLECTIONS83INTRODUCTIONREFLECTIONSPRINCIPLESPLAN FRAMEWORK TAKE ACTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS Impervious surfaces -- roads, parking lots, buildings, etc. -- interfere with the ability of rainwater to soak into the ground. Storm water run-off from a rain event travels quickly across impervious surfaces, picking up sediment and pollutants, and carrying them to nearby lakes and streams. The simultaneous increase in both water quantity and suspended sediments leads to stream erosion and degraded water quality. The small size of the permanent population of Snowmass Village (2,889) exempts it from National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) requirements under the U.S. Clean Water Act. Nonetheless, the Town is committed to safeguarding its ‘natural infrastructure’ (e.g., flood control, water filtration, air pollution removal, wildlife habitat, water supply provisions, etc.) to offset impacts associated with the development footprint. New or enhanced rules and requirements for storm water management, similar to those used in NPDES Phase II Permit areas, could help Snowmass Village implement a Town-wide storm water management strategy. The Town plans to allocate funds in future years to complete a storm water inventory and assessment in order to implement some improvements to the stormwater system. Storm Water Management Snowmass LakeSource: danieljoderphotography.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/201607163867-eThe-Upper-Trail-Option.jpg SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 201884 The Town of Snowmass Village provides solid waste collection and recycling services throughout the community. Residential curbside collection is provided on a weekly basis in the Horse Ranch, Crossings, and Rodeo Place Subdivisions. Several condominium associations and subdivisions maintain their own dumpster sheds that are serviced by the Town. Other residents have access to three dumpster sheds located along Brush Creek Road or Faraway Road. Non-residential uses also contract with the Town for solid waste collection and recycling services. All solid waste and recycling collected in the Town are sent to the Pitkin County Landfill located off of CO 82 near the Wildcat Subdivision. The facility accepts residential and commercial trash and construction debris and demolition materials. The landfill also provides single stream recycling and food and green waste composting. Estimates are, without a drastic change in the region’s ‘trash behavior’ that the landfill will reach capacity and be closed in under seven years. Several programs are underway to divert waste from the landfill, including aggregate recovery, a ‘drop and swap’ program, various recycling programs, and food and landscape waste composting initiatives. In 2016, the Town’s recycling program diverted between 14% - 17% of total waste collected from landing in the Pitkin County Landfill. The Town of Snowmass Village has a responsibility to the collective effort of the County to reduce waste going to the landfill. Snowmass will continue to partner with its neighbors to ensure good regulation and management of the system as a whole. The Town has allocated funds to complete a solid waste management plan. Solid Waste & Recycling The Town’s Public Works Department maintains local roads and rights-of-way (including bicycle facilities, walking paths and sidewalks) in Snowmass Village (approximately 39 lane miles, defined as the centerline length of all roads maintained by the Town multiplied by the number of lanes), including the Snowmelt Road (Carriageway) infrastructure. General responsibilities for the department include: snow and ice control and removal, street and ditch cleaning, storm water management, public sign maintenance and repair, street marking, ditch mowing and roadside weed control, streetlight maintenance, asphalt paving and concrete repairs, and grading of gravel roads. Funding for road maintenance is sponsored, in part, from a property tax levy and through occupancy assessments charged at time of issuance of Certificates of Occupancy for new residences and lodging properties. The Town should evaluate whether they should continue maintaining certain private roadways and access easements or whether they should focus maintenance only on roadways it owns to control expenses. Road Maintenance REFLECTIONS85INTRODUCTIONREFLECTIONSPRINCIPLESPLAN FRAMEWORK TAKE ACTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS Town Buildings & Facilities The Snowmass Village Recreation Center is a multi-purpose building that provides year round programs and amenities for residents and visitors. The 18,000-square foot facility includes a fitness area, gymnasium, climbing walls, and office space for the Town Parks Department. Basketball courts, sand volleyball courts, tennis courts, swimming pools (open year round), and a skate park surround the building as part of a larger recreation complex. The Town’s Parks and Trails Division is responsible for maintaining the local paved and unpaved trail system. The Snowmass rodeo grounds and a large parking lot for ski shuttle service in the winter are adjacent to the recreation complex. More information on parks, open space and recreation programs in Snowmass Village is provided in the Open Space chapter of the comprehensive plan. Snowmass Village Recreation Center The Little Red Schoolhouse (LRSH) is one of the Town’s few historic structures. Built more than a century ago, the schoolhouse is owned by the Town and leased to a day-care center for residents and employees. The facility is currently at capacity with ten (10) children in the early childhood facility and twenty-two (22) children in the preschool facility. Demand demonstrated by a waiting list of up to three years (especially for infant care) at the facility shows a significant shortfall in childcare for local residents. The non-profit that currently operates LRSH is currently studying the feasibility of expanding the buildings to accommodate more children, or possibly constructing a new facility adjacent to the Town Recreation Center. Little Red School House The Town Hall building provides office space for most Town services: administration; police; finance; building and planning; and marketing, special events and group sales. Town Council Chambers, a satellite location for the Pitkin County Library system, and several meeting rooms are also provided in the building. Town Hall The Town’s Public Works building provides administrative office space, vehicle maintenance facilities, and equipment storage areas for all divisions under Public Works: fleet maintenance, road maintenance, solid waste and recycle collection, and facilities maintenance. This complex also includes two (2) housing units that provide housing for Town government employees. Public Works Building The Town also owns or rents space in various locations to provide on-site services, including the Housing Office in the Mountain View Employee Housing Complex, the Transportation Administration Office in the Snowmass Mall, and the Bus Barn and Shuttle Driver’s Lounge in Town-owned condominiums in the Snowmass Mall. Other Town Facilities SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 201886 The Snowmass Water and Sanitation District (SWSD) is a Colorado Special District that has been providing clean water and treating wastewater for Snowmass Village since 1968. The District’s operation includes all components of the water and sewer systems: withdrawal, treatment, discharge, and collection and distribution systems. The District is governed by a publicly-elected five-member Board of Directors. SWSD staff implements policies, procedures and programs of the Board and is responsible for identified system improvements. Snowmass Water & Sanitation District Regional Facilities & Services The water system consists of a raw water intake system, water treatment plant, a system of pressure zones, water storage tanks, and water pipes to deliver potable water to customers. The water treatment plant has a permitted capacity of 4.7 million gallons per day (MGD) with an ultimate design capacity of 5.1 MGD. The plant uses mechanical filtration and ultra violet treatment to process raw water and produce potable water. Raw water is diverted from one of three District sources of supply -- Brush Creek, East Snowmass Creek and Snowmass Creek -- and from storage at the Ziegler Reservoir and conveyed by pipe to the water treatment plant. Available supply at one or more of the sources may be limited because of natural weather variations, other water demands, or available storage capacity. Thirteen potable water storage tanks are located in various District pressure zones to manage water distribution during peak demand periods (water or fire flow) or during exigent circumstances (emergency storage). The total capacity of water storage tanks in the system is approximately 6.0 million gallons (in aggregate). SWSD currently provides water service to 5,232 EQRs in the Snowmass Village area. (Note: the base unit for one EQR [equivalent residential unit] is a three-bedroom, two-bath home occupied by four persons. All residential land uses in the District are converted to EQRs for reporting purposes. The current capacity of available water within the Snowmass Village service area is 6,200 EQRs. See the Snowmass Water & Sanitation District website http://www.swsd.org/ for more information about EQRs.) Peak demand for water, fire flow and emergency storage measured at the water treatment plant was 3.04 MGD in 2012. Additional storage tanks may be needed in certain pressure zones depending on the future development locations, types, patterns or intensities. Water System REFLECTIONS87INTRODUCTIONREFLECTIONSPRINCIPLESPLAN FRAMEWORK TAKE ACTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS The Snowmass Water and Sanitation District treats its water using filtration and disinfection to remove or reduce harmful contaminants that come from source water. The process currently used by SWSD was reviewed by the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) and approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in 2000. The CDPHE does not have statutory authority to force the adoption or implementation of source water protection measures. The Town of Snowmass Village does not currently enforce source water protection measures in its local rules and ordinances. Water Quality The waste water system consists of collection sewer mains, lift stations and a waste water treatment plant. The waste water treatment plant has a treatment capacity of 3.2 million gallons per day (MGD), but uses a mirror image 1.6 MGD bifurcated system to minimize demands for primary, secondary and tertiary treatment based on seasonal demand. Treated effluent is discharged into Brush Creek. Sludge waste from the treatment plant is taken to the Pitkin County Landfill or the SWSD sludge disposal site in Woody Creek for composting. SWSD currently provides waste water service to approximately 5,232 EQRs in the Snowmass Village area. Waste Water System The Snowmass Water and Sanitation District charges new construction and remodel construction for the right to connect to the water and sewer system (a system development fee). The charges were $12,867.00 for water and $15,439.00 for waste water per equivalent residential unit (EQR) in 2016. Once paid, the District contacts the Town Building Department for permit release. SWSD System Development Fees (also known as Tap Fees) The Snowmass Water and Sanitation District is a model organization for water conservation initiatives in the State of Colorado. They have enacted several conservation-driven rules and procedures over time, which are formally identified in the SWSD Water Efficiency Plan adopted in 2014. Statutory requirements for water conservation include estimating the amount of water saved from the measures implemented. The SWSD Water Efficiency Plan identifies 37 different conservation measures in place or planned for the future. When fully-implemented, these measures could reduce consumption by up to 0.12 million gallons per day. The Town of Snowmass Village and their resort partners should promote year round water conservation initiatives -- educating residents, business owners, and hotel guests about the methods and potential water consumption savings (including the use of indigenous and drought tolerant plant materials) -- with the Water Conservation Officer at the Snowmass Water and Sanitation District. Water Conservation Initiatives SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 201888 The Snowmass-Wildcat Fire Protection District is autonomous from the Town of Snowmass Village but very important to its residents and business owners. It provides fire protection and emergency medical services with resources from a single station located at 5275 Owl Creek Road. The station supports the first engine company that arrives on scene, emergency medical unit, and forestry unit. Nineteen full- time and fourteen part-time employees serve the department working in three shifts. The District maintains an Insurance Service Office (ISO) rating of 4 for the entire service area. A rating of 5 is the highest rating that can be achieved. Resources of the fire department were used to respond to 1,100 fire protection and emergency medical service calls in 2016. The District also has mutual aid agreements with Aspen, Basalt and Carbondale fire departments. The old station on Owl Creek Road was considered old, unsafe and inefficient for future needs and has now been demolished. Voters approved a $17.0 million bond referendum in 2016 to build a new facility on the site of the original fire station, which is currently under construction. Temporary facilities have been located at the rodeo grounds until the new facility is finished, which is expected in the Fall of 2018. The Snowmass-Wildcat and the Basalt and Rural Fire Protection Districts entered into a Inter-Governmental Agreement (IGA) on December 18, 2017 to form a single fire authority merging the two special districts. The goal has been set to complete the formal applications of the new Fire Authority by January 1, 2019. The two Special Districts currently share Fire Chief, Deputy Chiefs, EMS Chief, Training Chief, Human Resource Director, Comptroller, Fleet Manager, Fire Marshal and Assistant Fire Marshals. Separate Boards of Directors will remain-one for the Basalt and Rural Fire Protection District and one the Snowmass-Wildcat Fire Protection District - to manage funds that are specific to each separate fire district’s obligations. The new Fire Authority Board will be comprised of three members of each District Board. Fire & EMS Students in Snowmass Village attend public schools in the Aspen RE-1 School District. The school system includes three facilities: Aspen Elementary School, Aspen Middle School and Aspen High School. Total enrollment for the District in the 2016/17 school year was 1,528. Approximately 300 of these students reside in the Town of Snowmass Village. The School District is one of the highest rated in the State of Colorado and the nation, with over 96% of students graduating. In addition, the area is served by the private Country Day school which is K-8 and Colorado Mountain College which serves Pitkin County and beyond. Continued coordination between the Town and School District will ensure efficient and high-quality services into the future. Specifically, the timing and location of development identified by the Comprehensive Plan should be closely coordinated with the District’s strategic plan and capital improvements plan. Aspen School District REFLECTIONS89INTRODUCTIONREFLECTIONSPRINCIPLESPLAN FRAMEWORK TAKE ACTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS With eleven mountain locations throughout Colorado, the College offers over 132 academic programs for students to choose from. Described as providing one of the most affordable bachelor’s degree in the country, it enrolls about ~3,700 full-time students. With a campus located in Aspen, the College offers a great option for local students to gain college experience and credits at no or low cost. Colorado Mountain College offers a blend of hands-on education, personal attention and rigorous academic preparation, providing students with a solid academic foundation to transfer to four-year colleges and universities. Colorado Mountain College The Pitkin County Library System includes two full-service locations: one in Aspen and one in Basalt. Snowmass Village has a “satellite library” on the second floor of the Town Hall. Residents and visitors can also return library materials at a drop box located in the Snowmass Center, or pick up reserved books at the Town Recreation Center. Pitkin County Library Services Visitors travel to the Aspen-Pitkin County Airport on commercial flights and general aviation aircraft to conduct business or vacation in Snowmass Village. Statistics from the Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT) estimate 240,000 visitors arrive at the airport each year (last reported in 2015). Visitors arriving by air spend money locally on winter skiing, summer events, food, lodging, transportation, entertainment and retail purchases. Their expenditures, in turn, generate local and state tax revenues. Statistics from CDOT estimate $47.0 million in annual local and state taxes were linked to the operation of Aspen-Pitkin County Airport (last reported in 2015). Identified improvements for the airport in the draft Environmental Assessment -- terminal and runway enhancements and multi-modal connections to transit -- are supported by the Town as a driver for future economic development in the Village. Aspen-Pitkin County Airport SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 201890 Holly Cross Energy provides electricity and Black Hills Energy provides natural gas to residents and businesses in the Snowmass Village area. These services are generally deemed adequate to meet future development needs. The Snowmass Village Land Use and Development Code requires all utilities be placed underground with limited exceptions. Town officials should continue to coordinate with service providers as development continues to ensure adequate service remains available. Electricity & Natural Gas Snowmass Village embraces telephone, cable and internet technology as a means for creating a more connected community. Current residential and commercial service providers include Century Link (land line telephone), Xfinity/Comcast (cable and internet), and DirectTV (satellite). Limited access to free wireless internet is provided in public spaces, including the Town Hall and Town Recreation Center. Base Village Phase 2 will also provide free wireless internet. Previous plans and studies have advocated for improved cellular phone service (AT&T, Sprint and Verizon serve the community), and widespread access to free wireless internet in public places (especially in the identified Town Core areas). Of note is the regular overloading of cellular service during special events and festivals. As technology advances, there will be greater demand for locating new and smaller telecommunication infrastructure in greater density throughout the community. These devices should be embraced as needed infrastructure, but should also be carefully sited to mitigate visual impacts to both the built and natural environments. Telephone, Internet & Cable REFLECTIONS91INTRODUCTIONREFLECTIONSPRINCIPLESPLAN FRAMEWORK TAKE ACTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS Snowmass Area Conference Centers & Marketing Support Quasi-Public Facilities & Services The Westin Snowmass Resort offers 24,000 square feet of conference space, including 5,000 square feet of flexible space in the Westin hotel, and 18,000 square feet in the adjacent Westin Snowmass Conference Center, of which the ballroom itself is 10,800 square feet. It is the largest conference facility in the upper valley. Westin Snowmass Conference Center The Snowmass Base Village offers 8,000 square feet of meeting space, including a grand ballroom (3,600 square feet) for large events and several smaller meeting room spaces. Snowmass Base Village Conference Center The Viceroy includes 11,000 square feet of meeting space; a 5,600-square-foot ballroom that can be divided into four smaller salons, and other spaces. Grand Ballroom at the Viceroy The Town of Snowmass Village Tourism Department The Town of Snowmass Village Tourism Department manages all marketing, special events, group sales, public relations, and guest services efforts in Town. The group sales team works with meeting or event planners at all conference center locations to coordinate on a variety of programs. The team is composed of 18 Town employees and is allocated over $6 Million of Lodging and Sales Taxes for marketing purposes. The Snowmass Chapel and Community Center (SCCC) offers non-denominational worship services year-round. In addition, the Chapel provides counseling services, weddings, and memorial services to residents and guests. Catholic mass is hosted by St. Mary Catholic Church during ski season. The SCCC offers 20,000 square feet of chapel and community space for a variety of activities year round. During the summer months, SCCC provides Camp Smashbox for children Kindergarten thru 6th grade, which enrolls 400 children per summer on average. Snowmass Chapel and Community Center 95 GUIDINGPRINCIPLES The Community Vision presented below was first developed during the 2010 Com-prehensive Plan update process and still holds true today. The Guiding Principles that follow were generated during the Plan Snowmass public engagement process, especially during the Visioning Sessions and PlanapaloozaTM. These principles are meant to set priorities for moving forward. The value of the recommendations contained within this Plan depends on local leaders incorporating the intent of the Vision and Principles into the decision-making culture. PRINCIPLES PRINCIPLES93PRINCIPLESREFLECTIONSINTRODUCTIONPLAN FRAMEWORK TAKE ACTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS The Common Vision for Snowmass Village is to “be the leading multi-season, family-oriented inclusive resort community. We will do this by creating, marketing, and delivering distinctive choices for fun, excitement, challenge, learning, and togetherness. All this is done amidst our unique, natural splendor…as part of a memorable Aspen/Snowmass experience. Further, we wish to be seen by others as welcoming, dynamic, convenient, and successful. We will always be responsible stewards of our environment, economy, and society. When successful, Snowmass Village will have achieved the quality of life and economic vitality that will assure our future as a sustainable resort community.”- 2010 Comprehensive Plan. Over the decades, debates about Snowmass Village primarily being a resort or a community have persisted. Through the planning process, we have concluded that this debate is miscalculated; it should not be an “either/or” type debate. Snowmass Village is a community that encompasses a resort. Community and resort are not, and do not need to be mutually exclusive. We are proud of our community and the resort in our community. VISION TPUDC worked with the public to identify a set of enduring Guiding Principles critical to Snowmass Village’s current and future quality of life. These Principles embody the core philosophy and Vision expressed by the community. Though the local context and approach for achieving these goals may change over time, the Guiding Principles should endure for generations. GUIDING PRINCIPLES SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 201894Base Village (foreground) and West Village (upper right) at night.Source: Aspen Times PRINCIPLES95PRINCIPLESREFLECTIONSINTRODUCTIONPLAN FRAMEWORK TAKE ACTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS Stewardship Snowmass Village will operate in a manner that conserves and safeguards our land, views and vistas, air and water resources, becoming a model of environmental stew-ardship and using the Town’s existing and future resources wisely to support present and future generations of Snowmass Village residents and visitors. Active & Healthy Promote and expand opportunities to experience Snowmass Village’s stunning natural environment, proximity to multiple recreational opportunities, and a safe and healthy lifestyle. Vibrant Make the Snowmass Village economy sustainable and resilient, while providing opportunities for a variety of new and innovative businesses and endeavors, and continue to support existing and locally-owned businesses. Together, investments in economic development should provide a variety of shopping, dining, cultural, recre-ational, housing, lodging and working opportunities for residents and visitors alike. Genuine Retain the natural, pristine and unique small village character while creating places that are interesting, welcoming, well-designed, useful and likely to provide long-stand-ing value to the community and visitors. Connected Support a safe, reliable and innovative transportation system that balances all modes of transportation (walking, biking, transit and motor vehicles) in all weather conditions, and offers strong linkages between neighborhoods, nodes, and valley-wide commu-nities. Balanced Provide a high quality of life for residents and a fulfilling experience for visitors. Bal-ance the needs of the community and resort by maintaining a high quality of life for residents when making decisions about the future. Inclusive Broaden the demographic composition of visitors and residents in Snowmass Vil-lage, understanding that inclusivity and variety are crucial to the creation of a socially sustainable community. Provide an array of housing, shopping, culture, entertainment and lodging options for employees, residents and guests at all income levels and stages of life. PLAN FRAMEWORK This section presents a new planning framework to implement the Comprehensive Plan. The Conservation and Development Map provides general guidance for how to proactively address change. Illustrative plans for the comprehensively planned areas (CPAs) show one potential outcome for development and redevelopment within these areas. These plans, generated during PlanapaloozaTM, reflect the intent of the Common Vision and Guiding Principles and are one physical manifestation of many of the ideas generated from the public. Future zoning changes and other policy decisions should be based on the framework provided here to address the Town’s hopes for the future and strengthen the municipal advantage.PLAN FRAMEWORK97PRINCIPLESPLAN FRAMEWORKREFLECTIONSINTRODUCTION TAKE ACTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS Snowmass Village has always identified with its stunning natural environment and has long expressed the desire to preserve this tremendous and unique asset. Simultaneously, the Town has a goal of providing affordable housing for a large percentage (60%) of employees working in Town, and offering visitors and residents alike an appealing array of services and lodging options. With the need for more affordable employee housing options remaining steady for several years (due in part to the longevity of stay by current tenants or homeowners), and the constant growth in employment, new units should be accommodated near the existing centers of activity. Directing development in this manner will allow for the two goals of housing and conservation to occur. With an aging stock of hotel accommodations and shopping facilities, like the Mall and Snowmass Center, the community has strongly expressed the desire to see redevelopment of those areas into updated and vibrant nodes of activity that will then be linked to the new Base Village currently under construction. In order to respond to these issues, the Plan provides a new framework for limited development and conservation of natural assets that addresses quality of life for residents while seeking to have a positive impact on the economy, business climate, tax base, and the sustainability of the Town into the future. The community overwhelmingly supports the idea of preserving Snowmass’s natural environment while recognizing the need for targeted redevelopment at the Snowmass Center and the West Village. WHY A FRAMEWORK FOR CONSERVATION & DEVELOPMENT? Snowmass Village residents understand that planning for the future will result in a stronger local econo-my, greater sustainability, and a better quality of life for current and future residents, as well as continued attractiveness for visitors. This section provides a description of the Conservation and Development Map that sets up a town-wide framework for investing in areas supported by existing infrastructure, retrofitting areas in need of redevelopment, and protecting open space and natural resources. A description of how this map is organized, according to conservation and development areas, is provided. The identified development sectors include areas for infill, redevelopment, and retrofit. A number of these development areas are illustrated in detail to show possibilities of how development could occur that reflects the goals and aspirations of the community. SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 201898 Input from participants at the Visioning Sessions and PlanapaloozaTM supported the concept of a conservation and development approach, focusing on conservation first and then on redevelopment of the existing nodes, i.e.: the Mall and Snowmass Center (as well as continued development of Base Village as approved), which can include the addition of new affordable housing units to help the Town meet its goal, while protecting existing residential neighborhoods and remaining rural lands. This approach reaffirms the community’s feeling that redevelopment of existing development sites or buildings should happen first to make the most efficient use of Town services while ensuring that carrying capacity of existing infrastructure is carefully addressed and not exceeded. The Conservation & Development Map (Map 5A & 5B) organizes the community into Areas prioritized for varying degrees of land conservation, including both permanently protected and recreation open spaces, existing developed neighborhoods, and development areas that support existing and proposed walkable, complete activity centers. The Conservation & Development Map will guide near‐term revisions to the Town’s zoning ordinance to assure that the land use regulations are consistent with the vision set forth in this Plan. The assignment of areas provides a framework for a new approach to zoning that specifically addresses the concerns related to preserving community character and qualitative concerns either town-wide or within the more intense areas of the village, to more effectively help Snowmass Village increase both economic potential and quality of life goals. By organizing the Town according to conservation and development areas, intentional and informed decisions can be made about how to most efficiently spend municipal dollars on infrastructure improvements that will be consistent with the Comprehensive Plan. The Conservation & Development Map graphically illustrates how the Town’s land use policies apply to the physical landscape of the community and where and how conservation and development should and should not be accommodated over the next decades. The Map is not a zoning map. It is intended to show, in a general sense, the desired amount of conservation and the pattern and location of future development or redevelopment. The boundaries shown are imperfect and are intended only to reflect the general pattern of desired future development. A more detailed zoning map will need to be generated with significant public involvement as a part of a future land use & development code update to achieve a more fine-grained assignment of zoning classifications. CONSERVATION & DEVELOPMENT MAP PLAN FRAMEWORK99PRINCIPLESPLAN FRAMEWORKREFLECTIONSINTRODUCTION TAKE ACTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS The Conservation & Development Map is organized around conservation and development areas. These Sectors set out conservation priorities and inform the intensity and the character of new development. This varies from the approach used by a conventional Future Land Use Map that focuses primarily on separating land by use rather than grouping areas with similar existing or desired future character. Sectors are used to guide where and to what extent conservation and development are to be encouraged and directed. A number of factors drive the assignment of sectors, including location of valuable open space, presence of existing neighborhoods, and availability of existing and future infrastructure. Publicly-Owned / Protected Open Space Areas These areas include parcels under protection by law or regulation as well as land acquired for conservation through purchase or by easement. These include USFS lands (shown as hatched area on the map); town-owned parks/facilities and the recreation center; surface waterbodies; protected wetlands; riparian corridors; acquired open space and conservation easements. These areas are suitable only for supplemental development that enhances these amenities, and should otherwise be protected in perpetuity from incompatible uses. Privately-Owned Recreation / Open Space Areas These are privately-owned areas that are or should be preserved for recreational purposes that enhance the resort amenities that locals and visitors alike treasure and are attractions within Snowmass Village. They include some ski slopes, the golf course, and open space set-asides within residential and other developments. These areas are suitable only for supplemental development that enhances these amenities. Organization of the Map Low Density Residential Areas Low Density Residential Areas are comprised of several large privately-owned tracts of land with very low density residential development, and is intended to remain as such. Parcels in this area are currently zoned PUD, large lot single family residential or estate residential, and are anticipated to remain as conventional use-based districts with minor or no adjustments made to existing densities and development standards. Residential Areas Residential Areas include all of Snowmass Village’ existing (non-rural) low- to medium-density residential neighborhoods, most of which have been developed as conventional attached and detached houses and multi-family complexes. Lots and parcels in this area are currently zoned single family residential, multi-family residential and some PUDs. As most of these areas are already developed, there are limited opportunities for future single-family infill, though it may be possible to incorporate a small amount of additional multi-family residential units within some complexes. These areas are intended to remain in their current form as conventional use-based districts. Conservation & Development Areas SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 2018100 Village Core Areas The Village Core Areas includes West Village (including the Snowmass Mall), Base Village and the Snowmass Center. This area includes existing commercial, retail, hotel, and multi-family residential uses, and has the potential for new development and redevelopment. Some of these areas were developed in a conventional, auto-oriented development pattern, while others have a more pedestrian-oriented resort-type development pattern. New development, redevelopment, or the reuse of existing land and buildings should be encouraged in these areas to better meet the local goal of achieving more walkable and bikeable corridors and improved connectivity throughout the Village Cores. Additional growth and development within Snowmass Village is most desirable within this area due to the presence of existing infrastructure and proximity of transit services. The plan envisions that most residential and commercial development over the next decades will occur in this area. Community Facility / Institutional Areas There are several locations within the Town that are considered community facilities. These include properties not only owned by the Town, but also other special districts, utilities, religious entities and non-profit organizations. These areas are suitable for some new and supplemental development that enhances these properties, which may or may not be under Town control or regulation, but should allow for the needed flexibility to achieve their needed use. Map 5A: Conservation & Development Map (Inset) __ _ _ _ _ Snowmass Center CPA Two Creeks Future CPA Town Park/Entryway CPA Snowmass Club Future CPA West Village/The Mall CPA Chapel/Anderson Ranch Future CPA 0 3,000 6,000 9,0001,500 FeetBrush C reek RoadOwl Creek B ru sh C ree k Road Road Privately-Owned Recreation & Open Space Areas Publicly-Owned or Protected Open Space Areas Low Density Residential Areas Residential Areas Village Core Areas Community Facilities / Institutional Areas Current Comprehensively Planned AreaCurrent Comprehensively Planned Area Future Comprehensively Planned Area LEGEND PLAN FRAMEWORK101PRINCIPLESPLAN FRAMEWORKREFLECTIONSINTRODUCTION TAKE ACTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS ___ _ _ _ Snowmass Center CPA Two Creeks Future CPA Town Park/Entryway CPA Snowmass Club Future CPA West Village/The Mall CPA Chapel/Anderson Ranch Future CPA 0 3,000 6,000 9,0001,500 Feet Br ush C ree k Ro adOwl Creek Brush CreekRoad Road Map 5B: Conservation & Development Map Privately-Owned Recreation & Open Space Areas Publicly-Owned or Protected Open Space Areas Low Density Residential Areas Residential Areas Village Core Areas Community Facilities / Institutional Areas Current Comprehensively Planned AreaCurrent Comprehensively Planned Area Future Comprehensively Planned Area LEGEND SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 2018102 Specific Wildlife Conservation Areas occur in both Publicly-Owned /Protected Open Space Areas and Privately-Owned Recreation & Open Space Areas. These protected areas include riparian areas and wildlife transportation corridors. These areas must be protected from incompatible development in order to preserve wildlife habitat. Wildlife Conservation Areas Map 6: Wildlife Closures Map 0 1,600 3,200 4,800800FeetBrush C reek RoadBURNT MT. NORTH Closed April 25 to June 21 NORTH MESAClosed December 1 to May 16 BURNT MT. SOUTHClosed May 15 to June 21 TRAIL CLOSURES Closed April 25 to June 21 Closed December 1 to May 16 Closed May 15 to June 21 CreekRoadOwl Closed Dec. 1 to May 16 SKY MTN. PARK PLAN FRAMEWORK103PRINCIPLESPLAN FRAMEWORKREFLECTIONSINTRODUCTION TAKE ACTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS There are seven Comprehensively Planned Areas (CPAs) in the Town of Snowmass Village that were identified in the 2010 Comprehensive Plan and confirmed through the public input process of this update. Specific land uses and objectives were designated for each of those areas but specific master planning was not done for each area. The Comprehensively Planned Areas were created to make sure that any development proposed for these areas is consistent with the goals, objectives, uses, and circulation patterns in the Comprehensive Plan. A Comprehensively Planned Area does not imply rezoning nor does it preclude rezoning. The 2010 Comprehensive Plan CPAs include: COMPREHENSIVELY PLANNED AREAS In the lower valley: • Town Park / Entryway CPA (renamed in this plan as the Town Park CPA) In the Town Core: • Faraway Ranch South CPA (fully developed)• Faraway Ranch North CPA (includes the Snowmass Center) • West Village-Mixed use CPA (includes the Mall)• Base Village CPA (under construction)• Multifamily Residential CPA (non-specific locations) For the purpose of the 2017 update of the Comprehensive Plan, Town Park, Faraway Ranch North and West Village Mixed-Use CPAs were identified as needing more visioning and master planning and as such were the only CPAs addressed in this update. The other CPAs remain valid but were not envisioned or further discussed in this update. However, updates to existing multi-family developments and small infill changes within these other CPAs are possible over time. During the PlanapaloozaTM, the TPUDC team worked with the community to develop long-range conceptual plans that illustrate many of the big ideas that emerged during the process for these three Comprehensively Planned Areas (CPAs). The CPAs detailed in this section show only ONE example of potential development for the CPAs names above. These plans are intended to be purely illustrative in nature and are NOT intended to represent what might actually be built. It should be noted that there has been much discussion about these images that included both great excitement and serious concerns about the future vision depicted in them. Some felt that the plans were right on target while others felt that they showed too drastic a change, with buildings too large to maintain the character of the community. The eventual build-out of these areas will surely vary significantly from the plans and renderings based on landowner interests, more detailed study of view corridors and topography, location of available infrastructure, and many other factors. However, while these were intended to be quick studies, they did take into consideration the Town’s previously adopted employee housing and environmental stewardship goals, the realities of development economics, parking demand, and the projected future vision of the resort. These plans and illustrations are meant to spur the imagination and provide visualizations of high-level concepts that are otherwise difficult to consider. SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 2018104 In order to achieve the broad and ambitious goals of the community as stated in the previously adopted comprehensive plan and during the extensive public outreach for this plan, it will require specific and carefully crafted solutions and additions to the built environment. These additions will have an impact on the community that can be either net positive or net negative. With thorough attention to detail, strong adherence to guiding design principles created by the Town, and constraining development to targeted key areas, the benefits will be improved quality of life for residents and will enhance the experience of visitors. __ _ _ _ _ Town Park/Entryway CPA West Village/The Mall CPA Two Creeks Future CPA Snowmass Club Future CPA Snowmass Center CPA Chapel/Anderson Ranch Future CPA 0 3,000 6,000 9,0001,500 FeetBrush Creek RoadOwl CreekBrush C r e e k Road Road Map 7: Comprehensively Planned Areas Map PLAN FRAMEWORK105PRINCIPLESPLAN FRAMEWORKREFLECTIONSINTRODUCTION TAKE ACTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS © 2017 Town Planning & Urban Design Collaborative LLC Implementation Plan RODEO GROUND/ENTRYWAY CPA The rodeo area is the gateway to the Town of Snowmass Village and is located at the intersection of Brush Creek Road and Highline Road. The rustic, western appearance of the rodeo grounds and surrounding open land is a siginificant element of the community’s rural character. This area currently is primarily a recreational activity area and includes the Town Park, skateboard park, basketball facilities, rodeo grounds, golf course and softball field. The Town welcome infor-mation booths and the major vehicle intercept parking facility are located in the vicinity of the intersection. The plan below shows a redesigned multi-purpose rodeo ground coupled with additional green fields, a new expanded daycare facility, additional housing units at Rodeo Place, as well as an underground parking structure underneath the softball field south of Brush Creek Rd, on the golf course side. The recently adopted POSTR plan includes several recommendations that are intended to give more specific guidances for the development of this area. IMPORTANT NOTE: This is an illustration of one possible scenario representing the views of many of the participants and is not intended to be the only plan possible for this property. The property owner and/or the Town will produce actual development plans through detailed study that will be reviewed during the official Town development review process before any action would be taken on the site. This illustrative plan is intended to help the community visualize possibilities and create a platform for dialogue about the ideas contained in the images and the comprehensive plan at large not about the specifics of this plan. 7 3 1 4 11 TENNIS COURTS 2 REDESIGNED MULTI-PURPOSE RODEO GROUND W/ BLEACHERS 3 DAYCARE FACILITIES (FORMER LITTLE RED SCHOOL) W/ PLAYGROUND 4 NEW HOUSING UNITS (~15 UNITS) 5 NEW FIELD (SOCCER OR OTHER) 6 SKATEPARK 7 MULTI-USE FIELD (SOCCER OR OTHER) 8 UNDERGROUND PARKING GARAGE W/ GREEN ROOF/SOFTBALL FIELD 9 AT-GRADE ENTRANCES TO PARKING GARAGE 10 NEW WELCOME CENTER EXISTING BUILDINGS 1 EXPANDED POND PROPOSED BUILDINGS LEGEND 56 8 CIVIC PLAZA 10 11 2 12 BEACH 12 9 9 13 PASTURES 14 EXISTING RECREATION CENTER 13 14 15 BIKE TRACK FACILITY 15 Town Park/Entryway CPA area is owned by the Town and has great potential to both create a welcoming entrance to Snowmass Village and accommodate many established and needed community facilities. Any development must create a welcoming, naturalistic character as it is the primary entry into the Town and must establish a memorable and positive visual experience reflective of the character of Snowmass Village. A comprehensive master plan should be developed to guide development of this area and should focus on creating a positive first impression of Snowmass Village: pastural, open, rural, authentic. It should enhance natural areas such as wetlands / fishing pond, pastures, mountainsides, while also providing more parking to accommodate the needs of locals and visitors. However, that added parking should be hidden from views either underground or behind buildings which will help preserve the natural landscape of the area. The area presents opportunities for an added small amount of low density affordable housing close to existing housing at Rodeo Place. The presence of the Welcome Center and Rodeo Grounds are essential, while creating an events center for the community would be an added amenity. Cellular service is limited in the area and should be improved if possible. The plan below shows one option of how this area could be re-organized to accommodate new facilities. A redesigned multi-purpose rodeo ground coupled with additional green fields, a new expanded daycare facility, additional housing units at Rodeo Place, as well as an underground parking structure, on the golf course side, which may be better suited to the parking area adjacent to Town Park. Because of the size limitations on the size of Town Park, any and all uses must be multi-purpose. The recently adopted POSTR plan includes several recommendations that are intended to give more specific guidance for the development of this area. TOWN PARK / ENTRYWAY CPA – Recreational/Welcoming Focus SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 2018106 Town Park CPA Area Conceptual Plan EXPANDED POND Currently a few locals use the existing pond for fishing. Expanding it and adding a beach area [12] would allow for more regular use of the facility possibly for kayaking, swimming and simply enjoying the water (this is the only publicly accessible water body in Snowmass Village). 1 REDESIGNED MULTI-PURPOSE RODEO GROUND W/ BLEACHERS The relocated Rodeo Ground facilities with accompanying paddocks [13] and bleachers would act as a multi-function facility and could be used for ice skating in the winter as well as events in the warmer months. 2 DAYCARE FACILITIES (FORMER LITTLE RED SCHOOL) W/ PLAYGROUND Considering the need for expanded daycare facilities in Snowmass Village, the plan shows the current daycare facility (currently in the Little Red School House) relocated here with its associated playground equipment. Locating daycare facilities in close proximity to the Recreation Center and Town Park would allow for cross usage of the facilities as they are complementary in nature. 3 EXPAND EMPLOYEE HOUSING OPTIONS New single family or attached homes could be built along Stallion Circle at the entrance of Rodeo Place. Having additional residential units along the street could help alleviate the speeding problem on the street by giving it a sense of enclosure. Planting trees along the street could also further encourage drivers to slow down as they enter this quiet residential neighborhood. About 10 to 20 housing units could be provided in this neighborhood. 4 NEW AND EXPANDED OUTDOOR RECREATIONAL FACILITIES Reorganization and the addition of the outdoor recreational facilities around the existing Recreation Center could allow for better usage and more activities in this area. A relocated skatepark [6], new sport fields [5-7-8], tennis courts [11] and bike pump track facility [15] would add to the vitality of the area and maximize the use of the land. 5 6 7 8 11 15 NEW PARKING FACILITY Parking at Town Park is widely used in the winter by skiers coming into Town for the day and using the shuttle to get to the ski mountain. In the summer, several festivals and events are held in Town Park and the need for additional parking is also high. Providing additional parking under the baseball diamond in a structure or adjacent to Town Park Station could increase capacity both in winter and summer. 8 BRING BUILDINGS CLOSER TO THE STREET The entrance to Snowmass Village is currently defined by parking lots and asphalt. By bringing buildings closer to Brush Creek Road, including the bleachers/buildings for the new Rodeo Ground and relocating parking areas to the rear of buildings would provide a much more welcoming entrance to Town. A new welcome/information center incorporated within a public plaza would give a sense of arrival and provide locals and visitors alike an inviting setting as they come into Town. 10 PLAN FRAMEWORK107PRINCIPLESPLAN FRAMEWORKREFLECTIONSINTRODUCTION TAKE ACTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS Perspective View of the plan presented above SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 2018108 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BANK PLAN FRAMEWORK109PRINCIPLESPLAN FRAMEWORKREFLECTIONSINTRODUCTION TAKE ACTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS The Snowmass Center currently includes offices, grocery store, post office, gas station, restaurants, and other community-oriented commercial uses. The Comprehensive Plan recommends that any redevelopment of the area include mixed-use locally-serving commercial and residential uses, with strong transit connections to the other two commercial nodes. Due to its easy access, parking and community-oriented retail and services offerings this area is unique in its being the place most residents visit on a nearly daily basis and should be further developed as the heart of the resident community. Re-development of this area should focus on making the Snowmass Center the “main street/town square” for the residents of Snowmass Village. Additional residential density may be appropriate for the area and could help support the businesses and improve walkability for residents. Any new residential development should be a cross-section of employee and free-market housing providing options for all. To ensure its vitality, this area should be connected to the Base Village area by a pedestrian bridge and/or aerial conveyance to facilitate interconnection between these two nodes and the West Village Mall area. The plans below present one option of how development could occur at Snowmass Center and how this re-development could be phased over time based on the needs of the community and the desirability of the intensity of development. Snowmass Center - Locally Serving PHASE 1 – Re-Development of Snowmass Center and Additional Housing Re-Development of the Commercial Core and addition of residential units in the draw above the existing Snowmass Center and above Town Hall. SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 2018110 Snowmass Center CPA Area Conceptual Plan PHASE 2 – Additional housing further up the hill. 4 8 8 8 8 9 10 © 2017 Town Planning & Urban Design Collaborative LLC Implementation PlanSNOWMASS CENTER CPAThe Snowmass Center currently includes offices, grocery store, post office, gas station, restaurants, and other community-oriented commercial uses. The 2010 Comprehensive Plan recommends that any redevelopment of the area include mixed-use community-serving commercial uses, parking and strong transit connections to the other two resort nodes. We have also heard that from many during the planning process that this area presents great opportunities for additional residential development. With the Center’s proximity to services, new residents would be able to easily walk to services as well as employment locations throughout the Village. IMPORTANT NOTE: This is an illustration of one possible scenario representing the views of many of the participants and is not intended to be the only plan possible for this property. The property owner and/or the Town will produce actual development plans through detailed study that will be reviewed during the official Town development review process before any action would be taken on the site. This illustrative plan is intended to help the community visualize possibilities and create a platform for dialogue about the ideas contained in the images and the comprehensive plan at large not about the specifics of this plan. 3 7 4 GATHERING SPACE W/ POTENTIAL GONDOLA LOADING 5 RELOCATED GAS STATION (PUMPS IN THE BACK) 6 BRIDGE OR GONDOLA CONNECTOR 7 PROPOSED HOUSING OR MIXED-USE BUILDING 8 PROPOSED MIXED-USE BUILDINGS EXISTING BUILDINGS 1 PROPOSED HOUSING W/ PARKING GARAGE PROPOSED BUILDINGS CIVIC PLAZA LEGEND 5 1 12 2 PROPOSED HOUSING W/ PARKING GARAGE 3 PROPOSED HOUSING W/ PARKING GARAGE 6 6 6 9 TOWN HALL 10 EXISTING SNOWMASS CENTER BUILDING ADDITIONAL HOUSING The Town of Snowmass Village owns a large parcel of land to the north of Town Hall, which is an attractive location for housing development, given its walking distance to the Snowmass Center, Base Village and the Mall. Multi-Family housing units, both employee and free-market could be located here. Other areas in the lower elevations north of the Snowmass Center present great opportunities for additional housing in close proximity to services. Because of the topography, this is also an ideal location for taller buildings that will not block any views while creating much needed housing for employees, retirees and others. 1 2 3 PLAN FRAMEWORK111PRINCIPLESPLAN FRAMEWORKREFLECTIONSINTRODUCTION TAKE ACTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS MIXED-USE DEVELOPMENT This Phase 1 plan illustrates how the Snowmass Center could become an activity center for the Village with the creation of a main street/town square and more walkable environment for locals and visitors to use. The orientation of new mixed-use buildings [8] defines the street and brings buildings up to the sidewalk to create an activated pedestrian environment. To make this area more vibrant, the plan shows new residential development within walking distance of existing and potential new businesses and/or office spaces. Having attached housing units and multi-family units within close proximity provides businesses with the benefit of additional customers/employees who can access shops on foot or by bike. A complete center of activity is created, with an interconnected system of narrow streets, sidewalks, street trees, convenient parking, and slow traffic speeds. The result should be a authentic place that is walkable, safe, and interesting. 8 107 PEDESTRIAN CONNECTION TO BASE VILLAGE A bridge or gondola connection to Base Village would increase the walkability and connectivity of the three central nodes within Snowmass Village allowing locals and visitors alike to access services and/or their place of residence on foot, encouraging them to leave their car at home. 6 GAS BACKWARDS The plan proposes moving the existing gas station and redeveloping the roundabout area with mixed-use buildings anchoring the intersection. This kind of change could transform the Snowmass Center into a destination and place where people want to spend time and walk by. The gas station, if moved a few parcels down off of Lower Kearns Rd., would also be redeveloped with gas pumps in the back of the building for a more consistent streetscape of buildings facing along Brush Creek Road. 5 CREATE A TOWN SQUARE Incorporating civic spaces within the Snowmass Center area would create an opportunity for locals to gather. This plan shows a small civic space at the far east end of the center, next to the post office, which if built, could provide a much-needed gathering space. Public spaces should provide locations for outdoor dining and community interaction, promoting investment in new mixed-use buildings. It would create a destination and place for daily civic life for both the community and visitors. 4 Perspective View of the plan SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 2018112 As the main community gathering space for local residents and visitors alike Snowmass Center presentsa great opportunity to create a vibrant Main Street for the Village. This rendering demonstrates thepossibility of the Snowmass Center to become just that, creating a mixed-use area where day-to-dayservices are available, along with office space and some additional housing. Parking is provided alongthe street and underneath the new mixed-use buildings in parking structures creating a more walkableand attractive streetscape, while still being easily accessible by car. VIEW WEST ALONG PROPOSED MAIN STREET PLAN FRAMEWORK113PRINCIPLESPLAN FRAMEWORKREFLECTIONSINTRODUCTION TAKE ACTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS Main Street Concept Sketch with Snowmass Mountain in background and existing Snowmass Center to the right. West Village includes the Mall as well as the surrounding residential and other properties located between Fanny Hill and the numbered parking lots. It currently includes a high concentration of short-term accommodations, retail businesses and restaurants. This is one of the most densely developed areas in Snowmass Village. Increased mixed-use activities should be encouraged to bolster vitality of the area and bring special events/programming. As it is the hub of the public transit system, increased development can be sustainably supported. Re-development of the Mall should include improved facilities for RFTA and Snowmass Shuttles. The Town would like to see the Mall re-developed with a specific focus on tourist specific services and lodging. Free market residential should be emphasized with employee housing as secondary. Re-development must include plaza level retail and may include upper level residential units as a way to generate human activity throughout the year. The scale of any re-development should complement the existing scale, but could be increased in some areas to offset development costs. As such, public-private partnerships may be needed to ensure a quality level of redevelopment and to help offset some of the costs. The Town should consider incentives to support the appropriate re-development of the Mall as it is an important element of the Town’s character. Preserving the intimate character and feel of the mall as a focal point and reflection of Snowmass ski history will be essential as re-development of West Village is being considered, so will be maintaining and enhancing the pedestrian nature of the mall itself. Connections to Base Village and Snowmass Center should be emphasized and improved. Incentives should be provided for current property owners to modernize existing lodging and multi-family residences. West Village CPA – Just Big Enough PHASE 1 – Re-Development of the Existing Mall Phase 1 could consist of the re-development of the existing Mall with possible addition to upper floors for other types of uses. Town parking lots could be used for the mall expansion with a new transit center and a re-aligned Carriage Way Road. 4 5 5 West Village CPA Area Conceptual Plan SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 2018114 1 1 2 3 3 3 3 Topography is a challenge in Snowmass Village, especially when it comes to pedestrian movement from Base Village to West Village and the mall areas. The existing Skittles SkyCab doesn’t have the capacity to move enough people in an efficient manner at peak times. A new people mover from Base Village to West Village is necessary to increase the ease of movement and connectivity. The Benedict Trail (though not owned or controlled by the Town), currently underused, inconsistently maintained and not well identified, could provide an alternative to the people mover for those wanting to walk and discover this meandering trail both winter and summer. Improving its access, visibility and safety is desirable. What was once known as upper Benedict Trail has been all but erased in upper West Village. Condominium Associations have taken over the historic drainageway with improvements that compromise the quality of what was originally used as a pedestrian trail connection to the Mall. The Town should further master plan this trail connection for pedestrian use to offer an alternative to transit and/or a future people mover system. NEW PEOPLE MOVER & BENEDICT TRAIL This plan illustrates how the Mall could be redeveloped/renovated and slightly expanded, giving it a much-needed facelift to improve the experience and create new opportunities for added business and housing options. The orientation of new mixed-use buildings [3] would be very similar to how the mall is laid out today with the exception of the northwest end of the mall that would be expanded with new buildings. Increasing building heights to 3 to 4 stories would provide more opportunities for housing (~250 units) and/or office spaces above retail. MIXED-USE REDEVELOPMENT OF THE MALL To enable the extension of the Mall on the northwest end, Carriage Way could be realigned, improving the sense of arrival to West Village from Brush Creek Road and improving circulation patterns. REALIGNMENT OF CARRIAGE WAY The creation of well-defined civic spaces at each end of the Mall coupled with additional retail/business offerings and additional housing would increase activity in the Mall and invite the skiers and visitors to extend their daily stay in Snowmass Village. Not only would this increase the capture of dollars in Snowmass Village, but could also help reduce the peak of traffic at the end of ski days or other events throughout the year. FRAMING NEW CIVIC SPACES With a large percentage of boarding on both the RFTA and Snowmass shuttle system occurring in West Village, especially in the winter months, a consolidated transit center in proximity to the new proposed mall plaza could provide a convenient location away from any potential bad weather. A new modern and well-lit passenger facility with art installations could provide an improved customer experience and become a highlight of the transit user journey to and from Snowmass Village. NEW TRANSIT CENTER AT WEST VILLAGE4 5 PLAN FRAMEWORK115PRINCIPLESPLAN FRAMEWORKREFLECTIONSINTRODUCTION TAKE ACTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS 1 2 3 PHASE 2 – Re-Development of the Lower Numbered Parking Lots As much as possible, the numbered parking lots should remain except where needed for higher/best use. The site plan for Phase 2 shows what redevelopment of the lower numbered lots could look like to ac-commodate additional housing units or lodging while preserving the number of parking spaces already in place and providing an additional amount of parking spaces for new development. Considering the Town’s desire to house 60% of employees working in the Village, new housing development will be needed in the future to accommodate the demand. The numbered lots in West Village present an opportunity for redevelopment for that additional housing to be provided, as well as additional lodging facilities for visitors. With the high utilization rate of the lots currently, it would be essential to maintain and likely increase the parking provided via the construction of structures that could accommodate all the current and future parking needs. The parking structures should be hidden from view behind liner buildings. The plan for Phase 2 shows a more intense buildout scenario, but it is important to remember that several variations of this scenario are possible based on the desires of the community and the economics of redevelopment. With an update of the parking standards to better reflect the realities of current infrastructure and parking needs by residents and visitors, there could be a surplus of several hundred spaces. Various scenarios are likely to be feasible here and redevelopment, if it occurs at all, could happen only on a phased portion of the numbered lots based on the economics of development and the needs of the community at the time. REDEVELOPMENT OF THE NUMBERED LOTS6 6 SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 2018116 As the main entrance to the redeveloped West Village/Mall, the public plaza depicted below will serveas another node of activity for the community and will be inviting for visitors, providing a sense of placeand arrival for West Village. This rendering shows 3 to 4 story buildings allowing for a mix of uses fromretail, office to residential on the upper floors adding a much needed vitality to the Mall area by the inclusion of more full-time residents. The redeveloped Mall into a vibrant walkable street or linear plaza willhelp connect visitors to the slopes in winter and events on Fanny Hill in summer. VIEW SOUTHWEST INTO PROPOSED NEW PLAZA West Village Mall Concept Sketch PLAN FRAMEWORK117PRINCIPLESPLAN FRAMEWORKREFLECTIONSINTRODUCTION TAKE ACTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS TAKE ACTION Implementing the Town’s Comprehensive Plan depends on the ability of property owners, developers, Town staff, elected officials, and the general public to work together for a common purpose. This Comprehensive Plan should be the compass by which all decisions are measured, moving Snowmass Village toward long-term quality of life for residents and success as a resort community.TAKE ACTION119TAKE ACTIONPLAN FRAMEWORKPRINCIPLESREFLECTIONSINTRODUCTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS The condition of the natural environment has a significant impact on quality of life and personal health, but for residents of Snowmass Village and visitors alike, the protection of these resources is much more than that. Town residents have a deep understanding of the critical value of the natural environment as the Town’s primary asset. They treasure and value the conservation and preservation of unique lands, wildlife habitat, streams, sensitive mountainsides and all other environmental resources that make the Town so special. For a long time now, the Town has promoted long-term stewardship of the natural beauty of the area. Snowmass Village should continue to capitalize on its abundance of natural resources within close proximity to its evolving mixed-use nodes. Additional protection of open spaces, updated land use policies, and aggressive strategies to direct any future development to the already developed nodes are needed to maintain the Town’s quality of life. FEATURE & PROTECT ALL THINGS GREEN & HEALTHY Make Snowmass Village More Walkable, Bikeable & Hikeable Improving connectivity between Snowmass Center, Base Village and the Mall, especially by providing assistance to deal with the change in topography would have a tremendous impact on the level of walkability for residents and visitors alike. Making Snowmass Village more walkable and allowing people to get out of cars also has a direct positive impact on the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions coming from transportation. • Further study the feasibility of a better connection (pedestrian bridge, aerial connection, etc.) between Base Village and Snowmass Center. • Study the feasibility of an improved uphill people mover along Fanny Hill between Base Village, the Mall, and the upper West Village, a more efficient alternative to the Skittles currently in place. • Plow trails in the winter within the Village core area to key neighborhoods so that pedestrians may use them year round. • Improve accessibility and visibility of trailheads to ensure easy access by all. • Provide trails/walkways adjacent to primary roadways such as Brush Creek Road, Owl Creek Road and Highline Road • Bring in Connectivity Plan key points under this section as bullets. • Continue to improve wayfinding for all modes of transportation. Next Steps: SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 2018120 Promote the Town Resiliency & Sustainability Plan The Snowmass Village Resiliency & Sustainability Plan, first adopted in 2009 and most recently updated in 2015 (included as part of this Comprehensive Plan by reference), includes a long list of implementation strategies that will help the Town meet its goals. Several of these established policies have already been implemented or are currently under way. More specifically, the plan highlights strategies around the following topics: 1. Energy Conservation and Climate Protection 2. Affordable Housing and Community-Serving Commercial 3. Land Use and Open Space 4. Water Conservation and Management 5. Resource Conservation, Recycling and Solid Waste 6. Green Building 7. Mobility and Transportation 8. Watershed Water Quality 9. Air Quality 10. Wildlife Habitat and Physical Environment TAKE ACTION121TAKE ACTIONPLAN FRAMEWORKPRINCIPLESREFLECTIONSINTRODUCTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS Protect Public Views Continuing to enhance the visual quality of the Town’s open spaces, the national forest and agricultural lands play a distinct role in both the economic vitality of the Town as well as its environmental sustainability. • Once identified, incorporate viewshed protection regulations in the Land Use & Development Code. Next Steps: • Continue to implement, revisit and regularly update the Resiliency & Sustainability Plan. Next Steps: Protect Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Protection of wildlife habitat and promotion of biodiversity is important. Because wildlife habitat is sensitive to human activity, the Town already manages development, as regulated in the Land Use & Development Code, such that it does not diminish wildlife habitat and ensures the continuing existence of species in the area. • Continue to enforce the sensitive wildlife habitat areas regulations of the Land Use & Development Code for any new development in Town and for public lands management. • Consider the creation of a Town Forester position who would manage the removal and replacement of trees, develop appropriate re-vegetation standards for development areas, and implement appropriate water-wise landscaping standards. Next Steps: Support the Comprehensive Water Conservation Program Water conservation, also known as demand management, promotes permanent water use efficiencies and is a prudent component of water resource management. Reducing the demand in turn increases the available supply of water from existing sources to support new economic growth or low supply in time of drought. It is also more immediate, significantly less costly and more energy efficient than developing new sources of water. Successfully fostering a strong ethic of water conservation will protect Snowmass Village’s sensitive water resources and help ensure a more sustainable supply of water for both natural systems and people. An added benefit of water conservation is its supporting role in environmental protection and savings on infrastructure improvements. Demand reduction decreases the competition for water between the needs of the developed areas and those of the environment. Water saved can be used to meet new needs, in effect expanding current water supplies, while protecting the environment by reducing both runoff and the need for wastewater disposal. • Explore the development of a comprehensive water conservation program in Snowmass Village that does not compromise secured water rights. • Explore and encourage the collection of roof runoff in cisterns for use as irrigation water as recently approved by the state legislature. Next Steps: SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 2018122 Be Innovative with Waste Management Zero Waste is a philosophy that encourages the redesign of resource life cycles so that all products are reused. No trash is sent to landfills or incinerators. The process recommended is one similar to the way that resources are reused in nature. Zero Waste is a goal that is ethical, economical, efficient and visionary, to guide people in changing their lifestyles and practices to emulate sustainable natural cycles, where all discarded materials are designed to become resources for others to use. While this approach to waste management may be far reaching, exploring this possibility could help the Town further its already comprehensive waste management policies presented in the 2015 Resiliency & Sustainability Plan. • Explore what a Zero Waste approach would entail and determine if any element could be achieved and brought forward to help reduce waste generation in the Town. • Encourage residents to consider a zero-waste approach to living by providing them information as well as opportunities to implement that approach. • Explore compostable units for neighborhoods or HOAs that are designed not to attract wildlife. Next Steps: Protect Open Spaces that are Important to the Community Several open spaces in Town, such as the golf course, and the parcel where horses graze have great value in the beautiful scenery that has been appreciated by residents and visitors alike for decades. However, many of these loved open spaces are privately owned and therefore not thoroughly protected from being developed in the future. If the Town wants to protect and maintain those areas as open space in perpetuity, protections will need to be added to the land. • Identify those open spaces that are not thoroughly protected today and explore the feasibility of purchasing them or protecting them long-term, via easements or other means. Next Steps:TAKE ACTION123TAKE ACTIONPLAN FRAMEWORKPRINCIPLESREFLECTIONSINTRODUCTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS PROMOTE MIXED-USE ACTIVITY CENTERS & DIVERSIFY THE ECONOMY SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 2018124The Snowmass Villas (Blue Roofs) along the 14th fairway of the Snowmass ClubA key component in building a community’s economic development infrastructure is the provision of a wide range of housing choices to address the needs and desires of a variety of socioeconomic groups. These housing types can range from workforce housing for an expanding service employment base to executive housing for professional and management employees. In association with job growth and housing diversity, creating interesting and appealing workplace environments will promote a strong connection between residents and employees and help to attract highly-skilled, high-income workers. Finally, by offering a broad array of retail and service activities within the community, the need for residents, employees and visitors to leave the Town to purchase goods and services elsewhere will be reduced, and the Town’s revenue base will be enhanced. The following recommendations are designed to enhance the Town and to help guide the development / redevelopment of land uses in a market-supportive and fiscally responsible manner. 1. Ensure that a broad range of housing alternatives are available for employees, employers and residents transitioning to various lifestyle stages, emphasizing product types and price points. Not surprisingly, higher-density housing products at the low to mid-range price points are most needed in Snowmass Village. All housing development should take into consideration the active lifestyles of residents and provide adequate storage and outdoor space accordingly. 2. Promote higher-density, mixed-use development in order to create vibrant live-work-play activity centers in targeted development areas. In a small, relatively constrained community like Snowmass Village, this type of development will more efficiently use municipal services and infrastructure. 3. Create a quality working environment through the beautification of major transportation corridors and the provision of trails, open lands, and alternative transportation choices to all commercial areas. 4. Encourage a full-service array of retail and service opportunities, including general merchandise, apparel, sporting goods, etc., thus limiting the necessity by residents and employees to leave the community to purchase goods and services. 5. Foster the creation and growth of small businesses, including the development of “incubator” and “creative” space for business start-ups. 6. Study the potential impacts of increasing the local minimum wage over time. 7. Evaluate the use of creative financing mechanisms as a vehicle to assist and position properties for development/redevelopment by private entities, as well as to finance capital improvements. 8. Benchmark the Town’s economic development success on a periodic basis (e.g., bi-annually) using a range of market and economic variables that could be compared to other communities of similar size (either locally or regionally). Variables to be measured could include: job growth by industry type; wage levels and growth; new nonresidential construction; new affordable housing construction; growth in nonresidential assessed value, etc. 9. Find ways to attract “creatives” to the community who can help better diversify the economy.TAKE ACTION125TAKE ACTIONPLAN FRAMEWORKPRINCIPLESREFLECTIONSINTRODUCTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS Diversify of the Economy Snowmass Village faces a complex and challenging housing conundrum when it comes to providing housing that is affordable, but mostly for employees, from entry-level service to management levels. EXPAND HOUSING CHOICE & AFFORDABILITY Focus New Housing within the Nodes Based on the limited amount of land available for development within Snowmass Village, new housing should be concentrated in and around the existing nodes of activity, i.e.: the Mall, Base Village and Snowmass Center. A total of 431 additional residential units are already slated for development as part of Base Village, of which 20 will be employee units and the rest will be market-rate. Future redevelopment and new development in and around the Mall and Snowmass Center areas present opportunities to increase the amount of available housing, with limited impact on the natural environment. Close proximity to local and regional transit and alternative services at both locations would also allow residents to reduce their transportation costs, traveling on foot to reach their employment locations and for day-to-day shopping. • Draft a new housing policy statement and seek approval of Town Council. • Create incentives for redevelopment beyond the 115% credit currently allowed by the Land Use Development Code (LUDC). Encourage mixed use in appropriate locations along Carriage Way. Next Steps: SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 2018126Snowmass Mall in West Village Provide More Employee Housing The most recent update to the RRC 2007 housing demand analysis, performed in May 2017 by Town Staff, estimates that Snowmass Village needs another 383 units of employee housing in order to meet its goal of providing housing for 60% of the Town’s workforce. The Town should continue to provide and ensure that others also build many different types, sizes, and price points intermingled in close proximity, with a range of living experiences from rural to more dense, so that there is something for everyone. The variety of dwelling types should include: different sizes of detached single family houses, townhouses, and multifamily condo buildings. Residential units should be available for lease and for ownership. This allows young and old, singles and families, and residents having a range of income levels to find a home that suits their preferences and lifestyles. An additional benefit of this mix of housing types is that workers can live within walking distance of their jobs, rather than requiring that they commute to work, worsening traffic on local roads. • Continue to implement the Town’s Employee Housing Program. • Rather than specify a number or range of numbers of units needed, consider the development of guidelines that would be implemented for all affordable housing so that they will fit well within existing neighborhoods and commercial areas. • Explore the possibility of developing public-private partnerships to provide employee housing as part of redevelopment projects in or close to the identified development areas. Next Steps: Incentivize Accessory Dwelling Units Modifying the current Accessory Dwelling Unit (ADU) program to allow maximum flexibility while creating units that are more likely to be rented could increase the private sector contributions toward meeting our employee housing demand as well as providing some much needed senior housing. As a separate, stand-alone unit or a unit above a garage, not only does it reduce the mass and scale of a residence (by breaking up the floor area), but it may also be more easily rented out. • Modify the Land Use & Development Code to combine the Accessory Employee Unit (AEU) and Accessory Caretaker Unit (ACU) programs into one Accessory Dwelling Unit (ADU) program that would give owners more flexibility. Next Steps:TAKE ACTION127TAKE ACTIONPLAN FRAMEWORKPRINCIPLESREFLECTIONSINTRODUCTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS Promote Micro-housing The Town should consider updating future codes and ordinances to allow for ‘micro-housing,’ or apartments totaling less than 350 square feet, consistent with the ADU program changes. These studio apartments could be ideal for full-time and seasonal employees, young people, and the elderly. This housing type has been successful in both large and small cities, and would provide a more reasonably priced option that could help local workers or those who just want the scaled-down lifestyle small square foot living provides. • Revise the minimum unit size limits to allow for small units in the core areas of Snowmass Village, and consider parking standard reductions for units under 300 SF. Next Steps: Bring an Aging Care Facility and/or Senior Housing to Snowmass Village The Town should explore the option of a public/private partnership to build a graduated care facility within Snowmass Village, providing a high quality and centrally located facility that would be a first of its kind in the Town. The facility could provide a range of housing alternatives, both market rate and subsidized, including detached and attached single-family independent-living cottages and condos, assisted living units, as well as memory care and skilled nursing facilities and related services. Each housing alternative provides a different level of care ranging from independent living to full time nursing and supervision. The new facility could be situated in one of the nodes in close proximity to services, restaurants and retail. Such a location would allow seniors to remain an integral part of the community even when they can no longer drive, cook meals or care for themselves. • Actively seek the development of a graduated care facility within the core area of Snowmass Village. Develop regulations and programs to encourage this type of development. • Encourage the development of housing specifically earmarked for seniors in development areas where services are accessible on foot. Next Steps: SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 2018128 PRESERVING & CELEBRATING SNOWMASS’ UNIQUE CHARACTER, ARTS & CULTURE Develop Snowmass Arts & Culture During the PlanapaloozaTM, protecting and enhancing Snowmass Village’s cultural resources and celebrating the community through art was part of the conversation. The arts are integrally tied to the renewal of the Town, attracting a similarly engaged and active citizen who wants to participate in its cultural and political life. The arts community in Snowmass Village not only celebrates the history of the Town, but the present and future, telling the story of this unique place as it evolves. Efforts should be focused on a broad based, aggressive marketing plan to help those in Snowmass Village and surrounding communities learn about the activities that are taking place and entice people to participate. • Partner with local organizations such as Anderson Ranch and others to promote Snowmass’s Arts & Culture, with the support of the Snowmass Arts Advisory Board. • Seek grants to develop an inventory of Snowmass Village’s most important historic buildings and develop a plan for their preservation, recognizing that even buildings less than 50 years old contribute to the genuine character of Snowmass Village and are worth preserving. Next Steps:“Transparency” by Michael Claper 2010 at Snowmass Town HallTAKE ACTION129TAKE ACTIONPLAN FRAMEWORKPRINCIPLESREFLECTIONSINTRODUCTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS Embrace the Creative Economy The “creative economy” is driven by people who make their living by thinking and creating. It includes writers, artists, actors, architects, lawyers, engineers, software designers, medical practitioners, educators, fabricators, restaurateurs, entrepreneurs, and many other professionals. In this evolving creative economy, people are able to choose where they want to live based on what attracts and inspires them, rather than moving to a place simply for a job. The Town can support diverse companies and entrepreneurs; quality restaurants, accessible open space, and abundant recreational opportunities; high quality housing options for non-traditional families; public transit and a healthy walk and bike culture; arts and cultural offerings; and a unique sense of place shaped by tasteful new development. • Support and encourage a Creative Economy that unites elected officials and departments around an economic mission statement to encourage “creatives” to locate in Snowmass Village. Next Steps: Integrate Civic Art Civic art and urban furniture (street lamps, trash cans, recycling containers, benches, hydrants, transformers, wayfinding signage, etc.) can be used to highlight Snowmass Village’s unique character and omnipresence of the stunning natural environment by commissioning local artists and/or businesses to create the pieces. • Work with SAAB to develop a “½% for art” program for both public and private sector developments. • Continue working with the SAAB and local artist community to commission public art pieces and identify specific locations where they could be installed. • Examine each development proposal for inclusion of proposed public art during development review of all new projects, and propose commitments to support these elements. Next Steps: SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 2018130 Improve Experience in the Base Village Transit Center Improving the physical environment in the current cavernous transit center drop off at Base Village would greatly improve customer’s experience. Giant screens with cameras on the slopes so users can watch people skiing as they enter, art installations, a lighter paint color, fun and interactive light panels and music as found in certain airports around the country could help liven up the space. A comprehensive solution to innovative transit facility improvements in the community, not just Base Village, is important so that more person trips can be generated and less single-occupancy vehicle trips. • Work with the Base Village developer to consider improvements in the Transit Center that will create more vitality and interest • Work with the local artist community to commission public art pieces and develop a concept for improving the experience in the transit center. Next Steps: Flex-Space/Live-Work Units In order to help foster the arts community and “creatives” in Snowmass Village, efforts should be made to provide affordable commercial, office, “maker”, and retail incubator space. Opportunities should be created to enable emerging artists and entrepreneurs to both live and create within the same location. Live-work buildings have the benefit of providing a single-mortgage property that can accommodate living and working, significantly reducing the overall cost of housing, transportation and business incubation. These kinds of spaces foster and support creative and innovative businesses and will help to shape the evolving economic base and identity of the Town. • Amend the Land Use Development Code to allow live-work units as a permitted use in appropriate locations. • Include performance standards in any code amendments to minimize impacts of odors, noise, etc. Next Steps:TAKE ACTION131TAKE ACTIONPLAN FRAMEWORKPRINCIPLESREFLECTIONSINTRODUCTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS Update Older Buildings in the Commercial Core If there is a strong concern about building height and massing in the West Village (the Mall) and Faraway Ranch North (Snowmass Center) CPA’s, the Town should consider partnering with developers to redevelop these areas and provide financial assistance to make the financials work for redevelopment. Limiting the amount of development in these areas too much will continue to cause them to stagnate and discourage their redevelopment. In addition, the Town should consider creating development incentives in the LUDC for the redevelopment of the older condominium buildings in the West Village CPA. • Encourage the updating of Snowmass Village’s commercial and residential/lodging properties in the Commercial Core areas to remain competitive in the resort market. • Develop zoning regulations that emphasize building form, facilitate infill, small local-serving commercial, and activate the streetscape for pedestrians. Include incentives that will encourage HOA’s to upgrade their older condominium buildings. • Develop public-private partnerships for the redevelopment of the West Village (the Mall) and Faraway Ranch North (Snowmass Center) CPA’s. • The Town should consider developing a low- or no-interest loan program for residential/lodging properties in the Commercial Core areas to upgrade exteriors. Next Steps:Snowmass Mall in West VillageSNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 2018132 Due to the nature of Snowmass Village as a remote mountain town with significant spikes in activity, transportation demand management is a fundamental strategy. Transit lines, parking lots, and streets each are subject to capacity constraints when visitation peaks, such as on powder days or around holidays. Coupled with topographic constraints, it is unlikely that the Town will ever be able to provide enough system capacity to accommodate these peak times without some level of delay or inconvenience. As a result, strategies that minimize the impacts of such peaks on quality of life and enjoyment for residents, visitors, and employees are preferred. PROMOTE TRANSPORTATION CHOICE & MOBILITY Community dialogue and input has identified a number of opportunities for improvement throughout the Town. These recommendations should be implemented as funding allows. Two of these recommendations are already under development, and the remainders are organized into high, medium, and low priorities, as shown in Table 11. Walking Paths, Sidewalks and Trails 12 - Town of Snowmass Village and RRC Associates. 2015 Community Survey Results. TAKE ACTION133TAKE ACTIONPLAN FRAMEWORKPRINCIPLESREFLECTIONSINTRODUCTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS Prioritize Walking and Safety Improvements Snowmass Village residents and stakeholders expressed a strong interest in making Snowmass Village a more walkable community. While it is recognized that Snowmass Village has significant topographical challenges and weather makes walking difficult in the winter, walking for routine transportation purposes supports the Town’s overall environmental and sustainability goals. Additionally, walkability, connectivity, and pedestrian safety were rated as a high priority in the 2015 Community Survey.12 Current conditions for walking in Snowmass Village need to be improved to provide a safer and more comfortable walking environment. Many Snowmass Village streets do not have walking paths or sidewalks and the visibility of pedestrians at night poses a safety risk. Lack of walkways along Brush Creek Road, particularly from Upper Kearns Rd. to Mountain View, is the most significant concern as traffic volumes and speeds are too high for pedestrians and vehicles to share the road. Crossing Brush Creek Road is also a safety hazard. • Develop a Master Plan for a walking path or sidewalk along Upper Brush Creek Road as the highest priority to implement improvements. • Revisit the CCP for adoption by Town Council to serve as the basis for walking paths, sidewalks, crosswalks and other bike and pedestrian improvements. Next Steps: Facility Type Project Description Status/Priority Level Unpaved Trail Fanny Hill from the top of the concert venue to the Top of the Village and further up the mountain.Under Development Sidewalk Brush Creek Road from Faraway Road to Upper Kearns Road, to connect residential areas off of Far-away Road to Snowmass Center and Base Village.High Priority Sidewalk Owl Creek Road and Brush Creek Road from the fire station, to Faraway Road to provide a walkway to Anderson Ranch, including the chapel, and to even-tually connect to Snowmass Center. High Priority Sidewalk Brush Creek Road from Snowmass Village Mall to Divide Road, to provide a walkway to employee housing at Mountain View Medium Priority Sidewalk Brush Creek Road from Upper Kearns Road to Divide Road, to connect Snowmass Center to em-ployee housing at Mountain View.High Priority Sidewalk Highline Road between Owl Creek Road and Brush Creek Road, to complete the Brush Creek Road-Owl Creek Road-Highline Road loop for pedestrians.Medium Priority Unpaved Trail Shortcut across Brush Creek from Mountain View to Snowmass Village Mall, to provide a more direct walkway to employee housing at Mountain View than Walkway #3 Medium Priority Unpaved Trail Across Slopeside from Snowmass Village Mall to Tom Blake Trail, to more directly connect Snowmass Village Mall to residences on Wood Road (summer only). Low Priority Unpaved Trail Underneath the existing Sky Cab Gondola from Base Village to Snowmass Village Mall, to facilitate pedes-trian travel between the two destinations when the Sky Cab Gondola is not running, when lines for the Sky Cab Gondola are long, or when people prefer to walk (summer only). Low Priority Sidewalk Connection between Town Park Station and the Brush Creek Road undercrossing to improve con-nectivity for transit passengers to the undercrossing.Low Priority Table 11 Community Connectivity Plan Pedestrian Facility Recommendations SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 2018134 Many Snowmass Village roads do not have a dedicated space for walking. In residential areas, with very low traffic speeds, pedestrians may be able to walk comfortably without a sidewalk or walking path. Twenty miles per hour is the appropriate speed to reduce the risk of injury on roads with a mix of vehicles, pedestrians, and bicyclists.13 Striped Shoulder - Credit: Dan Burden Low-cost treatment options have been used in some communities to encourage safer interaction between pedestrians and vehicles. For example, striped shoulders can be used to provide a dedicated walking space on the street without interfering with snowplow operations. According to the FHWA, the addition of a paved shoulder of at least 4 feet can result in a 71% reduction in crashes for pedestrians walking along the road.14 In these situations, reducing traffic lane widths to nine or ten feet would help provide the necessary space to accommodate pedestrians within the existing road width, while also visually narrowing the vehicle travel lanes, which may reduce vehicle speed. Where adequate width exists, shoulders should be striped on both sides of the road. If only one side can be striped, it is preferable to stripe the side where pedestrians and bicyclists can use the shoulder going uphill. Similar to a striped shoulder, advisory shoulders create a dedicated space for pedestrians or bicyclists, but allow motorists to cross the dashed Advisory Shoulder - Credit: Western Transportation Institute shoulder marking when pedestrians and bicyclists are not present, in order to pass an oncoming vehicle. They may be useful on roads without adequate width to accommodate a striped shoulder. As a relatively new treatment type in the US, advisory shoulders should be accompanied by education to ensure that they are understood by the public.15 Traffic calming is another strategy that can be used to increase the safety and comfort of walking. Traffic calming is the use of physical engineering measures that change the design of streets to reduce speeds, alter driver behavior, and improve conditions for people walking or bicycling. Traffic calming aims to slow the speeds of motorists to a “desired speed” (usually 20 mph or less for residential roads). The greatest benefit of traffic calming is increased safety and comfort for all users, including drivers and people trying to cross the street. Vertical traffic calming treatments such as speed humps, speed cushions, raised crossings, and other similar measures force drivers to slow down and horizontal treatments such as chicanes have a similar effect. Other Colorado mountain towns, such as Breckenridge, use traffic calming treatments on local streets. Traffic calming may be appropriate for residential roads in Snowmass Village such as Meadow Road and Lemond Place, but any intervention will need to be designed to ensure ease of access by transit and snowplowing in winter months. Low-Cost Measures on Neighborhood Roads 13 - FHWA. Methods and Practices for Setting Speed Limits: An Informational Report. 2012. https://safety.fhwa.dot.gov/speedmgt/ref_mats/fhwa-sa12004/fhwasa12004.pdf 14 - FHWA. Toolbox of Countermeasures and Their Potential Effectiveness for Pedestrian Crashes. 2008. https://safety.fhwa.dot.gov/ped_bike/tools_solve/ped_tctpepc/#crash 15 - Additional guidance regarding the use of advisory shoulders can be found in the Federal Highway Administration’s Small Town and Rural Multimodal Networks resource available here: https://www.fhwa.dot.gov/environment/bicycle_pedestrian/publications/small_towns/fhwahep17024_lg.pdf TAKE ACTION135TAKE ACTIONPLAN FRAMEWORKPRINCIPLESREFLECTIONSINTRODUCTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS Pedestrian crossings are a critical part of the pedestrian network. They are often the most dangerous part of a pedestrian’s journey as opportunities for conflicts with motor vehicles are higher at crossings. Crossings along Brush Creek Road are particularly challenging as there are many transit stops, relatively high traffic volume and speeds, and limited sight distance in some locations. These crossings have been studied in detail and are incorporated into the draft Community Connectivity Plan with recommendations made for relocation of transit stops and associated crossings, geometric improvements, signage and lighting. RRFB at Kearns Road/Brush Creek Road roundabout in Snowmass Village - Credit: Toole Design Group The crossing recommendations from the draft Community Connectivity Plan would improve the safety and comfort of pedestrians along the corridor. However, some community members expressed concern that the proposed crossing designs would negatively impact the natural character of Brush Creek Road by introducing beacons, which are integrated into the Rectangular Rapid Flashing Beacons (RRFBs) that are recommended in the Plan. RRFBs have been studied extensively and have been shown to increase yielding.16 Additionally, they have been implemented in other locations throughout the Roaring Fork Valley and at the recently constructed Base Village roundabout, so drivers and pedestrians are increasingly becoming familiar with how they work. While RRFBs do emit a bright light in the direction of oncoming traffic, their overall impact on lighting levels is minimal since they are only triggered when a pedestrian is present and activates the signal. Additionally, it is possible to reduce RRFB lighting levels during dark conditions.17 Although RRBFs are a recommended improvement for Brush Creek crossings, significant improvements can be made without implementation of RRFBs. High-visibility crosswalk markings in conjunction with advanced yield markings, pedestrian crossing signage, raised medians, curb extensions, and lighting improvements would go a long way to slow vehicle speeds and reduce the risk of pedestrian crashesalong Brush Creek Road, especially at night. Such measures could be implemented on a demonstration basis to determine how well drivers and snowplow operators are able to navigate new crossing features before permanent features are constructed. Crossings • Identify a pilot project to implement crossing improvements without a RRFB. Evaluate its productiveness to warn drivers and accommodate snowplow drivers without detriment. Next Steps:Crosswalk with median island. - Credit: Toole Design Group 16 - FHWA. Effects of Yellow Rectangular Rapid-Flashing Beacons on Yielding at Multilane Uncontrolled Crossings. September 2010. https://www.fhwa.dot.gov/publications/research/safety/pedbike/10043/10043.pdf 17 - http://elteccorp.com/warning_systems/rrfb/ SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 2018136 As a community with unmatched natural assets, it is essential that the Town invest in infrastructure that is not only functional, but is also beautiful. In the same way that architectural details are scrutinized, investments in public infrastructure should contribute to and solidify the Town’s relationship with the physical environment. Implementation of new and retrofitted transportation facilities presents an opportunity to express these design principles. For example, many of the recommendations for pedestrian improvements address the need for walking in constrained circumstances, such as steep terrain or narrow roads. In designing and implementing such projects, the Town could choose to implement enhanced facilities—such as sidewalks and/or walking paths separated by landscaped buffers when possible (taking into consideration maintenance and snow removal in various weather conditions) —instead of ones that provide a more basic level of functionality. Due to topography, these more comfortable or wider facilities would come at significant cost in many locations, but given the longevity of public infrastructure, the return on investment may be justified Pedestrian Infrastructure Implementation • Implement pedestrian facility recommendations from CCP, once adopted. • Implement pedestrian crossing recommendations from CCP, once adopted. • Require developers to provide the necessary pedestrian improvements to mitigate impacts of the development and encourage pedestrian access. • Monitor vehicle occupancy trends to determine effectiveness of travel demand management Next Steps:TAKE ACTION137TAKE ACTIONPLAN FRAMEWORKPRINCIPLESREFLECTIONSINTRODUCTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS Cemetery Lane Trail in Aspen - Source: Aspen4Sale Implement an E-Bike Share System The WE-cycle bike share system18 operates in Aspen and could be expanded to Snowmass Village to provide another transportation option in the Town. Bike share systems involve a managed fleet of bicycles that are available to the public to check out for short periods of time. They are often located near transit stops to connect transit riders to their origin or destination, but are also frequently used independent of transit. Although bike share systems generate some revenue, there is likely to be a shortfall that will need to be funded through a combination of public and private funding. Many systems utilize sponsorship opportunities on the bikes, stations, and other infrastructure to increase system revenues. Bicyclists using WeCycle Bike Share System in Aspen. - Credit: Toole Design Group Where they have been implemented, bike share systems have proven to be an important part of the overall transportation system. For Snowmass Village, bike share would be part of a package of transportation options that may mean visitors or residents no longer need to drive in the Town. Providing e-asist bikes as part of the bike share fleet would help overcome the challenging terrain in the Town. There are several electric-assist bike share programs operating in the United States and most bike share technology vendors (including WE-cycle’s technology vendor) offer e-assist options. A challenge associated with all bike share systems, but particularly those in an area with steep terrain such as Snowmass Village, is that users are more likely to ride downhill than uphill. Electric assist would help with this, but bikes will likely need to be moved or ‘rebalanced’ throughout the day to ensure they are available where needed (which is necessary for all bike share programs). Potential locations for bike share stations include: Snowmass Mall, Base Village, Snowmass Center, the Chapel/Anderson Ranch, Snowmass Club Commons, Creekside Condominiums, Mountain View Condominiums and Town Park. Some cities in cold-weather climates close the system during the winter months. However, because Carriage Way is heated, operating the Base Village and Snowmass Mall stations continuously throughout the year would provide the greatest value to the Town, though caution should be given in wet, melting conditions. • Explore the feasibility of implementing E-Bike Share. Consider a pilot program that would allow users to test the e-bikes within Snowmass Village before major investment in the program is considered. • Encourage new development to participate in and support the bike sharing program when it becomes available. Next Steps: 18 - https://www.we-cycle.org/ SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 2018138 Bring Car Sharing and Transportation Network Companies to Snowmass Village Similar to bike sharing, the operation of car sharing companies (e.g., Zipcar, Car2Go, etc.) in Snowmass Village would encourage residents and visitors to reduce their reliance on personal vehicles. It would provide them access to a vehicle when needed, such as for trips to nearby communities in the valley or to the grocery store, so that they could otherwise live without a car in the Town. As part of the Base Village PUD Amendment process, the developer agreed to implement a car sharing program for residents and visitors. This program is expected to be operational by November 2018. Transportation Network Companies (TNCs), such as Uber and Lyft, are another option to reduce the use of personal vehicles in Snowmass Village. To date, TNCs have not established consistently-available operations in Snowmass Village (or Aspen), but this may change over time as the market evolves. The Town, perhaps in partnership with the Aspen Skiing Company, should explore the relative cost of subsidizing TNCs compared to other alternatives such as increased transit service or building more parking infrastructure. For example, the Town of Summit, New Jersey has implemented a pilot program to subsidize Uber trips rather than build a new parking garage.19 While Snowmass Village has a low-cost Dial-a-Ride program for travel within the Village, many visitors are already familiar with TNC services, prefer the easy application interface, and are more likely to use them if available. • Support the new car sharing program and encourage Transportation Network Companies to come to Snowmass Village. • Encourage new development to participate in and support the car sharing program when it becomes available. Next Steps: 19 - King, Hope. CNN. October 3, 2016. http://money.cnn.com/2016/10/03/technology/uber-subsidized-commutes-summit-new-jersey/TAKE ACTION139TAKE ACTIONPLAN FRAMEWORKPRINCIPLESREFLECTIONSINTRODUCTION THE PUBLIC PROCESSSource: AutoBlog-Green Connect Base Village to the Mall As noted previously and as a recommendation of the draft CCP, the Skittles SkyCab is expensive to operate and has peak capacity constraints that often times make it extremely inconvenient to use. Further study is needed to determine whether the Skittles SkyCab can be replaced with more advanced technology that would provide improved service. The primary option identified for consideration is an at-grade walkway. However, additional ideas may be discovered through a more thorough review of conveyance options in similar environments. The Town, together with the Aspen Skiing Company and the Base Village developer, should conduct a study to determine the best options in terms of capacity, convenience, impacts to adjacent residents, and cost. • Conduct a jointly funded study with the Aspen Skiing Company and the Base Village developer to explore options for upgrading the Skittles SkyCab with more efficient options. Next Steps: Connect Base Village to the Snowmass Center A more direct pedestrian connection between Base Village and the Snowmass Center/Town Hall would encourage residents, visitors and employees to walk rather than drive in Town. Conceptual drawings for a new Pedestrian Bridge that would span Brush Creek and connect the two nodes have been developed, but require further study. Recognizing the benefits of having such an important connection, the developer of the Snowmass Center has offered to provide a sum of cash toward the implementation of a Pedestrian Bridge as a community purpose offering as part of their PUD proposal. • Conduct further study including the feasibility of a Pedestrian Bridge connection between Base Village and Snowmass Center/Town Hall. Next Steps: SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 2018140 Promote and Encourage the Culture of Bicycling There is a strong interest in bolstering biking culture in Snowmass Village to bring more summer visitors into the Town and increase bicycling for transportation. While Snowmass Village currently has some programming in place, it lacks a clear and consistent vision for bicycling in the Town. Expansion of bicycling in Snowmass Village must be accompanied by education to ensure that visitors and new bicyclists understand how to ride safely in Snowmass Village. Greater emphasis on trail etiquette may be needed as levels of bicycling increase along with conflicts between bicyclists and other trail users. Current bike-related programming is focused on mountain biking, yet the topography and scenic beauty would also appeal to recreational on-road bicyclists. Furthermore, bicycling is not currently marketed as a transportation option for visitors and residents. Promotion of bicycling for transportation would strengthen the Town’s brand as a bicycling community. To significantly impact the Town’s ability to accommodate existing bicyclists in the town and increase bicycle-related tourism, a comprehensive strategy or plan is needed. Without a plan, it is unlikely that uncoordinated bicycling promotion efforts will significantly impact levels of biking in Snowmass Village, as many other communities in Colorado and across the country are competing for a similar segment of the market. • Develop a comprehensive bicycle promotion strategy, consistent with the draft CCP recommendations, to encourage increased bicycle-related tourism. Next Steps:TAKE ACTION141TAKE ACTIONPLAN FRAMEWORKPRINCIPLESREFLECTIONSINTRODUCTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 2018142 Spread the Daily Travel Peaks Snowmass Village is subject to very distinct peaks in travel activity associated with skiing and special events. Although travel peaks are not unique to Snowmass Village, given the small size of the permanent resident population and limited infrastructure, these activity peaks are disproportionately large. As noted, fully accommodating these peaks through added transit or roadway capacity would come at a high cost. For example, buses which are full at peak capacity operate at much lower capacity at off-peak times and cannot be re-purposed.While travel peaks will always exist to some degree, efforts to spread travel over a broader period of time may be an inexpensive way to improve the efficiency of the transportation system, while achieving other Town goals. A few possible ways of spreading the travel peaks in Snowmass Village include: • Promote more après–ski activities, such as happy hours and restaurant options and include incentives for them to be used (this is a similar program used in the I-70 corridor) • Develop evening family-friendly programming • Work in partnership with the Aspen Skiing Company and other property owners and businesses to offer a variety of offerings in order to spread out the travel peaks. Next Steps:Lower Kearns Road and Brush Creek Road intersection improvement - Source: tosv.com Manage Parking & Transit Parking management is an important part of the Town’s overall transportation strategy. It has the potential to affect whether people arrive to Snowmass Village by car or other means, whether they carpool, whether they use transit, how long they stay, etc. Parking usage rates have been and should continue to be closely monitored to determine whether management strategies need to be adjusted. As parking is currently constrained during peak times, changes to the number of spaces available or more aggressive parking management may be needed in the future. Few options exist to increase the number of surface parking spaces in the Town. Increased reliance on the Intercept Lots have been suggested, but in order for this to be successful, additional transit service would need to be provided, which would be very costly to the Town. While this plan proposes to include structured parking as part of redevelopment in the West Village and at Town Park, and identifies potential additional parking capacity at the Two Creeks area, net expansion of parking capacity could be challenging over the long term given development pressure and limited available land. As a result, consideration should be given to increasing the price of parking during periods of high demand to encourage other modes of transportation. Parking pricing is one of the most effective ways to influence travel behavior. For example, a 2014 study determined that free parking for employees is a strong predictor of driving alone, while offering transit benefits and benefits for employees who walk or bike results in much lower rates of driving if free car parking is not offered.20 Parking price increases or adjustments would need to be carefully considered, including where parking increases may be needed and the likely impacts. Since transit and parking demand peak simultaneously, and transit does not have extra capacity at these times, higher parking prices at the Town Lots may disproportionately impact Snowmass employees. To alleviate this impact, carpooling for employees should be encouraged and/or incentivized. Over the long term, parking may also be influenced by trends in transportation network companies (TNCs) such as Uber and Lyft, as well as automated vehicles and emerging ridesharing platforms. Wider implementation of TNCs, for example, could reduce the number of people arriving to Snowmass Village by personal vehicle and thus reduce the need for additional parking in the future. • Consider implementing parking price increases at various locations and monitor results Next Steps: 20 - Hamre, Andrea and Ralph Buehler. Commuter Mode Choice and Free Car Parking, Public Transportation Benefits, Showers/Lockers, and Bike Parking at Work: Evidence from the Washington, DC Region. Journal of Public Transportation, Vol. 17, No. 2, 2014.TAKE ACTION143TAKE ACTIONPLAN FRAMEWORKPRINCIPLESREFLECTIONSINTRODUCTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS Evaluate and Monitor Progress Given the Town’s interest in limiting the use of motor vehicles on its roads, other performance measures for motor vehicle traffic in addition to LOS should be used. When new development is proposed, the Town should require developers to evaluate all modes of transportation and address any negative impacts. This holistic perspective will encourage solutions that increase the overall person-trip capacity of the system. For instance, if a new development will increase the overall number of trips, the Town may require additional investment in transit operations or the car share and bike share programs (when implemented). Similarly, new measures are needed to document changes to the transportation system over time. For example, monitoring vehicle occupancy rate, or the average number of people per car, would shed insight into whether a greater number of people may be entering the Town, while the number of vehicles remains constant. Occupancy rate can be determined through visual surveys. For convenience, surveys could be conducted at trip ends such as the numbered parking lots or Snowmass Center, but ideally should also be conducted on higher volume roads such as Brush Creek Road and Owl Creek Road. Programs to encourage carpooling/car-sharing can be implemented to help increase occupancy rates. • Consider implementing a carpooling incentive program, similar to the City of Aspen, that will allow free parking at various locations. Next Steps: SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 2018144 IMPORTANT NOTE: The POSTR Master Plan is summarized in a prioritized project and recommendation matrix that includes cost estimates and project timing for each. This Implementation and Action Plan should serve in tandem with the implementation strategies identified in other chapters of this Comprehensive Plan document. Following the identification of goals and objectives, the POSTR Master Plan (adopted _____date____, which is attached here by reference) includes projects, policies, actions and recommendations that resulted from the plan process. Each project includes a relative cost, timing and prioritization, and strategies for implementation. Refer to the POSTR plan for more detailed information. POSTR MASTER PLAN PROJECTS & RECOMMENDATIONS Town Park, Recreation and Trails Projects • Destination Bike Park • Lighting for Multi-Purpose Field Space • Platform Tennis • All Weather Artificial Turf on Multi-Use Field Space • Redesigned Rodeo Grounds to Finish Town Park • Community Garden at Cathy Robinson Park • Redesigned Ice Rink that extends the skating season • Bike Wash and Repair Station • Town Park Pond, Beach, and Green Infrastructure Improvements • Brush Creek Linear Park easement acquisition and access improvements TAKE ACTION145TAKE ACTIONPLAN FRAMEWORKPRINCIPLESREFLECTIONSINTRODUCTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS Open Space Policies & Actions The following seven Open Space Policies are included in the POSTR plan: • Seek acquisition of new open spaces that are multi-dimensional in the resource value they bring to the community • Provide latitude in policy to consider “other” opportunities for open space acquisition that, while still reflective of identified community value, may take advantage of unique circumstances to set aside parcels for future consideration. • Evaluate private open space or set asides associated with planned residential development in light of this framework and consider where private open space resource value and function might align with broader community objectives. • Complete a Town-wide Natural Resources Management Plan. • Continue to explore the role that partnerships might play in managing or acquiring open space parcels. • Always consider the resource values supported by the open space when developing specific proposals or defining management objectives. • Maximize opportunities to expand the function of existing open space to more broadly address community values (i.e., finding ways to enhance recreation, habitat, conservation etc.).Trail running on Sky MountainSNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 2018146 Garden Policies & Actions The following three Garden Policies are included in the POSTR plan: • Manage Town-owned gardens and open spaces to reduce invasive, non-native species. • Develop Landscape Maintenance Standards for Town Gardens utilizing xeric (low-water) species that are consistent with the Town’s aesthetic character to maintain the currently high level of quality for town managed gardens. • Explore opportunities for sponsorship to help support flower landscapes in Town where appropriate. • Explore the possibility of having a garden tool library available at the new community garden at Catherine Robinson Park. • Encourage residents to learn methods of raising more food crops at high elevation in the Village. Next Steps: Trails Policies & Actions The following four Trails Policies are included in the POSTR plan: • Encourage adherence to dog waste and leash policies. • Implement a volunteer Trail Ranger Program. • Ensure Sustainable Trail Design. • Remove the mountain bike trail closure on the South Rim Connector Trail. • Acquire trail easements where necessary to facilitate a cohesive and connected system of trails. The Trails section of the POSTR Plan also includes 24 projects listed and prioritized.TAKE ACTION147TAKE ACTIONPLAN FRAMEWORKPRINCIPLESREFLECTIONSINTRODUCTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS Recreation Program Recommendations The following eleven Recreation Programs have improvements included in the POSTR plan: • Offer more lunch time programs of all ilk • Expand Recreation Programs for Adults and Seniors • Drop-in Day Care • Community Movies • Expand yoga offerings • Silver Sneakers/Senior Programs • Expand Bicycling Programs • Lifestyle Programs • Informal or alternative sports • Sports and Fitness • Outdoor Rec Programs SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 2018148 Administrative and Management Policies & Actions The following four Trails Policies are included in the POSTR plan: • Implement Lifecycle Asset Management for all park and recreation center equipment so facilities can keep their image and value at a high level. • Develop an Operational Manual for the recreation center to maintain the site and establish consistent Recreation Center Facility Maintenance Standards. • Establish Standards and Performance Measures to gauge performance. • Utilize a diversified funding structure for the department including maximization of existing sources and exploration of new ones. • Implement greater price segmentation in recreation programs pricing to maximize both yield and participation. • Encourage greater pre-registration in programs, particularly youth programs with a range of approaches. • Enhance mechanisms for continuous feedback from recreation center members and program participants. • Develop an annual program review process. • Support the professional development of key department staff through membership in the Colorado Parks and Recreation Association and the National Recreation and Parks Association. • Establish Customer Requirements for each program area to identify those service and product attributes that are most important to customers. • Develop Customer Service Standards to reinforce to part-time and seasonal staff what is most important to customers and maintain quality customer experiences. • Conduct an annual review of partners and partnership opportunities to encourage active management of the partnership relationships. • Develop a marketing plan to lay out the overall marketing direction for the entire Department. • Continue to maintain parks, gardens and outdoor spaces at a high level through support of the seasonal grounds maintenance crew. • Develop a Special and Temporary Use Permit Application to manage and understand the nature of special uses of Town lands. • Continue to respect sensitive wildlife resources through adherence to Town Ordinance 10-29 and the intergovernmental agreement between the USFS, CPW, Pitkin County, Aspen Skiing Co and TOSV to close trails on Burnt Mountain each spring for elk calving.TAKE ACTION149TAKE ACTIONPLAN FRAMEWORKPRINCIPLESREFLECTIONSINTRODUCTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS POSTR Master Plan Standards Ensuring a sustainable system of parks, trails and open spaces requires design and construction practices that balance community needs, long-term maintenance, and reduced resource usage. The Master Plan includes standards for environmental sustainability, economic, and social sustainability, addressing topics such as air quality, recycling, renewable energy, resource protection, fiscal practices, education and outreach, and public health. Accessibility standards ensure inclusive design of parks and open space projects, with access to trails and other amenities provided for persons of all ages and physical abilities. Trails make up a huge part of the Snowmass Village POSTR network, and each type of trail has its own requirements and standards. The POSTR Master Plan references several published guidelines and standards used in the maintenance and development of trails throughout the Town, in addition to specific standards for different types of trails. SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 2018150 The information that follows summarizes how community facilities and services offered in Snowmass Village should be organized to support implementation of the Town’s Conservation & Development Map. A brief narrative for each topic area identifies the improvements that should be moved forward in subsequent capital planning initiatives or coordination activities. Work should be done with cooperation between government agencies and other partners responsible for implementing the proposed projects or policy recommendations. PROVIDE RELIABLE SERVICES & MUNICIPAL TRANSPARENCY Develop a ‘Public Realm Plan’ for Snowmass Village that Organizes Future Infrastructure Investments Town officials should develop a public realm plan that identifies the infrastructure needed to serve and connect the core areas on the Conservation & Development Map: Town Park, Snowmass Center, and West Village (the Mall). The plan should include an illustrative master plan, infrastructure investment strategy, and carrying capacity analysis that can be monitored and updated. The Town’s “just big enough” initiative should control the type and location of new infrastructure built to serve future development. Key infrastructure categories for the public realm plan should include: water, sewer, telecommunications, transportation, parks, solid waste, employee housing, pedestrian access, fire and police protection. Some categories will be studied in more detail - vision plan, projects, schedule and funding - because they are Town-provided facilities and services. Others will require coordination with the primary service providers to manage the type, location and timing of future development. Recommendations from the public realm plan should be programmed into the Town’s Capital Improvements Plan and/or used during the development application review process to leverage private investments in the public realm. • Prepare, adopt and implement a public realm plan for the Town of Snowmass Village that connects the core areas on the Conservation and Development Map. Next Steps:TAKE ACTION151TAKE ACTIONPLAN FRAMEWORKPRINCIPLESREFLECTIONSINTRODUCTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS Build More “Community Infrastructure” in the Public Realm There is an overall lack of public and semi-public gathering spaces in the public realm that could draw residents and visitors out of their homes to interact more with one another as a community. Supporting new public and semi-public places in the core areas identified on the Conservation and Development Map -- Town Park, Snowmass Center, West Village (the Mall) -- would give people a ‘third place’ (i.e., other than home or work) to connect and socialize, and give people a reason to linger and thereby spread out the movement from the peak times. Gathering places in the core areas should promote a variety of social events and activities, including summer concerts, children’s events, talking, playing, people watching, or simply enjoying time alone in the company of others. They should be inter-mixed throughout each of the core areas as formal areas (e.g., plazas, stages, play areas, amphitheaters and public restrooms) and informal areas (e.g., cafes, benches, or sitting walls) to accommodate varying crowds and year round interests. These areas should serve both residents and visitors, and be viable trade-offs for accepting higher densities and/or less private open space in the core areas. • Program ‘community infrastructure’ projects in the Town’s Capital Improvements Plan and/or require dedication of space and amenities during the development application review process to complement public investments. Next Steps: INSERT PHOTO _ STREET FURNITURE SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 2018152 Think of Our Buildings & Fields as Multi-Purpose Facilities Space is limited in Snowmass Village to maintain, expand or build the new infrastructure needed to protect the residents’ high quality-of-life and improve visitors’ experiences. Single-use facilities, such as the Rodeo Grounds or some athletic fields that have only one purpose and operate for only a portion of the year are not the most efficient use of limited space and facilities. Those space limitations also highlight opportunities for more public-private partnerships to provide facilities and services that meet community needs, visitor needs, and increase economic vitality throughout the Town (emphasizing year-round benefits for all parties involved). Moving forward, Town investments in infrastructure should 1) combine multiple uses on a single site; 2) pair uses and facilities that promote year-round use of the site; 3) take advantage of shared parking strategies; and 4) recognize the benefits of public-private partnerships for finding the right site to build a facility that can serve residents and visitors simultaneously. • Adopt a formal policy that officially states the Town’s position to plan, program and fund new community facilities as multipurpose centers, which can be used 1) in writing future requests for proposal; 2) in notifying other service providers of the Town’s intent to build multipurpose facilities; and 3) in driving decisions about land area needs, building sizes and locations, and the proximity of supporting infrastructure to be more efficient with multipurpose facilities. Next Steps: Find Location for Permanent Library The Town of Snowmass Village does not currently have a permanent full size library. The closest libraries are in Aspen and Basalt. A new library in Snowmass Village could be the catalyst for more community events and added quality of life. Libraries provide valuable meeting spaces, support personal productivity and cultural engagement, and provide a safe, important and central space in communities. • Explore the possibility of locating a new library within the core of Snowmass Village by soliciting interest from various organizations. Next Steps:TAKE ACTION153TAKE ACTIONPLAN FRAMEWORKPRINCIPLESREFLECTIONSINTRODUCTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS Coordinate with State & Regional Service Providers to Provide Infrastructure, as Needed, to Serve the Conservation & Development Map The Town of Snowmass Village provides only a portion of the infrastructure needed to support the daily needs of residents, business owners, and visitors to the mountain. Town officials should coordinate with representatives of the school district, water and sewer district, fire and emergency medical services departments, state department of transportation, the Regional Transportation Authority (RFTA) and County concerning the timing, intensity and locations of new development influenced by the Conservation & Development Map, and strengthen the Town’s ties to the strategic plans and capital improvements plans for the various regional service providers. • Advocate for recommendations in the Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan with regional service providers in the area, and participate in the processes established for updating their strategic plans and capital improvements plans. Next Steps: SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 2018154Source: City of Boulder Monitor Water Storage Capacity in Snowmass Village & Coordinate with SWSD Officials if Improvements are Needed Thirteen storage tanks located in various SWSD pressure zones provide enough treated water capacity for three days of typical Town water usage. Studies completed to support the SWSD Water Efficiency Plan (adopted in February 2014) found the District may not be able to meet all future development demands without the implementation of additional water conservation measures, the creation of raw water storage, or a combination of both additional conservation and storage. The Town of Snowmass Village also has an economic development interest in the capabilities of SWSD to meet the snowmaking needs for the Aspen Skiing Company (especially as climate changes may increase the need for longer, more intense snowmaking periods). • Town officials should coordinate regularly with the Snowmass Water and Sanitation District to ensure infrastructure is available to support the timing, intensity and locations of new development influenced by the Conservation and Development Map. This should include a strong partnership for implementing water conservation measures identified in the SWSD Water Efficiency Plan, as adopted, help siting and securing land for new or expanded SWSD water storage, and direct contact with SWSD officials during the development application review process. Next Steps: Implement a Local Storm Water Management Strategy for Snowmass Village On-site storm water infrastructure in some areas of the Town is already failing, which adds sediment to Brush Creek and negatively impacts the community. New or enhanced rules and requirements for storm water management similar to those used in NPDES Phase II Permit areas could help Snowmass Village implement a Town-wide storm water management strategy. • Allocate funds to complete a storm water inventory and assessment for the Town, and act on recommendations in the study related to things the Town can do to, 1) manage the quantity and quality of storm water on-site and as a larger community; 2) provide flood protection during significant storm events; and 3) limit the amount of sediment run-off for areas downstream. Next Steps:TAKE ACTION155TAKE ACTIONPLAN FRAMEWORKPRINCIPLESREFLECTIONSINTRODUCTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS Expand Childcare Facilities in Town as Needed to Support the Community’s Demand Childcare in Snowmass Village is very important to the community’s working households and the wait for a spot at the Little Red School House is up to three years for infant care -- is extraordinarily long and a hindrance to some in the community’s quality-of-life. The Town should support the efforts of the Little Red Schoolhouse to either expand the existing facility or find a new, larger location in Town to serve the overwhelming demand. • Support the staff at the Little Red School House to either expand the existing facility or to find a new location in the community. Next Steps: Begin the Process of developing a Historic Preservation Program for the Town The Snowmass Resort is celebrating its 50th Anniversary in 2017, and the Town incorporation just met its 40th anniversary milestone. Until now, the Town has not considered the possibility of designating any buildings or spaces as “historic” and worthy of preserving. The Little Red Schoolhouse and several structures within the Anderson Ranch facility are the oldest in the community. Further, several single family homes were designed by well-known modernist architects and may be worth considering local designation. Even the iconic Clock Tower in the Mall should be evaluated in terms of its importance to the Snowmass community. The first step in evaluating the possibility of developing a historic preservation program would be to develop criteria for and inventorying potential properties that may have historic value to the community. • Identify resources and potential funding opportunities to develop criteria for and to complete an initial inventory of buildings, structures and places that may be worthy of preserving. Next Steps: SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 2018156 Continue to Support Efforts to Expand & Modernize the Aspen-Pitkin County Airport The Aspen-Pitkin County Airport is critical to the Town’s economy and its ability to connect with the rest of the world (especially for seasonal residents and visitors to the area). Identified improvements for the airport in the draft Environmental Assessment - terminal and runway enhancements - should be supported by the Town as a driver for future economic development. • Be active in supporting improvements at the airport with federal, state and local officials for various departments and agencies. Next Steps: Change the Town’s ‘Trash Behavior’ to Divert More Waste Buried at the Pitkin County Landfill All solid waste and recycling collected in the Town are sent to the Pitkin County Landfill. Estimates are, without a drastic change in the region’s ‘trash behavior’, that the landfill will reach capacity and be closed in under seven years. Several programs are underway to divert waste from the landfill, including aggregate recovery, a ‘drop and swap’ program, various recycling programs, and food and landscape waste composting initiatives. The Town is committed to being a sustainable community in terms of waste reduction and recycling, and there is support to promote Snowmass Village as a place that is taking a lead in environmental awareness and human impacts on the environment. To this end, initiatives to reduce the diversion rate for the landfill by recycling, composting and reducing other waste generation behaviors should all be explored by the Town and its private sector partners. One goal for the Town should be to increase its recycling program participation by 2020 (currently between 14% - 17% of the total waste collected in Town is being recycled at the landfill; the Environmental Advisory Board recommends a goal of increasing this number to 20% by 2020). • Continue to encourage programs in the community that reduce the amount of trash going to the landfill (e.g., reusable shopping bags, community gardens and composting stations, zero-sort recycling programs, etc.) and coordinate with other towns in the region. Next Steps:TAKE ACTION157TAKE ACTIONPLAN FRAMEWORKPRINCIPLESREFLECTIONSINTRODUCTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS The Town of Snowmass Village led an open public engagement process un-like any other planning effort in Town. Over the course of 12 months, the Town offered an array of engagement opportunities, using a number of creative techniques to try and reach a broad cross-section of Snowmass Village and spread the word about the Plan Snowmass project. In today’s busy world, where there is no one way to reach people, Snowmass Village went above and beyond to reach constituents, inventing creative ways to engage the pub-lic and generate buzz. PUBLIC PROCESS PUBLICPROCESS159INTRODUCTIONPRINCIPLESTAKE ACTION THE PUBLIC PROCESSREFLECTIONSPLAN FRAMEWORK The Town Council formally appointed a Think Tank to work on the Plan. Its primary duties included community outreach, serving as a sounding board for the planning consultant, reviewing draft materials, and helping to facilitate plan implementation. The Think Tank was composed of elected officials, business owners, dedicated citizens, and representatives of local boards, commissions, and organizations. The Think Tank met several times prior to the PlanapaloozaTM, played an active role in the PlanapaloozaTM, and met again following the event to review the Plan and help ensure that all relevant information was incorporated into it. Think Tank The Town of Snowmass Village Planning staff spent hours of time communicating directly with other Town departments, stakeholders, and members of the public. In person, word-of-mouth communication, and having champions of the project were critical to generating energy and input. Word of Mouth SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 2018160 In October 2016, the Plan Snowmass team held a project kick-off, where about 75 residents attended to hear about the project, learn about the process and provide some initial feedback on what is important to them. In January 2017, the Plan Snowmass team held two visioning sessions at the Recreation Center, which were attended by approximately 130 participants including elected & appointed officials, residents, and Town staff members. These two interactive workshops were focused on reaffirming the broad vision for the Town, and encouraging participants to articulate their wishes and hopes for the future of the Village. Public Meetings PUBLICPROCESS161TAKE ACTION THE PUBLIC PROCESSPLAN FRAMEWORKPRINCIPLESREFLECTIONSINTRODUCTION TPUDC and Town Staff maintained a web presence (www.plansnowmass.com) and the Town’s newsletter and other social media was used to help disseminate information about the project and upcoming events. The project website was used to post documents, and gather public input through the use of discussion boards, map-based exercises, photo-sharing, and more. The website remained active throughout the entire process with more than 300 visitors. Social & Online Media SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 2018162 Monthly project updates and email invitations were sent directly to stakeholders who signed onto to the Plan Snowmass website (300 subscribers). Direct Communication The Town successfully contacted several news media outlets, including the Aspen Times, Snowmass Sun and Aspen Daily News, which covered the PlanapaloozaTM event. Town Staff supplied press releases to local media that resulted in coverage of events. Prior to the PlanapaloozaTM, the Aspen Times published articles encouraging public participation. Reporters from the Aspen Times wrote about the PlanapaloozaTM meetings and events throughout the process. TPUDC and Town Staff designed and produced posters that were displayed in prominent locations throughout Town and provided during events leading up to the PlanapaloozaTM. News Media In the months leading up to PlanapaloozaTM, TPUDC conducted one-on-one interviews with key land owners, special district administrators, and policy makers including members of the Planning Commission and Town Council. Personal Outreach A first draft of this Plan Snowmass document was released in June 2017, giving the Town Council, Planning Commission and Think Tank a chance to review and comment. A second “Public Draft” was released in January 2018, giving the entire community an opportunity to comment. Paper copies were made available and a website was built that incorporated commenting capabilities. Finally, a Plan Snowmass Open House was held in January 2018 for two days, providing an opportunity for the public to review, discuss, and comment on the draft. Over ? comments were received and analyzed to prepare the final “Public Hearing Draft” plan. Draft Plan Snowmass Review PUBLICPROCESS163TAKE ACTION THE PUBLIC PROCESSPLAN FRAMEWORKPRINCIPLESREFLECTIONSINTRODUCTION From February 23 through February 28, 2017, the citizens, business owners and visitors of Snowmass Village were invited to participate in a multi-day planning and design charrette called PlanapaloozaTM to continue honing in on the issues and wishes of the community for the future. PlanapaloozaTM, an intensive and fun community planning and design event, brought together the citizens of Snowmass Village to think about the future of the Town. This interactive engagement process provided an open forum for the public to work closely with the consultants from TPUDC to identify big ideas and generate a vision that will drive policy decisions for the Town while also building local capital and community-driven action. The PlanapaloozaTM team, along with Town planning staff, set up a full working office and studio at Town Hall, with over 200 members of the public stopping by to attend meetings, provide input, or talk with the planners. On the first evening of the charrette, TPUDC delivered an introductory presentation on comprehensive planning and the project so far at the Recreation Center. Immediately following the presentation, the TPUDC charrette team facilitated a hands-on “Speed Planning” workshop where the public was invited to roll up their sleeves, draw and brainstorm their ideas for improving the three Comprehensively Planned Areas (CPAs--Rodeo Grounds / Entryway [Town Park Area], Faraway Ranch North CPA [Snowmass Center] & Base Village CPA [includes the Mall area]), working over base maps to identify key areas where infill, redevelopment, or other interventions should be focused. On the second and third day of the charrette, the team conducted technical meetings on a variety of topics important to the project. These included economic development, infrastructure, transportation, development, environmental concerns, and more. Meanwhile, members of the team began developing plan alternatives, while gathering information from these meetings in real time. On the third night of the charrette, an “Après-Ski” public pin-up/open house was held in the studio, giving the team a chance to present alternative plan scenarios based on ideas generated by the public. Over 35 people assembled to see the draft plans and provide feedback on what they liked about the ideas presented, and where further work was needed. During the remainder of the charrette, members of the public continued to filter into the studio, adding their ideas, talking to the team, and filling out questionnaires. Feeding off this buzz of activity, the team entered production mode, synthesizing ideas, collaborating over design challenges, preparing renderings, and compiling precedent images. Based on all the input from the public gathered at the Hands-on Workshop, stakeholder meetings, the pin-up, and drop-ins, the charrette team developed examples of how the three Comprehensively Planned Areas could look if redevelopment and new development were to occur at those locations. The plans depict possible redevelopment and infill scenarios, building configurations, parks and plazas, street connections, and public facilities. A final presentation took place on the last day of the charrette, at which time all of the work produced during the week was presented and explained. The meeting was attended by over 75 members of the community. Not all those in attendance were in agreement with the sketch ideas and plans, but most agreed that there are few development sites that could achieve the community goals, with most opportunity in the three CPAs. PlanapaloozaTM SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 2018164 PUBLICPROCESS165TAKE ACTION THE PUBLIC PROCESSPLAN FRAMEWORKPRINCIPLESREFLECTIONSINTRODUCTION 1 | Page Snowmass Village “Just Big Enough” Policy 20 June 2017 Introduction The following technical memorandum regarding the Snowmass Village community’s “just big enough” approach to land use planning and growth has been prepared by representatives of Ricker|Cunningham (RC) for the Staff and Officials of the Town of Snowmass Village (TOSV), in the context of the current Plan Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Update. It begins with a description of our understanding of the policy, its definition and intentions, is followed by observations related to foundational assumptions used to establish the policy, and concludes with suggestions for modifying the Town’s definition of “just big enough” and criteria used to evaluate its effectiveness. Whereas the Town has conducted numerous investigations about prevailing physical and market conditions and engaged the community on several occasions in an effort to ensure that stated goals reflect the most current thinking of its residents and business and property interests (see items in timeline below), references from multiple sources are provided herein. As presented, two documents in particular provided the bulk of the content for this memo because they devoted the most space and time to the “just big enough policy.” So that the reader understands the origin of certain citations, they are color coded as follows: RC discussion presented in purple Comments from 2003 Snowmass Village Community Forum report presented in red Comments from 2010 Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan presented in blue History Resources and Notable Dates (presented in chronological order) Snowmass Village Community Forum report (2003) * Upper Village Revitalization Strategy (prepared by RC) (2005) Marketing Strategic Plan (2008) Beginning of Great Recession (2008) Snowmastodon Find (2010) Town of Snowmass Comprehensive Plan (2010) Snowmass Center, Base Village, and West Village Urban Renewal Conditions Survey (2010) End of Great Recession (2012) Overview of Resort Market and Economic Trends Report (2014) Parks, Open Space, Trails and Recreation Plan (commenced 2015) SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 2018166 2 | Page Community Connectivity Plan (commenced 2016) ∗Concept of “just big enough” born. Definitions of “Just Big Enough” “… the smallest amount of additional bed base within the Town Core that will support the necessary vital and vibrant commercial core.” Snowmass Village Community Forum Report, 2003 In terms of the “way forward” or strategies for ensuring “just enough” growth is achieved, the following regulatory recommendations were advanced -- maximum thresholds of 120K – 160K SF total commercial space in the Base Village and West Village Mall (combined); and building heights of 2 to 6 stories; and limits on the number of lodging beds (4,900 approx.) to support vital commercial concentrations and offer appropriate diversity and generate $12.2 million in gross annual sales. “Homework” for Town Council included: developing a plan for “just enough” housing distributed throughout the Town Core; preparing a strategy for minimizing traffic impacts; modifying the land use approval process to ensure consistency with stated guiding principles; working with private property and business interests in the West Village to further revitalization efforts; and continuing related discussions with the community. “.. planning approach more likely to provide the desired quality-of-life for the community while creating a differentiated, more welcoming, and convenient guest experience.” Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan, 2010 Objectives of “Just Big Enough” Policy “Achieve and maintain a balance between the community’s quality-of-life and town-wide economic viability.” 2003 City Council Preserve local character Maintain appropriate mass, scale, and density Minimize traffic congestion and maximize transportation options Enhance relative competitive position Improve access Keep “community” in resort community Provide amenities and activities Maintain air and water quality levels Obtain vital and vibrant commercial core and activity centers Provide primary job employment opportunities House working class residents PLAN FRAMEWORKPRINCIPLESREFLECTIONSINTRODUCTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS APPENDIX A167INTRODUCTIONTAKE ACTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS 3 | Page “Balance the aspects of resort and community, transportation and housing, while creating a sense of place.” Attain economic sustainability Maintain quality-of-life Preclude oversupply of lodging products Ensure desired rental pool participation levels (80 percent) Support strategic intent to be an inclusive resort community Provide convenient mobility between nodes Grow shoulder season business through expanded conference facilities while maintaining time to “renew” between peaks Measures of Success (at achieving “Just Big Enough” Balance) “When Successful, Snowmass Village will have achieved the Quality-of-Life and Economic Vitality that will assure our future as a Sustainable Resort Community.” In addition to this statement and in lieu of specific criteria, RC inferred that completion of “Preferred Elements of the Comprehensively Planned Areas (CPA)” could be considered appropriate measures of the policy’s effectiveness. Town Core which integrates a new Base Village with Snowmass Center and the Mall Vehicular / pedestrian connectivity and mobility Public spaces and amenities Year-round activity Conference space Mixed-use developments High-occupancies among residential units Opportunities for individual business ownership of commercial space Redeveloped Snowmass Center Community meeting places Preserved and enhanced trails and recreational areas View from Brush Creek Road of ski area Access to Brush Creek riparian corridor Enhanced transit facilities Access to parking Occupancy frequency rates among hotels and condominiums of 46 – 57% Occupancy intensity rates of 1.2 – 1.5 persons per unit Rental pool participation levels of 75 – 80% Capture rates among hotels and condominiums of 55% Per day spending of $110 among overnight visitors Average daily room (ADR) rates among hotels and condominiums of $300 Commercial sales per square foot of $400 SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 2018168 4 | Page ------ Expanded conference facilities and services Community-serving businesses oriented to daily needs of residents Locally-owned and operated businesses Enhanced employment opportunities for local employees Sufficient levels of the following services -- transportation, education, child care, housing, water, sewer, public safety, emergency, public health, utilities and infrastructure Observations Representatives of RC conducted a detailed review of the Snowmass Village Community Forum report (2003) in order to understand how and why the “just big enough” approach to land planning became an established Town policy. What follows are a series of statements (presented in red) provided for in that report, followed by an observation (presented in purple). The purpose of this analysis and presentation format is to lay the groundwork for modifying the Town’s definition of “just big enough” and measures used to evaluate the effectiveness of its efforts while still seeking to achieve similar objectives. “Many say we want to be a successful ‘resort community’; some say, what’s the matter with being ‘a nice’, little neighborhood?” The Council seemed to attempt a compromise by reporting, “We believe a real, yet worthwhile, challenge (objective) is to achieve and maintain a balance between the Community’s quality–of-life and our Town-wide economic viability;” an assertion that was in line with the 2000 Comprehensive Plan Vision Statement, “Snowmass Village in 2020 … the Village has successfully transitioned to a Multi-Seasoned Resort Town and full-time Residential Community. First class programs and facilities have been developed to broaden visitor seasons, strengthen business activity, provide community and visitor amenities, and increase employment opportunities;” and Aspiration Statement, “We aspire to be the Leading Multi-Season, Family-Oriented Mountain Resort Community.” This is the first time in the document that the term “family-oriented” appears. Additional Council comments go on to say that they believe, “All land use applications should and will respond to and directly address these concerns.” We would suggest that not only should all development applications further the community’s stated objectives (see above), but so should all of the Town’s resources -- regulations, policies, programs, capital plans, incentives, Council goals, and marketing and messaging materials. We believe that we are losing competitiveness against other mountain destination resorts. This statement somewhat narrows the Town’s focus on matters related to this single (yet significant) component of the economy – mountain destination resort, without explaining why. In addition, it excludes references to “balancing the area’s quality-of-life. This theme continues in subsequent statements including, “We need to understand ‘WHAT’ it takes to be a ‘successful resort community;’” and “We desire to retain and enhance our status as one of the premiere ski resorts in North America.” APPENDIX A169PLAN FRAMEWORKPRINCIPLESREFLECTIONSINTRODUCTION THE PUBLIC PROCESSINTRODUCTIONTAKE ACTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS 5 | Page The report cites, “Elements of a successful resort community include: vital and vibrant commercial core; sufficient, diverse and competitive lodging; host of amenities and activities on a mostly year-round basis; competitive access via multiple modes of transportation; effective and competitive value proposition; and marketing and special events.” While RC agrees with this list, the Urban Land Institute (ULI) states that in addition to these, other essential elements include: access to and depth of market (to be served); available labor force; outdoor recreational opportunities, scenic features, cultural / historic features; conference / convention facilities; favorable climate; discernable image and reputation; utilities and services; lodging, hotels / motels; and parking. We note these additions whereas many will further the Town’s other objective for a “balance between quality–of-life and economic viability.” Following this discussion is the assertion, “We need to agree “HOW MUCH” of each essential element is necessary to be ‘JUST’ big enough.” However, this is followed by the position that, “The lack of a vital and vibrant commercial core” is that thing which prevents us from being highly competitive as a mountain destination resort community.” A few observations related to this conclusion: this is the first point in the document that the term “destination” is mentioned; identifying the absence of this single “essential element” as the reason the Town cannot be “highly competitive as a mountain destination resort community,” somewhat minimizes the importance of the other “essential elements;” finally, it seems to provide the impetus for the decision that “just big enough” should be measured in terms of quantities of commercial space and lodging facilities. To this end, we would suggest expanding the number and type of measures used to monitor the Town’s effectiveness at achieving “just enough growth” to include those that consider other “essential elements” of its ultimate “end-state.” Suggestions Acknowledging that the final vision statement presented in the updated 2017 Comprehensive Plan will be different from those appearing in previous plans, input received to-date suggests that the essence of what the Town strives to achieve is similar. This said, we would suggest that the community’s “north arrow” or philosophical direction, is one that strives to be a community of people that welcomes the company of others, enjoys an environment unprecedented in its beauty and fosters economic success and independence. If correct, supporting objectives might best be prefaced with terms such as – balance, harmony, equilibrium, stability, connection, management, and organization. Further, measures of success should be both qualitative and quantitative. Finally, there should be agreement around the meaning of terms including: Village character Small-town feel Sustainability Quality of life Density Critical mass Economic stability SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 2018170 6 | Page Community-oriented businesses Self-sustaining Employee housing Town’s Role In terms of the Town’s efforts to advance the vision, inform growth and development, and achieve its desired outcomes, it should focus on those items it can control. For instance, the most effective use of public resources are those which fall within the following categories – market, physical, financial, regulatory, political, and organizational. For example, communities can influence the direction, pace and character of improvements by managing its natural amenities and man-made enhancements. It can ensure a desired character or level of quality through its regulations and accelerate rates of real estate activity through its financial incentives. It can attract or repel development through its stated Council goals and priorities and its efforts to minimize and share investment risk. Items the public sector cannot easily, if at all, control include everything from acts of nature to the investment targets of individual property and business owners. Other factors outside their control which can have a significant impact on the timing and type of community growth and development include: the availability of affordable capital for development, industry trends that reflect consumer preferences that favor online vs. in-store purchasing, fluctuations in the number of international visitors resulting from national policies, competition for labor with high-paying energy-related industries, and the effectiveness of area business managers. Measures of Success As stated above, while the principal components of the community’s vision can be distilled down to factors falling under the categories of “quality-of-life” and “economic vitality,” criteria that measure quantities of commercial space and lodging facilities are too limited to provide an accurate and comprehensive picture of success, failure or progress. These are further challenged by the fact that they are easily and often adversely influenced by factors outside the community’s control. To this end, we would suggest modifying the definition of “just big enough” provided for in the 2010 Comprehensive Plan which reads, “… planning approach more likely to provide the desired quality-of-life for the community while creating a differentiated, more welcoming, and convenient guest experience.” Alternatively, we would propose, “… a planning approach which attempts to protect those aspects of the community valued by its residents and visitors, while pursuing economic success for the purpose of ensuring sustainability of both.” With this modified definition, we would further propose that criteria used to measure success include several of those previously identified and presented above, as well as others such as: Jobs mix (by wage rate and industry group) Housing inventory (by target lifestyle segment and price point) Cost-of-living (in terms of housing affordability and disposable income) APPENDIX A171PLAN FRAMEWORKPRINCIPLESREFLECTIONSINTRODUCTION THE PUBLIC PROCESSINTRODUCTIONTAKE ACTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS 7 | Page Fiscal balance (in terms of desired community services and facilities and operational cash flows) Increases in property values (in terms of their ability to remain insulated from economic cycles) Breadth and depth of commercial offerings (daily needs) Medical services Infrastructure load (capacity) Health of natural resources Access to cultural venues Business development and entrepreneurship A test for evaluating the appropriateness of success criteria is to insert each one into the following statement, and follow it with an explanation. Statement: “Criteria” furthers the “stated vision” in the following ways. This approach can effectively reveal not only whether it is an appropriate measure relative to desired outcomes, but if it should be reclassified as a desired outcome of certain strategic initiatives. For example, “Expanded conference facilities and services” will further the community’s objective to “achieve the quality-of-life and economic vitality that will assure our future as a sustainable resort community” in the following ways. Explanation: Expanded conference facilities and services will afford the community the opportunity to attract visitors and guests year-round and particularly during the shoulder seasons. For example, “Maintenance of views from Brush Creek Road to the ski area” will further the community’s objective to “achieve the quality-of-life and economic vitality that will assure our future as a sustainable resort community” in the following ways. Critique: This might be an example of criteria that might better be classified as a desired outcome. Conclusion There is an adage used among individuals in recovering populations that essentially states, “You can control your path or your outcome, but not both. Decide on one, and then be open to either how you get there or where you end up.” We believe this is especially true in community development as well. You cannot set out a goal for a specific end-state and then limit the paths you take to arrive there. Success will be measured in your accomplishment of the goal, not the series of course amendments required to pave your way. SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 2018172 SUBDIVISIONS ZONING #LOTS/ UNITS #LOTS/ VACANT BUILDOUT % Adams Ranch PUD 3 0 100% Clear W Ranch EST 3 2 67% Cougar Canyon EST 5 5 0% Cozy Point Ridge / Schwarz EST 5 5 0% Country Club I SF-6 32 2 94% Country Club II (S'mass Club)PUD 4 0 100% Divide PUD 41 2 95% Divide Cabin for HOA MU/PUD 1 0 100% Faraway Ranch, Parcel M SPA-1 1 0 100% Fox Run PUD 25 2 92% Gracie's Cabin MU/PUD 2 1 50% Hidden Meadows n/a 4 0 100% Horse Ranch MF/PUD 96 6 94% Crossings at Horse Ranch MF/PUD 35 0 100% Melton Ranch I SF-15 58 1 98% Melton Ranch II SF-15 51 0 100% Melton Ranch III SF-15 22 0 100% The Pines at East Village PUD MU/PUD 51 3 94% Ridge Run I (SFD Lots 17 - 87)SF-30 71 2 95% Ridge Run II SF-30 16 0 100% Ridge Run III SF-30 60 3 95% Ridge Run IV SF-30 41 0 100% Ridge Condos, Parcel 3 MF 1 1 100% Rodeo Place ( TOSV) MF 21 0 100% Seven Star SF-150 1 1 0% Sinclair Meadows MF 17 3 82% Two Creeks MU/PUD 51 6 90% Wildcat Ranch Employee Housing*PUD 1 0 100% Wildcat Ranch Homesteads PUD 14 79% Wildcat Ridge 2 0%100% Wildcat Vista 3 0%100% Wildoak SF-150 13 0 100% Wildridge I SF-15 15 1 93% Wildridge II SF-15 47 1 98% Woodrun I SF-30 108 5 95% Woodrun II SF-30 10 0 100% Woodrun III SF-30 6 0 100% Woodrun IV SF-30 6 0 100% Woodrun V PUD 9 1 89% 952 53 6% Total Single Family Lots, Vacant Lots Remaining and Remaining Build-Out % TOSV ZONING, UNITS & BUILD-OUT AS OF OCTOBER 2017 (SINGLE FAMILY, MULTI-FAMILY & LODGES)APPENDIX B173PLAN FRAMEWORKPRINCIPLESREFLECTIONSINTRODUCTION THE PUBLIC PROCESSINTRODUCTIONTAKE ACTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 2018174 MULTI-FAMILY UNITS ZONING # UNITS # Potential Additional Units # Potential Future Units Aspenwood MU-2 52 3 55 Aspen Teacher Housing PUD 15 15 Base Village Lots 1-9 MU-2/PUD 606 606 Base Village Employee Housing*MU-2/PUD 28 28 Brush Creek Apts.*PUD 27 27 Carriageway Apts.SPA-1 12 2 14 Chamonix at Woodrun PUD 27 3 30 Club Commons II MF 36 36 Country Club Townhomes MF 86 6 92 Creekside Apts.* PUD 72 72 Crestwood SPA-1 127 14 141 Daly Townhomes*MF 16 16 Deerbrook (Parcel L) SPA-1 15 15 Enclave PUD 39 1 40 Fanny Hill Cabins PUD 10 7 17 Fairway Three* PUD 30 30 Homestead PUD 14 14 Interlude SPA-1 26 4 30 Laurelwood SPA-1 52 7 59 Lichenhearth SPA-1 40 4 44 Meadow Ranch SPA-2 60 60 Mountain View*MF-PUD 156 156 Owl Creek Townhomes MU-PUD 32 32 Palisades*PUD 26 26 Ridge Condos MF 37 1 38 Ridge Run I (Duplexes Lots 1-16)DU 31 1 32 Rodeo Place (Attached Units on Lots 1 - 3)*MF 8 8 Seven Star (MF Use on Lot 2-M) MF 1 1 Seasons Four SPA-1 96 1 97 Shadowbrook SPA-1 26 3 29 Sinclair Meadows TH*MF/PUD 21 21 Snowmass Center SPA-1 15 15 Snowmass Club Villas PUD 78 78 Snowmass Mountain Condos SPA-1 62 1 63 Snowmass Villas (Blue Roofs) SPA-2 28 28 Sonnenblick SPA-1 6 1 7 Stonebridge Condos SPA-1 92 10 102 Tamarack SPA-1 36 4 40 Terracehouse MF 29 4 33 Timberline Condos SPA-1 96 16 112 Timbers Club MF 40 40 Timbers Club Employee Units*MF 18 18 Top of the Village SPA-1 111 12 123 Villas North* PUD 32 23 55 Willows, Lower SPA-1 24 3 27 Willows, Center SPA01 40 4 44 Woodbridge Condos SPA-1 82 2 84 Woodrun V Townhomes PUD 45 45 Woodrun Place PUD 60 60 Woodrun Place Employee Units*PUD 6 6 TOTAL 2708 153 2861 APPENDIX B175 LODGING PUD #LOTS/ UNITS # Potential Additional Units # Potential Future Units Limelight MU-2 / PUD 99 99 Mountain Chalet Employee Units*6 6 Mountain Chalet SPA-1 64 7 71 Pokolodi Employee Units*3 3 Pokolodi Lodge SPA-1 47 5 52 Snowmass Inn Employee Units*SPA-1 2 2 Snowmass Inn SPA-1 37 4 41 Snowmass Lodge & Club PUD 52 52 Stonebridge Inn Employee Units*MU-2 / PUD 8 8 Stonebridge Inn MU-2 / PUD 95 11 106 Viceroy (Bldg. 13A in Base Village) MU-2 / PUD 150 150 Westin Employee Units*PUD 1 1 Westin (Silvertree) Hotel PUD 258 37 295 Wildwood Lodge Employee Units*SPA-1 7 7 Wildwood Lodge SPA-1 153 4 157 TOTAL 982 68 1050 PLAN FRAMEWORKPRINCIPLESREFLECTIONSINTRODUCTION THE PUBLIC PROCESSTAKE ACTION THE PUBLIC PROCESS