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02-07-00 Town Council Packet ��awQQ�c1�GEf- /oo SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL WORK SESSION 02-07-2000 1:00 — 1:10 P.M. INTERVIEW APPLICANT FOR BOARD OF APPEALS AND EXAMINERS VACANCY -- Gary Suiter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 1 1:10 —2:10 LAND USE CODE AMENDMENTS - Article 4, Employee Housing -- Leslie Klusmire/Victoria Giannola. . . . . . . . . . .Page 5 2:10 —4:10 TIMBERS AT SNOWMASS (FARAWAY RANCH SOUTH) PRELIMINARY PUD DISCUSSION • Staff Recommendations • Draft Resolution No. 06, Series of 2000 -- Chris Conrad. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 12 4:10 —4:30 WOODRUN V DUMPSTER — SITE ANALYSIS -- Hunt Walker. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 48 4:30 — 5:30 MALL TRANSIT PLAZA DISCUSSION (Information attached to back of packet) -- Joe Kracum. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 50 5:30 — 5:45 WILDCAT FIRE DISTRICT INTERGOVERNMENTAL AGREEMENT -- Craig Thompson/Steve Connor. . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 51 5:45 — 6:00 BREAK ..................SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN.COUNCIL.......No.......� REGULAR MEETING 02-07-2000 CALL TO ORDER AT 6:00 P.M. Item No. 1: ROLL CALL Item No. 2: PUBLIC NON-AGENDA ITEMS (5-Minute Time Limit) Item No. 3: DISCUSSION BUILDING AND PLANNING CONCERNS. . .No Packet Information 02-07-00tc Page 2 Item No. 4: DISCUSSION/ACTION PROFESSIONAL SERVICES AGREEMENTS: • ALAN RICHMAN PROPOSAL TO PROCESS PARCEL "N" APPLICATION • RENO/SMITH ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN PROPOSAL -- Victoria Giannola/Joe Coffey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 57 Item No. 5: PUBLIC HEARING — DRAFT RESOLUTION NO. 06, SERIES OF 2000 TO RECEIVE PUBLIC COMMENT ON DRAFT RESOLUTION NO. 06, SERIES OF 2000 CONCERNING THE TIMBERS AT SNOWMASS (FARAWAY RANCH SOUTH) PRELIMINARY PUD PLAN SUBMISSION, INVOLVING PARCEL K, FARAWAY RANCH GROSS PARCEL PLAT, AND THE GRANTING OF AUTHORIZATION TO SUBMIT A FINAL PUD PLAN APPLICATION -- Chris Conrad. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 70 Item No. 6: FIRST READING — ORDINANCE NO. 02, SERIES OF 2000 AN ORDINANCE ESTABLISHING THE PROCEDURES TO ASSESS AND COLLECT THE LIMITED EXCISE TAX ON IMPROVEMENTS IN EXCESS OF THE MAXIMUM ALLOWABLE FLOOR AREA FOR A LOT AS APPROVED BY THE ELECTORS OF THE TOWN ON NOVEMBER 2, 1999, IMPLEMENTING THE SAME BY AMENDMENT TO CHAPTER 4 OF THE SNOWMASS VILLAGE MUNICIPAL CODE. -- Steve Connor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 71 Item No. 7: FIRST READING — ORDINANCE NO. 03, SERIES OF 2000 AN ORDINANCE APPROVING THE SNOWMASS CLUB FINAL PLANNED UNIT DEVELOPMENT PLAN AMENDMENT -- Leslie Klusmire. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 77 Item No. 8: RESOLUTION NO. 05, SERIES OF 2000 A RESOLUTION OF THE TOWN COUNCIL OF THE TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO, APPROVING THE 2000 BUDGET FOR THE PITKIN COUNTY 'h CENT TRANSIT SALES AND USE TAX -- Gary Suiter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 83 Item No. 9: DISCUSSION/ACTION SEVEN-STAR RANCH FINAL PUD EXTENSION -- Gary Suiter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 87 02-07-00tc Page 3 Item No. 10: MANAGER'S REPORT -- Gary Suiter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 89 Item No. 11: APPROVAL OF WORK SESSION SUMMARIES FOR 12-06-99, 01-03-2000, 01-10-2000 AND MEETING MINUTES OF 01-17-2000. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 90 Item No. 12: DISCUSSION COMMITTEE REPORTS/COUNCIL COMMENTS Item No. 13: CALENDARS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 111 Item No. 14: EXECUTIVE SESSION PRIVILEGED ATTORNEY/CLIENT DISCUSSION REGARDING LAND ACQUISITIONS AND OTHER LEGAL MATTERS - Colorado Revised Statutes 24-06-402 (3) (a) - Snowmass Village Municipal Code Chapter 2, Article III, Section 2-45, Executive Sessions Item No. 15: ADJOURNMENT NOTE: ALL ITEMS AND TIMES ARE TENTATIVE AND SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT FURTHER NOTICE. PLEASE CALL THE OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK AT 923-3777 ON THE DAY OF THE MEETING FOR ANY AGENDA CHANGES COUNCIL COMMUNIQUE MEETING DATE: February 7, 2000 BY: Trudi Worline, Town Clerk THROUGH: Gary Suiter, Town Manager SUBJECT: Interview applicant for Town of Snowmass Village Board of Appeals and Examiners. OVERVIEW: Patrick Keelty has submitted an application expressing his interest in filling a vacancy on the Board of Appeals and Examiners. This vacancy occurred on the Board with the resignation of Tom Dunlop. The term of office will begin immediately and will expire on January 1, 2003. FINANCIAL SUMMARY: N/A BOARD OR COMMISSION RECOMMENDATION: N/A STAFF RECOMMENDATION: Staff recommends that Mr. Keelty be appointed to serve on the Board of Appeals and Examiners. H.�shared\clerk\boardsNappealsNkeelty Jan. 14. 2000 11 :48PM No. 0185 P. 2/2 TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE Application for Board/Commission Position NBoard of Appeals and Examiners ❑ Liquor Licensing Authority ❑ Finulcial Advisory ❑ Planning Commission u Eltction Judge ❑ Election Commission n Ans Advisory Board ❑ Other: �NA11 : Home Phone: pHr' � Cu 9�3 185 PL,v"cJ Noma 9196 SNGt016z f<0 Permanent Resident. Addcnt' StJOWrr)P V1L Yes'a No 0 ST &ZHI: Go 8/615 { >IIJ:g Aderesr PO BOX :.)c.86, WKau ?Iwo of Pomanent Residence; 4 r Latex.. S A;%Address: OffKC Phone. Po G's=)X 5686 y�3 53015 Icrnatov,d With: Pmitiom K-LCLL7j Y CDrJS 1 i 4c- Are you Registered to Vote in Snowmass Village: Yeses or No 0 I Lis; ;hc Experience or Education which may qualify you for this position: I, 1, 1. W do you wish to be appointed to this position': f_T_. wnt.y n i , eT i o 6 t vE &:�c.r T6 THL eomt,n u eT yam_ ?n na-5o HagJf JR Ar fat ktcso( "E" of g it.,O) 2ca GtiSTFm i i 'Z!1!otv:edge that 1 A n f nillix with the qualifications, duties and responsibilities of the position for which I :: rphimy an_. if appoicted, ; am ready, willing and able to take an ocdl as well a% act:cp:ing the :e�er^fwihues and duties. _ O cant's Sig tu:e Date .-,c:urn to : Town Clerk, Town of Snowmass Villa,t:, Box 5010, Snowmass Village, CO 51615 .P.bS c Keelty Construction, Inc. Patrick J. Keelty, President P.O.Box 5686 Snowmass Village, CO 81615 970-923-5300 Objective: To obtain high quality building projects. Summary: Experience includes building custom and spec homes , commercial projects, and both residential and commercial remodeling. Quality and timeliness are the priority of the entire staff. Management works closely with the client to consistently stay within budget. Current Projects Develping a 28,500q. ft. commercial building in Basalt Industrial Park, for mixed use: office, warehouse, and employee housing Extensive remodel on home 630 Two Creeks Drive in Snowmass Village Hotel Jerome, new mens and womens employee locker rooms 1997 to 1999 Custom 4500 sq. ft. home for clients on Bridge Ln. in Snowmass Village Remodeled home on 1496 Wood Rd. in Snowmass, with an addition of a bedroom and bathroom. Remodeled a new office for the law firm of Garfield &Hecht in Basalt Remodeled a new branch location for Pitkin County Bank in Basalt Thorough remodel of Aspen townhome located at 631 S. Galena Successfully developed and built a custom 4500 sq. ft. home appraised at $2.3 million at 421 Ridge Road. Project was financed by Pitkin County Bank and completed in eleven months, within budget. Developed and built a custom 4000 sq. ft. home that went under contract midway through construction, thus accommodating owner's specific needs and adaptations. Entire project completed in ten months. Commercial remodel of Pitkin County Bank's new branch in Snowmass Village, involving extensive electrical and security specifications. Remodel of Aspen Skiing Company locker rooms into a large daycare facility. 3 - Residential remodel involving new windows, custom kitchen cabinets, stonework, hardwood floors, paint ,wallpaper and creation of a music studio. Previous Experience: Residential remodels and additions in Aspen and Snowmass, Spec homes in Glenwood Springs and El Jebel. Interior remodel for the Assisted Living Facility through Aspen Valley Hospital. Cafe Suzanne remodel on Snowmass Mountain. Involved in operation of James Keelty Company, Inc., a family owned building and real estate firm in Maryland. Projects included building shopping centers, apartments, townhomes and single family homes. Education: B.S. in Business, New England College- Henniker, New Hampshire Personal Data: Ski instructor and team leader, Aspen Skiing Company Board of Directors, Early Learning Center Council Communique To: Gary Suiter From: Leslie Klusmire RE: Housing Mitigation Policy Decisions Date: February 7, 2000 One substantive policy decision remains in the revision process to Article 4 of the Municipal Code. Staff needs decisive policy direction from the Town Council on what degree of housing mitigation we want the developers of new and additional homes and commercial square footage to provide. We need decisive direction about what numbers go into the formula in order to create an acceptable level of housing mitigation. At the Council's last meeting, discussion centered around two issues, 1. the cumulative impacts of the various mitigation increases Council has asked for in the Standards for Restricted Housing, and 2. how this might impact the incentive to attempt both new development and redevelopment. After reviewing the report, staff would like Council's final decision on these matters: Recommendation: Staff recommends that the Council consider the housing policy questions being legislated by this Municipal Code section until the following questions are conclusively answered by a majority of the Council members. Assuming the rates in all categories given are real, defensible numbers and cannot be adjusted by doing more studies: 1. How much should developers mitigate their housing impacts?(now 100%) 2. What are appropriate job generation rates? 3. What is a reasonable amount of square footage requirement for mitigation? 4. What is the cumulative effect of the above decisions and can Council live with that? (If the answer is no, go back to questions 1, 2 and 3 and make adjustments until the answer is yes! More questions for now or another meeting: 41 . 4�� a. What policy do you want reflected in the ordinance concerning the cash in lieu mitigation option? b. How do you want this ordinance applied to various types of redevelopment project? MEMORANDUM To: Gary Suiter, Town Manager From: Leslie Klusmire, Steve Connor RE: Restricted Housing portion of the Code Date: February 7, 2000 One substantive policy decision remains in the revision process to Article 4 of the Municipal Code. Staff needs decisive policy direction from the Town Council on what degree of housing mitigation we want the developers of new and additional homes and commercial square footage to provide. We need decisive direction about what numbers go into the formula in order to create an acceptable level of housing mitigation. At the Council's last meeting, discussion centered around two issues, 1. the cumulative impacts of the various mitigation increases Council has asked for in the Standards for Restricted Housing, and 2. how this might impact the incentive to attempt both new development and redevelopment. Council has asked for increased mitigation in the areas of • degree of mitigation (100% of employee impact), already approved by ordinance • employee generation multipliers (increased to take into account current actual employee generation), • increase in number of land use categories for which employees are generated • square footage of housing required to mitigate per employee Job Generation Rates Job generation rates have been proposed for revision both by the generation rates used and the number of categories for which job generation rates apply. The job generation rates proposed by staff in response to Council request are current actual rates according to the 1999 Snowmass Village Employer Survey. For comparison purposes,the current job generation rates and the merged average rates for ski resorts in general is included for Council's information. Here is the proposed revised language for this section: (a) Job Generation Rates. Job generation rates vary by the type of land . The job generation rates found in Table 4-5,Job Generation Rates Per Type of Use, shall be applied to each type of use in the development at its maximum annual (peak) employment impact on the community. For any use not listed,the Planning Director shall determine the applicable job generation rate by consulting recognized professional publications or studies completed for resort communities similar to the Town. TABLE 4-5 JOB GENERATION RATES PER TYPE OF USE Current Code Merged Job Job Generation Generation Rates Rates Based on for Ski Resorts Actual SV Businesses Type of Use Number of Jobs Generated Commercial including general 5.57 jobs per 1,000 3.0 jobs per 1,000 6.94 jobs per 1,000 retail, grocery, liquor, interior square feet interior square feet interior square feet convenience Office 3.78 jobs per 1,000 4.03 jobs per 1,000 4.44 jobs per 1,000 interior square feet interior square feet interior square feet Service Commercial 5.57 jobs per 1,000 2.0 jobs per 1,000 2.0 jobs per 1,000 interior square feet interior square feet interior square feet Other Services 5.57 jobs per 1,000 2.9 jobs per 1,000 2.9 jobs per 1,000 interior square feet interior square feet interior square feet Multi-family and Fractional .50 jobs per unit Not part of study 0.66 jobs per unit Owncrship/Time Share Units Single-family/Duplex up to .30 jobs per lot Not part of study 0.31 jobs per lot 3000 sq. ft. Single-family/Duplex 3000 sq. .30 jobs per lot Not part of study 1.64 jobs per lot ft. to less than 5000 sq. ft Single-family/Duplex 5000 sq. .30 jobs per lot Not part of study 1.87 jobs per lot ft. to less than 7000 sq. ft Single-family/Duplex of 7000 .30 jobs per lot Not part of study 1.94 jobs per lot sq. ft. and over Hotel/Lodge Pillow .44 jobs per room Statistics not 0.22 jobs per comparable pillow Ski Area Restaurants— 4.58 jobs per 1,000 No figure 5.58 jobs per 1,000 Cafeteria Style square feet interior square feet Restaurants 5.57 jobs per 1,000 7.4 jobs per 1,000 7.9 jobs per 1,000 interior: feet interior square feet interior square feet Ski Areas 82.6 jobs per 1,000 82.6 jobs per 1,000 skiers at one time skiers at one time Conference Center 0.97 jobs per 1,000 0.97 jobs per 1,000 interior square feet interior square feet Health Club 1.47 jobs per 1,000 1.47 jobs per 1,000 interior square feet interior square feet Amount of Housing required Per Employee In response to Council request, staff proposed revising the square footage required per employee generated from 411 square feet to 448 square feet which is the amount of housing provided per employee at the recently completed Mountain View employee housing project. Here is the proposed revised language for this section: (b) Square Footage Per Employee. For that number of employees required to be housed in restricted housing, as determined in Subsections (a)through(c)above,the developer shall be responsible for the creation of a total square footage equal to four hundred forty- eight(448)square feet(as measured in Section 16A-3-210(b),Measuring Floor Area)for each employee to be housed. The total square footage for which the developer shall be responsible shall be provided in dwelling units whose size shall be within the range of sizes described in Subsection(e), Size Ranges of Restricted Dwelling Units. The unit mix and methods of providing said housing shall be determined as described in Section 16A-4-420, Methods of Complying With Requirements. Cumulative Impact This formula assesses the cumulative impacts of the revisions to mitigation degree requested by Council. The amount of jobs per employee(1.3)remains constant through adopted standards and survey results for both Snowmass Village and other ski resorts. Here is the proposed revised language for this section: (f) Summary of Formula. In summary,the total restricted housing square footage the developer shall provide shall be calculated in accordance with the following formula: Number of jobs generated/ 1.3 x 448 square feet If the Council believes that the cumulative housing mitigation requirement is too onerous given current economic conditions and common sense, one or all of the following formula multipliers must be reduced: - 9 I. Degree of housing mitigation required (now 100%) 2. Employee generation rates 3. Square footage of housing required per employee Cash in Lieu Option Currently,the Municipal Code allows a developer to provide cash in lieu of actual employee housing units if the developer has provide 75%of the actual employee housing required and the Council determines the development is minor in nature. The Council has discussed whether this is still a desired option or not in consideration of the expressed policy that developers need to provide actual housing for mitigation requirements. The proposed revision in this section which has been considered by Council reads as follows: (3) Cash-in-lieu. The Town may, at the Town Council's discretion, accept cash-in-lieu of restricted employee housing in the following instances: a. The Town Council may accept cash-in-lieu of restricted housing the development is minor in nature (such as, but not limited to, an addition to an existing structure), the Town Council may permit a developer to contribute cash-in-lieu to meet his or her entire restricted housing requirement. Costs to be included. Cash-in-lieu of employee housing shall include an amount of cash sufficient to cover and purchase land and all related planning, construction and construction management costs of the project, in current dollars, which would be incurred by the Town in order to provide the required amount of restricted housing. Recommendation: The proposed language seems reasonable to staff. Council may want to consider providing more definition to what is a "minor" development; for example, as development which requires less that one employee housing unit in mitigation. Impact on Redevelopment The current code allows a 12.5%markdown factor as a discount rate for the expansion of existing commercial floor area. The question has come up whether this is equitable or not. Mother significant concern is how this housing mitigation formula will impact the incentive for older lodging properties to redevelop. The Council should give staff the specific parameters under which specific types of development or redevelopment should be given relief from the housing mitigation requirements. In addition, staff needs to know what degree of relief is appropriate. Recommendation: Staff recommends that the Council consider the housing policy questions being legislated by this Municipal Code section until the following questions are conclusively answered by a majority of the Council members. Assuming the rates in all categories given are real,defensible numbers and cannot be adjusted by doing more studies: 1. How much should developers mitigate their housing impacts?(now 100%) 2. What are appropriate job generation rates? 3. What is a reasonable amount of square footage requirement for mitigation? 4. What is the cumulative effect of the above decisions and can Council live with that? (If the answer is no, go back to questions 1, 2 and 3 and make adjustments until the answer is yes! More questions for now or another meeting: a. What policy do you want reflected in the ordinance concerning the cash in lieu mitigation option? b. How do you want this ordinance applied to various types of redevelopment project? TOWN COUNCIL COMMUNIQUE MEETING DATE: February 4, 2000 BY: Planning Department STAFF: Chris Conrad SUBJECT: Work Session and Public Hearing concerning Resolution No. 6, Series of 2000, a resolution regarding the Timbers at Snowmass (Faraway Ranch South) Preliminary PUD Plan submission, involving Parcel K, Faraway Ranch Gross Parcel Plat, and the granting of authorization to submit a Final PUD Plan application. TOPIC: 1) Staff Recommendations Regarding: - Employee Housing Proposal - Construction Management Plan - Parking Management Plan - Rezoning/Subdivision Exemption -Trails 2) Discuss Draft Resolution/Direction to Staff BACKGROUND: The January 10 Town Council meeting principally involved discussion regarding the Timbers at Snowmass Preliminary Plan geotechnical information prepared by CTL/Thompson, Inc and the report prepared Lambert and Associates, who had been retained by the Town to evaluate geotechnical issues relating to the site. The Applicant was directed to respond to the Lambert report. Staff anticipates receipt of the CTL/Thompson response on February 7. The geotechnical issues can then be fully discussed at a subsequent meeting. A rough draft of Resolution No. 6, Series of 2000, has been prepared for discussion during the meeting. Staff would like to provide an overview, comments and recommendations prior to focusing upon the document itself. This brief discussion will principally focus upon the items listed above. Staff has received some new material that had been requested: 1 A new, more detailed, construction timeline and management plan. [See Exhibit C of the resolution. The large site diagram is in your Town Council Box/Will be reduced and included as part of Exhibit C] 2. A kiss and ride illustration providing "head-in" parking spaces vs. the original circular drop-off. [In your Town Council Box/Will be part of Exhibit G] T.C. Communique The Timbers at Snowmass Page 2 3. A sheet containing boulder retaining wall illustrations. [In your Town Council Box/Will be part of Exhibit A] 4. Drawings depicting the cantilevered RFTA bus pull-out along Brush Creek Road. [In your Town Council Box/Will be part of Exhibit G] 5. Additional comments from John McCarty regarding landscaping, the stream and the boulder retaining walls. [In your Town Council Box/Will be part of Exhibit 1] 6. Additional comments from Joe Coffey regarding the Employee Housing program. [Exhibit 1] In order to save paper, copying costs and to meet the packet deadline, not all of the exhibits referenced within the resolution have been included within the packet. A full set of the exhibits will be available for reference at the meeting. Here is a quick reference list of the resolution exhibits: Exhibit A: Necessary documents and drawings from the Applicant's application as needed to sufficiently describe the development proposal. Exhibit B: The final Parking Management Plan, including site and garage plans. Exhibit C: The final Construction Management Plan and diagram. Exhibit D: The Building Height diagram. Exhibit E: A site plan delineating the open space area which will placed within the Conservation Easement. Exhibit F: The Employee Housing Proposal. Exhibit G: Diagrams relating to the TOSV Shuttle Stops and RFTA pull-outs. Exhibit H: Site Plan and information relating to the ski and pedestrian trails. Exhibit 1: Staff and Consultant Recommendations. P:\user\cconrad\MS Word Docs\The Timbers\The Timbers Prelim TCMemo14 SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL RESOLUTION NO. 6 SERIES OF 2000 A RESOLUTION REGARDING THE TIMBERS AT SNOWMASS (FARAWAY RANCH SOUTH) PRELIMINARY PUD PLAN SUBMISSION, INVOLVING PARCEL K, FARAWAY RANCH GROSS PARCEL PLAT, AND THE GRANTING OF AUTHORIZATION TO SUBMIT A FINAL PUD PLAN APPLICATION. WHEREAS, Faraway South LLC submitted a Sketch Plan Application for a project referred to as the Faraway Ranch South Specially Planned Area to the Town for review and consideration; and WHEREAS, said Sketch Plan was approved by the Town Council on January 18, 1999 in Resolution No. 3, Series of 1999 (Resolution 3"); and WHEREAS, Resolution 3 conditionally authorized SM Partners, LLC, as the Sketch Plan Applicant, to submit a Preliminary Plan application for the Project; and WHEREAS, the Planning Commission and the Town Council of the Town of Snowmass Village provided Faraway South LLC with direction in Resolution 3 related to the development of the property and identified specific information and studies which were necessary to properly review a Preliminary Plan application for the Project; and WHEREAS, SM Partners, LLC had submitted on behalf of Faraway South, LLC and The Timbers at Snowmass, LLC (the "Landowners") a request for Preliminary Plan submission review of the Faraway Ranch South Specially Planned Area (SPA) involving Parcel K and N, Faraway Ranch Gross Parcel Plat, as recorded in Plat Book 17 at Page 5 in the records of the Pitkin County, Colorado Clerk and Recorder; and WHEREAS, the application was reviewed for completeness and accepted by the Town of Snowmass Village Planning Director("Planning Director") for review on April 13, 1999; and WHEREAS, Parcel N was subsequently conveyed to the Town of Snowmass Village (the "Town") and withdrawn from the Project at that time; and WHEREAS, The Timbers at Snowmass, LLC (the "Applicant'), which acquired the controlling interest in the Project from Faraway South LLC, continued with the Preliminary Plan Application to the Town for its review and approval of a project then renamed from "Faraway Ranch South Specially Planned Area (SPA)'to "The Timbers at Snowmass" (the "Project'); and WHEREAS, Faraway South LLC has consented to the Preliminary PUD Application by Applicant on its behalf, and WHEREAS, the submission also involves: 1) a request to rezone the property from SPA-1, Specially Planned Area, to MU-PUD, Mixed Use PUD; 2) subdivision of the parcel: and, 3) a Subdivision Exemption application to permit condominiumization (including a time share regime) of the project; and WHEREAS, the Planning Director had previously determined that the proposed Project qualified TC Reso.00-06 The Timbers Prelim.Plan Page 2 for review as a Major Planned Unit Development ("PUD") application in accordance with the procedures specified within Section 16A-5-300(b) of the Snowmass Village Municipal Code (the "Municipal Code"); and WHEREAS, said procedure requires an initial Public Hearing and Preliminary PUD Plan review by the Planning Commission; and WHEREAS, posted, mailed, and published notice of public hearings held before the Planning Commission on June 9, July 14 and August 18, 1999 were provided in accordance with the public notice requirements of Section 16A-5-60 of the Municipal Code; and WHEREAS, the Planning Commission reviewed the Project at public hearings which commenced on June 9 and August 18, 1999 for the purpose of receiving public comment; and WHEREAS, the Planning Commission conducted their review of the Project between June 9 and September 1 1999 to consider all relevant materials and testimony in order to evaluate whether the Project application complies with Section 16A-5-300(c), General Restrictions, and Section 16A-5-310, Review Standards of the Municipal Code and whether the preliminary plan submission by the Applicant has responded to the direction given by the Town as stated within Resolution 3; and WHEREAS, on September 1, 1999, the Planning Commission adopted Planning Commission Resolution No. 16, Series of 1999, which contains their findings and conditional recommendation for approval of the Applicant's Preliminary Plan submission; and WHEREAS, upon receiving the Planning Commission's recommendation, the Town Council, in accordance with the posted, mailed and published public hearing notice requirements of Section 16A-5- 150 of the Municipal Code, commenced a public hearing before the Town Council on September 7, 1999, to receive written and verbal public comment on the Project and to provide due process in accordance with the Municipal Code; and WHEREAS, the public hearing remained open and additional public testimony was received during the October 4, October 18, November 1,November 15 and December 6, 1999 Town Council meetings; and WHEREAS, in addition to reviewing the application,receiving public comment and recommendations from the Town staff and consultants on the above dates, a site visit and work session occurred on September 13 and additional work sessions were held on September 27, October 11, November 18, December 13, and December 20, 1999 as well as on January 3 and January 10, 2000; and WHEREAS, the Planning Commission, at the request of the Town Council,provided further review and comments during their November 17 meeting concerning the changes that occurred to Buildings A, D, L and M subsequent to their review and the overall architecture, colors and materials that were proposed within the applicant's November 8 submission packet; and TC Reso.00-06 The Timbers Prelim.Plan Page 3 WHEREAS, following receipt of a more detailed and consolidated set of submission documents on November 29, 1999, the public hearing was closed on December 6 and a new public hearing was scheduled for January 17, 2000 to receive public comment regarding the updated application; and WHEREAS, in accordance with the posted, mailed and published public hearing notice requirements of Section 16A-5-150 of the Municipal Code, a new public hearing commenced before the Town Council on January 17, 2000, to receive written and verbal public comment on the updated Preliminary Plan application; and WHEREAS, the further review of the application and receipt of public comment continued during public hearings and/or work sessions held before the Town Council on February 7, 14 and 21, 2000; and WHEREAS, the Town Council closed the public hearing on February_, 2000, completed it's review of the Preliminary PUD application for the Project on February_, 2000 and, in doing so, has fully considered the recommendations of the Planning Commission, Town staff, independent consultants hired by the Town to assist in the review of the Project and the relevant written and verbal testimony provided by the public during the course of their review of the Project application. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED by the Town Council of the Town of Snowmass Village, Colorado, as follows: Section One: General Findings. The Town Council finds generally as follows: 1. The Applicant submitted the Application for Preliminary Plan review of the Project in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 16A of the Municipal Code. The Planning Director accepted the Preliminary PUD Plan application after determining that it provided the "Minimum Contents" required pursuant to Section 16A-5-40(b), and included written and graphic materials pursuant to Section 16A-5-350, in sufficient detail to deem the application complete for review. Supplemental information had been submitted by the Applicant during the review process in response to staff, public and Town Council requests, comments, and concerns. To the extent, if any, that the original submission was different from the information used by the Town Council in the preparation of this resolution, the amended submission material had been reviewed and accepted by the Planning Director as meeting the intent and satisfying the requirements of Chapter 16A of the Municipal Code. 2. The Town Council finds that all Municipal Code requirements concerning the provision of public notice related to the project and public hearings thereon, including publication, posting, and mailing of notices, have been satisfied and that all Preliminary PUD application materials have been made available to the general public within a reasonable time to permit adequate review of the project. The Town Council further finds that the changes made by the Applicant during the Preliminary PUD review process were generally in response to directions and suggestions offered during the Public Hearings and that the public, Planning Commission and Town Council had ample opportunity to consider such changes. r_ TC Reso.00-06 The Timbers Prelim.Plan Page 4 3. The Town Council, during the Preliminary Plan review, considered alternative development layouts, architectural schemes and impact mitigation solutions for the property. These alternatives included: 1) Snow melting Faraway Road; 2) Removing the top floor of Building D to improve northerly sight lines from the Phase I Ridge Condominiums; 3) Eliminating the town home units and surface garages within Buildings L and M to be replaced by condominium four-plex buildings utilizing underground parking; 4) Creating a visually appealing water course and waterfall feature along the northerly perimeter of the Project; 5) Improving trail linkages and bus stops within the Project area; 6) Considering different color and materials schedules to lessen the visual nature of the project; and 6) Investigating whether to participate in the creation of the employee housing in order that the project be owned and managed by the Town. It was determined at the December 6, 1999 meeting not to proceed with the Applicant's offer to snow melt Faraway Road. 4. The amended Project, which was considered by the Town Council at the conclusion of the Preliminary Plan review and determined to be most consistent with Section 16A-5-300(c), General Restrictions, and Section 16A-5-310, Review Standards of the Municipal Code is as generally described below. The specific location of the structures and more detailed development parameters for the Preliminary Plan are shown and more fully described in Exhibit A of this resolution and the larger scale file documents and plans retained within the Planning Division records. A. Free Market Residential and Related Support Structures: 4 Four bedroom Townhouse units @ approx.3,586 S.F. ea. 14,344 S.F. 36 Three bedroom suites @ 2,000 S.F. 76,634 S.F. Circulation,Service&Common Area 44.472 SY TOTAL: 150,617 S.F. B. Free Market Residential Parking: 85 Underground parking spaces for Regular Club Members,Employees and Vans 50 Underground parking spaces for Associate Club Members 8 Parking spaces in town home two car garages 0 Surface apron spaces in front of town home garages 7 Surface plaza spaces(Short Tenn/Time Restricted Parking) 150 TOTAL Free Market Parking Spaces C. Restricted Employee Housing: 9 One Bedroom Units @ 557 S.F. 5,013 S.F. 9 Two Bedroom Units @ 1,057 S.F. 9.513 S.F. 18 Units (27 Bedrooms) TOTAL: 14,526 S.F. D. Restricted Employee Housing Parking: 41 Parking Spaces(1.5 spaces per bedroom) 3. The subject area is identified on the Comprehensive Plan Environmental Sensitivity Map as being _ I07 TC Reso.00-06 The Timbers Prelim.Plan Page 5 within the Brush Creek Impact Area. As such, the Applicant submitted a report that evaluated the potential impacts of the development on Brush Creek and its associated riparian habitat and wetlands. The Town Council has reviewed the report and evaluated the recommendations to determine whether consistency exists with the development evaluation standards found in Section 16A-4-30 of the Municipal Code. Specifically, the Town Council finds: a) Section 16A-4-30(e)(1) of the Municipal Code states that development shall not take place within twenty-five (25) feet from the channel of Brush Creek or the edge of any riparian or wetland areas; however, certain exceptions are permitted. The small stream channel that traverses the site has been previously altered and has historically transported sediment from the areas uphill from the Project to Brush Creek. The Applicant intends to enhance the stream condition by relocating and installing underground detention facilities to better regulate spring run-off flow rates and contain sedimentation so as to mitigate impacts onto Brush Creek. The proposal addresses existing off-site impacts beyond what would strictly be the sole responsibility of the applicant. In this regard, the Town Council finds that the applicant's proposal will be beneficial to Brush Creek and that the twenty-five (25) foot setback should be permitted to be varied to achieve the described development objectives. Specifically, the Town Council finds that the overall enhancement and restoration measures related to Brush Creek will substantially aid the improvement of the water quality and aquatic habitat of Brush Creek and replace the impacted wetland with more and better quality wetland elsewhere on site and in the community than would have resulted from strictly adhering to the setback requirements of the Municipal Code. b) The original proposal was to pipe a segment of the stream underground within the area between Building "A" and the ski slope, return to the surface to create a water feature/pond near the Woodbridge Bridge and then be piped underground to the existing discharge pipe which outflows into Brush Creek. The stream segment between Building "A" and the ski slope has now been brought to the surface. In addition, a pond has been created within the interior Club project area and a waterfall feature has been added proximate to the Brush Creek/Faraway Road intersection. The Town Council finds that these aspects of the enhancement plan to be desirable. c) The Applicant's US Army Corps of Engineers ("Corps") Section 404 permit application has been approved and the Applicant has agreed to mitigate the loss of approximately 0.13 acres that cannot be restored on site with 0.25 acre of wetlands within Brush Creek. The Applicant has indicated that the Corps has verbally agreed to allow this to occur. The applicant and Town Staff should continue to work with the Corps to develop a suitable solution that is beneficial to wetlands within the Town boundary. d) The Town Council has, to the extent necessary for and pertinent to a Preliminary Plan level of evaluation and review, determined that the application is generally consistent with the provisions of Section 16A-4-30, Brush Creek Impact Area, and that development could be permitted to take place within twenty-five (25) feet from the channel of Brush Creek and TC Reso.00-06 The Timbers Prelim.Plan Page 6 subject riparian/wetland areas by granting the setback exception permitted within Section 16A-4-30(e)(1) of the Municipal Code. These findings are subject to the Applicant satisfying the applicable conditions and Staff Recommendations contained within Section Three and Exhibit G, respectively, of this resolution. 4. The current zone classification for the Subject Property is SPA-1 Specially Planned Area. Section 16A-3-40(5) of the Municipal Code discusses the general purpose for the Specially Planned Area (SPA-1 and SPA-2) zone districts and specifies that development proposals within those districts are to be submitted and reviewed pursuant to the provisions of Article V, Division 3, Planned Unit Developments, and that those provisions will apply to establish and define the zoning parameters for the development. General Restriction No. 3 of the PUD regulations, however, states that "The land uses permitted in a PUD shall be limited to those uses that are allowed, or are allowed by special review, in the underlying zone district." Planning Commission Resolution 3 stated that the appropriate zone district for the proposed project was MU-PUD, Mixed Use PUD; however, Town Council Ordinance No. 11, Series of 1999, amends Chapter 16A of the Municipal Code such that the Project may not be rezoned to that zone district. As a result of Ordinance No. 11, Series of 1999, the Town Council finds, and the Applicant agrees, that the Project should be rezoned to the [MF, Multi- Family,] zone district in conjunction with any Final PUD approval. The MF zone district permits all of the uses now proposed in The Timbers Preliminary PUD application, including multiple family dwelling units, associated office, recreation, and other related uses, and the associated underground parking which will be limited to the multiple family uses and Associate Memberships. The rezoning of the Project to MF zone district will be approved at the time the Town Council approves the Final PUD plan for The Project. [To be discussed at the meeting] Additionally, the Applicant proposes that the"open space" areas, as shown on Exhibit E, be secured by a conservation easement in gross to preserve the open space within the MF zone district. The Town Council supports the Applicant's proposal and a final easement agreement will be provided for Final PUD review and approval. 5. Chapter Six, Future Land Use Plan, of the Comprehensive Plan identifies the subject area as the Faraway Ranch South (Parcel K & N) Comprehensively Planned Area ("CPA"). As such, the preferred development plan identified these elements: a) Employee housing could be included. b) Low-density, high occupancy, multi-family residential housing units could be included. c) A mixed-use recreation center at the base of Assay Hill could be included. d) Enhancement of the skier and pedestrian trails shall be included. e) Faraway Road/Brush Creek Road intersection improvement shall be included. f) Grouped development that provides for the maximum preservation of open space shall be included. g) Connection to the Snowmass Center and the Base area shall be included. Section 16A-3-40(6)b. of the Municipal Code specifies which of the above elements of the Comprehensive Plan shall be accommodated in the development of the Faraway Ranch South (Parcel --- /9 - TC Reso.00-06 The Timbers Prelim.Plan Page 7 K & N) CPA, namely: (1) enhancement of the skier access and pedestrian trails; (2) Faraway Road/Brush Creek Road intersection improvement; (3) clustered development that provides for the maximum preservation of open space; and (4) connection to the Snowmass Center and the Base area. The Town Council finds that the Project will accommodate these elements as described above, subject to the Applicant agreeing with the conditions in Section Three below relating to the pedestrian trails and Ridge Condominium owner's ski slope access. 7. Section 16A-3-40(6)b. of the Municipal Code also identifies elements of the Comprehensive Plan that could be considered in the development of the Faraway Ranch South (Parcel K & N) CPA, namely: (1) Low density, high occupancy, multi-family residential housing; (2) Mixed use recreation center at the base of Assay Hill; and (3) Employee Housing. The Town Council finds that these are not required elements that must be provided but notes that the Project will accommodate elements 1 and 3. Low density is defined within the Comprehensive Plan as being up to ten (10) units per acre. The free market residential component of the project will be 4.1 units per acre. 8. The "Comprehensive Plan" Build Out Analysis identifies the potential for up to 50 free market and 50 Affordable Housing units on the subject property if the PUD complies with Section 16A-5- 300(c)(6), Community Purposes for PUD's, and other applicable provisions of the Municipal Code. The development proposal involves far less than 85% and, therefore, no benefits are required except as may be needed for the height variation request. 9. Article IV, Division 4, Restricted Housing Requirements, of Chapter 16A of the Municipal Code, provides the methodology for determining the amount of restricted housing which must be provided by the Applicant to sufficiently mitigate the employee housing impact of the proposed development. The methodology in force and effect at the time this Preliminary Plan application was submitted requires: CLUB FACILITIES 1,022 S.F. Office Area X 3.78 jobs per 1,000 S.F. = 3.86 jobs 3,456 S.F. Ski Locker Area X 1.47 jobs per 1,000 S.F. = 5.08 jobs 2,955 S.F. Health Club Area X 1.47 jobs per 1,000 S.F. = 4.34 jobs 40 Multi-Family Units X 0.5 0 jobs per unit =20.0 jobs TOTAL: 33.28 jobs 33.28 Jobs Divided By 1.3 Jobs per Employee=25.6 Employees 25.6 X 411 sq. ft. per employee = 10,522 sq. ft. Restricted Housing Required The Applicant proposes to construct a minimum of 14,525 sq. ft. (not including storage units) of restricted housing as further described in Exhibit A. Of that amount, 10,522 sq. ft. will be TC Reso.00-06 The Timbers Prelim.Plan Page 8 constructed in fulfillment of the Applicant's obligation to mitigate the employee housing impacts of the Project. The remaining 4,003 sq. fl. are offered as a "Community Benefit" in connection with their height variance request. The Town Council finds that the Applicant can sufficiently meet the employee housing mitigation requirements of the Municipal Code for the Project. The Town Council has reviewed the Applicant's employee housing proposal but finds it to be in the best interest of the community to publicly participate in the creation of the housing and to proceed with structuring an agreement with the Applicant whereby the Town ultimately owns and manages the eighteen (18) employee housing units proposed by the developer. The initial discussion parameters were: a) Rent levels (Revenue)will be calculated based upon what the Mountain View Phase II rent would be for each unit type at the time of final PUD approval plus ten percent (10%). b) The Town will proceed with public financial participation by obtaining voter approval and securing funds through bond issuance (20 year term) in an amount that can be financed from the net operating income derived from collected rents. An estimated operating, maintenance and reserve budget needs to be developed and agreed upon by both the Applicant and Town prior to Final PUD approval. The bond question is to be presented for voter approval in November, 2000. c) The applicant will then be responsible for the remaining costs of constructing the proposed employee housing units approved as part of the Final PUD application. When completed, the employee housing project will be conveyed to the Town for the purchase price established by the above voter approved bond issuance. d) Upon completion, the Town will own, manage and maintain the project in accordance with Town guidelines, except as provided below. Conveyance will occur at the time of issuance of the Certificate of Occupancy for the Applicant's completed affordable housing project. e) While the Town Council finds that it is appropriate to make a certain amount of the housing available to the employees of the project, the Town Council finds that the majority of the project should be available to any employee that qualified under the Town's guidelines. The Town and Applicant mutually agree on a percentage of the project (by specified units)that the applicant shall be entitled to priority use by executing an employer master lease with the Town for the use of the units by employees working within the Timbers Club free market project. Matters involving rent collection, enforcement of housing guidelines and eviction of tenants residing within the master leased units are intended to be the responsibility of the applicant. 0 The applicant shall receive first priority to rent additional units should the Town be unable to rent them pursuant to the Town's Housing Guidelines. The Town Council also chose to develop a Plan `B" should the bond issue ballot question not be TC Reso.00-06 The Timbers Prelim.Plan Page 9 approved by the voters. To the extent necessary for and pertinent to a Preliminary Plan level of evaluation and review, the Town Council and Applicant have agreed that the final employee housing plan submitted as part of any Final PUD submission shall comply with the requirements and procedures specified within Exhibit F of this resolution. 10. The Town Council was requested by staff to provide their interpretation of Section 16A-4- 400, Purpose, of the Municipal Code which states: Recognizing the shortage of adequate housing for persons of low,moderate or middle income, adequate provisions for comfortable and affordable housing in suitable locations shall be made to accommodate such persons and their families employed as a result of the construction,operation or use proposed in a subdivision, PUD or special review application. The Town Council finds that this section of the Municipal Code should be interpreted to apply solely as the preamble to the regulatory provisions, being Section 116A-4-410, Restricted Housing Requirements, and Section 16A-4-420, Methods of complying with requirements, that follow and that the "Purpose" section has never been applied and should not be interpreted to mean that any required employee provided by the developer pursuant to the above sub-sections are to be made available exclusively or on a first priority basis for employees of the development in the manner which the applicant describes within their application. Further, the Town Council feels that the legislative intent of the "Purpose" section was simply to express the basis or reason for adopting the regulations that follow which specify the manner in which additional affordable housing is to provided by developers within the community. 11. The Town Council has, to the extent necessary for and pertinent to a Preliminary Plan level of evaluation and review, determined that the application is generally consistent with the provisions of Section 16A-5-300(c), General Restrictions, of the Municipal Code ("Restrictions"), as discussed below and/or subject to satisfying the applicable conditions contained within Section Three of this resolution. Although one (1) of the primary purposes of the PUD regulations is to provide flexibility in the land development process, the Restrictions are intended to define the limits of that flexibility. The following Restriction warrants comment: Dimensional Limitations and Community Purposes. Only certain dimensional limitations may be varied within the PUD process. The Applicant has requested approval to exceed the thirty-eight (38) foot maximum allowable height limit, as specified within the MF zone district, for Club Building "A". One of the review criteria for allowing the variation is that the Project must achieve one (1) or more of the applicable purposes listed in Section 16A-5-300(6), Community Purposes for PUD's. The "purposes" achieved are often referred to as "Community Benefits". The Town Council finds that more than one (1) of the purposes specified within Section 16A-5-300(c)(6) will be achieved. The Applicant has offered to provide 4,004 sq. ft. restricted housing in addition to the amount required to mitigate their employee housing impacts. In addition to the housing, other Community Benefits, as more fully specified within the variance request (see Section "L" of the November 29 TC Reso.00-06 The Timbers Prelim.Plan Page 10 application packet), are being offered in connection with their height variance request. The Applicant must also demonstrate that granting the height variation is `necessary for that purpose to be achieved." The Applicant relates the need to exceed the height limit for Building A as being necessary in order to accomplish an intended purpose to "encourage better design". The Applicant has cited the underground parking and their desire to incorporate roof forms that are compatible with mountain design concepts. A lesser factor involves the evolution of the project to reduce the number of larger stand-alone town homes and converting the town home "units" into smaller condominium suites contained within four buildings. The first fundamental question before the Town Council is whether the additional height being granted for Building A is reasonable and appropriate for the better architectural design that is being achieved and to achieve the other community benefits proposed. It is felt that the intent and purpose for granting any height variation should relate directly to the purpose being achieved and not entirely on the Community Benefits being provided by the Applicant. The second question is whether the Town Council should accept the recommendation of the Planning Commission regarding the manner in which building height will be calculated within the Project. The Municipal Code defines grade as the elevation of the ground in existence prior to the initiation of development or if it is determined that the existing grade has been altered prior to an application for development, then the Planning Director shall establish what had been the existing grade prior to the alteration. The Town Council finds that this site has been altered substantially over time. Detailed studies show that the majority of the 30 percent slopes which now exist on the site are, in fact, man made. The Town Council has determined that there is inadequate data to accurately establish and define the topography which would have existed on the site prior to its alteration. The Town Council and the applicant agree that the real issue relating to height is what the project will look like from various vantage points. For this reason the applicant submitted a substantial amount of computer generate imagery to demonstrate the related mass and visual impact of the project. The Town Council, based on Planning Commission and public input, has determined that the visual impact of the project now described in the Preliminary PUD application and the building height diagram attached as Exhibit D, identifying the defined maximum building roof ridge elevations, is acceptable and consistent with the community and neighborhood image and character. Therefore, for the purposes of calculating height and related variance request, the Town Council finds that it is appropriate to use the topography which existed on the property at the time of Preliminary PUD application. With regard to the height variance request,the Town Council finds: 1) The request to exceed the height limit for Building A, as specifically shown in the Preliminary PUD application is reasonable. The building is situated on top of the underground parking structure, which is considered to be a desirable feature of the project. The pad created by the parking structure is above the existing grade of the site, thereby adding additional height to Building A. - a3 - TC Reso.00-06 The Timbers Prelim.Plan Page 11 2) While the height of the building could be reduced by lowering the pitch of the roof, the Town Council finds that the proposed roof pitch is more characteristic of traditional mountain design. 3) The project includes smaller scale buildings in the foreground, as viewed from Brush Creek Road and the Woodbridge neighborhood which provides the appearance that the overall design will step up to hillside and that the height of Building A will be minimized by the .placement of 38 foot tall buildings in the foreground. 4) Although Building A will exceed the 38 foot height limit, the Town Council finds that this is the appropriate location for additional building height within the property and the proposed design will, as is shown in computer imagery provided with the Preliminary PUD application, protect the desirable view planes from surrounding residential projects. 12. The Town Council finds that the project will provide certain improvements that, under Section 16A-5-300(c)(6) constitute benefits to the community. These benefits are as follows. a) The project will provide either enclosed or underground parking for the 40 free market units. While this is a benefit to the project, the elimination of surface parking does produce a certain level of visual benefits to the community and surrounding neighborhood. b) The Timbers project will provide a number of infrastructure enhancements that will be directly applicable to assisting the development of the Town's employee housing site on Parcel N, including the extension of utilities and roadway and intersection improvements that mitigated the impact of not only The Timbers project but also mitigated the impact of the Parcel N employee housing. c) The Project will relocate the Brush Creek Road transit stop and shelter, now locate on the west side of the intersection, to a more suitable location east of the intersection. Relocating the facility for the purposes of improving sight distance and providing an adequate space for the Town and RFTA is a mitigation requirement. The project will, however,provide an enhanced shelter and landscaping as an aesthetic improvement and community benefit. d) The Project will establish a suitable kiss and ride facility to serve the surrounding residential neighborhood. The facility will ensure that, in the future, all drop-offs and pick ups can occur off of the public road. The drop off and pick up activity now occurs on private property. e) The Project will enhance the pedestrian trail system which crosses the property and provide crucial trail connections to help enhance the community and neighborhood trail network and provide better access to the Base Village area. These trails include: (1) The Brush Creek Trail will be realigned near the Faraway Road-Brush Creek Road z.4 TC Reso.00-06 The Timbers Prelim.Plan Page 12 intersection. A Class I trail right-of-way will be established and the trail reconstructed to the standard of 8 feet. The relocation will move the point of the Faraway Road crossing further from the intersection, thereby improving safety. Environmental and landscape enhancements will improve the aesthetic qualities that now occur along this section of trail. (2) A Class I trail will be provided along the hillside adjacent to the southerly side of Faraway Road, as generally shown on Exhibit H, connecting The Ridge neighborhood to the town shuttle stop area and the Brush Creek Trail. This trail,however, will be evaluated as part of the Final PUD submittal as to where such a paved trail could be constructed into the hill side: 1) without requiring undesirable retaining walls; 2) so as to not adversely affect slope stability or surrounding property; and 3)be extended through The Ridge Condominium parcel. In the alternative, the Applicant shall construct a sidewalk adjacent to Faraway Road within the right-of-way. (3) A Class II unpaved summer use trial will be established along The Ridge Condominiums existing ski egress trail to the westerly property line. This trial will be only for pedestrians, bicycles, and equestrians. Use will be prohibited during the ski season to ensure that the trail continues to provide proper ski egress for The Ridge Condominiums and does not interfere with the Aspen Skiing Company's winter operations on Assay Hill. An agreement ensuring that a trail easement will be provided to the Town by the Applicant, or successors, enabling the trail to extend westerly through the Aspen Skiing Company("ASC") ski easement when authorized by ASC will be provided with the Final PUD submission. 0 The Timbers at Snowmass will undertake significant improvements to the site drainage, which has undergone major alteration over time. The improvements are required to not only mitigate the on-site development, but also help to control the adverse impacts on water quality caused by previous improper development practices that actually occur off-site and above the Project. g) The Project will remove the existing railroad tie retaining wall near the Brush Creek-Faraway Road intersection. The project will provide significant aesthetic improvement at this location, including boulder walls, water feature, and enhanced landscaping as requested by the Planning Commission and Town Council. This will be a desirable aesthetic enhancement to that area. h) The Project will provide restricted employee housing in an amount that exceeds the requirements of the Code. The Developer will construct 15,167 square feet, thereby exceeding the requirement by 4,646 square feet. 13. The applicant has also requested approval of a required parking variation in order to obtain authorization to reduce the number of parking spaces required by Section 16A-4-310 allowing the required parking for the 36 Club Suites to be reduced from one (1) space per bedroom (3 --- 4 s-- TC Reso.00-06 The Timbers Prelim.Plan Page 13 spaces per unit)to a maximum of two (2) spaces per unit. With regard to this request, and given the level of community benefits provided by the project,the Town Council finds the following: a) The applicant has provided parking data obtained from similar fractional ownership interest projects to satisfactorily indicate that the number of parking spaces required by the Municipal Code likely exceeds what will be the actual amount of parking necessary to support a project of this type. b) The Applicant has agreed to lease (one year minimum term) rather than sell, for a period of three years from the date of completion of Phase I of the Project, a sufficient number of "Associate Member"parking spaces such that 126 spaces remain available within the parking structure for Townhome (8 spaces), Condominium (108 spaces), employee (8 spaces) and van (2 spaces)parking. c) At the end of the three (3) year evaluation period, or at any time prior to then as determined appropriate by the Town Council, the parking program will be evaluated to determine whether the required parking for the condominium units may be reduced to some level between two (2) spaces per unit (72 spaces) and the required (1) space per bedroom (being 3 spaces per unit or 108 spaces). The Town Council may then, by resolution, establish the long term parking program and authorize the Applicant to sell the available excess lease spaces to "Associate Members". d) The applicant has agreed to implement priority lease and/or sale provisions for all "Associate Members"parking spaces for 1)Faraway Road residents first; then 2) Snowmass Village residents; then 3) Pitkin County residents; and finally 4) all others. 13. The Town Council has, to the extent necessary for and pertinent to a Preliminary Plan level of evaluation and review, determined that the application is generally consistent with the provisions of Section 16A-5-310, Review Standards, of the Municipal Code ("Standards"), as discussed below and/or subject to satisfying the applicable conditions contained within Section Three of this resolution. a) The Preliminary Plan generally identifies land uses that are consistent with the Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan (the "Comprehensive Plan") Future Land Use Map in that the subject area is identified as being intended for Open Space/Conservation and Multi-Family Residential uses. The "Club Facility" and the associated parking would be appropriate accessory uses customarily found in connection with a development of this type. b) It is believed that Building D does partially extend into the area shown as being Open Space on the Comprehensive Plan Future Land Use Map; however, the Applicant has committed a southerly portion of the parcel to Open Space, as shown on Exhibit E, that is larger in area than what has been identified for "Open Space/Conservation" on the map. TC Reso.00-06 The Timbers Prelim.Plan Page 14 The Applicant needs to provide a copy of the conservation easement document and supply sufficient information within the Final PUD application to demonstrate to the satisfaction of the Town Council that there will be no net loss in Open Space from the amount currently identified on the Future Land Use Map. Although not a requirement to the processing of the application, the Town Council will then direct that the Future Land Use Map be amended to be consistent with the Final Plan approval. 14. The Town Council finds that the proposed project generally complies with the directions established by the Town in the Sketch Plan approval resolution and with subsequent guidance from the Planning Commission during Preliminary Plan review, as discussed below and/or subject to satisfying the applicable recommendations contained within Section Three of this resolution: a) Retaining Walls/Finished Grading. Considerable discussion has occurred regarding the manner in which the Applicant should handle the boulder/grade/landscape placement within the areas currently shown on the site plan as being vertical boulder walls. The Applicant has received verbal direction during the meetings and written comments have been provided within the Exhibit I of this resolution defining what needs to be provided as part of their Final PUD submittal. Rather than to rely entirely upon site detail and section drawings, it is reasonable to expect that a majority of the work will involve "field judgement and placement" of materials by the contractor. Therefore, the Town Council needs to also receive a descriptive outline the criteria and specifications to be used in the field by the contractor. b) Geotechnical, Groundwater and Drainage. The Town Council retained the professional services of Lambert and Associates, a geotechnical engineering firm located in Montrose, Colorado, to review the geological materials prepared by CTL/Thompson for the Applicant's Preliminary PUD submission. Their report was presented to the Town Council at their January 17, 2000 meeting and the Applicant was directed to respond to the comments, questions and issues outlined within their report...... NOTE: The CTL/Thompson response is to be provided to the Planning Division on January 7. c) Town Shuttle and RFTA Pullouts. The Applicant amended their November 29 material concerning the down-hill Faraway Road TOSV Shuttle Stop and west-bound Brush Creek Road RFTA pull-out, as shown in Exhibit G, in response to direction received by staff and the Town Council. The Town Council finds: TO BE DISCUSSED AT THE MEETING. d) Fractional Ownership. The Town Council finds that the fractional ownership nature of the project will help ensure a relatively high occupancy level within the Project. The Project satisfactorily complies with the requirements of the Municipal Code with regard to fiscal impacts. The Town Council finds that the Applicant has used generally conservative assumptions in the fiscal impact report provided with the Preliminary PUD application. As a result, the Town Council has determined that, with no more than a fifty-five percent (55%) occupancy rate, the project will generate sufficient revenue, in the form of taxes, fees and other revenue sources, to offset the readily identifiable fiscal impacts that it creates on the community. Any higher occupancy level was found to produce a net positive benefit to the aq � TC Reso.00-06 The Timbers Prelim.Plan Page 15 community. The Town Council finds it to be in the public interest to enable the Applicant to establish Club provisions that may help ensure high occupancy if ownership occupancy does not meet The fifty-five percent (55%) occupancy levels shown to be the"break-even"point within the Fiscal Impact Analysis. The Applicant proposes to allow the owners of interest in the Project, by simple majority vote, to determine whether units, or interests therein, may be rented on a short term basis to individuals not owning fractional interests in the Project. The Town Council finds this to be a desirable provision. 15. The Town amended the Land Use and Development Code in Ordinance No. 11, Series of 1999,which will affect the manner in which floor area is calculated for the project. While the Planning Commission and Town Council have thoroughly reviewed the amount of floor area proposed in the Preliminary PUD application, the Town Council recognizes that the applicant will be required to provide with the Final PUD application revised floor area calculations that are consistent with the amendment to the Code approved under Ordinance 11. 16. The Town Council considered the applicant's proposed options related to improving the lower portion of Faraway Road. One option included providing a wider driving surface and a second option included a narrower pavement width with a snowmelt system. The Town Council has determined that the narrower pavement surface and snowmelt system is not appropriate. The wider pavement surface with all related improvement described in the Preliminary PUD application is the most desirable traffic mitigation solution. 17. The applicant has requested that the Town Council approve an excavation permit to for the purposes of. 1)preparing for employee housing utilities and preparing a staging area, 2) establishing a temporary stream diversion, 3) creating a shoring wall at the back of the parking structure, 4) commence construction of the parking structure and 5) commence construction of Building A. The Town Council finds that while they are under no obligation to issue an excavation permit, there are appropriate reasons to consider allowing the Applicant to commence with Items 1, 2 and 3 above at this time The Town Council finds that sufficient understanding has been gained during the Preliminary PUD review to permit such improvements to commence. Geotechnical studies have considered on-site and neighboring property conditions. Related engineering requirements have been established through the geotechnical studies and reports prepared by the applicant's consultant and the recommendations generated by the Town's independent geotechnical consultant. The Town Council also finds that it is desirable to commence this excavation during the winter months and prior to the Spring run-off and rising water tables. No authorization should be granted, however, until wall, diversion and drainage construction documents have been submitted and acceptable detailed construction management and interim erosion control plans have been developed which carefully TC Reso.00-06 The Timbers Prelim.Plan Page 16 minimize visual, environmental, noise, traffic and operational impacts on surrounding properties, roadways and Brush Creek during the period when the ski area is operational. 18. The Town Council finds that the applicant's request for a subdivision exemption for the purposes exempting a condominiumization and time share estate from the subdivision regulations of the Town is appropriate, except as discussed below. The Code defines a time share unit as "the ownership or use of which is subject to an arrangement . . . . . which provides for or allows the exclusive use or occupancy of the dwelling unit by one (1) or more co-owners or co-users during any annually recurring period of time if said agreement is in any way binding or effective on any assignee or future owner of the unit or any fractional interest therein." The Timbers at Snowmass request approval of an exemption from subdivision regulations of the Town for the following purposes of condominiumizing 36 Club Suites and 4 Club Townhome units; creating a time share estate, including a total of 302 fractional ownership interests in the 36 Club Suites and 4 Club Townhome units; and condominiumizing parking spaces within the parking structure, as specifically described in the Preliminary PUD application. One condominium unit will include all of the parking spaces owned and managed by The Timbers Association. There will be thirty-six (36) individually condominiumized parking space that must be initially owned by the Developer but leased to the Master Association(126 initially required spaces minus 90 spaces if parking reduced to 2 spaces per Condo. Unit). The specific number of"Associate Member"spaces that can initially be sold will range from 24 spaces upward depending on the interior engineering design of the parking structure.. Ultimately, there will be at least fifty(50) individual condominiumized spaces for sale to Associate Members. The subdivision exemption request is consistent with the goals of the Comprehensive Plan and is necessary to further the objectives of the PUD plan. The subdivision exemption will be approved in conjunction with the Final PUD Plan. ADD: 1) Should the employee housing units be permitted to be condominiumized? 2) Should at least 1 condominiumized parking space per unit be designated for and conveyed to the interest owners of each unit? 3) The parking not designated to Associate Members should be conveyed as an undivided interest to the unit owners (as a common element) or The Timbers at Snowmass Owners Association. Section Two: Action. To provide for the welfare and safety of the public and to ensure that the development proceeds in accordance with community goals and objectives, the Town Council hereby grants authorization to The Timbers at Snowmass, LLC to apply for Final PUD Plan development review of The Timbers at Snowmass project, as described within Exhibit A and incorporated herein by this reference as if set forth at length, subject to the requirements of Chapter 16A of the Municipal Code, the findings stated within Section One above and the conditions specified within Section Three below. 1. The Project use, density, and development configuration, which is described in the Preliminary PUD Plan, includes the following Land Use and Development Program: - Z.q -- TC Reso.00-06 The Timbers Prelim.Plan Page 17 NOTE: Square footage figures need to be re-calculated per Ordinance No. 11, Series of 1999 A. 36 three bedroom Condominium, Timeshare Estate Units S.F. B. 4 four bedroom Condominium, Timeshare Estate Units S.F. C. Reserved interior Unit space within building footprint S.F. D. Interior common area, lobby and service space S.F. E. Office S.F. F. Health Club S.F. G. 9 one bedroom employee units S.F. H. 9 two bedroom employee units S.F. I. 7 plaza level parking spaces: -2 Surface Shuttle Parking Spaces -5 Surface Short Term Parking Spaces J. 8 enclosed townhome parking spaces K. 150 underground parking spaces L. 41 employee housing surface parking spaces M. Trails and sidewalks N. School bus and RFTA kiss and ride drop-off O. Exterior pool and spa P. Open space 2. Upon adoption of this resolution, the Town Council hereby authorizes the Applicant to apply for appropriate Town permits as necessary solely for the purposes of: 1) preparing for employee housing utilities and creating a staging area within that portion of Parcel K located north of Faraway Road; 2) implementing interim erosion control measures within the project area; 3) commencing work on the curtain drainage trench located south and uphill of the shoring wall; 4) install a temporary stream diversion; 4) create access roads as shown on the Construction Management Plan from Faraway Road into the Project; and 5) create a shoring wall within the area adjacent to the south wall of the proposed garage structure. Any work conducted on site shall be subject to the Construction Management Plan attached as Exhibit C. Any such permit(s) so issued may only be exercised at the Applicant's own risk. No excavation or foundation permit may be issued for the drainage trench or shoring wall until such time as the construction and engineering documents have been reviewed by the Town Engineer and Town geotechnical consultant. Compliance with all of the recommendations of the Town Building Official, Town Engineer, Project Geotechnical Report and Lambert and Associates, the Town's geotechnical consulting engineer is mandatory. Performance Bond/Restoration Provisions] Section Three: Conditions of Final PUD Submission. 1. The Final PUD Plan shall comply with the revised Preliminary PUD application approved pursuant to this resolution, except as otherwise noted in these conditions. 2. The Applicant shall recalculate all floor area approved in the Preliminary PUD plan in a manner TC Reso.00-06 The Timbers Prelim.Plan Page 18 that is now consistent with the provisions of Ordinance 11, which amended the procedure for calculating floor area. The revised floor area calculations shall be included in the Final PUD application. Because of the complexity of the project, the Planning Director and the applicant shall review and agree upon the floor area calculations included with the Final PUD application. 3. The building heights for all buildings shall be as now described in the Preliminary PUD application and as further described in Exhibit D. The maximum building elevations shall be documented in an appropriate manner in the Final PUD approval. Elevation 100' on all Sopris Engineering and Stryker/Brown drawings equals 8315'MSL(Mean Sea Level Elevation) and the "Project Benchmark" (Assumed Elevation 1020.33')per Note# 8 on Sopris Sheet C1 (Improvement Location Survey and Topographic/Existing Conditions Map), would be 120.33' Stryker/Brown & Sopris elevation or 8335.33'MSL elevation. Any reduction in the plaza surface elevation as part of the Final PUD submission requires a commensurate reduction in building height. 4. The project shall maintain a 22 foot unobstructed emergency access through the project. The project shall also comply with the requirements of the Snowmass-Wildcat Fire Protection District, as described in project review memorandum dated December 9, 1999 attached as part of Exhibit I. 5. The Timbers Master Association shall provide four vans, as described by the Applicant in the Preliminary PUD application, to provide 24 hour on-call complimentary transportation service for the benefit of the Club Members, including but not limited to transportation to and from the Pitkin County Airport. The Timber Association shall in its Reservation Policies and Procedures include a notice to all club members and guests regarding the availability of Club and public transit options. 6. The applicant shall convey a Conservation Easement in gross to the Town that limits the use of that portion of the property located above The Ridge ski egress trail, as shown on Exhibit E, to open space, passive open use recreation, trails, and the Deerbrook access in existence on the date of the Final PUD approval. The conservation easement shall be conveyed by the applicant within 90 days of the effective date of the Final PUD approval or prior to building permit issuance, whichever occurs first. 7. The applicant shall mitigate the project's wetland impacts in accordance with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers 404 permit for the project. The applicant shall provide .25 acres of off-site wetland mitigation occurring within the Town of Snowmass Village by no later than two years from the date of the permit to complete the off-site mitigation, as required by the Corps of Engineers. Provided, however, the Town must assure the Applicant and the Army Corps of Engineers that the Town's mitigation project will be completed within two years of the date of the permit. If the Town is unable to provide such assurances that a project will be competed within the specified time, The Timbers at Snowmass will purchase wetland mitigation at the Colorado Rocky Mountain Institute wetland bank or, subject to Army Corps of Engineers authorization, make an equivalent cash contribution to the Town to be escrowed until applied to a mitigation project within the Town. - 31 - TC Reso.00-06 The Timbers Prelim.Plan Page 19 8. All site lighting source will appropriately shielded from view. While up directed accent lighting will be permitted it shall be minimized to as not to create an excessive amount of light pollution. Exposed wall-pak lighting and other similar fixtures are prohibited. 9. In order to minimize the level of traffic impacts from this project, the Town will not issue resident parking permits for the public parking lots to the members of this project. 10. There shall be a minimum of 191 parking spaces provided in the project, including 41 employee housing parking spaces and 150 Club and Associate Member parking spaces. The actual number of parking spaces may be up to 201 depending on the final engineered design of the interior of the parking structure. The following restrictions shall be applied to the parking. A. With the exception of the two (2) plaza-level van parking spaces provided near the porte- cochere, exterior parking will be time restricted and controlled by The Timbers Association. B. The Applicant shall maintain 1 space per bedroom for the 4 Townhomes. The owners of each townhome will own the two spaces in garage that is attached to the dwelling unit. The Timbers Association will own two related spaces within the parking garage. C. The Timbers Association will own four(4)parking spaces for Club vans and eight(8) parking spaces for employees. D. The Applicant shall provide 2.0 spaces per unit for the 36 three bedroom Club suites. Of this number 1 space per unit, (36 spaces), will continue to be owned by the applicant/developer and leased to the Master Association for only the prorated cost of maintenance and liability. A three year parking evaluation period will be established, commencing upon the issuance of a certificate of occupancy for those units in Phase I, to determine the actual needs of the Club Suites. During this time, the Developer and the Planning Director will project the parking needs for an individual Club Suite. It shall then be determined whether any or all of the 36 spaces should still be required to meet the needs of the Club Suites. The Applicant will convey each space required to meet the needs of 36 Club Suites to the Master Association. If the Town Council determines that any or all of these spaces are not required, then the Applicant may convert said spaces into additional Associate Member spaces. E. The Applicant may provide up to fifty(50) associate member parking spaces during the two year parking evaluation period. During this period the applicant/developer may lease said spaces to Associate Members. The Timbers will offer each Associate Membership created on a priority basis. Property owners in Ridge Run will be given first priority and property owners within Snowmass Village in general second priority. If at the end of the parking evaluation period it is determined that the projected parking needs of a Club Suite exceed 2.0 spaces per unit,up to a maximum of 3.0 spaces per unit, then the Applicant TC Reso.00-06 The Timbers Prelim.Plan Page 20 shall reduce the number of Associate Member parking spaces accordingly to ensure that the Club Suite requirement is met. Based on the determination of need, the Town Council shall specify the amount of the reduction necessary. The applicant/developer will convey each space required to meet the needs of the Club Suites to the Master Association. F. Upon completion of the three year evaluation period, and once the applicant/developer determines the final number of Associate Member spaces that will be available, then the applicant/developer may either continue to lease or sell any space designated for an Associate Member. Associate member spaces that have not been allocated as described in subsection(E) above will be offered on the same priority basis, except after one year any unallocated space may then be made available to resident of the Roaring Fork Valley. G. The Master Association will assign within the parking structure one (1)parking space per Club Suite and two (2) parking spaces per Townhome. The location of the assigned spaces will be based on proximity of the parking space to the unit. All other required Club Suite parking spaces will not be assigned. 11. The Applicant shall provide reasonable security in the development improvements agreement to guarantee the construction of four bus shelters. The design of each bus shelter shall be approved with the Final PUD Plan. Generally, the design will be enclosed on three sides, with appropriate glazing material, and benches. The Town and the applicant shall continue to study the need for and design of a bus shelter at the uphill location along Brush Creek Road. A determination as to the need and/or design of this shelter shall be made prior to Final PUD approval. 12. The applicant shall use a textured concrete at each bus pull out location to differentiate the pull out from the roadway. The final details shall be approved with the Final PUD Plan. 13. The engineering plans related to all roadway, intersection, retaining, and drainage shall be consistent with the Preliminary PUD application and as further described in Exhibit A. The final engineering details shall be approved in conjunction with the Final PUD Plan. 14. The landscape plan shall be consistent with the Preliminary PUD application and as further described in Exhibit I. The final landscape details shall be approved in conjunction with the Final PUD Plan. 15. The Final PUD application shall include the final designs for the down hill bus stop on Faraway Road, RFTA west bound Brush Creek Road pull out and the kiss and ride facility as shown on Exhibit F. The related pathways shall be in compliance with the plan provided in Exhibit H and the landscaping shall be in compliance with the plans in Exhibit A or as may need to be amended to respond to comments contained within Exhibit I. The kiss and ride facility will be conveyed to the Town as part of the employee housing parcel, as described in Exhibit F, and the Town will be responsible for controlling parking at that location. 16. The applicant shall revise the condominium documents to require only a simple majority vote the -33 -- TC Reso.00-06 The Timbers Prelim.Plan Page 21 property owners to allow short term rental of a unit or portion thereof. The final condominium documents shall be submitted with the Final PUD application. 17. The applicant has moved The Ridge ski egress trail in a manner that is consistent with the Preliminary PUD application. If it is determined during the 1999-2000 winter ski season that the trail can or should be improved from the now current alignment, the applicant shall make such improvements prior to the commencement of the 2000-2001 winter ski season. The Applicant shall survey and document the Spring, 2000 trail centerline location and grade elevations prior to making adjustments during the Summer of 2000. Working with the Ridge Condominium Association the Applicant shall"field adjust" the new trail following the 2000-2001 ski season as well in order to develop the best trail design solution. 18. The representations made by the Applicant during meetings with the Town Council as well as the recommendations of Town staff and consultants, attached hereto as Exhibit I and incorporated herein by reference, shall be considered as conditions of approval and must be fully addressed or satisfied within the Final PUD submission. INTRODUCED, READ AND ADOPTED on this day of February, 2000 by the Town Council of the Town of Snowmass Village, Colorado on a motion made by Council member seconded by Council member by a vote of_to TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE T. Michael Manchester, Mayor ATTEST: Trudi Worline, Town Clerk HAShared\Clerk\reso.tc\TC 00-06 The Timbers Prelim PUD - 3� - Exhibit A: The Applicant's Development Proposal. Exhibit B: Parking Management Plan. Exhibit C: Construction Management Plan. Exhibit D: Building Height. Exhibit E: Conservation Easement. Exhibit F: Employee Housing Proposal. Exhibit G: TOSV Shuttle Stops and RFTA Pull-outs. Exhibit H: Ski and Pedestrian Trails. Exhibit I: Staff and Consultant Recommendations. - 3 S- EXHIBIT F EMPLOYEE HOUSING PLAN [NOTE: THIS IS THE APPLICANT'S CURRENT PROPOSAL] The final employee housing plan shall comply with the following requirements and procedures for providing such housing. The condominium documents will be revised in a manner that reflects this condition and submitted with the Final PUD application. It is the intent of the Town Council to purchase, own, and manage all of the employee housing as described here. This requires the Town to gain approval of an appropriate housing finance bond no later than November, 2000. Failure to obtain such bond approval by the voters required that the Town and the applicant to maintain a suitable fall back procedure for providing such housing. These procedures shall be as follows: A. Procedure for providing employee housing assuming approval of a housing finance bond no later than November , 2000. (1) The applicant will submit a request for subdivision approval along with the Final PUD application, the purpose of which will be to subdivide that portion of the property located east of Faraway Road from Parcel K. If the Town completes the purchase of the employee housing project, it shall be detached from The Timbers Master Association. (2) Prior to Final PUD application, the applicant and the Town shall agree upon an estimated annual budget for the employee housing project, including operations, maintenance, and capital reserve needs. (3) Upon Final PUD approval, the applicant/developer shall construct the employee housing in accordance with the plans described in the Preliminary PUD application and approved with the Final PUD Plan. The employee housing shall be constructed in accordance with all plans and conditions of the Final PUD approval. (4) The applicant/developer shall construct the employee housing in Phase II of the Project and as specifically described in the Phasing Plan included with the Preliminary PUD application and shall obtain a building permit for the employee housing either before or in conjunction with the first building permit issued for Phase II of the Project. (5) The applicant/developer shall obtain a certificate of occupancy for the employee units prior to obtaining the final certificate of occupancy for any units in Buildings L and M in Phase II. (6) Immediately upon issuance of the certificate of occupancy for the employee housing, the Town shall purchase the entire employee housing project from the applicant/developer. Closing shall occur on the date of the issuance of the final certificate of occupancy for the employee housing unless other arrangements are agreed to by the applicant. The purchase shall include land, structures and other improvements, and all construction and improvement warranties and the Town and applicant will enter into a hold harmless agreement at that time. The purchase price shall be equal to the amount which can be financed over 20 years by the available net project rental. Rental income for one and two bedroom units shall be an amount equal to the estimated amount of rent that will be charged by the Town for the Mountain View Phase II units at the time the final certificate of occupancy is issued for the employee housing units. The estimated rents and the purchase price shall be agreed upon by the Town and applicant prior to Final PUD approval. (7) The Town will guarantee The Timbers Master Association an employer master lease arrangement, comparable to that now used by the Town in other projects and for a term of twenty(20) years but which may be terminated prior to that time at The Timbers Master Association's option, the priority use of three(3) one bedroom units and three (3) two bedroom units within Building E of the employee housing project. The applicant and Town shall enter into an agreement at the time of final PUD approval specifying those units for which The Timbers will be granted priority use. If The Timbers is unable to place a qualified employee in the priority unit(s), then the unit(s) will be made available any employee qualified by the Town guidelines and identified by the Town Housing Department. At the end of the lease period of such employee, The Timbers shall regain the priority use of the unit if it can place a qualified employee in the unit. The Timber's units will be subject to the Town's employee housing rules and regulations for this project. B. Procedure for providing employee housing assuming an unsuccessful attempt by the Town to gain approval of a housing finance bond, which shall occur no later than November, 2000 unless otherwise approved by the applicant. (1) The applicant/developer shall construct the employee housing in Phase II of the Project and as specifically described in the Phasing Plan included with the Preliminary PUD application and shall obtain a building permit for the employee housing either before or in conjunction with the first building permit issued for Phase II of the Project. The employee housing shall be constructed in accordance with all plans and conditions of the Final PUD approval. (2) The applicant/developer shall obtain a certificate of occupancy for the employee units prior to obtaining the final certificate of occupancy for any units in Buildings L and M in Phase II. (3) The applicant/developer shall retain ownership of the housing, unless conveyance to a third party is approved by the Town. (4) Prior to issuance of a certificate of occupancy for any of the employee housing units, the applicant/developer shall establish a deed restriction to the benefit of the Town which limits the use in perpetuity of each unit within the employee housing project to affordable employee housing. --3 "1 (5) The Timbers Master Association shall retain for the life of The Timbers project the priority use of three (3) one bedroom units and three{3) two bedroom units within this employee housing project. The applicant and Town shall enter into an agreement at the time of Final PUD approval specifying those units for which The Timbers will retain priority use. If The Timbers is unable to place a qualified employee in the priority unit(s), then the unit(s) will be made available any employee qualified by the Town guidelines and identified by the Town Housing Department. At the end of the lease period of such employee, The Timbers shall regain the priority use of the unit if it can place a qualified employee in the unit. The Timbers' units will be subject to the Towns employee housing rules and regulations for this project. (6) The applicant/developer and Town shall enter into an agreement at the time of final PUD approval specifying those units for which The Timbers will be granted priority use. (7) Prior to issuance of a certificate of occupancy, the applicant/developer establishes a deed restriction to the benefit of the Town to ensure that those units not subject to The Timbers priority will be made available any employee qualified by the Town guidelines and identified by the Town Housing Department. These units shall be subject to all Town rules and regulations for employee housing. (8) Rents charged by the applicant/developer for one and two bedroom units shall be equal to the amount of rent that will be charged by the Town for the Mountain View Phase II units at the time the final certificate of occupancy is issued for the employee housing units. The applicant/ developer, at its option, may institute annual rent adjustment in an amount comparable to those instituted by the Town for Mountain View Phase II or other Town employee housing project. Exhibit I Staff and Consultant Recommendations. INTEROFFICE MEMORANDUM TO: Chris Conrad FROM: Hunt Walker RE: Timber's Solid Waste Plan DATE: January 3, 2000 I've reviewed the Solid Waste Plan contained in the Timbers November submittal of new materials, and have the following comments: 1) VOLUMES - The calculations for the trash generated by the project are correct. The 38 units on the West side of Faraway Road are anticipated to generate 19.6 cubic yards of trash per week while the 18 employee units on the East side of Faraway Road are projected to create 8.82 cubic yards of trash. If the project generates volumes different from the projections, the applicant can adjust frequency of pick up to meet demand. 2) ANIMAL RESISTANT SHED - Although a design for the dumpster shed is not required in a Preliminary Application, the applicant should design an animal resistant shed for the employee housing dumpsters. The applicant has indicated he will have the site and building design for the shed approved by the Public Works Department prior to construction. Since the containers on the West side of the road are located within the parking garage, an animal resistant shed is not required. 3) CONTAINER SIZE - The applicant is proposing to locate several six-yard containers just inside the entry to the underground structure. Since the Town Solid Waste crew will have to roll the dumpsters out through the entry door to the trash truck, the development needs to replace the six cubic yard containers with two cubic yard containers. The trash crew can't physically move four or six yard containers. To handle the projected volumes the Timbers Club might need to increase their frequency of pick up. --39 - Snowmass-Wildcat Fire Protection District P.O. Box 6436 Snowmass Village, Colorado 81615 923-2212 flare• To: Chris Conrad. Planner From: John T, N-lele. Fire Marshal Subject: Timbers at Snowmass Please relay our concerns on the recent submittal of the Timbers Project. 1. The Town of Snowmass Village must approve a variance from their requirement that all new roads be 24' in width. This is partly an emergency access issue. Should this be granted. all 22 feet of width required for emergency access must be unobstructed. A clearance height of 13'6 must also be maintained in this access area. . It still appears from the preliminary landscape plans that this is not being taken into consideration as the canopy of trees and shrubs are encroaching into this soace. . (UFC 10.204 1991) "Fire Lane" signs as will be required for the entire emergency access roadway prohibiting parking at any time. (UFC 10.206 ) 2. Location of fire hydrants will be determined by the Fire Chief and shall be located within 175 feet of approach to any commercial, multifamily, public assembly, or public building. UFC Appendix III B, SVIv1C sec.18-122. 3. Underground parking structure will conform to Protection requirements as described in Chapter 5 ofNFPA 88A. 4. Wet Standpipes shall be located as per NFPA 14 and approved by the District Fire Chief. 5. Nowhere in the plans do 1 see any designated area for deliveries. (Loading dock, etc.) Where will the deliveries be made? - 4Q Somft 1 1JW17 t11 SNOWM ASS V1bAGE To: Chris Conrad From: Joe Coffey C.C. Paul Broom, Wayne Stryker Date: February 3, 2000 Re: Timbers Employee Housing --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Chris, I have met with Paul Broom of Norris and Associates and Wayne Stryker of Stryker Brown Architects to discuss my construction recommendations for the Timbers Employee Housing. The meeting was very productive and many items were discussed and agreed upon. There are two items that have not been completely resolved yet. The two items are apartment widths and a laundry room facility. I have listed my thoughts about the two outstanding issues below. • Apartment widths - The recently constructed Mt. View Phase II apartments are considerably wider than the proposed Timbers units. The Mt. View one-bedroom apartments are 19' wide and the two bedrooms are 17' wide. All the residents really like the size of these apartments. These apartments do not have the tunnel or trailer type feeling that our narrower units have. I currently have a large number of apartments (118) that are 12' 9" wide. After reviewing the apartment widths I recommend that The Timbers apartments should be constructed no less than 16 feet wide. This will provide a product that is similar to our Mt. View Phase II apartments. All the dimensions discussed above are interior wall to wall living space measurements. • A laundry facility will be necessary for these apartments. Four coin operated washers and dryers would be adequate for this complex. The laundry room should be located as close to the center of the complex as possible. C.C. Paul Broom Wayne Stryker 4 t �� PO [SOX 5010 - SNOWMASS VILLAGE.COLORADO 81615 (970) 923-3777 - ((ax) (970) 923-6083 - tosv@tosv.com www.tomcom TOWN OF SNOWMASS HOUSING DEPARTMENT Memo To: Chris Conrad From:Joe Coffey Date: 02/03/00 Re: The Timbers Employee Housing Chris, I have listed below my concerns and questions about The Timbers employee housing proposal. BUILDING DESIGN ♦Each building should have a central boiler for heat and hot water. ♦The apartments are narrow like the Mountain View Phase I units. Wider apartments were built in Phase II complex to reduce the trailer type feel. *Adequate storage will be necessary for each apartment. *Will there be laundry facilities? ♦Each apartment should have washer and dryer hook-ups. *Counter tops that double as eating areas are very useful in small apartments. *Are any units handicapped accessible? •Page 1 Ai +The two-bedroom units have the kitchen located in the middle of the bottom floor. If the kitchens were moved to one side, a larger living and dining area would be obtained. +A half bath on the lower floor of the two-bedroom apartments under the stairs would be very convenient for the residents. +The current two-bedroom plans show different size bedrooms. Similar size bedrooms are preferred over one small and one large bedroom. *Window coverings will be required to keep apartment appearance the same from the exterior. +A maintenance and storage room will be necessary. MANAGEMENT AND MAINTENANCE +All apartments that are for the community benefit of Snowmass Village shall be leased under the same guidelines as the apartments of the Town. *The Housing waiting list will be used to place tenants into the community benefit apartments. *A full time resident manager or maintenance worker must reside in the complex to serve the residents. +24-hour assistance must be provided for residents. *Snowplowing and snow removal must occur after each snowstorm. +The rents and deposits must be within 10% of the Housing Department rates. ♦A complete maintenance plan must be established to keep these apartments in good condition. +A Capital Replacement Budget must be approved by the Housing Department. +The Annual Operating Budget and Rental Rates must be approved by the Housing Department. +The long term management and maintenance of these buildings concern the Housing Manager most. •Page 2 �• �� �� OTHERISSUES *Do the employee housing apartments need to be classified as condominiums at this time? *Would the developer sell the apartments to the Town with a debt service ratio so that rents would cover the operating and maintenance? +The Town will need access to Parcel "N" for construction that could possibly begin in 2000. *The employee housing should be constructed with the free market units and open with the club to begin housing employees. *The access road to Parcel "N" will go through the Timbers employee housing complex. The Town and the Timbers should split 24'of roadway from Faraway Road to the Parcel "N" property line. The expense to maintain this section of road should be split equally between the Town and the Timbers. ♦The utility lines must be sized for the Timbers and Parcel "N". *All utilities that can be shared with the Timbers employee housing and Parcel "N" should be identified and planned for cost sharing if necessary. *The ski access for the Timbers employees and Parcel "N" residents should be as short and direct as possible. Planning for ski access now may be easier than managing the access later. ♦Under the community benefits, what are the infrastructure enhancements that will benefit the Town? •Page 3 �� �� GENERAL APARTMENT RECOMMENDATIONS 1. Soundproof walls and ceilings - do not place a living room in one apartment next to a bedroom in the apartment next door. 2. A storage closet for each apartment is a necessity for bicycles, skis, snow tires, etc. 3. Phones should be wired to each bedroom and kitchen. 4. Cable TV should be wired to each bedroom and living room. 5. A garbage disposal should be provided for each apartment. 6. Kitchen and vanity cabinets need to be good quality to last in rental apartments. 7. Solid core interior doors require less repair and are more soundproof. 8. Moen or Delta plumbing fixtures are low maintenance fixtures. 9. ' A good quality smooth finished tub and enclosure will clean much easier than the ones with the textured surfaces. Glass shower doors are not recommended for rental apartments. 10. Each bathroom should have an outdoor exhaust fan. 11. A good grade of carpet and vinyl is recommended to last five to ten years. Darker colors will not show dirt as much as the lighter colors. Provide vinyl or tile in entryway. 12. Strong closet shelves and clothes rods are recommended over the lightweight wire closet storage systems. 13. All interior paint should be latex semi-gloss enamel. 14. Schlage locks are low maintenance. 15. General Electric or Hotpoint appliances are recommended for parts availability. 16. Self-cleaning ovens are a necessity for rental apartments. 17. A washer and dryer closet should be provided for all 1 bdrm. and 2 bdrm. apartments. A side by side standard washer and dryer closet is preferred over a stackable closet system when possible. 18. A double basin kitchen sink with a sprayer is necessary. 19. Metal window blinds work well in the kitchens and bathrooms. Drapes are lower maintenance window coverings on all other windows. 20. Programmable heat thermostats will reduce energy usage. 21. Each kitchen should have a range hood fan with an outdoor exhaust vent. 22. Use light fixtures that require a standard incandescent light bulb. 23. No flat roofs. GENERAL APARTMENT BUILDING AND SITE RECOMMENDATIONS 1. Apartment buildings with one main entrance and enclosed or partially enclosed stairways or walkways will reduce snow removal expenses. 2. All outdoor stairs and landings should be galvanized steel with serrated edges. 3. Outdoor stairways must be elevated to allow for snow accumulation under the stairs. 4. Covered outdoor stairways are best but are usually expensive for employee housing complexes. 5. Snow storage areas along all walkways is mandatory. Inadequate snow storage will require the snow to be removed twice. 6. The parking lots should be designed for easy snow removal and have plenty of room for snow storage. 7. An enclosed dumpster shed with extra space for recycling containers will be necessary. 8. All building, walkway, and parking lot lights should be wired to a photo-cell switch. 9. One central laundry room currently works well for the existing employee housing complexes. 10. The laundry room should have a wash basin, laundry soap machine, soda machine, and a one dollar change machine for the residents. 11. All buildings will have a backflow preventers which must be inspected once a year by a qualified inspector. The backflow preventors should be located to provide easy access for inspection and service work. 12. All buildings should have an exterior crawl space entrance. Entering the crawl space through an apartment is not recommended. 13. An irrigation system will be necessary for the new landscaping. 14. Twenty year asphalt shingles or a standing seam metal roof is recommended. 15. Two courses of ice and water shield at the roof eave lines. This will prevent water damage from ice dams. 16. Roofs need to have adequate overhangs to prevent water from running down the siding. 17. Gutters are necessary over all walkways. 18. Attic access will be required. 19. Hot water circulated heat is recommended for lower utility bill to the residents. 20. The exterior paint scheme should be no more than two colors to reduce future re-painting expenses. �.► 17 �� COUNCIL COMMUNIQUE MEETING DATE: February 7, 2000 STAFF: Hunt Walker Steve Connor SUBJECT: WOODRUN DUMPSTER SITE ANALYSIS OVERVIEW: Staff has conducted two exercises: 1) a re-review of potential sites for the relocation of the Woodrun dumpster shed; and 2) a site analysis of the current site (see attached map). After reviewing all of the potential dumpster sites that access Wood Road, the only viable sites are the two sites identified earlier within the Base Village property. There is not a suitable site above Woodrun 5. If the Council is willing to consider a location removed from Woodrun, the "draw parcel", adjacent to the Snowmass Center, is another possibility. To make the current site acceptable, a site plan similar to the one constructed for the Sinclair Road facility would need to be built at the existing location. To illustrate how much land would be required,the attached map shows the Sinclair site plan superimposed on the Woodrun site. Note that the new site plan encroaches on the Woodrun 5 driveway, and the dumpster shed almost touches the parking garage. It might be possible to move the site downhill to a point where the exit for the dumpster shed shares the Woodrun 5 driveway. In either case,because of the grade changes, a retaining wall will probably need to be constructed along the back(east) side of the site. Additional land will need to be acquired from the Woodrun 5 Homeowners Association to make this site plan feasible. FINANCIAL SUMMARY: A cost analysis hasn't been done. BOARD OR COMMISSION RECOMMENDATION: NA LEGAL RECOMMENDATION: Steve Connor will be at Monday's meeting. STAFF RECOMMENDATION: Staff needs direction from Council on how to proceed. - Alk ONO T=shng Conditions .flap Pood RW TrWA oronpstar Xw Aw oa Lot Paso[4 .mood AUn !/wit s OQOSED for of snamawv nmw Pta"n Cownty Colorado { �t�e � �..reuis_r•wr.�s • .'ter_ � .P'/ �:....v.� w sw� _.low w,r r • � / A w.++rwrri+a�i� I Pa cel I Ab0 n nit 6' ni� 'y 1F/t IIC • /aad/Pan rrwA A 1 � ,. Town of Snonmass Village t r ei�c a a l COUNCIL COMMUNIQUE MEETING DATE: February 7, 2000 STAFF: Joe Kracum, Hunt Walker SUBJECT: MALL TRANSIT FACILITY — PARKING ISSUES OVERVIEW: The primary purpose of the Council Meeting is to make decisions related to parking. In the attached memo Joe Kracum has outlined three questions which, if answered, will move the design of this project forward. STAFF RECOMMENDATION: 1. Location of replacement parking: Staff recommends that the 98 spaces displaced by the new Transit Facility be replaced within the vicinity of Lots 4, 5 and 6. Keeping the spaces in the lower village will maintain the current balance in parking spaces between the upper and lower numbered lots. 2. Number of Net New Spaces: Although the final number of net new spaces will depend on cost and viable funding scenarios, staff recommends that 200 net new spaces be built. Parking demand for Resident Day Skiers, a majority of Employees, and Mall Business Customers illustrates that more parking is needed adjacent to the Mail. Lots 1 — 3 and 11 — 12 experience less demand. It should be noted that creating 200 net new spaces, without a reduction in spaces elsewhere, uses up all of the 200 additional spaces allocated to the Town Core (Mall and Base Village) as specified in the Comprehensive Plan. It is possible to cut 50 spaces each out of the upper and lower lots to create the capacity for additional public parking spaces in Base Village. In addition it might make sense to reevaluate the Comprehensive Plan parking caps (2250 total, 1200 Town Core) when the Town receives a development application for Base Village. 3. Transit Plaza without Parking Structure: Although staff would prefer the complete project be built, staff recommends that the Transit Plaza be built if funding for the Parking Structure can't be secured. The Transit Plaza should be built because the Town Shuttle exceeds the capacity of its current facility and the RFTA Depot is also undersized. Consolidating both transit systems in the same place makes it more user friendly for the transit rider. TOWN COUNCIL COMMUNIQUE Meeting Date: February 7, 2000 Presented By: Craig Thompson, Community Development Director; Steve Connor, Town Attorney Subject: Resolution No. 02, Series of 2000 Overview: This Resolution amends Resolution No. 11, 1. Background Series of 1993, and Intergovernmental Fire 2. Issues Code Enforcement Agreement with the 3. Alternatives Snowmass Fire Protection District. Major administrative changes to Resolution No. 02 are as follows: 1) Copies of all fire inspection and fire investigation reports by the District to the Town Building Official; and 2) Submission of Annual Fire Inspection Plan by the District to the Town Manager. Recommendation: Review and comment on Draft IGA. Placement on February 21 Council Agenda. - �'. 40- TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL RESOLUTION NO. 02 SERIES OF 2000 A RESOLUTION APPROVING THE ENTRANCE INTO AN INTERGOVERNMENTAL FIRE CODE ENFORCEMENT AGREEMENT WITH THE SNOWMASS-WILDCAT FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT. WHEREAS, the Town is authorized to enter into this Agreement in accordance with the terms and conditions of Section 1.4 of Article I of the Home Rule Charter; and WHEREAS, the District is authorized to enter into this Agreement in accordance with the provisions of Colorado Revised Statutes 32-1-1001(1)(d); and WHEREAS, the Town Manager and the Community Development Director have recommended to the Town Council that the function of enforcing the Uniform Fire Code, as adopted in the Town, can continue to be more efficiently and more economically accomplished through a contractual relationship with the Snowmass-Wildcat Fire Protection District; and WHEREAS, the Town and the District currently share the expense of fire inspections conducted by the District pursuant to an intergovernmental agreement which was effective January 1, 1993; and WHEREAS, the relationship between the Town and the District has been favorable during the term of the Agreement and the Town Manager and the Community Development Director recommend a continuation of the scope of the intergovernmental agreement; and WHEREAS, the Town Council finds that the entrance into an intergovernmental agreement with the District accomplishes a more efficient use of government personnel which will enable better service to be provided to those persons affected by the Uniform Fire Code. NOW, THEREFORE, be it resolved by the Town Council of the Town of Snowmass Village, as follows: 1. Approval of Agreement. The Intergovernmental Agreement Fire Code Enforcement Agreement attached hereto as Exhibit "A", and incorporated herein by this reference, is hereby approved on behalf of the Town. 5M ..� Resolution No. 02, Series of 2000 Page 2 2. Direction to Town Manager. The Town Manager is hereby authorized to execute the Intergovernmental Fire Code Enforcement Agreement on behalf of the Town. The Town Manager is further authorized and directed to take such actions as are necessary and proper to carry out the intention of the Agreement. 3. Recision of Approval. If the Intergovernmental Fire Code Enforcement Agreement is not approved by the Board of Directors of the Snowmass-Wildcat Fire Protection District on or before April 30, 2000, then the approval set forth in Section No. 1 and the directions set forth in Section No. 2 of this Resolution are hereby rescinded and revoked. 4. Severabilitv. If any provision of this Resolution or application hereof to any person or circumstance is held invalid, the invalidity shall not affect any other provision or application of this Resolution which can be given effect without the invalid provision or application, and, to this end, the provisions of this Resolution are severable. INTRODUCED, READ AND ADOPTED by the Town Council of the Town of Snowmass Village, Colorado on the 21st day of February, 2000, upon the motion of Council Member , the second of Council Member and approved by a vote of_ in favor and _opposed. TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE By: T. Michael Manchester, Mayor ATTEST: Trudi Worline, Town Clerk _3'3 Resolution No. 02, Series of 2000 Page 3 Exhibit "A" INTERGOVERNMENTAL FIRE CODE ENFORCEMENT AGREEMENT THIS AGREEMENT is made and entered into by and between the Town of Snowmass Village, Colorado, a Colorado home rule municipality, whose address is Post Office Box 5010, Snowmass Village, Colorado 81615, hereinafter referred to as the "Town", and the Snowmass-Wildcat Fire Protection District, a Colorado special district, whose address is Post Office Box 6436, Snowmass Village, Colorado 81615, hereinafter referred to as the "District". WITNESSETH: WHEREAS, this Agreement is authorized by the provisions of Section 29-1-201, C.R.S., at seg., concerning intergovernmental relationships; and WHEREAS, the Town is authorized to enter into this Agreement in accordance with the terms and conditions of Section 1.4 of Article I of the Town Home Rule Charter; and WHEREAS, the District is authorized to enter into this Agreement in accordance with the provisions of Section 32-1-1001(1)(d) C.R.S.; and WHEREAS, the Town and the District have determined that the establishment of an intergovernmental relationship to ensure compliance with Article VII, Chapter 18 of the Town of Snowmass Village Municipal Code is an efficient and effective use of the powers and responsibilities of the Town and the District through cooperation; and WHEREAS, fire inspections are required to be performed by the Fire Chief of the District in accordance with the provisions of the Uniform Fire Code as adopted by the Town, as specified by Section 18-124 Fire department administration of the Town of Snowmass Village Municipal Code; and WHEREAS, fire inspections are additionally required to be performed by the District in accordance with the provisions of Section 32-1-1002 C.R.S.; and WHEREAS, both the Town and the District are political subdivisions within the meaning of Section 29-1-202(2) C.R.S. ; and Resolution No. 02, Series of 2000 Page 4 WHEREAS, in compliance with the provisions of Section 29-1-203 C.R.S., the Town desires to contract with the District to provide service for the enforcement of Article VII, Chapter 18 of the Town of Snowmass Village Municipal Code, on the terms and conditions as hereinafter set forth. NOW, THEREFORE, for and in consideration of the mutual covenants of the parties, and for other good and valuable consideration, the adequacy and sufficiency of which is hereby acknowledged, the parties agree as follows: 1. Fire Code Enforcement. The District shall perform all functions of the Fire Marshall and the Fire Chief as set forth in Article VII, Chapter 18 of the Town of Snowmass Village Municipal Code. The following specific provisions shall apply: a. All fees which are collected pursuant to the provisions of the Uniform Fire Code shall be the sole and separate property of the Town. b. The District shall provide the Town Building Official with a copy of ah'fire inspection and fire investigation reports promptly after issuance of the same. c. The District shall provide the Town Manager with a fire inspection plan for the Town identifying the structures to be inspected and the frequency of inspection for the term of this Agreement. Such plan shall be provided to the Town Manager within 10 days of the date of execution of this Agreement. d. The District shall cooperate with the Town Building Official in the enforcement of the provisions of Chapter 18 of the Town of Snowmass Village Municipal Code. e. Any citation for noncompliance with the provisions of Article VII, Chapter 18 of the Town of Snowmass Village Municipal Code shall be based upon an affidavit sworn to by an authorized District representative which is presented to the Town Manager. If the Town Manager and the Fire Chief determine that the matter set forth in the affidavit requires the issuance of a Summons and Complaint pursuant to the Municipal Code, the District will cooperate with the Town in the prosecution of the Complaint. 2. District Compensation. The Town shall pay the District the amount of $37,000.00 annually for the services to be provided pursuant to this Agreement. The fee shall be paid by the Town to the District in the amount of$18,500.00 to be paid on June Resolution No. 02, Series of 2000 Page 5 30th and $18,500.00 to be paid on December 31st of each year during the term of this Agreement. The initial payment shall be paid by the Town on June 30, 2000. 3. Termination. This Agreement shall terminate on December 31, 2000, unless sooner terminated pursuant to the terms and conditions hereof. 4. Termination of Existing Agreement. The Intergovernmental Fire Inspection Agreement entered into by and between the Town and the District effective January 1, 1993, is hereby mutually rescinded and declared to be null and void and of no effect. This Agreement shall supersede and replace the Intergovernmental Fire Inspection Agreement upon its effective date. 5. Effective Date. This Agreement shall become effective on January 1, 2000 irrespective of the date this Agreement is actually executed. IN WTNESS.WiEREOF, the Town has caused its name to be hereunto subscribed by its Town Manager and the District has caused its name to be hereunto subscribed'by its President, on the_day of February, 2000 Town of Snowmass Village Snowmass-Wildcat Fire Protection District By: By: Gary Suiter, Town Manager William L. Cowan, District Manager - 36 _ COUNCIL COMMUNIQUE Meeting Date: 7 February 2000 Presented By: Victoria Giannola, Planning Director Subject: Professional Services Agreement from Alan Richman for preparation and submission of the preliminary plan for the Parcel N project Overview: Attached is an agreement to provide professional services for processing the Parcel N submission. Recommendation: Enter into a contract with Alan Richman under the terms of the Agreement. � 7 - NLHN K1GNMwN yZb 11 cJ I. W� t�laAC �lelu�ca� �i�rKlol f S�uudce� edw 361 a,Qeuc, �ele+wds 816t P ;a/�erre/des (9701 9P0-»P5 PROFESSIONAL SERVICES AGREEMENT THIS AGREEMENT, entered into as of this 13th day of January, 2000, by and between the Town of Snowmass Village, Colorado (hereinafter referred to as "the Town"), and Alan Richman Planning Services (hereinafter referred to as "the Consultant"). WHEREAS, the Town requires certain professional planning services to be provided with regard to preparing preliminary plan and final PUD applications for Parcel N of the Faraway Ranch, and taking those applications through the Town's review process, and also accomplishing a class action rezoning of publicly-owned parcels within the Town; and WHEREAS, the Town desires to hire the Consultant as an independent contractor for the provision of such professional planning services as are hereinafter set forth. NOW, THEREFORE, the Town and the Consultant, in consideration of the mutual covenants and agreements herein contained, agree as follows: A. EMPLOYMENT OF CONSULTANT The Town does hereby employ the Consultant as an independent contractor, and the Consultant does hereby accept employment in accordance with the covenants and conditions contained herein, The services covered by this Agreement shall be performed solely by the Consultant. No portion of the services, nor any right, title or interest herein under this Agreement shall be assigned,transferred,conveyed or sub-contracted without the Town's prior authorization. B. SCOPE OF SERVICES 1. The Consultant shall, in conjunction with Reno and Smith, Architects, and in accordance with the Town's instructions, prepare preliminary plan and final PUD applications to obtain approval for an affordable housing project on Parcel N of the Faraway Ranch. The applications shall address all relevant review criteria and submission requirements of the Town's Land Use and Development Code. The applications shall be prepared in a timely manner,based on a schedule to be established jointly by the Consultant and the Town. 2. The Consultant, in cooperation with the Town's Planning Office, shall prepare a class action application to rezone publicly-owned parcels within the Town to the Public zone district. The list of properties to be rezoned shall be compiled by the Town. The Town shall also provide the Consultant with survey maps and legal descriptions of the properties to be rezoned. HLiiN IG_1-1..NFIHIV YZV A • 3. The Consultant shall represent the Town with regard to said applications before all relevant boards and commissions applications will be subject to review by the Planning Con m;scion It is anticipated that the,and the Town Council. 4. r r shall services as may be required o Te efpnce py eown in the ma of this Agreemen and which are mutually agreed to by the parties hereto. D• COMPENSATION For the above services, the Town agrees to compensate the Consultant for all work performed, upon completion of same, at the rate of One Hundred-Fifteen Dollars ($115,00) per hour. The Town also agrees to reimburse the Consultant for any out-of. pocket expenses reasonably incurred in connection with the work, including but not necessarily limited to printing, postage, mileage, and long distance telephone/facsimile. Because of the many uncertainties involved in preparing and processing land use applications, it is not possible to establish a fixed fee for these services. Based on the Consultant's experience in completing similar projects, it is estimated that the fee for preparing and processing the applications for Parcel N of the Faraway Ranch will not exceed $10,000,while the fee for preparing and processing the class action rezoning application will not exceed $4,000. The Consultant hereby agrees not to exceed either of these amounts without the prior approval of the Town Manager. The Town shall make payment to the Consultant on a monthly bass for services rendered. Payment shall be based upon the hours of professional services performed, plus expenses, which shall be billed at cost. The Consultant shall present an invoice to the Town at the beginning of each month for the payment currently due. Monthly invoices shall detail the number of hours worked,hourly rates, and expenses incurred. Payment shall be made within thirty (30) days after the invoice has been received by the Town. If the Town fails to pay the Consultant Within thirty (30) days of the billing date, the balance due shall beat interest from the date payment is due at the rate of one and one-half percent (1.5%) per month. E. MODIFICATION AND TERMINATION Additions to, modifications of, or deletions from this Professional Services Agreement shall only be made in writing, upon agreement of the Town and the Consultant. It is wi furnished by the Consultant will and be allowed f extra w d by the Town s provided herein,or shall the Consultant do any work or furnish any materials not covered by this Agreement unless such work is first authorized in writing by a change order or supplemental agreement. 2 RLHN KiuHMHN 9201125 P. 04 The Town reserves the right, at its discretion, to terminate the services provided pursuant to this Agreement for misfeasance, malfeasance, or non-performance of the contract by the Consultant. The Consultant reserves the right to terminate this Agreement due to non-performance of the Agreement by the Town. In the event the Town shall terminate the services or any part of the services of the Agreement herein provided, the Town shall notify the Consultant in writing, and the Consultant shall discontinue advancing the work under this Agreement immediately after receipt of such notice, unless the Town instructs the Consultant to finish work on a particular product or task, in which case the Consultant shall diligently finish and deliver such product or the work on such task. Upon termination, the Consultant shall deliver to the Town all drawings, illustrations, text, data and other documents entirely or partially completed, together with a statement of the work completed. The Consultant shall receive compensation in full for services performed to the date of termination and for any other work which the Town has directed the Consultant to complete. Payment shall reflect work completed by the Consultant. The Town shall make this final payment within sixty (60) days after the Consultant has delivered the last of the partially completed documents, together with any records that may be required to determine the amount due. F. CHOICE OF LAW AND CHOICE OF FORUM If any disputes arise out of the performance of this Agreement, both parties agree that the dispute will be resolved by a mediator acceptable to both parties. In the event this Agreement is the subject of litigation between the Consultant and the Town, the parties hereto agree the Agreement shall he construed according to the laws of the State of Colorado and jurisdiction and venue of such litigation shall be the Pitkin County District Court. G. INDEMNIFICATION AND LIMITATION OF LIABILITY The Consultant does hereby agree to indemnify and hold harmless the Town, its officers and employees, against all claims of any nature whatsoever arising from acts or omissions of the Consultant in the performance of this contract. The Consultant acknowledges and assumes all risks in the operation of his business pursuant to this contract and shall be solely responsible and answerable for any and all injuries arising out of his performance. Subject to its immunities and rights as provided by the Colorado Governmental Immunity Act (C.R.S. 2410-101, ft se .), the Town does agree to indemnify and save harmless the Consultant, as permitted by law, from any claims, suits, demands, costs and liabilities, including attorney's fees, arising from a negligent act or omission by the Town or any of its employees committed pursuant to the performance of this contract. 3 �— 0 QWWW- HLRN R3CNMRN _ ._92(l13L5 P. bS The Consultant shall be responsible for the completeness and accuracy of his work, supporting data and other documents prepared or compiled under his obligation for this project and shall correct, at his expense, all significant errors or omissions therein which may be disclosed. The fact that the Town has accepted or approved the Consultant's work shall in no way relieve the Consultant of any of his responsibilities. This provision shall not apply to any maps, official records, contracts or other data supplied to the Consultant by the Town which the Consultant should reasonably expect to be accurate and which the Consultant could not reasonably be expected to know to be inaccurate. The Town agrees to limit the Consultant's liability to the Town due to any negligent act,error or omission by the Consultant,such that the Consultant's total aggregate liability to the Town shall not exceed the Consultant's total fee for services performed with regard to the project, provided, however, that such limitation shall not apply in the event of gross negligence or fraud on behalf of the Consultant. H. OWNERSHIP OF DOCUMENTS All documents which are obtained or prepared in the performance of this contract are to be, and shall remain, the property of the Town and shall be delivered to the Town before the final payment is made to the Consultant. 1. RECORDS The Consultant shall maintain comprehensive,complete,and accurate records and accounts of his performance relating to this Agreement for a period of three (3)years following final payment hereunder. The Town shall have the right within such period to inspect such books, records and documents upon demand, with reasonable notice and at a reasonable time, for the purpose of determining compliance with the requirements of this contract and the law, in accordance with acceptable accounting and auditing standards. I UNLAWFUL DISCRIMINATION The Consultant shall not discriminate against any employee or applicant for employment to be employed in the performance of this Agreement on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, sex, ancestry, physical handicap, sexual orientation, age, political affiliation or family responsibility. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the parties hereto have executed this Agreement on the date first written above. TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE AIAN RICHMAN PLANNING SERVICES By: By; kpw, "^ Gary Suiter, Town Manager an Richman, Owner 4 Co COUNCIL COMMUNIQUE MEETING DATE: 02-07-00 BY: Scott Smith STAFF: Joe Coffey SUBJECT: Architectural Design For Parcel "N" Proposal OVERVIEW: Scott will present a design proposal for Parcel "N" today. If time permits, Scott may give a brief update on the Ridge Homeowners Association meeting. FINANCIAL SUMMARY: Council Housing Funds? BOARD OF COMMISSION RECOMMENDATION: N/A STAFF RECOMMENDATION: Review proposal and approve so the project does not lose momentum. December 13, 1999 (Revised February 2, 2000) Mr. Joe Coffey,Director Snowmass Housing Authority AUGUST P.O. Box 6156 RENO Snowmass Village, Colorado 81615 ALA SCOTT RE: Town of Snowmass Village SMITH Faraway Ranch Parcel "N" ALA Affordable Housing Project Dear Joe: , . I L We are pleased to submit this proposal for design services for the above-mentioned project. I feel we are off to a good start and am anxious to continue in a timely manner in order to facilitate the RENO SMITH Planning Approval Process and preparation for the development of A RCIf IT EC T S, L. L. C. this project. Iii The following is a recap of the project program as discussed in our HYMAN recent field visit meeting to review the "storey poles"and reflects the 210 E.No 2oz 02 deletion of(1) 3-bedroom unit and addition of(1) 2-bedroom unit: ASPEN TYPE OF UNITS SIZE # UNITS TOTAL COLORADO SF 81611 A.)2-BEDROOM UNITS 970.925.5968 1) 2-Bedroom H.C. 1200 1 1200 FACSIMILE 2) 2-Bedroom (2-level) 1200 2 2400 970.925.5993 (@ IS,story) 3) 2-Bedroom(2-level) 1200 4 4800 E-MAIL (@ 2"d story) officeCrenosmlth.com SUBTOTAL 7 8400 B.)3-BEDROOM UNITS 0371 SOUTHSIDE DRIVE 1) 3-Bedroom Flat 1408 1 1408 BASALT (H.C.) COLORADO 2) 3-Bedroom Flat 1408 2 2816 81621 (Similar to H.C.) 3) 3-Bedroom (2-Level) 1614 7 11,298 970.927.6834 FACSIMILE SUBTOTAL 10 L5m 970.927.6840 TOTAL SF UNITS 23,922 Joe Coffey Faraway Ranch Parcel "N' 12/13/99 Revised 2/2/2000 Page 2 C.)GARAGES/STORAGE 1) Attached(15) 305 15 4545 2) Detached(2) 605 2 1210 SUBTOTAL 17 5755 D.)TOTAL SQUARE FOOTAGE 1) Units 23,922 2) Garages/Storage 2,878 (Counted as 50%) 26,800SF The units will comprise (3) buildings(2 and 3 story heights) as shown on the enclosed plan. These sales units will be larger and have more upgraded finishes and detailing than the Mountain View Phase II Project. The buildings will be accessed by a private drive with a fire turnaround at the end. There may also be covered carports located on the south side of the drive. We have completed our Pre-Design/Conceptual Site Development work per our previous proposal. The following is a description and proposal for the remaining design services for this project. We anticipate need to complete the Schematic Design Phase and a small portion of the Design Development Phase in order to prepare the adequate information required with the P.U.D. Planning Submission. PHASE 1 SCHEMATIC DESIGN • Coordinate with the project Civil Engineer(Dean Gordon) regarding vehicle access, grading issues, drainage; retaining structures, and site utilities. Joe Coffey Faraway Ranch Parcel "N" 12/13/99 Revised 2/2/2000 Page 3 • Revise and produce an overall site plan showing all site elements. - Coordinate site-paving elements. - Coordinate walkways and exterior building elements. - Coordinate and show site retaining features • Develop and revise: - Unit floor plans (revise to reflect latest mix& layout with Site Plan; Develop exterior stairs to upper units and non- attached garages/carports). - Roof plans - Building Elevations (heights, materials, etc.) - Landscape Plan(with assistance of a Landscape Designer) - Develop(3) site sections showing relationship of new buildings to adjacent structures (The Ridge, The Timbers, Brush Creek Road) - Review and coordinate information on a schematic cost estimate with Owner. - Review and coordinate development schedule with Owner. PHASE 2 DESIGN DEVELOPMENT - Identify structural system(s) - Identify mechanical/electrical systems - Produce adequate M&E sizing for pricing - Dimensional floor plans - Dimensional elevations - Dimensional building sections - Typical wall section(s) - Develop Interior/Exterior materials - Produce perspective rendering of project - Assist Owner with selection of qualified Construction Management Co. (C.M.G.C.) - Coordinate Value Engineering options with Owner and Construction Manager(C.M.G.C.) _ 4s` Joe Coffey Faraway Ranch Parcel "N' 12/13/99 Revised 2/2/2000 Page 4 PHASE 3 CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENTS - Coordinate civil engineering of site utilities, drainage, access (roads/paving) - Landscape architecture with planting plan, specifications, walkway, stairs, retaining structure improvements. - Site plan showing all site improvements - Detailed building plans - Detailed floor plans - Roof plan - Reflected ceiling plan(s) - Detailed exterior elevations - Detailed building sections - Detailed large scale wall sections - Blow-up details of critical assemblies - Interior wall elevations - Schedules of windows, doors, finishes (coordinate with interior designer) Structural engineering, layouts, and details (foundation/framing plans) - Lighting design and layouts - Electrical engineering and layouts - Heating/air handling engineering and layouts - Plumbing design and layouts - Specifications Manual PHASE 4 BIDDING/NEGOTIATION - Assist Owner and Construction Manager in evaluating final pricing, subcontractor lists/scope of work, and value engineering options. - Issue construction documents and prepare clarifications and addenda - Prepare and/or review the Contract for construction and schedule. Joe Coffey Faraway Ranch Parcel "N" 12/13/99 Revised 2/2/2000 Page 5 PHASE 5 CONSTRUCTION ADMINISTRATION - Confer with building official to facilitate issuance of Building Permit. - Review submittals, shop drawings, samples and test results. - Conduct regular job site meetings with contractor and Owner. - Coordinate inspections of engineering consultants - Serve as point of contact for Owner/Contractor communications, and issue written reports. - Review Contractor's monthly payment applications. - Determine date of substantial completion and list of final items to be rectified. - Conduct final inspections/Punch List - Follow-up review of Punch List DESIGN TEAM COMPENSATION Phase I Schematic Design(13%) $20,090.00 Phase 2 Design Development(22%) 42,000.00 Phase 3 Construction Documents (40%) 78,700.00 Phase 4 Bidding/Negotiations(5%) 9,600.00 Phase 5 Construction Administration (20%) 38,700.00 TOTAL DESIGN TEAM COMPENSATION $189,090.00 (Compensation is based on the program information above, and an assumed construction cost of about $180.00/SF and an overall design service fee of about 3.9%.) By comparison, the Mountain View Phase II Architectural Services represented a fee of approximately 6%of construction costs. We feel we can provide the level of Architectural Services required for the Parcel "N"Townhome Project at this lower percentage rate based on our familiarity with the project, the Owner's goals and expectations and a good professional working relationship with the Housing Department(Joe Coffey)and the Town of Snowmass Village. Joe Coffey Faraway Ranch Parcel "N' 12/13/99 Revised 2/2/2000 Page 6 It is anticipated that designs and revisions would be presented at (3) Council meetings. A separate proposal can be submitted for a study model if and when it is required. The development planning review process would be handled on an hourly, as needed basis. This proposal does not include services for soil or environmental testing, survey or legal work. Normal reimbursable expenses are in addition to design fees. We are looking forward to assisting the Town with this exciting project as we feel it has the potential to raise the level of quality for affordable housing in Snowmass Village and the Roaring Fork Valley. Please let me now if you have any questions. If this proposal is acceptable, let me know, as we will prepare a Standard AIA Owner-Architect Agreement for signing. Res ectfully tt C. ith, AIA rw m : r n a = W L >y M N q d e O e � O 2 t t?m N \ � / D n I• 7M � z I n -wonbq s � I � J1\�rr� f-I��� i I I � � L % rs i 1 8 OVOtl AV MV tlVd jm A I TOWN OFSNOWMASS VILLAGE ( � I.—FARAWAY RANCH PARCEL N AFFORDABLE HOUSING PROJECT j '� I SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL PUBLIC HEARING CHANGE OF PUBLIC HEARING DATE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN OF CONTINUATION OF A PUBLIC HEARING OPENED ON JANUARY 17, 2000 TO RECEIVE PUBLIC COMMENT ON THE TIMBERS AT SNOWMASS PRELIMINARY PLAN. THE PUBLIC HEARING IS SCHEDULED AS FOLLOWS: WHEN: February 7, 2000 (continued from January 24, 2000) TIME: During a meeting which begins at 4:00 p.m. WHERE: Town Council Chambers 2nd Floor, Snowmass Center 0016 Kearns Road WHY: To receive final public comment regarding The Timbers at Snowmass (Faraway Ranch South) Preliminary Plan submission, involving Parcel K, Faraway Ranch Gross Parcel Plat, as recorded March 18, 1985 in Plat Book 17 at Page 5 in the records of the Pitkin County, Colorado Clerk and Recorder. The submission also involves a request to rezone the property from SPA-1, Specially Planned Area, to MU-PUD, Mixed Use PUD, subdivision of the parcel and a Subdivision Exemption application to permit condominiumization (including a time share regime) of the project. INFO: Contact the Snowmass Village Planning Department at 923-5524 for additional information. Trudi Worline, Town Clerk Published in the Snowmass Villa a Sun on December 8, 1999 Notice of date change posted and published in the Snowmass Village Sun on January 5, 2000. Continuation Posted and Publlished in the Snowmass Village Sun on February 2, 2000. ...� 70 TOWN COUNCIL COMMUNIQUE Meeting Date: January 3, 2000 Presented By: Stephen R. Connor, Town Attorney Subject: Ordinance No. 02, Series of 2000 Overview: This Ordinance implements the excise tax approved by the electors on November 2, 1999. Please review the procedures contained in the Ordinance for discussion at the meeting. Recommendation: Approve the Ordinance on first reading. 7 ! - TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL ORDINANCE No. 02 SERIES OF 2000 AN ORDINANCE ESTABLISHING THE PROCEDURES TO ASSESS AND COLLECT THE LIMITED EXCISE TAX ON IMPROVEMENTS IN EXCESS OF THE MAXIMUM ALLOWABLE FLOOR AREA FOR A LOT AS APPROVED BY THE ELECTORS OF THE TOWN ON NOVEMBER 2, 1999, IMPLEMENTING THE SAME BY AMENDMENT TO CHAPTER 4 OF THE SNOWMASS VILLAGE MUNICIPAL CODE. WHEREAS, the Town Council proposed the establishment of a limited excise tax for consideration by the electors of the Town, in accordance with the provisions of Section 11.1 Authority to Levy Taxes of the Home Rule Charter, by Resolution No. 34, Series of 1999; and WHEREAS, the limited excise tax was considered by the electorate at the November 2, 1999 municipal election as required by the Home Rule Charter, and as a financial question within the meaning of Article X, Section 20 of the Colorado Constitution; and WHEREAS, the electors of the Town approved the financial question at the municipal election occurring on November 2, 1999, as follows: SHALL TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE TAXES BE INCREASED BY $500,000.00, ESTIMATED FIRST FULL FISCAL YEAR COLLECTION, OR SUCH OTHER AMOUNT THAT SHALL BE RECEIVED ANNUALLY, BY THE ENACTMENT OF A LIMITED EXCISE TAX TO BE ASSESSED ONLY IF THE OWNER OF A LOT DECIDES TO CONSTRUCT, REMODEL, OR EXPAND IMPROVEMENTS IN EXCESS OF THE MAXIMUM ALLOWABLE FLOOR AREA FOR A LOT, OTHER THAN BY VARIANCE, IN DETACHED SINGLE FAMILY RESIDENTIAL AREAS ONLY, PROVIDED THAT ANY SUCH CONSTRUCTION, REMODELING OR EXPANSION THAT IS SUBJECT TO THE EXCISE TAX MAY NOT EXCEED 550 SQUARE FEET OR 10% OF THE MAXIMUM ALLOWABLE FLOOR AREA FOR THE LOT, WHICHEVER IS LESS, AT A SQUARE FOOTAGE EXCISE TAX RATE EQUAL TO THE FAIR MARKET VALUE OF THE IMPROVEMENTS ON THE LOT CALCULATED TO THE SQUARE FOOT, NOT INCLUDING LAND, AS SET FORTH IN THE RECORDS OF THE PITKIN COUNTY ASSESSOR, AND UPON TERMS AND CONDITIONS ENACTED BY THE TOWN COUNCIL FROM TIME TO TIME; AND SUCH EXCISE TAX TO EXPIRE 10 YEARS AFTER ENACTMENT OR SUCH EARLIER DATE AS DETERMINED BY THE TOWN COUNCIL; AND REVENUES FROM SUCH - 742M _ Ordinance No. 02, Series of 2000 Page 2 EXCISE TAX TO BE RESTRICTED FOR THE ACQUISITION, CONSTRUCTION, REHABILITATION OF AFFORDABLE EMPLOYEE HOUSING, INCLUDING LAND, NOW OWNED OR HEREAFTER ACQUIRED BY THE TOWN AND ANY SUCH AFFORDABLE EMPLOYEE HOUSING SO ACQUIRED, CONSTRUCTED OR REHABILITATED MAY BE SOLD TO QUALIFIED PURCHASERS AS DETERMINED BY THE TOWN COUNCIL; AND SUCH EXCISE TAX REVENUES TO BE COLLECTED AND SPENT WITHOUT LIMITATION OR CONDITION AS A VOTER-APPROVED REVENUE CHANGE UNDER ARTICLE X, SECTION 20 OF THE COLORADO CONSTITUTION? WHEREAS, the Town Council is authorized by the financial question to enact terms and conditions for the assessment and collection of the limited excise tax; and WHEREAS, the Town Council has directed the Town Attorney to concoct the procedures for the assessment and collection of the limited excise tax; WHEREAS, the Town Council conducted a work session on December 13, 1999 to discuss assessment, collection and implementation issues regarding the limited excise tax; and WHEREAS, the Town Council has reviewed the procedures for the assessment and collection of the limited excise tax and finds the same to be within the scope of the delegation of the electors by approving the limited excise tax; and WHEREAS, the Town Council caused notice of a public hearing on January 3, 2000 to receive comment from the public on the provisions of this Ordinance; and WHEREAS, the Town Council received and considered comment from the public at the public hearing, and comment and recommendations from the Town Staff; and WHEREAS, the Town Council finds that the adoption of this Ordinance is necessary for the immediate preservation of the public health, safety and welfare. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED, by the Town Council of the Town of Snowmass Village, as follows: � 7 Ordinance No. 02, Series of 2000 Page 3 1. Establishment of Limited Excise Tax. Article VI Floor Area Excise Tax, Chapter 4 Revenue and Finance of the Municipal Code Is hereby created as follows: 4-130 Purpose. The purpose of this Article is to implement the authorization of the electorate of the Town given on November 2, 1999 to enact a limited excise tax to allow the construction of improvements in excess of the maximum allowable floor area for certain detached single-family dwellings. 4-131 Imposition of Tax. An excise tax is hereby imposed on construction, remodeling, or expansion of improvements requiring the issuance of a building permit within the scope of Chapter 18 of this Code in excess of the maximum floor area, as defined in the Land Use and Development Code, except as specifically authorized by a variance. 4-132 Liability for Tax. The owner of a lot which is subject to the excise tax imposed under Section 4-131 is liable for the payment of the tax upon issuance of a building permit within the scope of Chapter 18 of this Code. 4-133 Amount of Tax. The amount of the excise tax shall be calculated by.the Planning Director by multiplying the square footage that is in excess of the maximum floor area for the lot by: a. The actual value of the lot including improvements, but not including the land, as calculated from the records of the County Assessor, divided by the floor area square footage of the single-family detached dwelling and any accessory building, not including the floor area subject to the excise tax, as calculated in accordance with the provisions of Section 16A-3-210(b), Measuring Floor Area; or b. In the event that the actual value of the lot from the records of the County Assessor, then one hundred twenty-five percent (125%) of the numeric average of the actual value of all lots including improvements, but not including land, for the subdivision or PUD in which the lot exists as calculated from the records of the County Assessor shall be divided by the actual floor area square footage of lot, not including the floor area subject to the excise tax; c. Provided, however, if a change in the actual value of the lot according to the records of the County Assessor occurs within one (1) year from the date of payment of the -- 74 - Ordinance No. 02, Series of 2000 Page 4 mitigation fee, then the amount of the excise tax shall be recalculated by the Planning Director. The Planning Director shall notify the owner of the amount of the additional excise tax, which shall be paid by the owner within thirty (30) days. If the owner paid an excise tax in excess of the recalculated excise tax, then the Planning Director shall cause the overpayment to be refunded to the owner. 4-134 Exemptions. The excise tax imposed under Section 4-131 shall not apply as follows: a. to a lot that has received a variance under the provisions of the Land Use and Development Code; and b. to a lot upon which an AEU has been installed in accordance with the provisions of the Land Use and Development Code. 4-135 Expiration Date. The provisions of this Article shall become effective at 12:00 o'clock a.m. on February 2, 2000 and shall expire at 11:59 o'clock p.m. on February 1, 2010, or on such earlier date as determined by the Town Council by Resolution. 4-136 Applicability of Tax. The excise tax shall apply specifically to construction, remodeling, or expansion of improvements on a detached single-family dwelling lot in the following subdivisions only: a. Divide PUD; and b. Fox Run PUD; and C. Horse Ranch PUD; and d. Melton Ranch Units 1-III; and e. Ridge Run Units I-IV, but not including any area zoned DU; and f. The Pines PUD, but not in any area zoned DU; and g. Two Creeks PUD but not in any area zoned DU; and h. Wild Oak Unit I; and i. Wildridge Units 1-II; and j. Wood Run Units I-V, excluding therefrom, any restricted employee housing within the meaning of Chapter 17. 4-137 Maximum Square Footage. The maximum square footage to square footage Ordinance No. 02, Series of 2000 Page 5 in excess of the maximum floor area not to exceed five hundred fifty (550) square feet or ten percent (10%) of the maximum floor area, whichever is less, minus square footage in excess of the maximum floor area currently existing or granted by variance. 2. Allocation of Excise Tax. The excise tax collected under the provisions of Chapter 4 Article 4 shall be restricted for expenditure for the acquisition, construction and rehabilitation of affordable employee housing, including land, now owned or hereafter acquired by the Town. 3. Severabilitv. If any provision of this Ordinance or application hereof to any person or circumstance is held invalid, the invalidity shall not affect any other provision or application of this Ordinance which can be given effect without the invalid provision or application, and, to this end, the provisions of this Ordinance are severable. READ, APPROVED AND ADOPTED by the Town Council of the Town of Snowmass Village on First Reading on January 3, 2000 upon a motion by Council Member , the second of Council Member and upon a vote of in favor and _ against. READ, APPROVED AND ADOPTED by the Town Council of the Town of Snowmass Village on Second Reading on January 17, 2000 upon a motion by Council Member , the second of Council Member and upon a vote of in favor and _ against. TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE T. Michael Manchester, Mayor ATTEST: Trudi Worline, Town Clerk _ 71v _ . Council Communique To: Gary Suiter From: Leslie Klusmire RE: Snowmass Club Ordinance 2000-3 Date: February 7, 2000 The attached draft Ordinance formalizes the approval of the zoning amendments to the PUD. This draft ordinance is being presented to the Town Council for first reading. I understand that in the past, PUD amendments were not always formalized by Ordinance. With the new code revisions, it is now required. No new decisions are being made with this ordinance as all the approvals it formalizes have already been made by the Town Council. Attached as Exhibit A is the "PUD Guide" an new document required by the Municipal Code revisions which summarizes the Snowmass Club PUD as it applies to Parcels 4 and 12. Staff Recommends: Approval TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL ORDINANCE NO. 03 SERIES OF 2000 AN ORDINANCE APPROVING THE SNOWMASS CLUB FINAL PLANNED UNIT DEVELOPMENT PLAN AMENDMENT. WHEREAS, the Town Council approved the Preliminary PUD Plan application by adoption of Resolution No. 35, Series of 1999; and the Final Planned Unit Development Plan Amendment by adoption of Resolution No. 50 Series of 1999; WHEREAS, The Project, includes proposed changes to the Snowmass Club PUD - Parcel Four, Parcel Ten and Parcel Twelve; including a PUD amendment to allow for additional square footage and bedrooms per condominium unit, more building coverage and building height on Parcel 4 than that allowed by the PUD, to allow kitchens in units, to allow employee housing on Parcel 12, more parking than allowed by PUD and a longer than two week stay by guests. The Project contemplates demolition of existing 76 room lodge; 30 new fractional ownership condominium units; demolition, relocation and expansion of golf course maintenance facility; 61 units w/154 bedrooms employee housing, improve Lower Fairway Drive to Town standards, construct Snowmass Club Circle golf cart underpass, miscellaneous club improvements including a 9,000 sq. ft events courts, new/reconfigured pool area, outdoor kids play area, pedestrian improvements easement parallel to Highline Road and a new trail from the Club complex to Brush Creek Road; WHEREAS; the Town Council in Resolution 35, Series of 1999, found that: a. The proposal for Snowmass Club PUD as amended is consistent with the overall concept and intent of the original PUD. b. The proposal for Snowmass Club PUD as amended has no substantial adverse impacts on the neighborhood surrounding the land where the amendment is proposed and has no substantially adverse impact on the enjoyment of land abutting upon or across the street from the proposal site. c. The proposal for Snowmass Club PUD as amended will not substantially change the basic character of the existing PUD development or surrounding area. WHEREAS, the Town Council finds that the adoption of this Ordinance is necessary for the immediate preservation of the public health, safety and welfare. - ' 7e- Ord. 03-00 Page 2 NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED by the Town Council of the Town of Snowmass Village, Colorado, as follows: 1. Approval of PUD Amendment. The amended Snowmass Club PUD Parcels 4, 10 and 12 was approved as set forth in the final application submitted on October 5, 1999 in Ordinance 50, Series of 1999. The final application is incorporated herein by this reference as if set forth at length. 2. Approval. Parcel 4 and Parcel 12 Program Summary as incorporated into the PUD Guide, Exhibit A, as recorded by the Town Planning Director on February_, 2000, shall be used to determine future zoning including the following amendments: a. 61 employee-housing units which include up 154 bedrooms intended to house up to 160 employees are authorized on Parcel 12. b. Up to10%of the roof area is authorized to be no more than 48' high on the new private residence building. c. Full kitchens are allowed in any condominium units authorized on Parcel 4. d. A maximum of 500 parking spaces are authorized on Parcels 4, 10 and 12 with approval of a preliminary plan showing the location of those spaces. e. A maximum building coverage of 1.2 acres is authorized on Parcel 4 12 with approval of a preliminary plan showing the location and configuration of any proposed buildings. f. Any restriction on how long condominium/lodge guests may stay is eliminated. g. Residential uses, specifically restricted employee housing, are allowed on Parcel 12. 3. Land Use Plan Map. The amendments granted herein shall be incorporated into a revised land use plan map as required in Municipal Code 16A-5-390(2)f, as approved by the Planning Director within 90 days of the adoption of this ordinance. READ, APPROVED AND ADOPTED by the Town Council of the Town of Snowmass Village on First Reading on Th day of February 2000 upon a motion by Council Member , the second of Council Member and upon a vote of_in favor and_against. INTRODUCED, READ AND ADOPTED on this_day of 2000 by the Town Council of the Town of Snowmass Village, Colorado upon a motion made by _ 7qnow Ord.03-00 Page 3 Council member the second of Council member and by a vote of _in favor and against. TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE T. Michael Manchester, Mayor ATTEST: Trudi Worline, Town Clerk _ 90 Ordinance 2000-03, Exhibit A, Page 1 of 2 SNOWMASS CLUB PUD GUIDE Parcel Four Parcel 4 Program Summary Approved PUD Previously Approved Specifications Parcel Four Four Parcel Gross Land Area 20.02 acres 21.18 acres Public Right-of-Way 0 acres 0 acre Net Land Area 21.18 acres 21.18 Permitted Uses Health/Athletic Club Health/Athletic Club Restaurant Restaurant Lodge Condominiums Lodge/Condominiums Tennis Complex Tennis Complex Maximum Building Coverage 1 acre 1.12 acre Floor Area(LUC Calculation) n/a 122,320 sf Maximum Parking/Drive Coverage 2.5 acres 1.63 acres Maximum Parking Spaces 200 500** Minimum Parking Spaces 99 99 Maximum Building Height 44 ft, 59 ft for elevator 44 feet except may be exceeded by stack 4 ft on less than 10%of total Maximum Number of Dwelling 76 lodge rooms/30.4 30 unrestricted condo units Units unrestricted condo units Maximum Number of Bedrooms 76 76 Average Number of Bedrooms/Unit 2.5 2.53 Average Unit Size 450 sf/lodge room, 1,800 sf 1,790 sf unrestricted condo unit Club Floor Area* n/a 55,998 sf Minimum Open Space 25 percent 87 percent Minimum Lot Area n/a n/a Minimum Setbacks n/a n/a The 76 lodge rooms proposed as part of the club facility shall be equivalent to 30.4 unrestricted condominium units as defined in Ordinance 17, Series of 1978. Cooking facilities, such as kitchens, are allowed in the individual units as defined in Resolution 35, Series of 1999. The condominimization of the lodge is approved as defined in Resolution 35, Series of 1999. There are restrictions on length of stay by guests in units under Resolution 35, Series of 1999. This removes the two-week restriction in place under previous ordinances. Resolution 35, Series of 1999 allow additional square footage and bedrooms per condominium unit than that allowed in previous ordinances. The maximum building height of the lodge building is allowed to be more than 48 feet for up to 10 percent of the roof area under Resolution 35, Series of 1999. The maximum building coverage of 1.2 acres is allowed under Resolution 35, Series of 1999. *From Future Land Use Map/1998 Comprehensive Plan. "Maximum parking spaces applies to parcels 4,10, and 12 with a maximum on all three parcels equaling 500 spaces. Ordinance 2000-03, Exhibit A, Page 2 Of 2 Parcel Twelve Parcel 12 Program Summary Approved PUD Previously Approved Specification Parcel 12 12 Parcel Gross Land Area 4.8 acres 4.8 acres Public Right-of-Way 0 acres 0 acres Net Land Area 4.8 acres 4.8 acres Permitted Uses Sewer Plant Expansion Sewer Plant Expansion Golf Course Golf Course Open Space Open Space Trails Trails Recreation Recreation Tree Farm Tree Farm Multi-Family* Employee Housing Maximum Building Coverage n/a .75 acres or 15.6 % Floor Area(LUC Calculation) n/a 63,108 sq. ft. Maximum Parking/Drive Coverage n/a 1.5 acres or 31% Maximum Parking Spaces n/a 500** Minimum Parking Spaces n/a n/a Maximum Building Height n/a 41.0' Maximum Number of Dwelling Units 23* 61 Maximum Number of Bedrooms 94* 154 Average Number of Bedrooms/Units n/a 2.5 Average Unit Size n/a n/a Minimum Open Space 25 percent 65 percent The applicant will construct 61 units, or 154 bedrooms for up to 160 employees, of employee housing within parcel 12, as well as a reconstructed and expanded golf and building maintenance facility. Although no employee mitigation is required, the applicant desires to provide as many units as possible to help satisfy the town-wide demand for restricted housing. Resolution 35, Series of 1999 allows residential uses on the parcel and allows 100 percent buildout, or construction of the 61 units. These units will be maintained in perpetuity at restricted rents, and ten percent of the bedrooms will be reserved for year-round use. Snowmass Village employees will be favored in the winter months to the extent there is demand, but in no case will less than 80 percent of the total number of seasonal and full-time resident employees be employed in Snowmass Village during the winter ski season. *From Future Land Use Map/1998 Comprehensive Plan. **Maximum parking spaces applies to parcels 4,10, and 12 with a maximum on all three parcels equaling 500 spaces. COUNCIL COMMUNIQUE MEETING DATE: February 7, 2000 BY: Gary Suiter STAFF: SUBJECT: Resolution No. 05, Series of 2000, Approving the 2000 Budget for the Pitkin County '/ Cent Transit Sales and Use Tax OVERVIEW: This resolution approves the 2000 Budget for the Pitkin County ''Y2 Cent Transit Sales and Use Tax. It includes the RFTA operating shortfall of$300,000, the RFRHA budget share of$385,121 and $300,000 for Mall Transit Plaza planning and design. The budget for 2000 is about $2.3 million. The EOTC approved this budget at their regular meeting. STAFF RECOMMENDATION: Approval. p:/sha red/clerk/manager.xsdcmq.99/ 8'3 woo SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL RESOLUTION NO. 05 SERIES OF 2000 A RESOLUTION OF THE TOWN COUNCIL OF THE TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO, APPROVING THE 2000 BUDGET FOR THE PITKIN COUNTY 1/2 CENT TRANSIT SALES AND USE TAXES WHEREAS, the Aspen City Council, the Pitkin County Board of County Commissioners and the Town Council of Snowmass Village (the "Parties") have previously identified general elements of their Comprehensive Valley Transportation Plan (the "Plan") which are eligible for funding from the Pitkin County one-half cent transit sales and use tax; and WHEREAS, by intergovernmental agreement dated September 14,. 1993, the Parties agreed: a. to conduct regular public meetings to continue to refine and agree upon proposed projects and transportation elements consistent with or complimentary to the Plan; and b. that all expenditures and projects to be funded from the County-wide one- half cent transit sales and use tax shall be agreed upon by the Parties and evidenced by a resolution adopted by the governing body of each party; and WHEREAS, in November of 1993 Piddn County voters authorized the issuance of up to $13,650,000 of revenue bonds for the purpose of improving the public mass transportation system in the Roaring Fork Valley (the 'Revenue Bond Authorization") if such improvements are authorized by agreement between the Parties; and WHEREAS, at public meetings held on November 11, 1999 and January 13, 2000, the Parties considered and approved (a) the attached requested budget for the year 2000 for the Pitkin County one-half cent transit sales and use taxes, (b) the proposed budget for the Roaring Fork Railroad Holding Authority (RFRHA) for the year 2000, and (c) their share of the RFRHA budget; and WHEREAS, in approving the RFRHA budget the Parties also approved an advance of up to $419,567 for RFRHA to request entry into Preliminary Engineering from the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) until such funds are fully reimbursed from an FTA grant authorized for federal fiscal year 2000; and WHEREAS, the Parties approved the deferral for up to three (3) years of the repayment to the Parties from other members of RFRHA for the costs incurred to negotiate the acquisition of the D&RGW railroad right-of-way; and Reso. 05-00 Page 2 WHEREAS the $400,000 RFTA operating shortfall line-item in the one-half cent transit sales and use tax budget was approved contingent upon additional review in June 2000, with the Parties reserving the right to adjust the amount depending on progress with the formation of the Rural Transportation Authority, and on the status of 2000 fare revenues and sales tax proceeds. WHEREAS, pursuant to voter approval the use tax had to be used first for the acquisition of the rail right-of-way and then for other transit projects; and WHEREAS, the Parties desire to approve the attached 2000 budget with the understanding that upon the successful acquisition of the rail right-of-way in 1997, the one-half cent use tax revenues became available for other transit projects on an equal footing with projects funded by the one-half cent sales tax revenues; and WHEREAS, the Town of Snowmass Village Town Council wishes to ratify the approvals given at the November 11, 1999 and January 13, 2000 meetings by adoption of this resolution. NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED by the Town Council of the Town of Snowmass Village, Colorado that the attached 2000 one-half cent transit sales and use tax revenue and expenditure budgets are hereby approved. 1/2% Transit Sales and Use Tax 2000 Total Projected Revenues $4,782,000 Total Approved Expenditures $2,292,745 INTRODUCED, READ AND ADOPTED by the Town Council of the Town of Snowmass Village on the 7th day of February 2000 with a motion made by Council Member , the second of Council Member and by a vote of _ in favor to _opposed. TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE T. Michael Manchester, Mayor ATTEST: Trudi Worline, Town Clerk gs� Attachment "A" Reso. 05-00 Requested Budget for 2000 EOTC Transit Project Funding Current Requested Actual Acual Actual Actual Actual Projection Budget EOTC SOURCES: 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 a) Pitkin County 1/2%sales tax 2,455,143 2,526,855 2,641,380 2,826,666 3,052,234 3,055,445 3,175,000 b) Pitkin County 1/2%use tax 208,982 335,456 299,414 341,193 391,128 419,000 390,000 c) Grants 5,000 5,000 4,600,000 1,000,000 d) Investment income&misc. 22,653 62,177 118,635 131,671 150,284 182,000 217,000 a) Reimbursement of expenditures 17,377 10,981 26,000 Total EOTC Sources 2,686,778 2,929,488 3,081,806 7,910,511 3,618,646 3,656,445 4.782,000 EOTC USES: 1) 5RFTA buses-debt service 75,554 145,710 142,884 146,232 143,000 145,828 145,153 2) Expanded RFTA bus service 700,000 735,000 772,000 826,152 892,081 893,019 927,847 3) RFTA operating shortfall 146,000 150,000 400,000 4) Airport intercept lot constr. 635,376 5) Intercept lot landscaping 124,102 38,585 6) Intercept lot shuttle service 308,000 218,000 150,747 106,138 7) Intercept lot maintenance 19,592 9,579 7,830 13,000 13,000 8) Project design,mgmt,&admin 700,537 39,987 63,480 112,679 88,674 42,477 41,124 9) Entrance-to-Aspen design/engineering 30,080 149.908 138,025 10) Aspen reimbursements 65,824 30,000 18,000 11) Snowmass transit center design 29,764 87,671 100,000 300,000 12) Use tax collection costs 51,634 15,074 34,400 27,063 60,000 80,500 13) ROW acquisition efforts 42,987 53,864 177,787 151,623 14) ROW acquisition-EOTC(56%) 1,624,000 15) ROW acquisition-grants 5,593,075 16) RFRHA budget share 172,999 396,833 597,848 385,121 17) RFRHA CIS advance 118,125 56,875 (175,000) 18) RFRHA CIS contribution 618,000 19) RFRHA enhanced public process 127,000 20) Moore Open Space appraisal 3,000 21)Regional Transit Authority Plan 75,000 22)Brush Creek Study 125,000 23)RFTA mitigation of roundabout construction up to 40,000 _24)Roundabout loan 1,624,519 Total EOTC Uses 2,154,454 1,700,085 1,715,073 8,990,691 2,688,402 3,604,716 2,292,745 EOTC ANNUAL SURPLUS/(DEFICIT) 532,324 1,229,403 1,366,733 (1,080,180) 930,244 51,729 2,489,255 EOTC CUMULATIVE SURPLUS/(DEFICIT) 532,324 1,761,727 3,128,460 2,048,280 2,978.524 3,030,253 5,519,508 Notes: eee eeww• Actual/projected increase in sales tax revenue 2.9% 4.5% 7.0% 8.0% 01% 3.9% Projected inflation rate 2.5% 3.3% 2.3% 1.7% 1.7% 2.0% Projected investment earnings rate 5.5% 5.0% 4.5% 5.0% 'projected sales tax increase for 1999 if one-time revenue from sale of Ritz Carlton Hotel in 1998 is excluded from base 2.0% expenditure detail: 1997 1998 1999 2000 8) is composed of the following: 14,099 16,556 17,477 16,124 financial admin.and insurance 9,668 21,487 25,000 25,000 meeting support and facilitation 21,962 50,631 transportation linkages workshop(1/2 reimbursed by Aspen Skiing Co.) 30,000 match for Regional Transportation Partnerships grant 36,950 rail demonstration project 112,679 88,674 42,477 41,124 2/3100 �' �� �� Hlfcnl00 COUNCIL COMMUNIQUE MEETING DATE: February 4, 2000 BY: Gary Suiter, Town Manager STAFF: SUBJECT: Seven Star Ranch Final PUD Extension OVERVIEW: This development review has been extended, at the applicant's request, until February 8, 2000. Attached is a letter from Joe Wells requesting an additional extension while negotiations for access continue. STAFF RECOMMENDATION: Staff recommends Council approve the extension per the applicant's request. p:/shared/clerk/manager.xsc/cmq.2000/ �� 17 �� FROM JWLP INC PHONE NO. : 970 925 8275 FEB. 4.2000 12:48PM P 2 Joseph Wells Land Planning, Inc. 602 Midland Park Place Aspect Colorado 81611 Phone:970.925.8080 Facsimile: 970.925.8275 e-mail Address: jwells@sopris.net February 4, 2000 Gary Suiter,Acting Planning Director Steve Connor, Town Attorney Town of Snowmass Village 16 Kearns Road Snowmass Village, Colorado 81615 Delivered by Facsimile to 923-6083 and 925-9199 Dear Gary and Steve: I am writing on behalf of Seven Star Residential Partners, Ltd., Snowmass Land Partners, Ltd. and Snowmass Partners,Ltd., owners of Seven Star Ranch. I request that the Town Council continue its review of the Seven Star Ranch Final PUD Application for an additional 41-day period,from February 8,2000 until no later than March 20,2000,in order to give the Town Council more time to consider an ordinance regarding the Seven Star Ranch Final PUD Application. ce seph Wells, AICP cc: John Sullivan Gideon Kaufman TO: SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL FROM: GARY SUITER, TOWN MANAGER RE: MANAGER'S REPORT DATE: FEBRUARY 4, 2000 44t#**#ttt###ttiYettt#Rt**RRRRRR**RR***R*RR*#*R*#tt*t***t*Y`YeYrktttRR*RR*#*##4ietttt#*t#R**R*RR#tttttt#tttRt*** BRUSH CREEK ROAD/HIGHWAY 82 SIGN Craig Thompson has informed me that the Pitkin County Board of County Commissioners will hear and make a decision on Snowmass Village's sign application at their February 23rd Regular Meeting. This means that we will bypass the Board of Adjustment. Please be advised that the Brush Creek Village Homeowners'Association is opposed to the sign. Bud Eyler, County Engineer also has concerns over the sign but did not have a list of issues at the time of our conversation with him. We will keep you updated as we receive additional information. Please mark your calendars for February 23`d so that we can have Council Members attending the meeting. RFRHA MEETING UPDATE At their January 19' meeting, the Roaring Fork Railroad Holding Authority acted on several items. All future Board meetings are now scheduled for the third Wednesday of each month at 9:OOam. The Board also passed a Resolution in favor of amending the RTA legislation, which would include additional revenue-raising opportunities. The Board also enthusiastically approved the Interim Trail Plan, which is slated to begin this November. CDOT HIGHWAY 82 SIGNAGE The Mayor brought to my attention the poor directional signage at the new round-a-bout and at Shale Bluffs for directions to Snowmass Village. Staff will contact CDOT to determine their ultimate signage plan and will report back to Council. MALL TRANSIT PLAZA I have contacted Walter Kieser and asked him to develop a scope of work jointly with our staff. The scope will detail the necessary steps and analyses required in order to develop a funding package with a rational nexus to public benefit. Once the scope is refined, Walter will cost out the work. I will report back to Council prior to signing an agreement with EPS. ADMINISTRATIVE For your information, some minor alterations are being made to the front desk area in the Community Development Department. This should be occurring within the next month. Also, the update to our Pay and Classification Plan has been slightly delayed, due to late survey responses from comparable communities. We expect a draft report this month. Also, the 2000 Budget Document is back from the printers and will be available in your boxes this week. `Response requested SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL WORK SESSION SUMMARY 12-06-99 The Work Session began at 1:12 p.m. COUNCIL MEMBERS PRESENT: Mayor T. Michael Manchester, Doug Mercatoris, Jack Hatfield, Kevin Costello COUNCIL MEMBERS ABSENT: Mark Brady STAFF PRESENT: Gary Suiter, Town Manager; Steve Connor, Town Attorney; David Peckler, Transportation Manager; Chris Conrad, Senior Planner; Victoria Giannola, Planning Director; Joe Coffey, Housing Manager; Hunt Walker, Public Works Director; Jennifer Worth, Deputy Town Clerk PUBLIC PRESENT: Wayne Stryker, Martin Mata, Doug Dotson, John Dresser, Judith Burwell; Bill Hegberg; John McCarty; Grassroots TV and other members of the public interested in today's Agenda items. LAND USE CODE DISCUSSIONS Giannola reviewed with Council the schedule changes for the Draft Proposed Land Use Code schedule. She explained that the schedule had been modified slightly and that today's 2nd Reading of Ordinance 11 would be tabled until December 20`h so that staff would have an opportunity to make some final revisions. Giannola went on to explain that, according to the proposed schedule, the Code should be approved in its entirety by the 7th of February. Giannola then requested feedback from the Council regarding the schedule, as explained. Council agreed that the schedule was fine but that it may not be necessary to finish one Article before starting another, especially if it would expedite the process. Council also suggested that the Planning Commission review the Articles right after First Reading. Giannola said that she would revise the Land Use Review flow charts to reflect actual dates for each Article and the Comprehensive Plan and that she would also check with the Town Attorney to make sure that all the legal requirements are met. Giannola then reviewed the proposed schedule for review and approval of the Comprehensive Plan and the Land Use maps and asked Council for their input. After some discussion, Council approved of the existing schedule. Hatfield and Mercatoris emphasized their need for further clarification on how the Land Use Code and Comprehensive Plan tie in together with the Allocation Charts and Community Benefit before final approval of the Comprehensive Plan. �� �� MOM 12-06-99.ws Page 2 (Note: The Item below was not listed on the Agenda) DISCUSSION OF ENTRYWAY SIGN AT BRUSH CREEK RD. & HWY 82 John McCarty, of OTAK, reviewed the design and dimensions of the proposed Entryway sign as revised based on Council's requested changes. After some discussion, the majority of Council approved of the revisions. Council requested that the installation of the sign be started in the early spring, right after the ski season. McCarty suggested that this project be "bid-out" due to the ease of the installation. TIMBERS AT SNOWMASS (FARAWAY RANCH SOUTH) PRELIMINARY PUD DISCUSSION Conrad reviewed with Council where the Timbers project currently stood. He explained that the topics of today's discussion and review would be proposed design and material changes, the transit and parking program for the development, and the possibility of snowmelting Faraway Road, which would have some effect on the structure and status of the employee housing. Manchester explained that since the Council now has a complete application submitted by the Timbers, he would like to start the Public Hearing process over again by noticing a new Public Hearing consistent with the new information that the Timbers has submitted. Council then discussed the schedule of review as it currently stood. Wayne Stryker, representing the Timbers, then explained the changes to the design based on the concerns that the Council and Planning Commission had regarding the visual impacts from the road. He explained that they had softened the visual impact through landscaping and this will also reduce the visual height of the project. Council requested that the amount of concrete around the entryway to the Timbers and at the face of the parking garage be kept to a minimum and that the integration with the landscaping be aesthetically pleasing. Stryker said that he would come back with a representation specific to the wall. There was further discussion regarding the integration of a waterfall in the project and copper roofing on sheds and small dormers. Examples were displayed of each. Dotson reviewed the transportation plan for the Timbers, including moving the transit shelter to the downhill side of the employee housing access; stamping or texturing the concrete in the transit areas; moving the bus shelter to accommodate RFTA requirements; making sure all ADA requirements have been met for RFTA and TOSV Shuttle stops. Dotson also discussed the proposal for snowmelting the roadway up to the Timbers property and a portion of Faraway Road. Dotson then explained the parking proposal for the project, which included the number of parking spaces allocated to each unit; for operational vehicles and additional parking spaces, which would have the potential use for associate parking. Council discussed the parking spaces and requested clarification by the Timbers on related questions. After some discussion between the Council, the Timbers's representatives and TOSV staff regarding the applicant's proposal of associate parking spaces within their development, Council suggested that the parking spaces be leased to Snowmass Village residents as long as the minimum number of spaces deemed necessary for the development is met. The Timbers and Town Staff would determine details regarding the administration of the associate parking. �� CI %we 12-06-99.ws Page 3 Council then reviewed the pros and cons of the applicant's proposal to snowmelt lower Faraway Road. After listening to Staffs opinions and some discussion, the majority of Council agreed that it would not be beneficial to the Town for the applicant to snowmelt Faraway Road due to maintenance and energy costs that would be incurred by the Town. Council requested that diligent snowplowing and sanding by the Road Department be maintained in lieu of snowmelting. Council then discussed various transportation mitigation issues, including the possibility of upgrading the bus shelters, or paying some sort of mitigation fee to the Town for Village Shuttle and RFTA needs. The Town Council also discussed possible bus stop locations and other transportation issues that they thought needed to be addressed during future discussions. The Work Session ended at 4:02pm Submitted by: Jennifer Worth Deputy Town Clerk .� �� r SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL WORK SESSION SUMMARY 01-03-2000 The Work Session began at 2:15 p.m. COUNCIL MEMBERS PRESENT: Mayor T. Michael Manchester,Jack Hatfield, Kevin Costello, Mark Brady, Douglas Mercatoris COUNCIL MEMBERS ABSENT: All members were present. STAFF PRESENT: Gary Suiter, Town Manager; Hunt Walker, Public Works Director; Steve Connor, Town Attorney; Victoria Giannola, Planning Director; Chris Conrad, Senior Planner; Joe Coffey, Housing Manager; David Peckler, Transportation Manager; Marianne Rakowski, Finance Director; Rebecca Harlowe, Secretary; Trudi Worline, Town Clerk PUBLIC PRESENT: Carolyn Sackariason, Fred Pierce, Don Schuster, Gary Soucie, Doug Dotson, John Dresser, Tom Gilchrist, Martin Mata, David Burden, Sarah Chung, Judi Burwell, and members of the public interested in today's Agenda items. DISCUSSION OF PARCEL N PROCESS Giannola reported that she met with the Town Attorney and Town staff regarding the process for the Town's proposal to construct employee housing on Parcel "N". Alan Richman, of Alan Richman Planning Services, will be retained as Lead Planner for the project and will provide the necessary rezoning of the property. The proposal will be submitted as a Special Review per recent amendments to the Land Use Code. Scott Smith, of Reno/Smith Architects, will be retained for design planning and Giannola will provide guidance for submission procedures. Projected time for completion of the process is 3 to 4 months. The Town Attorney explained that Special Review is an abbreviated process requiring minimum submission requirements and is reviewed by the Planning Commission. Council Review would precede Special Review and additional requirements may be requested by the Planning Director. Coffey stated that he would provide Council with updates during the process to ensure Council's continued involvement. Council discussed strategies to minimize costs. The Town Attorney explained that Parcels "M" and "N" were surveyed when the Town purchased the property. Mayor Manchester requested that the same standards for construction be followed for this project as for a private sector project. - 9'3 01-03-00 ws Page 2 Council requested a Public Hearing be scheduled and continued throughout the process in order to receive comments from the public regarding this application. Council also requested that letters be mailed to notify homeowners' associations from the Woodbridge, Ridge and Seasons Four Condominiums, as well as the Snowmass Homeowners' Association, inviting them to attend Council presentations and discussions regarding Parcel "N". DISCUSSION OF ESTABLISHMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION OF FLOOR AREA EXCISE TAX Giannola requested that Council answer a list of questions necessary for the formulation of an Ordinance implementing the Excise Tax. Council discussed the list of questions and provided answers for staff. Council requested that changes to variance review standards be addressed in the near future. Council discussed the possibility of a discount rate and recommended that staff include First Reading of an Ordinance implementing the Excise Tax on the January 10, 2000 Council Meeting Agenda. Council requested that staff develop an informational fact sheet for the public and explore a valuation process at variable rates for consideration in the Ordinance. Discussion of the definition of hardship will be discussed before 2nd reading. TIMBERS AT SNOWMASS (FARAWAY RANCH SOUTH) PRELIMINARY PUD Conrad outlined the three items for discussion at this meeting which included the Fiscal Impact Analysis, employee housing, and finalization of architecture, materials and lighting. He reviewed recent changes submitted by the applicant which included modifications to the average annual occupancy rate estimates, a new year 2002 construction start date, and elimination of Real Estate Transfer Tax and solid waste as possible revenue sources. Conrad explained that the changes to occupancy rates resulted in an annual surplus to the Town of approximately $4,700.00. The amended Fiscal Impact Analysis will be discussed at the January 10, 2000 Work Session. Coffey discussed fiscal projections and potential financing for purchase of the employee housing units. He presented cost estimates and revenue projections based on the Mountain View Employee Housing construction project and the assumption that the project will begin in 2001. Council discussed the cost estimates, net income projections and bonding potential. After further discussion, Council requested further investigation to substantiate existing estimates. Council expressed an interest to purchase all of the employee housing units from the Timbers. The group discussed variables concerning potential community benefit, the Timbers employee housing needs and management/ownership details. Timbers representatives requested that they retain 50-percent of the units for their own employees. Council discussed the pros and cons of purchasing the units. 01-03-00 ws Page 3 Conrad summarized relevant methods to comply with the mitigation requirements. Based on the assumption that the Timbers team is willing to have first right of rental on the square feet in excess of the mitigation requirement, the Mayor proposed that the Town purchase the entire project and control the rental of all mitigation square footage. He further proposed that the Timbers have first right of rental on any excess square footage which, if not used, would default to the Town Housing Authority. Manchester explained that the Town could purchase the project for the amount of debt financed through traditional means, with a 20-year bond based on rents consistent with the Mountain View project, minus operating, maintenance and reserve funds. A straw vote was taken and Council majority agreed that this scenario represents a significant community benefit. Council also agreed that a financial bond question may be necessary at the November 2000 Regular Election, therefore, a Plan "B" should be devised in case the bond issue is not approved by the voters. Staff will meet with the Timbers team to draft the two plans. Council reviewed changes to architectural details, roof shapes and sizes, decks, lighting and access. Conrad reported that the Planning Commission preferred the architectural style of Building "K" to that of Building "U. Conrad outlined discussion items for the next meeting. He stated that a draft Resolution on the preliminary PUD will be discussed at the January 17, 2000 Council Work Session. The Work Session ended at 4:45 p.m. Submitted by: Rebecca Harlowe, Secretary/Records Manager SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL WORK SESSION SUMMARY 01-10-2000 The Work Session began at 2:06 p.m. COUNCIL MEMBERS PRESENT: T. Michael Manchester, Mayor, Doug Mercatoris, Jack Hatfield, Kevin Costello, Mark Brady COUNCIL MEMBERS ABSENT: All Council Members were present. STAFF PRESENT: Gary Suiter, Town Manager; Craig Thompson, Community Development Director; Marianne Rakowski, Finance Director; Chris Conrad, Senior Planner; Victoria Giannola, Planning Director; Hunt Walker, Public Works Director; Leslie Klusmire, Assistant to the Town Manager; Joe Coffey, Housing Manager; Trudi Worline, Town Clerk PUBLIC PRESENT: John McCarty, John Dresser, Carolyn Sackariason, Doug Dotson, Martin Mada, Doug Pratt, Don Schuster, Chris Kiley, Rich Norris and other members of the public interested in today's Agenda items. TIMBERS AT SNOWMASS (FARAWAY RANCH SOUTH) PRELIMINARY PUD Bill Cunningham discussed changes recently made to the development and the impact of those changes on the Impact Report submitted to Council at the January 3, 2000 Work Session. The changes included moving the project start date out to the year 2002, changing the average annual occupancy rates to 50- percent for the club units and 95-percent for the employee housing, and the removal of solid waste and Real Estate Transfer Tax as revenue sources. Cunningham explained that these changes have resulted in a net annual deficit to the Town of approximately $4,000. Town expenditures are based on a peak period population and do not include inflation or price increases. Council discussed the impacts on property taxes, transportation numbers, occupancy comparisons to similar projects, Town shuttle pull-out as it relates to the trail crossing, site retaining walls and landscaping, Doug Pratt explained materials planned for use on the retaining walls within the project. John McCarty provided comments based on his review of materials to 01-10-flows Page 2 be used for"naturalizing" the walls. Council requested an example drawing of the proposed construction and landscaping for the retaining walls. McCarty will work with the applicant and staff regarding use of materials and design as requested by Council. Pratt stated that the applicant has agreed to the landscaping recommendations provided by McCarty. He further explained the landscaping plans for the project. Conrad stated that the Wildcat Fire District would provide a letter stating their requirements of the project. Council discussed the drop-off lot as a circle configuration with island landscaping or as a lot with head-in parking spaces and determined that construction of the lot with head-in parking would be the most appropriate for its uses. Among other uses, the parking lot will be used for parents to park their vehicles while they walk their children to meet the school bus on Brush Creek Road. Council also discussed the possibility of this lot being used for employee housing nighttime guest parking. Council requested that the Town shuttle bus pull-off on the east side of Brush Creek Road, be relocated downhill approximately 40-feet. Council also requested a recommendation from the Transportation Manager regarding the design for the bus stop shelter and pull-off lane and that the applicant provide a design for the west-bound bus stop and shelter for discussion at the next meeting. Council discussed a summarized draft of the Construction Management Plan included in today's Council packet. A final and completed plan will be developed and submitted by the applicant at the time of request for any permit following Preliminary Review or at Final Review. Council discussed issues related to the draft Construction Management Plan, including the type of work planned to begin before the end of ski season, issuance of any permits following Preliminary Review, locations designated for stockpiling dirt, transporting materials on Brush Creek Road during high season, staging area at the employee housing for the first phase of construction, possibility of the use of Parcel "N" as a staging area, Timbers utility installation in conjunction with that of Parcel "N", and access roads to be constructed on the development site. Mark Norris stated that initial work on the site after final approval would include installation of the shoring system. Council requested that the Police Department comment on the entrance and exit of truck traffic on Brush Creek Road. They further requested that public roads be kept free of dirt and mud during construction, that the contractor would not start equipment engines before 7:30 a.m. and that the developer keep Brush Creek free from run-off water or any other contamination. Council further discussed an erosion control plan, pedestrian walkways, plans for closing the trail and pedestrian safety measures during construction and school bus drop-off during construction. Council requested that the Timbers coordinate with Town staff regarding construction of 01-10-2000ws Page 3 Parcel "N" and that the neighboring communities be updated on an ongoing basis. Dresser stated that the agenda for the January 20, 2000 Ridge Homeowners Meeting includes a discussion regarding an optional school bus drop-off location. The applicant requested that Council approve an Excavation Permit as a part of the resolution approving the Preliminary Plan. Dotson stated that representatives of the Timbers met briefly with the Housing Manager for a preliminary discussion regarding construction of the employee housing portion of their development project. The group will meet in the near future to further discuss an agreement for coordination of Parcel "N" construction elements with the Timbers construction as well as design, construction and budget issues for the Timbers employee housing. Dotson explained that two options will be developed regarding the Timbers employee housing, one option assuming that the Town will purchase the units and one assuming otherwise. Initially, the applicant will proceed with the plan that assumes a housing bond will be approved for the Town to purchase the employee housing units. He explained that the developer would build the employee housing which would then be deeded to the Town when a Certificate of Occupancy is issued. He outlined the two optional plans and stated that Timbers representatives will meet with Town staff to refine the plans. Council requested quality construction for the employee housing units and requested that the Housing Manager review the floor plans. The Timbers will retain three 2-bedroom and three 1-bedroom units, although Council requested to have first right of refusal on renting the units. Conrad stated that a Public Hearing is scheduled for the January 17, 2000 Regular Town Council Meeting and will provide Council with a draft Resolution approving the Preliminary PUD. LAND USE CODE DISCUSSION —ARTICLE IV Leslie Klusmire, Assistant to the Town Manager, explained that the Job Generation Chart has been revised as requested previously by Council. The Chart is used as a tool to determine the number of employees generated from new construction and the amount of employee housing required of the developer to meet those housing needs. Revisions previously requested by Council were to make the Chart more specific to certain uses and include additional categories. She reviewed the changes with Council and explained that the numbers were generated from the most recent survey of Snowmass Village businesses. Chris Kiley stated that he was informed that the survey information was not to be used for special data that would impact the Land Use Code since the questions were very general. 01-10-2000ws Page 4 Council requested copies of the original Job Generation Chart before the above revisions were made. They also requested copies of average job generation rates from other ski resorts. Council agreed that developers paying cash-in-lieu should receive the same credits as those who do not have this option. Council requested that staff provide the amount it would cost to provide the housing and the land at a value that is sustainable at affordable housing sale or rental rates, in order to apply this information to those paying cash-in-lieu. Council discussed ways to create an incentive for developers to construct employee housing rather than paying the cash-in-lieu. Council determined that there should be two options available in the language which would require that owner build and maintain the employee housing or that the owner build and transfer the employee housing to the Town. Council requested that any reference to "Conceptual Review" be replaced with "Sketch Plan Review'. EMPLOYEE HOUSING RESALE GUIDELINES This item was not discussed at this meeting. CALENDARS Aspen Highlands Tour A Council/Staff tour of Highlands Base Area was scheduled for Friday, January 21, 2000 at 11:00 a.m. Aspen Village Public Hearing A Public Hearing is scheduled before the Pitkin County Board of County Commissioners on February 9, 2000 at the Plaza I Conference Room. Aspen Village is requesting that the Resident Occupant (RO) Guidelines be removed from the lots in Aspen Village. Elected Officials Transportation Committee Meeting An Elected Officials Transportation Committee Meeting (EOTC) is scheduled for 4:00 p.m. on Thursday, January 13, 2000 in Aspen. Regional Transportation Authority Meeting A Regional Transportation Authority Meeting (RTA) is scheduled for 9:00 a.m. on Thursday, January 13, 2000 at the Garfield County Courthouse in Glenwood Springs. The Work Session ended at 6:35 p.m. Trudi Worline, Town Clerk -9g SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL REGULAR MEETING MINUTES 01-17-2000 Mayor T. Michael Manchester called to order the Regular Meeting of the Snowmass Village Town Council on Monday, January 17, 2000 at 4:05 p.m. Item No. 1: ROLL CALL COUNCIL MEMBERS PRESENT: Mayor T. Michael Manchester, Doug Mercatoris, Jack Hatfield, Kevin Costello, Mark Brady COUNCIL MEMBERS ABSENT: All Council Members were present. STAFF PRESENT: Gary Suiter, Town Manager; Steve Connor, Town Attorney; Victoria Giannola, Planning Director; Craig Thompson, Community Development Director; Dean Stahman, Planning Technician; Chris Conrad, Senior Planner; Hunt Walker, Public Works Director; Joe Coffey, Housing Manager; Jennifer Worth, Deputy Town Clerk; Trudi Worline, Town Clerk PUBLIC PRESENT: Carolyn Sackariason, John Dresser, Wolfe Gensch, Judi Burwell, Robert Goldstein, Bill Kane, Don Schuster, Tom Newland and other members of the public interested in today's Agenda items. Item No. 2: PUBLIC NON-AGENDA ITEMS (5-Minute Time Limit) In response to an inquiry from a member of the public, Joe Coffey, Housing Manager, explained that discussions with Council regarding proposed construction of employee housing on Parcel "N" are planned to begin in February, 2000. Item No. 3: RESOLUTION NO. 10, SERIES OF 2000 A RESOLUTION EXPRESSING APPRECIATION TO TOM DUNLOP FOR HIS SERVICE ON THE SNOWMASS VILLAGE BOARD OF APPEALS AND EXAMINERS 01-17-2000tc Page 2 Mayor Manchester read Resolution No. 10, Series of 2000, expressing appreciation to Tom Dunlop for 18 and 'Y2 years of service on the Snowmass Village Board of Appeals and Examiners. Mercatoris made the motion to approve Resolution No. 10, seconded by Costello. The motion was approved unanimously. Manchester presented Dunlop with a copy of the Resolution and a plaque stating the Town's appreciation. Dunlop stated his thanks for the recognition and encouraged the public to volunteer on the various Town boards and commissions. Wolfe Gensch, Chairman of the Board of Appeals and Examiners, thanked Dunlop for the years he has volunteered his services on the Board. Item No. 4: PUBLIC HEARING — ORDINANCE NO. 15, SERIES OF 1999 TO RECEIVE PUBLIC COMMENT ON AN ORDINANCE GRANTING A FRANCHISE TO HOLY CROSS ENERGY FOR DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRICAL ENERGY TO THE RESIDENTS OF THE TOWN FOR LIGHT, HEAT, POWER AND OTHER PURPOSES AND FIXING THE TERMS AND CONDITIONS THEREOF Mayor Manchester opened the Public Hearing at 4:10 p.m. There being no comments from the public, the Public Hearing was closed at 4:10 p.m. The Town Attorney stated that the public was notified of this Public Hearing in accordance with the Town of Snowmass Village Municipal Code. Item No. 8: RESOLUTION NO. 04, SERIES OF 2000 A RESOLUTION OF THE TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO, EXTENDING A FRANCHISE TO HOLY CROSS ELECTRIC ASSOCIATION, INC., ITS SUCCESSORS AND ASSIGNS, UNTIL APRIL 30, 2000 Mercatoris made a motion to approve Resolution No. 04, Series of 2000, seconded by Costello. The Town Manager explained that he met with representatives of the Holy Cross Electric Association regarding issues Council earlier identified within the Franchise Agreement. The next step is for the attorney's representing both organizations to meet and discuss the issues and finalize the language. The Town Manager further explained that this Resolution provides an extension of the Franchise to April 30, 2000. The extension will allow sufficient time for attorneys representing both organizations to meet and discuss the issues and finalize the language before Second Reading of Ordinance No. 15, Series of 1999. This Ordinance approves the Franchise Agreement with Holy Cross. After further discussion, the Resolution was approved by a vote of 5 in favor to 0 opposed. - i 0 1 -- 01-17-2000tc Page 3 Item No. 5: PUBLIC HEARING AND SECOND READING — ORDINANCE NO. 23, SERIES OF 1999 TO RECEIVE PUBLIC COMMENT AND SECOND READING ON AN ORDINANCE AMENDING THE PROVISIONS OF CHAPTER 16A OF THE MUNICIPAL CODE TO PROVIDE FOR AN EXTENSION OF TIME FOR THE INTERIM AMENDMENT PROCEDURE FOR THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AND THE TEXT OF THE LAND USE AND DEVELOPMENT CODE Mayor Manchester opened the Public Hearing at 4:16 p.m. There being no comments from the public, the Public Hearing was closed at 4:16 p.m. Mercatoris made a motion to approve Second Reading of Ordinance No. 23, Series of 1999, seconded by Brady. There being no further discussion, a roll-call vote was taken and Second Reading of the Ordinance was approved by a vote of 5 in favor to 0 opposed. Item No. 6: PUBLIC HEARING — DRAFT RESOLUTION NO. 06. SERIES OF 2000 TO RECEIVE PUBLIC COMMENT ON DRAFT RESOLUTION NO. O6, SERIES OF 2000 CONCERNING THE TIMBERS AT SNOWMASS (FARAWAY RANCH SOUTH) PRELIMINARY PUD PLAN SUBMISSION, INVOLVING PARCEL K, FARAWAY RANCH GROSS PARCEL PLAT, AND THE GRANTING OF AUTHORIZATION TO SUBMIT FINAL PUD PLAN APPLICATION Mayor Manchester opened the Public Hearing at 4:19 p.m. Judi Burwell, representing the Woodbridge Board of Directors, stated a concern regarding the height of the proposed buildings, increased traffic congestion and the need to re-design the intersection at Faraway Road and Woodbridge Road to form a "T" intersection. In response to an inquiry from Burwell, Mayor Manchester stated that a Public Hearing process will take place for the proposed Parcel "N" employee housing construction. John Dresser, representing the Ridge Homeowners Association, requested that this Public Hearing be continued to the February 7, 2000 Regular Town Council Meeting. Chris Conrad, Senior Planner, stated that he received a letter from Alden Crawford, 116 Deer Ridge Lane, regarding his concerns of the development. He informed Council that copies of Crawford's letter were distributed to Council Members at this meeting and will become a part of the record for this Public Hearing. There being no further comments from the public, at 4:21 p.m. Mayor 01-17-2000tc Page 4 Manchester stated that this Public Hearing will be continued to the February 7, 2000 Regular Town Council Meeting scheduled to begin at 4:00 p.m. Item No. 7: PUBLIC HEARING AND ACTION — RESOLUTION NO. 07, SERIES OF 2000 TO RECEIVE COMMENT AND COUNCIL ACTION ON AN APPLICATION BY THE TIMBERS AT SNOWMASS, LLC, FOR AN ANNUAL TEMPORARY USE PERMIT Mayor Manchester opened the Public Hearing at 4:21 p.m. There being no comments from the public, the Public Hearing was closed at 4:21 p.m. Conrad stated that submission and public notification requirements for an application of this type have been satisfied in accordance to the Snowmass Village Municipal Code. Mayor Manchester made a motion to approve Resolution No. 07, Series of 2000, seconded by Costello. The applicant explained that this Permit is to allow a temporary trailer to be located at the staging area. He further explained that a temporary model of the units to be sold also exists on the property. Conrad explained that a sign previously approved by Council at another location on the construction site would now be located at the sales office near the staging area. Council requested that staff include language reflecting the sign relocation in this Resolution. Council discussed the location of the trailer. Hatfield made a motion to amend the Resolution to include language regarding relocation of the sign. Costello seconded the motion. The motion to amend was approved by a vote of 5 in favor to 0 opposed. There being no further discussion, the Resolution was approved as amended, by a vote of 5 in favor to 0 opposed. Item No. 9: RESOLUTION NO. 12, SERIES OF 2000 A RESOLUTION IN SUPPORT OF AMENDMENTS TO RURAL TRANSPORTATION AUTHORITY LAW Mercatoris made a motion to approve Resolution No. 12, Series of 2000, seconded by Mayor Manchester. Manchester explained that this Resolution, approved by several government entities throughout the Valley, is an enabling vehicle to provide additional options to local jurisdictions. The Resolution, which identifies proposed amendments to the Rural Transportation Authority (RTA) Law, is to be considered by the State Legislature during the upcoming Legislative Session. The comments proposed by the RTA Steering Committee will be forwarded to Russell George for his support. After further discussion, the Resolution was approved by a vote of 5 in favor to 0 opposed. Item No. 10: MANAGER'S REPORT 01-17-2000tc Page 5 Woodrun V Dumpster The Town Manager reported that he met with the President of the Woodrun Homeowners Association to discuss the location of the Woodrun V Dumpster. The meeting resulted in a suggestion to temporarily locate the dumpster in Parking Lot "C" until a permanent location can be identified. Mercatoris stated that he felt the appropriate location was the site earlier proposed uphill from Woodrun V because it serves the Woodrun neighborhood. Council discussed other identified sites for possible location of the dumpster shed and eliminated each as impractical and inappropriate for this use. After further discussing the issue, Council agreed that for practical reasons as well as to retain the Town's rights for historical use, the dumpster should remain at the historical Woodrun V location. Council requested that staff work with Woodrun V to improve the aesthetics of the dumpster and directed staff to determine if the area where the dumpster is currently located is large enough for construction and landscaping similar to the Fox Run/Two Creeks dumpster shed. Town Meeting Suiter stated that the Town Meeting has been scheduled for 6:00 p.m. on February 2, 2000 at Anderson Ranch. A list of possible topics for discussion are included in the Council packet for this meeting. Council requested that staff provide maps and any other materials related to issues before the Town to aid in discussions at the meeting. Two Creeks Bus Service The Town Manager reported that he approved suspension of Roaring Fork Transportation Authority (RFTA) bus service at Two Creeks for last weekend, in response to a request from Doug Mackenzie of the ASC. Mackenzie is requesting that the service be suspended for the remainder of the season. RFTA will provide additional bus service to cover possible increases in ridership at the Mall. In order to keep the Two Creeks parking lot vital and active, Mackenzie has proposed free parking at that parking lot. After further discussion, Council agreed to Mackenzie's request and asked that a letter of agreement from Council to Mackenzie state that if snowfall increases and Two Creeks is able to open to full service or if the parking lot is heavily used, this issue will be opened for discussion and possible change. Aspen Highlands Tour The Town Manager stated that a tour of Aspen Highlands base area is scheduled for Friday, January 21, 2000. Those attending will meet at Town Hall at 10:30 a.m. for transportation to the area. — io � — 10-17-2000tc Page 6 Council Retreat The Town Council Retreat is scheduled for January 26, 27 and 28 at Copper Mountain. Council and staff will leave Town Hall at noon on the 26th. Mayor Manchester outlined the agenda of topics for discussion at the Retreat. Mall Transit Plannina Hatfield requested Work Session time be set to discuss continuance of planning for the Mall Transit Plaza before proceeding with the planning process. He stated that Council should discuss this and any other Town issues as a unit rather than having individual conversations with staff. Mercatoris requested that those involved in the Mall Transit Planning be notified by staff well in advance of upcoming meetings. He identified a list of group representatives and individuals to be notified. The Town Manager stated that the next meeting is scheduled for January 20, 2000 at 9:00 a.m. Location for the meeting is to be determined. Parcel "N" Employee Housing Giannola reported that she attended an initial planning meeting for construction of employee housing on Parcel "N". The group made a decision to process Parcel "N" as a Planned Unit Development (PUD), identifying it as the most expeditious process. Alan Richman will provide a breakdown of costs for his services at the next Council Meeting. The planning review process will take approximately four months. Krabloonik Proposal Giannola stated that Krabloonik has requested Work Session time on February 7, 2000 regarding a proposal to expand the restaurant and for a change in land use. Krabloonik representatives disagree with points made in a staff report. Krabloonik representatives would like to discuss the change in land use and housing mitigation issues related to the proposal. The Town Attorney said that Work Session time could be set if they wish to request permission to use Town land as a part of their planning process, although the appropriate appeal process should be followed if they wish to appeal staffs decision. Item No. 11: DISCUSSION/ACTION ROARING FORK RAILROAD HOLDING AUTHORITY DRAFT COMPREHENSIVE PLAN Hunt Walker explained that the Comprehensive Plan for the railroad corridor was distributed in November, 1999 to solicit comments from all entities involved. He stated that a final Comprehensive Plan will need to be approved by all the member entities. The Plan includes a recreational trails plan for a temporary and long-term trail along the corridor, an access control plan, the Corridor Investment 01-17-2000tc Page 7 Study (CIS) and a summary for all three. He provided Council with comments on the Plan made by the Elected Officials Transportation Committee (EOTC). Tom Newland, Director of the Roaring Fork Railroad Holding Authority (RFRHA), stated that he would provide Council with a list of comments from all eight entities. After all comments have been collected, he will develop a final draft to present to the RFRHA Board for ratification. The goal is to complete the Comprehensive Plan by March, 2000. Council discussed using funds for a by- pass, uses for the corridor, completion of the CIS, transferability of the corridor to the RTA, Federal funding, paving of the trail and impacts to the eagles' nesting area. Costello stated his opposition to ban hunting. Hatfield stated his opposition to future modification of the conservation easement for including only sensitive wildlife areas, paving the trail and funding road improvements. Mercatoris stated his objection to the costs involved. Mayor Manchester requested Newland's comments regarding a resolution approving the year 2000 EOTC budget that will come before Council for approval in the near future. Hunt Walker provided Council with copies of the budget numbers that were distributed to all EOTC members at their last meeting. Newland explained RFRHA legal costs that are included in the budget. Newland presented Council with a large plaque stating RFRHA's appreciation for the Town's participation in the purchase of the railroad right-of-way. The plaque included a stock certificate that identified that the Town of Snowmass Village owns $337,000 worth of shares in the railroad right-of-way. Item No. 13: DISCUSSION REGIONAL TRANSPORTATION AUTHORITY (RTA) Newland explained that RTA representatives will meet with the Council on February 7, 2000 to receive comments on issues related to the development of the RTA and the upcoming Intergovernmental Agreement (IGA). Manchester reported that he attended a RTA meeting on January 13, 2000. He further reported that Colin Laird is in the process of drafting a summary of the history and goals of the RTA efforts. The summary will be mailed to interested parties throughout the State to create an awareness of the legislative changes to be proposed to the State Legislature. Manchester presented an overview of the meeting and explained how the process will work. The Committee has been named the RFTA RTA Policy Committee and will draft the IGA with assistance from consultants and facilitators. Newland explained changes that have recently been made to the budget. Item No. 12: APPROVAL OF WORK SESSION SUMMARY FOR 12-20-99 AND MEETING MINUTES OF 12-20-99 AND 01-03-00 ._ gyp ( 01-17-2000tc Page 8 Mercatoris made a motion to approve the Work Session Summary of December 20, 1999 and Meeting Minutes of December 20, 1999 and January 3, 2000. Costello seconded the motion. There being no corrections or additions, the motion was approved by a vote of 5 in favor to 0 opposed. Item No. 14: DISCUSSION COMMITTEE REPORTS/COUNCIL COMMENTS "Not in Service" RFTA buses Hatfield requested an explanation for the increase of"not in service" RFTA buses that have recently appeared on the roads. Brady will make an inquiry and report back to Council. Police Officers in Transit Hatfield stated that recently he has noticed two police officers together in a squad car. He requested that the Town Manager make an inquiry and report back to Council. Grassroots TV Absence Hatfield requested that staff contact Grassroots TV to determine the reason why they did not film this Work Session and Meeting. RFTA Meeting Brady stated that he attended a recent RFTA Board Meeting. He reported that ridership numbers are down from last year approximately 9,000 to 6,000 for November, 1999 and low ridership numbers are expected for December, 1999 and January, 2000. The group discussed the application before Garfield County for the Sanders Ranch development. He said the application is in the final stages of review. A decision could be made on this development application in approximately two weeks. Although RFTA service will not be offered to Sanders Ranch, RFTA has offered them an outline of transportation items recommended for discussion and consideration purposes that include impacts to neighboring towns. Council concluded that they will provide information to the Garfield County Commissioners regarding the impacts of Sanders Ranch on the Roaring Fork Valley and will mention the restrictions and provisions of the Garfield County Comprehensive Plan. Brush Creek Road/Highway 82 Sign In response to an inquiry from Brady, Craig Thompson explained that the Snowmass Village sign proposal is currently on the February meeting agenda for the Pitkin County Board of Adjusters to review and make recommendations. He said that he expects a report outlining the issues and concerns from John `snow / • WAWW 01-17-2000tc Page 9 McCarty within the next two weeks. Council discussed whether the Board of Adjusters or the County Commissioners have jurisdiction over this proposal. Low-Snow Year Brady stated that he met with Pat O'Donnell of the ASC, who reported that the lack of snow has forced closure of certain ski runs on the mountain. O'Donnell stated that since certain ski areas within the State have received good snowfall, Colorado as a whole has not been perceived as having bad skiing conditions. Council Group Photo In response to an inquiry from Brady, the Town Clerk explained that Council pictures would be taken in the Spring. Snowmass Village Resort Association Mercatoris reported that he recently attended a Snowmass Village Resort Association (SVRA) Board of Governors Meeting. He requested that Town staff be notified of low sales tax income projections for the first quarter of this year that will affect the Town budget. He will provide a December sales report after January 20, 2000. The Board discussed their concern regarding the Mall Transit Plaza. They will be approving funds to complete a feasibility study for construction of a new conference center on Daly Lane. Mercatoris stated that Mayor Manchester provided the Board with a Town report. Mayor Manchester stated that SVRA is in the process of restructuring their Internet Web Page. He requested that the Town's Web Page be linked with SVRA's Web Page. Brady suggested that the invitation to link to these Home Pages be extended to other businesses in Town. Snowmass Community Fund Mercatoris reported that he recently attended the Snowmass Community Fund Board of Directors Meeting. The Snowmass Community Fund is a non-profit organization that channels funds for special projects. Jeff Tippett will be retiring from the Snowmass Community Fund as well as from the SVRA. He said that the group is searching for someone to fill Tippett's position on the Community Fund Board. He explained that the Snowmass Community Fund is responsible for the free summer music series. The summer music series has requested that SVRA make application earlier this year in order provide time to receive any comments from the public. The Town will then address any issues from the public. A request will be made to extend the summer music series with one additional concert. This would require beginning the series at the end of June. Mercatoris further reported that money remaining in the Arbor Day Fund may be donated to the Town to purchase a tree and that the Sacred Places project is coming to completion. Any remaining funds in that account will also be donated. - lap dow 01-17-2000tc Page 10 New Conference Center Committee The Town Manager reported that he is representing Council on a committee for construction of a new Conference Center. He stated that the group may request a favorable consideration from the Town in the near future. Brush Creek Corridor Studv Mayor Manchester reported that an update on the Brush Creek Corridor Study was provided at the last EOTC Meeting. The report was received favorably by the group. Upon completion, a process will begin to adopt the Study as an advisory document of the Pitkin County land use process. Following approval, the process will begin for construction of a multi-purpose trail along the corridor. Divide Homeowners Association Manchester requested that staff respond to all letters from the Divide Homeowners Association. Suiter stated that staff has responded by telephone in the past. Hunt Walker explained that he has written responses to the Divide's attorney. The Town Manager stated that all responses would be made in writing in the future. Paving Owl Creek Road Hunt Walker stated that the Pitkin County Road and Bridge Department has recommended paving the east end of Owl Creek Road from the new intersection of Owl Creek Road and Highway 82 to the east Owl Creek Divide entrance with funding from the Colorado Department of Transportation. The Road and Bridge Department is requesting comments from Council. The Board of County Commissioners will vote on the recommendation to pave on January 18, 2000. Council majority stated that they were in favor of paving the road. Mercatoris stated that the SVRA Board of Governors is in favor of paving all of Owl Creek Road. Community Development Department Costello stated that he feels the Community Development Department has greatly improved and is now more functional. He stated that he is very impressed with the department's direction and improvements. Item No. 15: CALENDARS Calendar items were discussed during Item No. 14. NOTE: THE FOLLOWING ITEM WAS NOT LISTED ON THE AGENDA FOR THIS MEETING Item No. 15a: EXECUTIVE SESSION — � a9 — 01-17-2000tc Page 11 At 6:59 p.m. Mercatoris made a motion to convene to Executive Session for the purpose of privileged Town Attorney/Client discussion regarding the annexation agreement with Seven Star Ranch and a settlement agreement with the RFRHA Board. Costello seconded the motion. The motion was approved by a vote of 5 in favor to 0 opposed. At 7:52 p.m. Brady made a motion to reconvene the Regular Meeting seconded by Costello. The motion was approved by a vote of 5 in favor to 0 opposed. Item No. 16: ADJOURNMENT There being no further business, Costello made a motion to adjourn the meeting, seconded by Brady. The motion was approved by a vote of 5 in favor to 0 opposed. The meeting adjourned at 7:53 p.m. Submitted By, Trudi Worline, Town Clerk r ► 0 VAOW Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday February 2000 1 2 3 4 5 6:Oopm Town Mtg. Scherer Mtg. Hall Anderson Ranch 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 1:OOpm-TC WS 6:OOpm-TC Reg. 13 14 15 16 17 16 19 2:OOpm-TC WS 4:OOpm-TC Reg. I 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 2:OOpm-TC WS BOCC Public 4:OOpm-TO Hearing-Brush Reg.. Creek Sign I 27 26 29 I Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday March 2000 1 2 3 14 I I I I j I 5 6 7 8 9 I 10 11 2:OOPM-TC EOTC Meeting ws 4:OOPM-TC Aspen Council 1 Reg. Chambers i 4PM 1 i 12 13 14 15 16 i 17 i 18 2:OOPM-TC WS 4:OOPM-TC Reg i 19 20 21 22 23 24 1 25 2:OOPM-TC WS 4:OOPM-TC I i Reg. I I I I it j ! I 26 27 28 29 30 31 ,II I II I 3 Kiss and Ride to be six OP --- Phead In parking spaces ,1C O marked as Bit;Drop Off {� 5 U C N B Parkin90n1Y V C? Rppp silo" Planting island to arviae kits and ride from e.h. i parking. ,T Bus shelter moved down Faraway Drive to line up with entry1wtofbus. 'V „ N EMPLOYEE HOUSING r' Planting island added —screen parkea cars from - street. Planting can not block views of oncoming c traffic at Intersection Faraway Road _.NEWBpSSTO __ �k� kiss and ride illustration the timbers club«LAND,,�o snowmass village,eolorado w11..... "1611 ,.wn 9901929-MW :/1�/W Scale 1'=30'0" fu 19901 9291$1 /A / - +two t A M1 ! B F.a Boulder retalnln9 walls and �Il•` ^ stream edges not visible from .e public areas along the edge of` the prgiect may be constructed ✓ - �, .4.� � ►. Of excavated boulders _ including rounded boulders 1 ` with planting pockets similar to illustrations C$D. ylr�`Y 1 i a 1 - - --- - - Boulder retaining walls and stream -- -') edges visible from public areas along - --��' --— — ` - ---Faraway Drive and Brush Creek Road will be constructed of angular - -- j 1` boulders with planting pockets similar to illustrations A&B above. _ ' __ •-: ^�1 Rounded boulders from on site `y excavations can be used behind angular boulders on the face of the walls. Y SeCtion A scale 1"=10'-0" A 90.�cHS-� • ,° The Timbers Club x _ Boulder Retaining Wall Illustrations 1/14/00 A i�Pl�fl the LAND studio post office box 107 basalt, colorado 81621 phone(970) 9273690 fax (970) 927-4261 John C.Dresser,Jr. Attorney al law 323 West Main Street—Suite 301 —Aspen,CO 81611 Phone 970-920 0244—Fax 970-925.9199—Email Jdresser @r t net 1 — ,1 00 0� CI' February 7, 2000 Town Council Town of Snowmass Village P.O. Box 5010 Snowmass Village, CO 81615 RE: The Timbers Club at Snowmass &Parcel "N" Employee Housing Good Day Council Members! As you continue the preliminary review of the PUD application for The Timbers Club,The Ridge Condominiums, through the Board of Directors, would like to respond to your inquires regarding a trail easement, share some continuing concerns regarding the Timbers and comment on Parcel "N"employee housing. The Ridge Board of Directors met on January 28"and discussed the review process in some detail. This discussion included the request that a trail easement be granted to the Town in favor of the public for a trail connection between Ridge Road through the Ridge complex and continuing downward through the Timbers to the intersection of Brush Creek and Faraway Roads. The Board considered the request and determined it would have to submit the request to the ownership for a final decision prior to granting an easement. The general ownership meeting is towards the end of the ski season. The Board also discussed at length the connection of such a trail to the ski trail. As you know the ski trail has been a source of serious concern for the Ridge throughout the review process. As you no doubt recall, the applicant relocated the ski trail to the proposed location before the ski season began so Ridge owners could use the relocated trail this ski season to understand the effects of the relocation on accessibility to the slopes. The effort was somewhat frustrated by the lack of snow this ski season and just in the past two weeks have Ridge owners and guests been able to use the relocated ski trail. The relocated trail is a failure. It is unsuitable for skiing. People who have tried the trail have had to remove their skis and walk to the slope. They usually then use their vehicles or the shuttle to access the slopes rather than attempt to use the trail again. In the two weeks the trail has been useable this season, the property management company has received complaints from short term renters who have vowed not to return to the Ridge because of the access. i This situation is a paramount concern of the Ridge as it affects the economic viability of ownership of Ridge units. It has been exacerbated by the applicant in a letter to the Board suggesting that the new ski trail "is quite an improvement over the existing"and "an easier, more consistent and, arguably more pleasant approach to the ski area". The applicant also represents to the Board and to this Council that it will adjust or"tweak"the trail to make it more suitable over the next two off seasons but then in the proposed written amendment to the ski easement says that any adjustments must be complete by August 31, 2000. The Board is aware of this developer's legal setback regarding ditch rights in another project it has in the valley and wonders how the present situation will proceed?The Board suggested that the developer be required to guarantee the performance of the proposed adjustments by putting in place a bond to cover expenses. The effect of the ski trail relocation on the Ridge will be to lose short term tenants because the ski access is not suitable for skiing. This in turn will be a loss of"HOT"beds to the community. We would point out that this will be a loss of verifiable occupancy rather than speculative occupancy. In this respect we question why no occupancy figures from comparable projects have been provided to the Town by the applicant? When parking reduction was requested by the applicant, figures from the comparable projects were readily available to support the request. As the ski trail relates to the requested trail easement, the Board at the Ridge questions why it should consent to a trail through it's property connecting that new trail to a ski trail that will not be used because it is unsuitable for skiing. The Board is wondering if it makes sense to have a trail running very close to the lower units in Phase I and close to the pool, with the resulting loss of privacy, for the public to hike in the summer time as the trail will not be used in the wintertime. On the other hand, if the ski trail was a functional access to the slopes the connecting trail proposed by the Town would be something that would make sense to the burdened property owner and would probably be put forth to the ownership at the Ridge with a positive recommendation from the Board. In terms of the Comprehensive Plan and the Land Use and Development Code, the development of this site shall include enhancement of ski access and trails. While there are several proposed new trails in this proposal, the Boa,d believes that the relocation of the ski trail can not under any analysis be considered an enhancement and such analysis would show it to be clearly a detriment, if not complete defeat, of the ski access. We sincerely hope that the Council will thoroughly review this aspect of the project anr1 the consequences of the relocation. The Board is also concerned with the geotechnical investigation and recommendations. These concerns have been voiced on behalf of the Ridge to the Planning Commission and the Town Council since the beginning of the review process. Reading the draft of the Preliminary Plan Resolution and in the Snowmass Village Sun that the developer will break ground later this month has caused serious concern on the Board regarding the geotechnical report and design of the project. The Ridge has a geotechnical engineer reviewing the findings and proposals submitted so far and to date the material submitted has only been preliminary in nature and a formal opinion can not be completed with the information submitted. We sincerely hope that the Ridge will have a reasonable time to review and have their engineer review the engineering plan before the review process ends and permits are issued. I would point out that the Land Use and Development Code states that"the burden at the preliminary stage is on the applicant to provide detailed information and mitigation proposals to be evaluated by the Town and the public." (EMPHASIS ADDED)This is very important because of the way the review process is structured under the Code. If numerous items of a proposal are left unaddressed or uncomplete to then be completed during the Final review, the review process does not provide for public hearings at the Final review level. Another issue for the Board is the proposed granting of excavation permits. I explained to the board that the Code provides that "Approval of the preliminary plan shall not constitute approval of a PUD, or permission to proceed with construction of any aspect of the development." The Board questioned me as to how the Council can authorize construction to begin under the terms of the Code? I did not have an answer to this question and would ask the Council on what basis are permits to be issued? The Board is also concerned about the construction management plan, the impacts that can be expected and the enforcement of provisions of the plan. I informed them that the final proposed construction management plan had not been submitted as yet. We discussed in general terms some items the Ridge would like to have included and reviewed during the process and I will present those to the Council at the appropriate time. At the meeting the Board listened to a presentation from Scott Smith and Councilman Costello regarding the Town's Parcel "N"project. This project was favorably received to the extent it has been developed thus far. The Board recognizes the desperate need of housing for employees in Snowmass Village and supports efforts to supply such housing. In fact, one comment made by the Board to Mr. Costello was that, they really have no problem with the employee housing as it is, it is the project across the street that is too big and so out of character for the Town and the neighborhood that is problematic. As to the Parcel "N"project the concerns expressed by the Board were the buildings being in the slope where it is over 30% grade and the height of some of the buildings. Scott showed the Board where some height reductions had already been suggested for those buildings after the Council's site visit on Thursday the 27`h. These ideas were received positively by the Board, but geoteclnnical concerns regarding the slope and the 30% grade remain. The Board did wish to express thanks to the Town and staff for erecting the story poles and presenting the concepts to the Board at their meeting. The concept of the Town owning and managing the employee housing located on Parcel "K"was also discussed. The Board strongly supports the Town's efforts to acquire this portion of the Timbers project. The Board's concern in this area is whether the Town, in it's desire to acquire more employee housing, is permitting irreversible impacts that are so substantial as to be beyond what the community desires, as evidenced by the Comprehensive Plan. Without complete "detailed information"the community is unable to completely understand, quantify or review such impacts. In closing, The Board would urge the Town Council to not acquiesce to the developer's time schedule in allowing construction to begin before the Town's review is final but rather require the applicant to formulate a complete, detailed plan that can then be reviewed and evaluated by k' the Town and the public in a meaningful way and then after such a complete review,permit the project to go forward. On behalf of The Board at The Ridge,please allow me to thank you for your consideration in these respects. Sincerely, John C. Dresser, Jr. 4 ASSOCIATES inc. General Contractor Custom Homes . Commercial Date: January, 13, 2000 To: Town of Snowmass Village From: Paul Broome,Norris and Associates Re: The Timbers Club at Snowmass, Construction Management Plan The total construction duration for the project will be approximately 30 months. We are anticipating an April 1, 2000 start date. (Please see the attached bar chart schedule for details.) The following is a brief description of the activities: Notice to proceed • Once a notice to proceed is given to Norris and Associates, we will mobilize within two weeks. Mobilize to the site(duration 2 weeks) • A construction office trailer will be set east of the model unit and south of the existing pedestrian path. This trailer will stay in this location until fall of 2000. • Earthworks Construction will bring in heavy equipment as needed for excavation. • Coggin& Sons will bring in a drill rig with related equipment Staging(duration 2 weeks) • We plan on staging construction trailers and most of the materials on the employee-housing site. • A small staging area will be placed east of building D. This area will be used for lumber materials etc. • 4' Orange safety fencing will be placed around the perimeter of the site Erosion Control and Dewatering(duration 2 weeks) • Filter trenches, holding ponds and silt fencing will be placed along Faraway Road. This work will be completed prior to any mass excavation. The trenches will handle on site ground water and surface drainage water. Clean water will discharge into the existing culvert at Faraway Road. See sheet C 12 for additional details. Const man plan 1-13.doc Page 1 of 3 BCMI Curtain Drainage Trench(duration 3 weeks) • A trench drain will be installed uphill of the shoring wall. This drain will be built by drilling a series of 36"diameter holes adjacent to each other. The drain will pick up the ground water from above the site and discharge the water to the existing creek. Temporary Creek Diversion(duration 2 week) • The existing creek will be diverted around the site in hard pipe. The pipe will discharge into the existing culvert that runs under Faraway Road. Access Roads (duration 2 weeks) • Access roads will be constructed to allow trucks to enter and exit the site safely. • Mud racks(a short stretch of roadway with clean fill) will be placed at each exit of the site. The haul trucks will stay on a firm and clean driving surface. • We would like to create a second entrance to the site. This location would be reviewed with Hunt Walker and Art Smythe for their approval. Shoring Wall (duration 6 weeks) • A bench area will be cut into the hillside at the shoring wall location. From here the drill rig will drill approximately 30"holes 20' to 33' deep at 8'0"on center along the wall. These holes will be filled with concrete and steel immediately after excavation. Once the piers are set, timber shoring will be placed to allow removal of dirt in 8'0" lifts. This process will continue until we reach the design grades. Excavation (duration 6—8 weeks) • Most of the excavated dirt will be removed from the site via trucks. The trucks will leave the site and go down Brush Creek Road to a dumpsite. We will schedule the trucks to operate between 8:00 AM and 4:00 PM. Flag persons will be used as needed to assist the trucks entering and exiting the site. We will take steps as needed to minimize dirt and debris on the streets. Daily clean up will be done as needed. Building Construction Garage Structure and finishes • Anticipated start date 5/8/00 • Total completion of the garage structure will be approximately 4/23/01 • Building A • Anticipated start date 5/8/00 • Total duration will be approximately 12 months • Receive a certificate of occupancy after all building, fire and life safety issues are complete (Anticipated 5/29/01) • Building K • Anticipated start date 11/13/00 • Total duration will be approximately 7 months • Occupancy anticipated 5/18/01 • Building B • Anticipated start date 10/23/00 • Total duration will be approximately 9 months • Occupancy anticipated 6/5/01 Const man plan I.I3.doc Page 2 of 3 BCMI • Building C o Anticipated start date 11/20/00 o Total duration will be approximately 9 months o Occupancy anticipated 6/26/01 Building M • Anticipated start date 7/31/01 • Total duration will be approximately 8 months • Occupancy anticipated 3/27/02 Building L • Anticipated start date 7/17/01 • Total duration will be approximately 8 months • Occupancy anticipated 3/13/02 • Building E • Anticipated start date 7/1/01 • Total duration will be approximately 6 months • Occupancy anticipated 12/28/01 • Building F • Anticipated start date 7/17/01 • Total duration will be approximately 6 months • Occupancy anticipated 1/11/02 • Building D o Anticipated start date 7/3/01 o Total duration will be approximately 11 months o Occupancy anticipated 5/28/02 • Building J • Anticipated start date 7/3/01 • Total duration will be approximately 6 months • Occupancy anticipated 12/28/01 Const man plan 1-13.doc Page 3 of 3 BCMI Norris and Associates The Timbers Club Thu 127100 Sample Schedule at Snowmass 1st Quarter 2nd Quarter 3rd Quarter 4th Quarter 1st Quarter 2nd Quarter 3rd ID 8 Task Name Duration Start Finish Jan Feb Mar Ma Jun Jul I Aug Sep I Oct I Nov I Dec I Jan jFeb I Mar Apr IlMa Jun Jul 1 E3 Submit for soil nailing permit 1 day Tue 2/1/00 Tue 211/00 I Stryker/Brown 2 ® Submit for garage permit 1 day Mon 2/14/00 Mon 2/14/00 I StrykedBrown ' 3 Submit for building A permit 1 day Mon 2114/00 Mon 2174/00 Stryker/Brown j !. I 4 Permit issued for soil nailing 1 day Wed 318/00 Wed 3/8/00 I Town of Snowmass 5 ® Notice to proceed 1 day Fri 3/10/00 Fri 3170/00 Timbers 6 Mobilize 10 days Mon 3113100 Fri 3124/00 fj'All Subs I 7 Staging 10 days Mon 320/00 Fri 3/31/00 All Subs 8 Permit issued for garage 1 day Tue 321/00 Tue 321/00 Town of Snowmass 9 Permit issued for building A 1 day Tue 321/00 Tue 321/ I Town of Snowmass 10 Erosion control 10 days Mon 327100 Fri 477/00 Q Earthworks' 11 Access roads 10 days Mon 4/3/00 Fri 4/14/00 Earthworks 12 Install soil nailing wall 10 days Mon 4/3/00 Fri 4/14/00 Coggin j 13 Excavation building A 15 days Mon 4/17/00 Fri 5/5100 Earthworks 14 ® Ski area doses 1 day H4121/00 Fri 421/00 I Snowmass Ski Area 15 Temporary creek diversion 10 days Mon 424/00 Fri 5/5/00 Earthworks 16 Curtain drain 15 days Mon 424/00 Fri 5/12/00 Goggins 17 Garage pads 10 days Mon 5000 Fri 5/19/00 ® BTE i 18 Building A footings 10 days Mon 5/8/00 Fri 5/19/00 ! ® BTE 19 Install soil stabilizing well 25 days Mon 5/15/00 Fri 6/16/00 Coggin 20 Garage columns 10 days Mon 5115100 Fri 526/00 ! © STE. 21 Mass excavation 20 days Mon 529100 Fri 623100 Earthworks 22 Foundation wall waterproofing 15 days Mon 6/19/00 Fri 7!7/00 AAA Waterproofing I 23 Garage wells 30 days Mon 6/19/00 E Fri 728/00 STE i 24 ® Site water 3 sewer 40 days Mon 626700 Fri 8118/OD BCMI Project schedule.MPP Page 1 Norris and Associates The Timbers Club Sample Schedule Thu 127100 at Snowmass tat Quarter 2nd Quarter 3rd Quarbr 4th Quarter 1 1st Quarter 2nd Quarter jit- ID 9 Task Name Duration Start Finish I Jan I Feb Mar Apr I May Jun Ii Jul lAug I Sep Oct I Nov I Dec I Jan IFetil Mar Apr I May Jun Jul 25 Building A foundation wags 10 days Mon 6/2GJ00 Fit 7/7/00 El BTE 26 Elevator shafts to plaza 20 days Mon 713/00 Fri 728/00 i 27 Building A structural steel 20 days Mon 7/10/00 Fri 8/4/00 28 Plaza deck - 40 days Mon 7/17/00 Fri 918/00 29 Building A framing 65 days Mon 724/00 Fri 10/20/00 f 30 Foundation drainage system 20 days Mon 7/31/00 Fri 825/00 Earthworks 31 Site utilities 20 days Mon 821/00 Fri 9/15/00 '.. EN Earthworks 32 Faraway Road widen 20 days Mon 621/00 Fri 9/15/00 Earthworks 33 Building B,C&D foundations 15 days on 8/28/00 Fri 9/15/00 ! I i 34 Under slab utilities - 20 days Mon 9/4/00 Fri 929/00 j Earthworks 35 Water feature 20 days Mon 9118/00 Fri 10/13/00 Ground Crew i 36 Plaza waterproofing 15 days Mon 9118100 Fri 10/6/00 � MA Waterproofing I 37 Garage slab 15 days Mon 925100 Fri 10/13/00 38 Plaza backfill 15 days Mon 10/9100 Fri 1027/00 39 Building A rough-in plumbing 40 days Mon 10/9/00 Fri 12/1/00 40 Building Arough-in electrical 40 days Mon 10/16/00 Fri 12/8/00 j i 41 Garage framing 30 days Mon 10/16100 Fri 1124100 42 Building A roof system 20 days Mon 1023100 Fri 11/17/00 j 43 Building A fascia&soffits 20 days Mon 1023/00 Fri 11/17/00 I 44 Building A rough-in HVAC 30 days Mon 1023/00 Fri 1211100 45 Building K excavation 15 days Mon 10/30/00 Fri 11117/00 ; Earthworks 46 Plaza driveway 15 days Mon 10/30/00 Fri 11/17/00 47 Building B framing 50 days Mon 10/30100 Fri 1/5101 i I 48 Building A fire sprinkler system 20 days Mon 11/6100 Fri 12/1/00 Project sdredule.MPP Page 2 BCMI Norris and Associates The Timbers Club Thu 1127/00 Sample Schedule at Snowmass 1st Quarter I 2nd Quarter 1 3rd Quarter 4th Quarter 1 1st Quarter 2nd Quarter 3nd ID 5 Task Name Duration start Finish Jan IFebI Mar I Apr IMayIJun I Jul jAug Oct INoVIDecj Jan IFebI MarbApr Ma Jun Jul 49 Building A siding 20 days Mon 1116/00 Fri 12/1/00 So Building K footings&walls 20 days Mon 11/20/00 Fri 12N 5100 51 Sidewalks 15 days Mon 11/20/00 Fri 12/8/00 i 52 Bulking A windows 10 days Mon 1120/00 Fd 1211/00 53 Building A dry-in 15 days Mon 1120/00 Fri 12/8100 54 Building A stonework 30 days Mon 1120/00 Fri 1229/00 i 55 Building C framing 50 days Mon 1127/00 Fri 22101 56 Garage rough-in HVAC 40 days Mon 11/27/00 Fri 1/19/01 57 Garage fire sprinkler system 40 days Mon 1127/00 Fri 1/19101 58 Garage rough-in plumbing - 60 days Mon 1127100 Fri 2116/01 59 Garage rough-in electrical 60 days Mon 1127/00 Fri 2116101 60 Building A exterior staining 10 days Mon 12/4/00 Fri 12/15/00 i 61 Building A rough-in low voltage 20 days Mon 12/11/00 Fri 115/01 62 Building A roof shakes 20 days Mon 12/11/00 Fri 1/5/01 63 Building K framing 40 days Mon 12/18/00 Fri 2/9/01 64 Building B rough-in plumbing 25 days Mon 1225100 Fri 126101 65 Building B structural steel 30 days Mon 1225/00 Fri 22/01 66 Building B rough-in electrical 25 days Mon 111/01 Fri 22/01 87 Bulking A stucco 20 days Mon 1/1101 Fri 126/01 6e Landscaping 40 days Mon 1/1/01 Fri 223/01 i 69 Building A insulation 20 days Tue 12101 Mon 129101 �sry 70 Building C structural steel 20 days Mon 1/8/01 Fri 22101 71 Building B roof system 15 days Mon 11=1 Fri 126/01 i 72 Building B fascia&soffits 15 days Mon 1/8/01 Fri 126101 Project schedule.MPP Page 3 BCMI Norris and Associates The Timbers Club Thu 127/00 Sample Schedule at Snowmass 1st Quarter 2nd Quarter 3rd Quarter 4th Quarter 1st Quarter 2nd Quarter 3rd ID 8 Task Name Duration Start Finish Jan Feb Mar A r Ma Jun Jul JAug ISepl Oct Nov Dec Jan IFebIMar I Apr IMayIJun Jul 73 Building B rough-in HVAC 25 days Mon 1/8/01 Fri 2/9/01 ED 74 Building A rough4n inspections 1 day Mon 1/8/01 Mon 1/8101 75 Building B fire sprinkler system 15 days Mon 1/15/01 Fri 22/01 76 Building B siding 15 days Mon 1115/01 Fri 22/01 77 Building C rough-in plumbing 25 days Mon 122/01 Fri 223/01 EN 78 Building B stonework 20 days Mon 122101 Fri 2/16101 kx 79 Garage rough-in low voltage 20 days Mon 122/01 Fri 2/16/01 El 8o Building A drywall 20 days Tue 123101 Mon 2/19/01 0 81 Building Krough-in plumbing 20 days Mon 129/01 Fri 223/01 = El 82 Building C rough-in electrical 25 days Mon 129/01 Fri 32!07 83 Building B dry4n 10 days Mon 129/01 Fn 219/01 84 Building B windows 10 days Mon 129/01 Fri 219/01 ! 85 Building K structural steel 10 days Mon 215/01 Fri 2116/01 86 Building K rough4n electrical 20 days Mon 2/5/01 Fri 32/01 El 87 Building C roof system 15 days Mon 215/01 Fri 223/01 88 Building C fascia 8 soffits 15 days Mon 2/5/01 Fri 223/01 El 89 Building C rough4n HVAC 25 days Mon 2/5/01 Fn 319/01 90 Building B exterior staining 10 days Mon 215101 Fri 2116/01 i 91 Building Brough-in low voltage 15 days Mon 215101 Fri 223/01 _ ❑ 92 Building K roof system 10 days Mon 2/12/01 Fri 223/01 93 Building K fire sprinkler system 10 days Mon 2/12/01 Fri 223/01 - 94 Building K fascia&soffits 10 days Mon 2/12/01 Fri 223101 95 Building K rough-in HVAC 20 days Mon 2/12/01 Fri 31MI 96 Building C siding 15 days Mon 2/12101 Fri 32/07 Project schedule.MPP Page 4 BCMI Norris and Associates The Tanbers Club Sample Schedule Thu 7/27/00 at Snowmass 1st Quarter 2nd Quarter 3rd Quarter 4th Quarter 1st Quarter 2nd Quarter 3rd ID 8 Task Name Duration Start Finish Jan Feb Mar Lkpr I May Jun I Jul I Au Jul 97 Building B roof shakes 15 days Mon 2112/01 Fri 3/2101 ❑ 98 Building K siding 10 days Mon 2119101 Fri 32/01 j O 99 Building C stonework 20 days Mon 2119/01 Fri 3116101 ® i 100 Building B stucco 15 days Mon 2/19/01 Fri 319/01 101 Garage finishes 50 days Mon 2119101 Fri 4/27101 102 Building B insulation 10 days Tue 220101 Mon 315101 103 Building A interior doors 15 days Tue 220/01 Mon 3112/01 104 Building A tile work 20 days Tue 220/01 Mon 3/19/01 j i 105 Building A millwork 40 days Tue 220/01 Mon 4/16/01 106 Building K dry-in 5 days Mon 226101 Fri 312/01 a 107 Building K windows 5 days Mon 226101 Fri 32101 8 108 Building K stonework 15 days Mon 226/01 Fri 3/16/01 109 Building C dry-in 10 days Mon 2/26101 Fri 3/9/01 _ El 110 Building C windows 10 days Mon 226101 Fri 3/9/01 Q 111 Building C fire sprinkler system 15 days Mon 226101 Fri 3/16101 _ ❑ 112 Building Brough-in inspections 1 day Mon 226/01 Mon 226/01 - 113 Building B drywall ZO days Tue 227/01 Mon 326/01 114 Building K rough-in lour voltage 5 days Mon 3/5101 Fri 3/9101 8 115 Building K exterior staining 5 days Mon 315/01 Fri 3/9/01 116 Building K roof shakes 10 days Mon 3/5101 Fri 3/16101 117 Building C rough-in low vo8age 10 days Mon 3/5101 Fri 3/16101 118 Building C exterior staining 10 days Mon 315/01 Fri 3116/01 i , I 119 Building ng insulation 10 days Tue 3/6/01 Mon 3119/01 � I 120 Building A counter tops 20 days Tue 3/6101 Mon 42/01 I Project schedule.MPP Page 5 BCMI Norris and Associates The Timbers Club Thu 127100 Sample Schedule at Snowmass tat Quarter 2nd Quarter I 3rd Quarter 4th Quarter 1st Quarter 2nd Quarter ID 8 Task Name Duration Start Finish Jan FeD Mar Ma Jun Jul A Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar r Ma Jun Jul 121 Building K rough-in inspections . t day Mon 3/12101 Mon 3112101 122 Building C roof shakes 15 days Mon 3112/01 Fri 3/30/01 123 Building K drywall 15 days Tue 3/13101 Mon 42101 124 Building C insulation 10 days Tue 3/13/01 Mon 326/01 El 125 Building K stucco 15 days Mon 3/19/01 Fri 4/6/01 O 126 Building C rough4n inspections 1 day Mon 3119101 Mon 3119101 127 Building C stucco 15 days Mon 3119101 Fri 4/6/01 El 128 Building C drywall 20 days Tue 320/01 Mon 4/16101 129 Building B interior doors 10 days Tue 327/01 Mon 419/01 ❑ 130 Building B the work 15 days Tue 327101 Mon 4/16101 131 Building B mNMrork 25 days Tue 3/27/01 Mon 4/30101 132 Building K interior doors 5 days Tue 4/3101 Mon 4/9101 Q 133 Building K tile work 10 days Tue 4/3/01 Mon 4/16101 i 134 Building K milMrork 20 days Tue 4/3/01 Mon 4130/01 135 Building B counter tops 15 days Tue 4/3/01 Mon 423101 El 136 Building A stain&finish 20 days Tue 4/3101 Mon 4130/01 i 137 Building K counter tops 10 days Tue 4/10/01 Mon 423/01 I 138 Building K stain&finish 15 days Tue 4/17/01 Mon 577101 139 Building C interior doors 10 days Tue 4/17101 Mon 4/30101 - 140 Building C file work 15 days Tue 4117101 Mon 5/7101 :1 141 Building C millwork 25 days Tue 4117101 Mon 521/01 142 Building B stain&finish 15 days Tue 4/17/01 Mon 5!7/01 143 Building A floor coverings 20 days Tue 4/17/01 Mon 5/14/01 I 144 Building A drywall finish 20 days Tue 4/17101 Mon 5/14/01 Project sctreduk:.MPP Page 6 BCMI Norris and Associates The Timbers Club Thu 127/00 Sample Schedule atSnowmass tat Quarter 2nd Quarter 3rd Quarter 4fh Quarter tat Quarter 2nd Quarter ID 9 Task Name Duration start Finish Jan Feb Mar r Jun JW A Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Jun Jul 145 Building C counter tops 15 days Tue 4/24101 Mon 5114/01 146 Garage ubstantial completion pletion 1 day Mon 4/30/01 Mon 440/01 % I 147 Building K floor coverings 5 days Tue 511101 Mon 5/7/01 148 Building B floor coverings 10 days Tue 5/1/01 Mon 5/14/01 El 149 Building K appliances 3 days Tue 5/8101 Thu 5/10/01 150 Building K plumbing trim 5 days Tue 518/01 Mon 5114/01 151 Building K drywall finish 10 days Tue 5/8/01 Mon 521/01 152 Building C stain&finish 15 days Tue 5/6/01 Mon 528101 El 153 Building B drywall finish 15 days Tue 5/8/01 Mon 528/01 164 Building B appliances 5 days Tue 5/15/01 Mon 521/01 155 Building B plumbing trim 10 days Tue 5115/01 Mon 528!01 156 Building A appliances 10 days Tue 5/15/01 Mon 528101 157 Building A plumbing trim 15 days Tue 5/15/01 Mon 614/01 158 Building A fire sprinkler trim 10 days Tue 5115/01 Mon 5/26/01 j 159 Building A ow voltage trim 10 days 77ue 5/15/01 Mon 528/01 j 160 Building A electrical trim 15 days Tue 5115/01 Mon 6/4101 161 Building A HVAC trim 15 days Tue 5115/01 Mon 6/4/01 162 Building K HVAC trim 2 days Tue 522/01 Wed 523/01 163 Building K fire sprinkler trim 2 days Tue 522 101 Wed 523101 164 Building K electrical trim 3 days Tue 5/22/01 Thu 524/w i 165 Building K ow voltage trim 3 days Tue 522/01 Thu 524/01 166 Building C floor coverings 15 days Tue 522/01 Non 6/11/01 i 167 BWWing K substantial completlo 1 day Fri 5125101 FN S/25/01 � I � 168 Building C drywall finish 15 days Tue 529/01 Mon 6118/01 Project schedule.MPP Page 7 BCMI .. Norris and Associates The Timbers Club Sample Sdredule at Snowmas Thu 727/00 s 1st Quarter 2nd Quarter 3rd Quarter 4th Qrmter let Quarter I 2nd Quarter ID 6 Task Name Duration start Finish Jan Feb Mar M Jun Jul Oct Nov pee Jan FebjMarjAprjMayjjun Jul 169 Building B fire sprinkler trim 5 days Tue 5/29/01 Mon 6/4101 i 170 Building B low voltage trim 5 days Tue 5!29101 Mon 614/01 171 Building B ekdrical trim 10 days Tue 529101 Mon 6/11/01 I . 172 Building B ti VAC trim 10 days Tue 529101 Mon 6111/01 I j 173 Building A substantial eompletlo 1 day Tus 615101 Tue 815101 I 174 Budding C appliances 5 days Tue 6112MI Mon 6118101 175 Building C plumbing trim 10 days Tue 6112101 Mon 625/01 j 176 Building B substantial cornpletlo 1 day Tue 6112101 due 6M2/01 j • 177 Building C fire sprinkler trim 5 days Tue 6119101 Mon 6125101 178 Building C low voltage trim 5 days Tue 6119101 Mon 625101 179 Building C electrical trim 10 days Tue 6119101 Mon 72 101 180 Building C HVAC trim 10 days due 6!19101 Mon 72/01 � 181 ® Start Phase 2 1 day Mon 7001 Mon 72101 j 182 Budding C substantial completio 1 day Tue 713101 Tue 713101 ' - i 183 Building D(11 months) 236 days Tue 7/3101 Tue 5/28/02 i 184 Building E(6 months) 129 days Tue 7/3/01 Fri 1228/01 j 185 Building J(6 months) 129 days Tue 7/3/01 Fri 1228101 186 Building F(6 months) 129 days Toe 7/17/01 Fri 1/11102 i 187 Building L(8 months) 172 days Tue 7117/01 Wed 3113/02 188 Building M(8 months) 172 days Tue 7131/01 Wed 327/02 i Project sdreduie.MPP Page 8 BCMI r. p , S T R Y K E R / BROWN ARCHITECTS , PC �) S � ctil TRANSMITTAL TO: CHRIS CONRAD FROM: Martin Mata t970 948 4257 DATE: Friday, January 21, 2000 RE: The Timbers Club NOTES: Following are sketches describing the work on the up-hill Brush Creek Road bus stop. As you can see in the sketches the design is based on discussions with the Town Council regarding minimizing disturbance to the site with a cantilevered walkway design. We have also indicated a preferred location of the retaining wall that would greatly simplify the construction of the bus stop and still allow for disturbance to occur within the ROW. We can mention in the resolution that disturbance to the site is to be minimized by accessing the work area from Brush Creek Road. Thanks Distribution: —David Burden ---._-...------------------------------ — David Burden Mark Norris Paul Broome Doug Dotson Wayne Stryker _ 3 f - fly 12A�NG�1_ �11�W 115 erroP 0I J Pc„AN — tit f(Zr5r�-V �,OC.4mor� �_. of f `(+KtJ1Nf WA-LC- OhJt s'Tfl�p WtvL tJ�+`f (yWF1�0'CLP�ct_ .AC(.Q cr _ Q - (nt ALl. -CO A40 LO O A6 5kkak1 ►_ o,J Ps,a N _wit-��nX_ SJtT� rtc.�VECtc�n f,;T-m- eT To Man to-[ASIA VkS-ruf- A-?,,l C.E kl t-cu-i rl Rottil . BLS \�iV C1 V X1111 lllVAII co 096 Vv� \ 1 - - o0' V 1 1 t*11 11 \ OD I � I \ I 7t 1 sr tl \ cn e• • \\ \1 \\\ \ 111 \ \ 1 • \ \ \ .� -41 rn ml 1 1 1 1 \ 1 •.. \ � s Q \ � Di�I ylll 111 -41 I 1 ) d,Zrj 111 X v ° 11111111111 y � � I II 11111111 3 N 4 db o ROCK CREEK STUDIO -r Qy�-7 - .�� -� February 3, 2000 Chris Conrad Town of Snowmass Village P. 0. Box 5010 Snowmass Village, CO Re: Timber's Review— Otak Project No. 10181 Dear Chris: During the Timber's review process we've had several discussions regarding the appearance of the proposed relocated stream and landscape retaining wall. Enclosed please find additional information that should be helpful in communicating Council's expectations to the applicant. The gradient of the proposed stream alignment is similar to an A-type stream classification. A-type streams are further categorized by the material make-up of the channel. In this case, the most stable and attractive A-type stream is one with boulders serving as the predominant channel material, which is referred to as an A-2 type stream. Enclosed is information describing morphological characteristics of A-2 type streams from David Rosgen's book, Aovlied River Morphology. Accompanying the physical description of an A-2 type stream are photos of projects we've completed in Snowmass Village. The photos are of reconstructed stream reaches that would classify as an A-2 type stream. The projects represented include two small stretches along Brush Creek near the Woodbridge Condominiums; one stretch of Brush Creek at the Snowmass Chapel, and; two photos of stream reconstruction at Benedict Park near the Mall. Approximate gradients are noted on each photo. I should further note that the channel flow of these projects is not controlled, as the applicant's stream is proposed to be, while at the same time the applicant's channel design has many concrete control structures. Concrete control structures were not used on either the Brush Creek or Benedict Park projects. I am concerned over the visual detection of any concrete element J:\RCS ProjeoN\Curren,Projects\Timbera at Snow- -10181\Comments 2-3-OO."d ,w\ I , M ARCHITECTURE ENGINEERING 36 n fourth street GIG LANDSCAPE Carbondale, Colorado 81623-2012 ARCHITECTURE (970) 963.1971 PLANNING fax (970) 963-1622 SURVEYING a MAPPING www.otak.com URBAN DESIGN Chris Conrad Page 2 Timber's Review February 3, 2000 in the stream at any time. Also accompanying the stream photos is one scanned from the Wallace Stegner book, The Sound of Mountain Water. The stream on the book cover is an A-2 type stream, as well. Enclosed please find the 11 x 17 photo copy of the applicant's sheet C2 showing the proposed landscape wall locations. I've highlighted in yellow the wall locations where we are most concerned over visual character. While we have many concerns, our greatest is with the walls that run parallel above and below the Brush Creek Trail in front of buildings E, F, J, L and M. The Council expressed that they do not want to see stacked boulder walls. The main concern is assuring that the applicant will follow through with constructing a land form to the Council's expectations rather than an imposing boulder wall. This concern is present because of the way the plans and cross-sections show the proposed landscape walls being constructed. The applicant should develop a plan sheet and cross-sections that better reflects the concepts discussed, which should minimize the Council's concerns and provides the Staff with a plan for confirming approval compliance during construction. In many cases, the applicant preserved enough landscape area allowing the opportunity to construct boulder retained land forms accommodating the Council's wishes. The larger the variation in boulder size, the more creative and diverse the land form. The applicant should use boulders ranging in size from six foot in diameter to as small as 11/2 foot. The more constraining the area, the larger boulders need to be. Some areas may require the use of boulders larger than six foot. Enclosed are photos showing this concept and a typical cross-section. Cross-section 4 was used to generate the typical cross-section. During our review of the retaining walls, we discovered that we have no information regarding the realignment of the Brush Creek Trail or the proposed adjusted profile. This information is not included in the set of plans presently in our possession and needs to be J.UtCS Pmjmte\Curmnt Pmjaeta\Timbm at Snoa maaa-1018 t\Commenta 2-2-M."d Chris Conrad Page 3 Timber's Review February 3, 2000 submitted for review. Also enclosed are photo copies of the planting plan. The highlighted areas are those that should include additional planting to restore the aspen forest. Five gallon containerized aspen trees should be planted on ten foot centers in the areas highlighted in pink. Additional larger caliper aspens should be planted in areas highlighted in yellow. Please call with any questions or modifications to the above items. Sincerely, Otak, Incorporated \A (Y\(11- A\�� John McCarty Senior Landscape Architect jhm J:\RCS Pro)mu\Curmnt ProjeouCRmben it Snow msd0181\Commenu 2.3.00."d Ok w �• �!,„. ` x \�\ ► UN ow _ "�, O will MISM Val 6L 0, Ol �y�aQt I{�'' C �` L e ILC ,� ,� F •iiy , ('�, '_LG •y, f a !f ,�o X1.0 ? e, fin. `r bo mP Ln • r t<� .n t •Z3 r a 4�1 \Yj1'J Lh Q �' GAG '�yy��ll ttl In n- Aj Q *r al 127 b t�. of :ta t7a z^ Nil y' Q: 9 21 a qt:i ILI L11 , '\ t � - - f`t•',��l�iii yew ?T v -. � Gf1� �QC'6j��ll `! aa 11k GI LEVEL II: THE MORPHOLOGICAL DESCRIPTION E , Y . iYb Y: 1 .• DELINEATIVE CRITERIA (A2) Landform/soils: Steep, structural controlled slopes with colluvial deposition in narrow and confined valleys. Channel materials: Predominantly boulders, with lesser amounts of cobble, gravel and sand. Some bedrock sporadically spaced. Slope Range: .04 - .10 (A2a+> .10) Entrenchment Ratio: < 1.4 Width/depth Ratio: < 12 Sinuosity: < 1.2 5-41 �5� I� .V�i1i' �??fyy r,�'. I `TII I�'` 1 ; 11 I. •r I. ;1 I�yy�'yy� �ryyyy • I, I�.,♦ I I a> r "',�-1 •,.�,.•„�M.�♦M.\ 1 1,' �• l T£ �TiC 1 u � • r • • LEVEL II: THE MORPHOLOGICAL DESCRIPTION STREAM TYPE A2 EOOenchment Ratio Range(N.M. ) 90 99 WIdIN/DaDIN Ratio Range ( N.M. ) eo �— 70 10 _ 50 )0 50 1 50 LL 40 50 JO ee 40 20 30 10 20 0 10 0 1.10. 1.0 1.17- 1.25 1,25- LJ4 2.7.6.6 6.6.0.3 e.0. 112 Average :1.24 Average.7.3 Sinuosity Range Range(ft M, 90 ) Slope Range 1 11.M. ) BO F 0 o 0 60 1 50 40 30 H—20 �� 20 10 i ■ 0 m 10 0 1.01 -1.05 LOS- 1.00 LO9. 1.15 1 .192-.33 .33•.46e Average. 1.07 Average. .1577 25 100 e0 20 eo )o is gg �p eo 9 aIS 6g i�[ t0 40 f0 5 20 10 0 N N N O N � O O N O N fNi • E O R P � � H S O 8 O ^ r N � a � ' • 8 n Bad Surface Material - Panicle Size-Classes -(mnt) u N s-a2 re sg s yy ly 2� J r « �•,, � "k A =^ a s i. r S`t Te d :vlr3ty t: .r 1�. w a W � ,d�0• "°%r«a..}�,:�f.�vfr�,tih�t�*gp„y.1.�W 1 \ 1 � 1 1 , ;i • .r _ h i i , 1 ac- .' � i . } ` _ .v � . . _ � i � - � ��� � 1 �: _ .. ,' __� y � � r �' �� � yy � t � ,� .r . , 4.i.. _z _ � �� l� r� A, � � �� � �� �L �. i '� r,. .. . . �.� � ; t \�� � � `N. �. � _ ., - . ., __ _- ---. t fib' \ �• '' . . .t. n �Y , . � -y .. ... 1 JI t;R' r � t 4 , a WALLACE STEGNER Author of Angle of Repose and Crossing to Safe , ,. r ' T.IIE SOUNTI) 011' A40UNTAINT N7,�ryjii I 1 � c : ii \ Nii 1\, I ( : \ \ \\ 1 ,) I 1.'w . 7 � V if lot ry Y 1 n . 2 � i `S P i • • rt. 4 i" yj.�T[�T��" � •; '� { �' � "�. 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A �I.. � '.fir I . h -i - _ ( I. ik 1 kx M s ♦ 1 1 , r _ �1 Y}1! 4�•�r43 �\ nx 2 TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE. 1999 Employer Survey y Final Report June 2, 1999 i J Prepared for: Town of Snowmass Village Prepared by: :3 RRC Associates 4940 Pearl East Circle,Suite 103 Boulder,Colorado 80301 p..n 3031449-6558 1 1 1999 Snmrmts village Employer Sure► Rnol Report 1 1 TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION....„„....„......_............................................................................................._.........................................„„....„1 ' EXECUTIVE SUMMARY-------_..„„................................................._..........................................................._.f ... 2 EmploymentPattems..„............._...........„......................„...„............._.............„..........................„........... 2 Employee Selected Business Characteristics...............................„......_._..._............................................................._..„„„„„.3 Employment Generation Rates..___........._......„.....„.„.„................................_...................................._.„„..„_„..3 Average Number of Jobs per Employee...............„........_.......„............„........:.„........................................:.. Affordability of Housing for Snowmass Village Employees.........„......................................................._......_._...„._.4 BUSINESSCHARACTERISIICS„.„..............„.................,..„...„........._..._...........................................................„_„„„.......5 Typeof Business...................................................„.._._............„.......................................................... 5 i Number of Business Locations......„_........._......_.._.. ...___...„.................._........„................„..„....„.. 5 Square footage/Number of lodging Units...........„.„...........„.„...„....._..................................................„..„.„._.._„6 Lengthof Time in Business...................................................„..................................................................„. 6 ' EMPLOYMENT CHARACTERISTICS................_......................................_.._.....„............................................................„„„„„„.7 Number of Employees by Season and Type........„.„....„..„„........_„.................„.................................. 7 WageRates „.„„ „.__..........„„.„„ ..„.„„......„.„.....„„........._........_...._ 8 Place of Residence of Employees..........................„.„„.. „ ..„.......„....„.................................... 9 Primary language Other Than English.......................„„„..„„........_......_„..„„....................................... 10 UnfilledJobs..„.„„„„....._.._„._.._............................__._...............................................................„......„„..„._.10 ' Persons Not Hired/Left Employment..........................._..„.__.........„„........................................................„„.„„„„10 Post and Future Employment Trends...............................„._.___...„..........................._.................................„..._11 i HOUSIN6/1RANSPORIAT10N ISSUES...._....—_..._......................._..__„„„„._....„.„.„...._._.„___........„„..................„„„„._12 Which Employees Have Housing Problems................__„_„„.._ „„„„ „ „....„..„....__........_...„„.... 12 i Provision of Housing or Subsidies for Employees......_ „.....„..„„..„..„...................................... 12 Transportation Assistance/Alternatives.......„.....„..............„..„.„..„_„.„............„................................... 14 JOB GENERATION RATES...„......„...„...................................................._.._...„.„........_.....„....„..............................„.„...„.„.14 AVERAGE NUMBER OF JOBS PER EMPLOYEE..............................„... ..._.„...„..„._....................................................._.„.18 AFFORDABILITY OF HOUSING FOR EMPLOYEES BASED ON INCOME AND MORTGAGE RATES...............................................___19 a APPENDIX Survey Form Open-Ended Comments 1 RAGAuociates COMM i 1999 SNOWMASS VILLAGE EMPLOYER SURVEY 31 FINAL REPORT June 2,1999 31 max INTRODUC11011 This report summarizes the resuts of a February/March 1999 survey of Snowmass Village employers regarding_..y employmettt patterns and other issues which pertain to affordable housing.. The survey was conducted in ordir to ' provide backmuixl information to the Town in support of its efforts to plan projects,allocate resources,review ft housing regulations which are included in the Town of Snowmass Village Land Use and Development Code,and assist in the developmeet of housing for the Town's resident workforce. . . i The survey was mailed to 183 Snowmass Village employers,using the Town's Business Uoense list,supplemented with pubilo employers: A total of 81 establishments participated in the survey,yielding a response rate of 44 percent. Seventy-five of d481 y surveys contained sufficiently complete information to be used in the analysis(the other six responses were from " self-employed persons who answered a very small proportion of the questions on the survey). Most of the TOWW' largest employers participated in the survey. In aggregate,the survey respondents account for an estimated1;010' winter employees in Snowmass Village,or what is believed to be in excess of 80 percent of actual total employment j in Snowmass Village pnciuding the ski area).' To the extent that responding employers account for the large ntej3rity of the area's employees,the survey results can be viewed as largely representative of employee/employer lam'. y in the Town. ,. . . x The results of the survey are intended to provide a variety of information that will be useful to the Town of Snowmien Village as ft'revtews its housing policies. Topics investigated in the survey indude a variety of business cfi WIM (type of business;number of locations,square footage,etc.);numerous employment characteristics(numbef oAK'' employees by season and type,wage rates,place of residence of employees,hiring trends,etc.);and Interest('°' participation in housing and transportation efforts. j In addition to providing updated information on various employment and business trends,one of the key objeial w- of the study is to assess employment generation rates by type of business. This report contains an analysis of' employment generation rates,using data from the 1999 Snowmass Village survey as well as merged data from IS j other employer surveys conducted in Colorado mountain resort communities by RRC Associates between 1890 and 1989. This latter database of merged employer surveys has a comparatively,large sample size and offers a be*for comparison relative to other resort communities. A W, * Additionally,this report includes a discussion of multiple Jobholding,a factor which is incorporated into the Towr's!� housing regulations,as well as estimates of housing prices which are affordable to Snowmass Village workers. Qata for.these analyses cones from employee and resident surveys that were conducted in the Roaring Fork Valley in,, 1998 by Heatthy.Mountain Communities and the Aspen Valley Improvement Association. v i1 ....-o"! t' Attached at the end of the report is an appendix which includes a copy of the survey questionnaire with response statistics summarized on the form and a listing of comments from the open-ended questions on the survey. Additionally,a set of tables which summarize results for selected categories of businesses has been provided under separate cover. IT—he so+percent cepdre estlrrarte Is based on analysis of December 1988 Snowiness Wage'ES2a2'a n*mn W*cfed toward to wrier 199889 teased an more mcem ES202 employment data for Pflldrn WAV as a wtoie,in oo padson to do aggregate eaipblm"t of Wry RRGAssodata ._ .....,,tom 1999 snowni m 9tllop Em "N sun" Rawl Report EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Employment Patterns • Businesses participating in the summary account for an aggregate of 3,040 jobs in winter and 1,558 jobs in summer. These figures are estimated to represent in excess of 80 percent of the total jots in Snowmass Village. The results suggest that summer employment is roughly half the level of winter employment. • Interesangly,the woddorce is dominated by seasonal workers in both winter(n percent)and summer(60 pe— d). Year round employees comprise only a minority of the workforce in winter(21 percent)and summer(40 perceM�.. • Most, whe)er year-round or seasonal,are full time both in winter(75 percent)and summer(82 percent), r A minority of jabs are part-time in winter(25 percent)and summer(18 percent). • Roughly half of responding employers have more employees today than five years ago(47 percent),while 26 percent report no change and 15 percent report a decrease(12 percent were not in business five years ago). Among those businesses whose employment increased,roughly half(47 percent)Indicate that the additional ,-_ employees are being accommodated in the same space—in other words,that existing space is being used more intensively. In other cases,the increased employment was associated with business expansion,new branches t expanded hours,or purchases of other existing businesses. • Looking ahead to next year,more businesses expect their employment to increase(28 percent)than decrease (6 percent) ,although the majority expect their employment levels to stay the same(66 percent). Businesses expecting to increase their employment expect to hire an additional 58 winter employees and 18 summer employees,in aggregate. • Responding businesses reported an aggregate total of 136 unfilled jobs at the time of the survey,with 30 percent. of businesses reporting at least one unfilled job. These unfilled jobs represented approximately 4 percent of total., potential Jabs( and unfilled)in Snowmass Village this past winter. 5 +=v{rq 'kW.zc • Additionally,businesses reported an aggregate of 79 unfilled jobs last summer(1998),with 28 percent of 1 businesses reporting at least one unfilled position. These unfilled jobs represented approximately 5 percent of total potential jobs(filled and unfilled)in Snowmass Village last summer. ' • Respondents reported that an aggregate of 227 persons were not hired or left their employment last year - because they lacked housing,with 43 percent of employers reporting losing at least one employee due to lads ' of housing. r Employee Chamctedsum Y ,�;° ..., tip,�.ca:", -, . ., .., .�;•�:•'` • . Most Snowmass Village employees(64 percent)earn between$8/hour and$14/hour. An additional 17 percent earn$14-$201hour, 12 percent earn$20-$30/hour,and 2 percent earn$30+Ihour,based on the results of the Employer Survey. Five percent are paid less than$81hour,although many of the employees with the lowest wage rates are waitstaff or others whose wages are supplemented by tips. Based on the aggregate estimates of employers,an esdmated 19 percent of Snowmass Village employees five in Snowmass Village. An additional 19 percent live in the Aspen through Woody Creek area. The remaining 62 percent In downvaley,including 6 percent in Gerbazdale through Holland Hills,19 percent in the Basalt/ El Jebel area;l4perciR in Carbondale,9 percent in Glenwood Springs,and 14 percent in other,generally more-dLstant,locations, ;w. . i i 1MSaoemms Ville"EmporerSurnr FimlReW 1 • An estimated 11 percent of Snowmass Village employees do not speak English as their primary language, with 34 percent of employers having at least one employee whose primary language is other than English. Selected Business Maractedstics • Rotighly three-quarters of responding businesses have a presence in Snowmass Village only,with no other branches in other locations. In addition,within Snowmass Village,85 percent of businesses have only one location. These results suggest that most employers in Snowmass are local'and unique to Snowmass Village, rather than pad of a larger chain. The median year when respondents opened for business in Snowmass.vl(impe was 199f80. W • Excluding lodgng and property management businesses,respondents exhibit wide variation in square footeg9 occupied,with"a'range of 80 square feet to 50,000 square feet. The median square footage occupied by noW lodging respondents Is 1,008 square feet,while the average is 4,741 square feet(pulled up by a few large establishments). Overall,non-lodging respondents report occupying a total of 203,883 square feet. The median square footage occupied is notably higher for restaurants(median 2,500 square feet)than for retail(median 1,457 square feet)and professional/commercial services(median 650 square feet). • Lodging and property management operations which responded to the survey represent a total of 1,960 rooms) 1 units,with a range of 1 to 410 units for individual companies. The median number of rooms/units managed is•. ' 76 5,while the average is 108.9 across the 18 lodging/property management respondents. A majority of employers feel that housing is at least a'moderate problem or worse for all levels of their r employees,both lower-and upper-level. Seasonal workers are left to have the worst problems,with 41 peroeot of employers indicating that housing is a'major problem'for their seasonal employees,and a 69 percent indicating that housing is at least a'moderate problem'for their seasonais � • • Roughly one4 M of respondents(32 percent)said they provide housing or rentfmortgage subsidies to at,kW some of their employees. A total of 162 housing units for 274 employees are identified as provided or assisted by responding employers. Employers expressed some openness to participation in selected types of housing. assistance efforts. Employment Generation Rates Employment generation rates were calculated for certain types of business uses. Results for Snowmass V'IRage ' were compared to the standards contained in the Town Code as well as to the merged results from similar employer surveys conducted by RRC Associates at other mountain resorts over the past 10 years. Relative to ' the Town Code,the employer survey results suggest that employment generation rates in Snowmass Village tend to be similar to or somewhat higher than the standards contained in the Town Code,subject to the limitations of ' a small sample sae for certain types of uses. This may in part reflect a Vend among many businesses towards an increasingly intensive use of space over the past several years. Additionally,the Snowmass Village factors tend to be somewhat higher than the merged dataset average across most business categories,which may be because Snowmass is a relatively mature resort with high land prices as compared to many of the other resorts In the database. 3 . The results indicate that there is considerable variation in employment generation rates between certain types of businesses,which may warrant finer distinctions within the Town Code to ensure that different types of uses i are treated equitably,particularly within the broad'commerciar category. i ' MA=dM= S i 1999 si owman Valage Worer wrm final Report • It should be noted that on an individual establishment basis,great variability in employment generation rates is typically observed in the business categories examined in this section. As a result,it may be worth considering building some flexibility into the Code in the event that an individual proposal is anticipated to produce significantly lower or higher employment generation rates. Additionally,the figures as reported from the surveys should be used with judgment as to their specificity and precision,and it should be recognized that there may be sound reasons to use modified standards rather than the exact survey results from either the Snowmass Village ' surveyor the merged survey database in specific instances. ' Average Number of Jobs per Employee ;.. , Overall,the results suggest that the existing standard of 1.3 jobs per employee is likely to be relatively aomirate an an overall average basis,based on the results of the 1998 Healthy Mountain Communities Travel Patterns- Sarvey and 1998 Aspen Valley Improvement Association Housing Survey. However,further probing suggests that jobs per employee factors vary significantly by type of job,with restaurant workers more likely to hold. - multiple jobs,for example. These variations might also be considered as the Town evaluates its Code. .ru - y Affordability of Housing for Snowmass Village Employees Based on a 1998 survey sponsored by the Aspen Valley Improvement Association of 63 persons who work in. Snowmass Village,the median household income of Snowmass Village employees is$4,000 per month. Asa general rule,housing is considered to be affordable if the monthly rent or mortgage payment does not exceed ' 30 percent of the combined gross income of all household members. By this standard,households eaming the median can afford to spend up to$1,200 per month for rent. This same household could potentially qualify to ' purchase a home priced at approximately$174,000. mr Housing priced at market rates is only affordable to a small percentage of the town's employees;less than:::: 15 percent can afford housing priced at or above$370,000,and probably no more than 5 percent can afford housing in excess of$500,000. Homes priced in the$150,000 to$200,000 price range would be affordable±-, for 38 percent of the employees working in Snowiness Wage,i.e.those with a household income of$3,500 $4,500. Approximately 22 percent of the community's employees could not afford these homes,however. . Rental housing is probably a more economically viable option for these employees. a= i -Y a i 9 RRCA=dda 4 1999 snovism Village EMorof suly Red bW BUSINESS CHARACHRISTICS Type of Business A diverse array of businesses responded to the Snowmass Village employer survey. As the following graph illustrates,the largest proportion of responding businesses were property management establishments(15 of 75; survey respondents,or.20 percent of the total). Following were retail-sporting goods/clothing(9 respondents), bar/restaurant(7 respondents),retail-other(5 respondents hotel(5 respondents),professional services (5 respondents),and a variety of other business categories. HISURE i r Percent of Responding Businesses b►Type of Business ` Paca ofResponAVeushbwp 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% Pfop m2t(b v and stow lens meals)(15 rew) 20% Oeslt(14 reap•) 19% Rdei 4PMM QOMWdaesrg is rasp.) 12% 1. tkdresburant(7 reap) 9�L Retaeol W(5 rasp.) 7% 1bOM(5 resp•) =7% Pfobsslonal services is rasp.) 7% m(3 rasp.) 44I Red esbb(3 rasp.) 414 WAii-Query(2 rasp.) 3% (2 reeP•) �3% camrrenid services(2 uP•) —3% +, Mmom(1 rasp•) 1% CwoucibWadesomp•) 1% - e4,vamnem p reap.) "=I% Note: 'Otller mdudes businesses WM as adcoun&V,catedrg,conference center,de&eryllav,gas station,printirg,Leaning,wtalesele,ate Number of Business locations Most respondents have only one location within Snowmass Village(85 percent). An additional 11 percent have two or three Snowmass Village locations,while 4 percent report no Snowmass Village location(e.g.provide services In Snowmass Village but do not occupy a permanent physical space in the Town). Most respondents have a business presence in Snowmass Village only,with no other branches in other locations (73 percent). Cowersely,27 percent have additional business locations elsewhere. Most of those with additional business locations have just one or two other locations(16 percent),although some have three or more other locations in addition to their Snowmass Village operations(11 percent). a RRCAssodotes 1999 Saooa m t9llop Employer Suns► Raol Report Square IF ootage/Number of Lodging Units Excluding lodging and property management businesses,respondents exhibit wide variation in square footage ` occupied,with a range of 80 square feet to 50,000 square feet. The median square footage occupied by respondents is 1,008 square feet,while the average is 4,741 square feet(pulled up by a few large establishmen Overall,responding non-lodging businesses report occupying a total of 203,883 square feet. fie median square J„ footage occupied is notably higher for restaurants(median 2,500 square feet)than for retail(median 1,457 square feet)and professional/oommercial services(median 650 square feet). Lodging and property management operations are perhaps more usefully evaluated by the number of units managed than by square footage. A sum total of 1,960 units are represented by 18 responding lodging/property management operations,with a range of 1 to 410 units for individual companies. The median number of roomstunits managed Is 76.5,while the average is 108.9 across respondents. Length of Time in Business Responding businesses have been operating in Snowmass Village for varying lengths of time,opening from 1967 to as recently as 1998. The median year when respondents opened for business in Snowmass Village was 1980. f j 11MAssodates 6 i 1999 sawn 9Nloye h*"w surrey Floot Report EMPLOYMENT CHARACTERISTICS ' Number of Employees by Season and Type The following illustrates aggregate levels of employment b season winter/summer and ' ' � n9 9mPi! Y ( ) type(full timelpart� time) "�- among responding businesses. Overall,among 71 respondents providing employment data,aggregate winter`' ' peak employment is 3,040 jobs,while aggregate summer employment is 1,558 jobs,illustrating that employment W roughly twice as high in winter than summer. interestingly,the workforce is dominated by seasonal workers in both winter(77 percentrand'summer(60 percent). Year-round employees comprise.only"a minority of the woddoa hV both winter(21 percent)and summer(40 percent). .._ ._.-"Oft R6URE 2 Number of Employees by Type and Season 3.500 aseesaW Pan•rme Emownwa - 3.000 ■SmoW FuFrme Employmeru 709 (23% �EY9wR. wW Pan rme Employmem i 2.5D0 - - WYeu•Flaud Fal•The EmO%vat e4: �,. ' z000 ilkE 1.500 �&w Peek Emplcymeie rt •`tl' •, ToW 3.0a1 (100X) 'ToW 1,558 (10M 3 ` RRCAsmai" na^T 1 1999 Snotmiaa Pillage Emplit"Suney Firm Report Wage Rates The following figure illustrates the distribution of hourly wage rates among Snowmass Village employees. The columns illustrate the aggregate number of employees in each wage category,as provided for a total of 2,835 employees at 66 responding businesses. The line with the dark squares illustrates the percentage of total employees that are in each wage category. Finally,the dashed line with clear circles illustrates the percentage of businesses . which have one or more employees in each respective wage category. Overall,the graph illustrates that most employees are clustered in the$8-$141hour wage categories(64 percent of employees►: Ait idthional 17 percent earn$14-$20A1our, 12 percent eam$20-$30/hour,and 2 percent earn over$30 per hour. Additionally,5 percent earn less than$8/hour,although many of these employees are waitstaff or others whose earnings are supplemented by tips. FIGURE 3 Wage Rates B00 728 70% 700 %.05e% 60% . 600 j .. —535—LL"% - 50% S •••0,47% ' 500 - 2% 039% 140% x' 400 28 ••1029% •30% 300 tee 201 20% ..,.' 128 ..' '. . 9lr• e4 . ta% •• Yt% •012% 10% 1t10 % 27 19 17 9c_ tr196-�1>` o% 0 �o�to `SOsS` SoSS`yo tosS`so`SoS'oov,NO A`SO A`So 00VS 0'10 : IR�Tow Empioyees I—*—Percent of Total Er poyees -O•-Percent of Businesses Which tlave t or Wm Englorm In Wage Category RRCA=da%s 8. 1999 Snoamme Waage Employer Survey FNd ftepon Place of Residence of Employees The following graph illustrates the place of residence of Snowmass Village employees,as estimated by responding . employers. Spnilar to the graph above,the columns illustrate the aggregate number of employees living in each- community,as estimated for a total of 2,754 employees at 63 responding businesses. The line with the dark squares illustrates the percentage of total employees that live in each community. Finally,the dashed line with the dear, clrdes illustrates the percentage of businesses which have one or more employees who live in each respective community. .; Nifi"." Overall,the results indicate that 19 percent of Snowmass Village employees live in Snowmass Village. An adtidonal 19 percent live in the Aspen through Woody Creek area. The remaining 62 percent live downvalley,including, 6 percent In Gerbazdale through Holland Hills, 19 percent In the Basalt/El Jebel area, 14 percent in CarboncialeR 9 percent In Glenwood Springs,and 14 percent in other,generally more distant,locations. , F16URE 4 Place of Residence of Employees ; y eau 8 J I 53112 t'. ,- Soo o °• L rao sm 30D a b ' { 219, 193 200 t •.123,. S, 102. tas 720% too � x e3 --'o tax y o at ox ;00" X110 1e-, i—l•�• TPOetrecelFnt n o(Tow enpbyees 0-•Percent of Businesses Which Have 1 or More Fnployees In Wage Category .1KAssedates s 1999 Saorrmasa Village EM*WSurroV Rnel Report / Primary language Other Than English / Responding employers indicate that 323 of their total employees,or 11 percent of their winter total,do not speak English as their primary language. One-third of employers(34 percent)have one or more employees who do not / speak English as their primary language. The hotel/property management sector employs a comparatively high proportion of these employees. The sector employs approximately 33 percent of total aggregate employees ' represented by the survey but 72 percent of total persons whose primary language is not English that are represented by the survey. Unfilled Jobs ` Responding businesses reported an aggregate total of 136 unfilled jobs at the time of the survey,with 30 percent of businesses reporting at least one unfilled job. These unfilled jobs represented approximately 4 percent of total r. potential jobs(filled and unfilled)in Snowmass Village last winter. Additionally,businesses reported an aggregate of 79 unfilled jobs last summer(1998),with 28 percent of businesses reporting at least one unfilled position. These unfilled jobs represented approximately 5 percent of total potential jobs (filled and unfilled)in Snowmass Village last summer. ' Persons Not Hired/Left Employment 31 they reported that an aggregate of 227 persons were not hired or left their employment last year because they lacked housing,with 43 percent of employers reporting losing at least one employee due to lack of housing. 3 Additionally,a number of persons were not hired or left employment due to other reasons,including low wages (53 persons/l6 percent of employers),lack of transportation(31 persons and 11 percent of employers affected),lack of day care(22 persons/12 percent of employers),lack of parking(22 persons/3 percent of employers),and other reasons(10 persons/4 percent of employers). a 3 3 WAssodata ^10^ 1019 SMMM lakye 6eployer Survey Aiitgpn Past and Future Employment Trends The graph below illustrates selected past employment trends and expected future hiring patterns. Overall,th tTaKi is suggest an overall pattern of growth over time. Roughly halt of respondent employers report having more employees today than frveyears ago(47 percent),while 26 percent report no change and 15 percent report a decrease, (12 percent were nokin business five years ago). Among those.dusineases whose employment increased,roughly hall(47 percent)Indicate that the 'fix .,employees a rebehtgaccammodated in the same space—Inj*erwords,that exiefing 6pace is tieing; intensively. Atelse equal,these patterns would imply that employment generation ratios are likeWto be i _ y Ilk possibility is explored in more detail later in the report. Other factors associated with a.past increase iri, i employees include increased number of business locations(13 percent),increased space used(10 perm; expanded hours(10 percent),and other reasons such as purchasing other existing businesses(20 percent). R6URE 5 Post and Future Employment Trends Percent of Respondent euabeesea 0% ... 10% 20% 30% 40% 5o% 60%, 70% More employees t�fithan 5 Ye ars a0o � Few employees clan 5 years ago • 1y!< I cif:' n' { s, �•,MWAAMONOFEMPLOYEEdTOOAY Nodante 28% YREAIPLOYM RYE YEMdA00 WMWtinbushm5 years y ittaswddMdaea space InwNch you doWsbM p :a u u y M yEE50ICAFASED)MAeM imeuedbnuro er dbce tlae^f oryourbus ine r tom# 0 YOOruYN01EMPL Mon N tle cramespa ce-eparded h oel ia%:• . , ' ,a I . Mae enpbyeety��iyb tame epace•more demanding csenYls I -J1y7%+1_�p. %!9 '•.1t. Oe1Bf{`3. ' 1'. Say the as= 08% . Decrease 6% Increase zax MLL YOUR EWLGY1EAlh...� 'Fl7V�"e..!'ffi'.,'7Il:L: .. r :: . . . {,.'Y:Yi: � 'Tt Y.�'^' _,.,t `fit .."i,5�-'_: '' "^ '''nA✓ Tl�jl Looking ahead to next year,more businesses expect their employment to increase(28 percent)than tfecxease (6 percent),although the majority expect their employment levels to stay the same(66 percent). Businesses" v eucpechng to increase,their employment expect to hire an additional 58 winter employees and 18 summer empl in aggregate. �• � M�.� 4h}PMl!,S VF Ry'�. .Y�W.���f.-0i�'-�.�1.:. � � �f.. tttlCAuodtnet . :?Taa�7lfft 11 1 1999 seoeao:s village Employersuney Rod Report 1 HOUSIMARANSPORTATION ISSUES ' Which Employees Have Housing Problems The following graph illustrates employers'perceptions of the existence and severity of housing problems for various groups of their employees. Overall,a majority of employers feel that housing is at least a'moderate"problem or- ' worse for all levels of their employees,both lower-and upper-level. Seasonal workers are felt to have the worst problems,with 41 pe fcent of employers indicating that housing is a'major problem'for their seasonal employees; and a total of 69_percent indicating that housing is at least a'moderate problem'for their seasonals. At the odd end of the scale,even upper management is not immune to housing problems,with 52 percent of employers saying , ! housing is at least a"moderate'problem for their upper management employees. M R611RE 6 "Which of your employees have a housing problem?" t ' 31 1 EEMPa w Respw*q'3.Mod=W Podem* 80% ! Percent Reap dM.4' i 69% 73% -MM Mrdq'S Mapr Problem. 5 70% 65%--887. 4S a 527' y .'s 50% ) . " 3.5 40% "x 3 .a J C 3a% • - 12.5 Al 2a% 10% # - 1.5 o% 1 seemnalwo"M EroyWM ,time PAWN eea wbw uppmaanegemere pmresomab mos emem swoced0cs 3 Provision of Housing or Subsidies for Employees 3 Roughly one-third of respondents(32 percent)said they provide housing or rentfmc:: age subsidies for at least some of their employees. A total of 162 housing units for 274 employees are identified as provided or assisted by :3 responding employers. v _ :V The following graph illustrates methods that employers are currently using to assist employees with housing,as well as methods which employers would be willing to use in the future. Overall,the four most common techniques 3 currently In use are master leasing of rental units(used by 16 percent of employers),security deposit assistance (16 percent),rent subsidies(14 percent),and down payment loanstgrants(14 percent). ' RIICAssodales it a b. w 1p9lSefeelafMno�eE4plorrsoner Rod Row Considering methods both cwTe*in use,as well as methods which employers would be willing to use in the future, shows moderate levels of support for certain types of housing assistance approaches. As illustrated in the graph below,interest is greatest for programs which target renters,such as master leasing of rental units,security deposits, x and rent subsidies:-Interest Is barest for mortgage subsidies. Some respondents indicated that even though they are not neoessarlly definitely 11rWUV to participate in these programs,they"mighC be willing to participate or are: 'open to suggestions:' Indeed,a majority of respondents did not answer this block of questions,suggesting ft. many employers may not have formed an opinion on the respective approaches and are not ready to either adopt or rule out particular options. F1611RE 7 x MetbodsQrrentlr Used to Assist EmplofeesWltlrNousinq%MethodsWllling to Use in the Future -- — - _.Pow of NNpe11o"fpelfMMp w MN LNW ASSOO f Or ele WMFM to Ulfe f1 H" mow Wft W"oft 26% - - ( •"'?e1/1!- N�YY4 -a.T�•i„�-.. b�iw•'a:�wu ( 1 r a{o$e.r,at .:.-gef•.°+4v fie% c rtreaeaaef DI 2i% PumtMe Melq harYlp -. 14X• ie ec s ?2% ' DewnpfprontbYtl�ylp 11 ..- 19% smog hK=lponfee 0 y M, ,f MWN F• #x 18% I 1 tw rty I I _. I .f 4K ���IerUffinem 1% GYYi10 j,j to Mtn Mixt 1 h e% S. Ylt M• 'J ate. . . ,: :. �^ _� . - • ,,. _ . t -MAteedaes J y - - I- r.- 19t'9sao.omsnnageEmNoyrsanef ��"• -'� ' Transportation Assistance/Altematires ' 1 Employers were asked whether they provide certain specified types of transportation assistance/alternatives for then employees. Among the available options,'flexible work schedule'is the most commonly cited method of ! transportation assistance.(45'percent),followed by RFTA Pass(28 percent),company car or van(22 percent),. and van pool ftercentl• IF ILI • ;. R611RE 8 Percemolle of Employers Which Offer Transportation Assistance/Altemotfres - Prrrcem of RaWWN eu4nessa Which Oar Aabtms { 0%` 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 90% 95% 40% 15% 50f• A I 5L 14 Fk*b Work SchKkf PM RFTA 2 % cffwm Ca a_il' f •.av! 'S I . 22x v Pool an ' JOB GENERATION RATES ^_ Stt�:: - -•^"-•'"}p�r,' ..,: ;,,y..�+'a'�, , � ,r�;•, i .a, -;%rt�' aY. 31 iTie Town of Snowmass Village Land Use and Development Code utilizes job generation rates as part of Its pnic.M a� ter mnining f rattsl6gi mitigation standards for different types of new commercial and residential devel 31 goal of this study was to research existing job generation rates to provide background data for eness Of Current Code standards for feSMC1ed housing. YVhlle lt to beyond the scope of this 3 .detailed recommendations with regards to the Town Code,the results of the analysis are ted 6ridderation by the Town. , the Town Code sets forth separate job generation rates for different types of land uses. Job geneiatior�t* ;, � re�s_fapcotnmendal,ofRce,and selected other uses are specified on ajobs-per-1000 square feet basis. Hao91. reafde diaT„ evelopriont standards are established on a jobs-per-unit or jobs-per-lot basis. The ski area starter ,:. ' =d a jabs per•1000 skiers at one time basis The 1999 Employer Survey was primarily aimed ob generation rates for businesses,and did not specifically address job generation rates for f 3 Fdr purposes of RRC Associates has also compiled job generation data for other mountain resort communities.y Par employer survey approach. Altogether,this merged database represents iT � surveys(Mai Village)that have been conducted in mountain resort communities betweeri 1999. This data the advantage of providing an expanded sample for each type of business, mountain r stress to the analysis of individual on of businesses. The communities represettDed Into database ki the following table. •4 • >, Y . .. 1999 Saoerams xlloge Emgoya Snne► Raw Row E TABLE 1 Communities Represented in Merged Employer Survey Database Aspen,CO 1991 • Estes Park,CO 1990 • Routt County,CO 1990 Vig,CO' Blaine County,ID 1990 • Frisco,CO 1998 o no County C01 990 • Blaine County,ID 1996 • Grand County,CO 1992 • Summit ' Chaffee County,001994 • Gunnison County,CO 1992 • Telluride,CO 1993 • Eagle County,001990_ • Gunnison County,CO 1998 •.,Telluride,C01.996 .• Eagle County,CO 1999 Roaring Fk Valley,CO 1998 Table 2 below Illustrates job generation rates for office,commercial, .tr ,. in and ski area restaurant uses,showing the , existing rates in the Town Code,the results for the Snowmass Village Employer Survey,and the results from the;y'v merged employer database. The job generation rates are calculated from the ratio of the sum of jobs to the sum of square footage across all respondents in each use category. The number of businesses which provided restdla which drive the factors are also shown in the table. For commercial uses,the Town Code figure of 5.57 employees per 1000 square feet falls between the results, 1 obtained from the Snowiness Village employer survey(6.94)and the larger merged employer survey databaseo.1 .... ' (4.10). Note,however,that the Snowiness Village Employer Survey results are a,Odficantly.affected by one.'aullie , business with a particularly high employment per square foot ratio. If that business is excluded,the ratio obtained: ' through the Snowmass Village survey drops to 5.82 jobs/1000 square feet,which is relatively close to the exis"., Town Code figure. The relatively high result for Snowmass Village as compared to the merged employer data may In part reflect a more intensive use of existing space commensurate with the high land pries in.Snowmass,,e- Additionally.the somewhat high employment generation rates observed in the�Snowmass Village Employer SkWL is consistent with the pattem seen in many Snowmass VillaQe businesses over time towards more intensive " ll. Space;as doted earfier in this report. 4ilM.y'�ii:�'T al a:., , .., ,,. -..... '•t- :h _-�LS'7:� , �' -fi if f�!°f -, ea ::tb�irT""' For office uses,the Town Code figure of 3.87 employees per 1000 square feet is somewhat lower than the observed figure of 4.44 jobs/1000 square feet from the Snowmass Village Employer Survey,although it should be noted that ttie survey only represents four responding businesses that provided both employment and square footage data ' 7119 larger merged employer survey database yields a figure of 4.03 jobs per 1000 employees,which is very similar to.the Toxin Code's standard. For ski area restaurants,the observed figure from the Snowmass Village Employer Survey is 5.50 jobs/1000 square feet,alhough it should be cautioned that this represents just two of the aid area restaurants at Snowmass. The Tbwn Code figure,byp"son,is 06 jobs/1000 square feet No comparable figure is available from the 1 employer database. .. .,-. • ir'°d ,'�, s�• r, Rg°" R»._�. ',#'. i i�CYf Yfir a __ Employment Generation Rates for selected Uses -Tam of Snowmass 1919_Seowinaaa Village MKged Database D Villa Code r Survey 07 Emolover Surveys) ; Uae JOW1000 sq.ft JOW1000 sq.it Semple Size JobillOW sq.ft Sample Size. Commercw 5.57 8.34• 20" 4.10 525 Oft 397 0>:_ r_ 4. .,, 4.03 284 ' SW Area Pastatsams_ . 440 5W . 2 Will n/a •11999 SSnowvnass`t N8p Employer Survey fgum tot awrrarpe�Joba/f000 sq R for banrnemrdrops ^YYOL/obaf1000 aq.R i/one udaremplayarie wuYIRU. ' RRCAssocida sr. 1999 Snewmass Ylnage 8oplohr Sersey Raal • Figure 9 below illustrates employment generation rates for more specific types of commercial uses. To the extent that differences exist by type of land use,it may be appropriate for those specific types of land uses to be specified more precisely in the Town Code. For example,varying employment generation rates are observed for restaurants, retail,services,etc.,as illustrated in the graph. Restaurants have among the highest employment generation rates, with lower rates observed for selected other uses. Comparing the Snowmass Village results to the merged employer database,the two sources have very similar results for restaurants(T.4 employees/1000 sq ft and 7.9 employees/1000 sq ft respectively;the Snowmass Vilage figures include ski area restaurants). ' e: For general rata ftmeery/lquor/convenience,Snowmass Village has markedly higher employment generation rates (6.0 employees11000 sq.fL)than the merged dataset(3.0 employees/1000 sq.ft.). The relatively high Snowmass.- Village figure is gem In several businesses rather than being driven by outliers,as 10 of 15 responding retail . ! businesses have employment generation rates in excess of 6.0 employees11000 sq.ft. f Another category of interest Is'service commercial! The two Snowmass Village respondents,which providerquasi property management services such as maintenance/cleaning/plant care,showed very high employment generation rates of approximately 16 employees per 1000 square feet in the Snowmass Village results,as compared to SO. employees/1000 sq ft In the merged database. Clearly they are providing services that would be double counted based on the current Snowmass Village formula which is tied to residential units as well as commercial square �. footage. As the Snowmass Village Code is reviewed,consideration should be given to the appropriate manner- ; of addressing such types of businesses. Overall,the Snowmass Village factors tend to be somewhat higher than the merged dataset average across most business categories,which may be because Snowmass is a relatively mature resort with high land prices as­.,^0, compared to many of the other resorts in the database. Additionally,the trend towards more intensive use of speoe ' over time has also been noted in other communities,and to the extent that the Snowmass Village results aremore recent relative to other surveys in the merged database,the trends in Snowiness Village could be more advanced. rr`AY: RGURE 9 Employment Generation Rates per 1000 Square feet Selected Commerdal Uses ' Snowmass Village vs.Merged Employer Database .. __ . . .EaPbey Y PK 1 000 Sq ft ' 0 1 2_ 3 4_, 6 . B,. 7 8 9 f0 � . X A �.:. eed1851811R1a (n-137J5) �:.�,re•.rmrrs..a+rrwrar.s..,...::h�wnn......_ jr/.Q 1h�.TN" i' Tmmmnatim (n-sn I I I 7.2 Constw10 0rades (n-105q '! �M ed Datahaa ' a 6000—.4. tMwnywgoayygpncveence (n•2 �15) I 3.0 I i�,l]SnowmasaVieOe 6.0 Odwsemm (rr151,0) 29 Ssrvla oommeread (n-77M _ 20 j it i I '• Ulirbs In-&'01 'M7re: Empbymera gerlerabomaEes A7rtwo seance commew ialrespordents in Snowmass Vwape are in excess of 16 earpr0yeesr1000 e4It • -is = eN� RACAssodetes 199p sno.�ass►AOage EmploMr sw.eq firm Report 1 The following graph illustrates employee generation rates on a per-room/per-unit basis for hotel/lodging properties 1 and property management firms. For hoteVlodging properties,an aggregate of 0.75 employees per unit was found in Snowmass Village and 0.90 employees per unit was found in the larger merged database. By comparison,the, 1 standard contained in the Town Code is 0.44 jobs per lodge room. Variability between these figures may in part be ' due to dd(ereirces in whether accessory uses such as restaurants and retail are included or excluded in the employment calculations. k_., eM companies,an average of 0.31 employees unit is observed In Snowmass _ Anon9 ProParty m P� rag PIoY Par Village .. and 0.30 employees is observed in the merged dataset(which includes and is dominated by the Snowmass Vfa9ge.- results in this case). Property management is one of major types of employment generated by second homes,and would be an important contributor to estimates of employment generation ratios associated with residential units. R6URE 10 ' Employment 6enemrion Rates per lodge Room/Unit(Hotel/Lodging and Property Mgt Firms) Snowmass Village vs.Merged Employer Database S � OBD 03 1111164090 1111164090 Database(17 Employer Surveys) 1 ' ' OB 7,g OBrrom m ynage $ 0.6 IL 0.5 OA a2a 0.91 cri! y V Ix x t Qt T ' '50 MWVZ, ,era wctedraeubdgrg(n-Za�1 Plepanymanapemenl(o-r1n2) � .lr -?..'*i3 BtY.. ., Type at Bushma d'f "'�".•�. a"owner al mepardeme in merged dmbw end Brwrm f In"eramy am ehoam in parenureses) ' 1n conclusion,4 should be noted that on an individual establishment basis,great variability in employment generation rates is f ly observed in the business categories examined in this section. As a result,it may be worth ' considerira bung some flexibility into the Code in the event that an individual proposal is anticipated to produce eipniRi:w*bwer.or higher employment generaton rates. Addifionally,the figures as reported from the surveys should be .►t as to their specificity and precision in light of the sample sae,and it should be recognized may be sound reasons to use modified standards rather than the exact survey results from elther the survey or the merged survey database in specific instances. R�CAtsodotes . S 1999 Snoweaa Yllloge Enmlonr`-rny Real Repat f' AVERAGE NUMBER OF JOBS PER EMPLOYEE The Snowmass Village lend Use and Development Code accounts for multiple job holding by dividing the estimated number of jobs generated by new development by the average number of jobs per employee. The current development Code uses a standard of 1.3 average jobs per employee. Recent survey data suggests that this factor is likely to still be correct. As illustrated in the following table,Healthy Mountain Communities'(HMC) 1998 Travel Patterns Survey in the Aspen to Parachute region found an average of approximately 1.3 jobs per employee in the Aspen area,as Nlustrafed In the following table. The results are based on responses for 230 randomly selected � « �., employees In the.Aspen area and reflects jobholding during the peak winter season. TABLE 3 a Number of Jobs in Winter per Employed Worker Aspen/Snowmass Area,1998: HMC Survey Percent 1 job 77% 2 jobs 20% 3+jobs 3% Total 100% *Mean Number of Jobs 1.3 Sample Size 230 r 'Counts 3+jobs as 3jobs. Source: 1999 Healthy Mountain Communities TrB��//yyW Patterns Survey. T... - Another recent survey,the 1998 Aspen Valley Improvement Association(AVIA)hous6ig study,found that the average number of jobs per employee during the peak winter season is virtually identical throughout the Aspen area, with similar patterns in Snowiness Vllage,the Aspen downtown core,Aspen outlying,and the Alrport Business `Center. Consequently,the above results which apply to the Aspen area generally miglt reasonably be assumed to ' tie applicable to Snowmass Village as well. It should be noted that the AVIA resuHs,shown below,found slightly Lotter-ratios of jobs per employee(approximately 1.23 jobslemployee in Snowiness Village and 1.22 jobs/employee inthe broader Aspen area). Surveys in other resort communities generally reveal 1.3 jobs/employee ratios. TABLE d - - Number of Jobs in Winter per Employed Worker '7 Asper/Snowmass Area,1998: APIA Surrey r Aspen core/ Mpen Snowmass `1*rt downtown outtyina me Busln.ss Carrier Total Part-time. 6% 7% 2% r '1')ob 78% 73% 78% 71% 75% r 2W 15% 16% 17% 13% 15% •'3+Iobs 3% 4% 3% 4% 3% T , .irlaTOtal 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 'Abe NW ber06J 120 124 1.23 121 122 S&T Size 191 96 60 24 371 'Cants 0W-0='-Msp0nse as 1 job:counts 3+jobs as 3 jobs. Source: 1996 AWA Housing Survey. IiRCAwdates tie i' 1999 eteo Seo s mope limployer surm Red Report It should also be noted that multiple job holding is more prevalent within certain types of job categories than others, as illustrated In the graph below. For example,according to the results of the 1998 AVIA survey,restaurant workers ) in the Aspen area have significantly higher rates of multiple jobholding than other workers. The Town may want to consider these variations in reviewing its codes,in order to ensure that different types of businesses are treated may. *' _ Consistent with these patterns,it is also worth noting that multiple jobholders tend to have lower incomes than single jobholders. In the 1998 AVIA study,the median individual income of Aspen-area workers who held just one joh was: $2,500/month,as compared to$2,000 1month for persons holding two or more jobs. These results may not Vim necessarily have direct implications for the Town Code,but they do help to illustrate important underlying patterns In the labor market and are important to keep in mind for planning purposes. F16URE 11 T;. Aremge Jobs per Employee by Primary Source of Income - b Aspen Area,1998: APIA Surrey • Amp Jabs per Employee 1.0 1.1 12 13 1.4- 15. 1.6 .. eedmslsumre(m•15) 1.53 _ RsneatloNald tires operations(a-39) , '... 1.33 SWft(rP34) 129 N.. 1 Remr(••-.,••I 125 125 a PtegneNepelhneorpl(nfis) 127 15A Sea evoymem(rte 121 Y Cotroucoon(nit) y 1.18 � <mpnWw>re�Irrtz2s1�1ae� 1s medho rsr"(W1) 1A9 i I >s meot rat ) 1A9 Real eaulerpapeny menepe ( 31 ..a3�i ' 6dls;mbn(mt� i t.Op 1 '"•,`r,: -r „• 'Oorertunem In,,, j 1.00 � .1� ��'Y'd!t✓!fir .�1.y' . .. , f, r. ,. _ 191iBAspen VaEey ImpovemeMAssoriatlon Hoasrg�aHey _ 3 `4' �:" kk t M AFFORDABILITY OF HOUSING FOR EMPLOYEES BASED ON INCOME AND MORTGAGE RATES Asa general rule,housing is considered to be affordable ff the monthly rent or mortgage payment does not exceed 30 percent of the ccmbGted gross income of all household members. Most Federal housing programs and conventional products are based on the 30 percent standard. Borrowers with good credit and limited fixed debt can us�for larger mortgages but the 30 percent standard is appropriate to use when targeting residents of m resort communities given their employment patterns and typically low rate of savings. BoW on a 9987 ey sponsored by the Aspen Valley Improvement Association of 63 persons who work in Sttowtnass VRIaQe,die man household income of Snowmass Village employees is$4,000 per month. Households earning the median can atford to spend up to$1,200 per month for rent. This same household could potentially qualify to purchase a home priced at approximately$174,000. ' R1C Assodtltes ..:u.,,19: -. k. AMi V. � IM snoemms Village Emplarer surrey Red Row' t As shown on the following table,homes priced in the$150,000 to$200,000 price range would be affordable for 38 percent of the employees working in Snowmass Village. Approximately 22 percent of the community's employees could not afford these homes,however. Rental housing is probably a more economically viable option for these employees. Housing priced at market rates is only affordable for a small percentage of the town's employees;less than 15 percent can afford housing priced at or above$370,000. It is difficult to further break out housing affordability levels for this very high income group,due to the small sample size as well as the fact that lenders typically ease the 30 percent of income standard. However,the proportion of Snowiness Village workers who are able to afford. market-rate housing,in excess of$500,000 is likely to be very small(probably 5 percent or less). TABLE 5 Estimated Affordable Housing Payment and Purchase Pgce of Workers Employed in Snowiness Village Alondrly Affordable Affordable Household Income %Employees Housing Payment Purchase Price' 3 Less than$2,000 1.6 Less than$600 Less than$77,000 $2,000-$2,499 9.5 $800-$750 $77,000-$101,000 r $2,500-$2,999 32 $750-$900 $101,000-$126,000 y $3,000-$3,499 7.9 $900-$1,050 $126,000•$150,000 $3,500-$3,999 19.0 $1,050-$1,200 $150,000-$174,000 $4,000-$4,499 19.0 $t,2oo-$1,350 $174,000-$199,000 $4,500-$4,999 1.6 $1,350-$1,500 $199,000•$222,000 $r $5,000-$5,499 1.6 $1,500-$1,650 $222,000-$248,000 $5,500-$5,999 4.8 $1,650-$1,800 $248,000-$272,000 $6,000-$6,999 32 $1,800-$2,100 $272,000-$321,000 $7,000-$7,999 14.3 $2,100-$2,400 $321,000-$370,000 ;. $8,000 or More 14.3 SZ400 or More $370,000 or More d. 100% " 'Based on a 30-yearft red-rate rtartm at 7.25%*010%doun and property taxeOmmance of$150 per MUMS Sam of income data: 1998 Aspen Valley Improvement Association HousM Survey. , odd be noted that these calculations are based on current IHestyles and living arrangements. A portion of the tlxim's employees lives in households consisting of unrelated roommates,often in units that are overcrowded. The c Oted Incomes of the household members are substantial yet targeting efforts to serve these households Used on lxtir@nt income levels would perpetuate substandard housing conditions. It should,therefore,be assumed that the inconie and affordability levels are somewhat overstated. "c•_. - � All 7?,Eerr+t; '� "� kYdmuwneMreeo•Wx 1 Mr RAC Assaiahs r Ie cx_t . 2/07/2000 Proposed Revision Division 4. Standards for Restricted Housing See. 16A-4-4M. Purpose. To alleviate the shortage of adequate housing for persons of low, moderate or middle income, provisions for comfortable and affordable housing in locations approved by the Town Council shall be made to accommodate 100'/o the employees generated by development and redevelopment and their families.. (Old. 4-1998 §1) Sec. 16A4410. Restricted housing requirements. (a) One Hundred Percent (100%) of Snowmass Village Employees Shall Be Housed. The developer shall provide restricted housing for one hundred percent(100%)of the new employees employed in Snowmass Village that are generated by development. (b) Job Generation Rates. Job generation rates vary by the type of land.The job generation rates found in Table 4-5, Job Generation Rates Per Type of Use, shall be applied to each type of.use in the development at its maximum annual(peak)employment impact on the community. For any use not listed, the Planning Director shall determine the applicable job generation rate by consulting recognized professional publications or studies completed for resort communities similar to the Town. TABLE 4-5 JOB GENERATION RATES PER TYPE OF USE Type of Use Number of Jobs Generated Commercial including general retail,grocery, 6.94 jobs per 1,000 interior square feet liquor,convenience Office T 4.44 jobs per 1,000 interior square feet Service Commercial 2.0 jobs per 1,000 interior square feet Other Services 2.9 jobs per 1,000 interior square feet Multi-family and Fractional Ownership/Time 0.66 jobs per unit Share Units ._ Single family/Duplex up to 3000 sq.ft. 0.31 jobs per lot Single-family/Duplex 3000 sq.ft.to less than 1.64 jobs per lot 5000 sq.ft Single-family/Duplex 5000 sq.ft.to less than 1.87 jobs per lot 7000 sq.ft Single-family/Duplex of 7000 sq.ft.and over 1.94 jobs per lot Hotel/Lodge Pillow 0.22 jobs per pillow Ski Area Restaurants—Cafeteria Style 5.58 jobs per 1,000 interior square feet Restaurants 7.9 jobs per 1,000 interior square feet Ski Areas 82.6 jobs per 1,000 skiers at one time Conference Center 0.97 jobs per 1,000 interior square feet Health Club 1.47 jobs per 1,000 interior square feet (b) Average Number of Jobs Per Employee. The number of jobs generated by all types of uses, as determined in Subsection(a),Job Generation Rates, shall be divided by one and three-tenths (13')" the average number of jobs per employee,to determine the number of new employees that will be generated by the development. (c) Square Footage Per Employee. For that number of employees required to be housed in restricted housing,as determined in Subsections(a)through(c) above,the developer shall be responsible for the creation of a total square footage equal to four hundred forty-eight (448) square feet (as measured in Section 16A-3-210(b), Measuring Floor Area) for each employee to be housed. The total square footage for which the developer shall be responsible shall be provided in dwelling units whose size shall be within the range of sizes described in Subsection(e),Size Ranges of Restricted Dwelling Units. The unit mix and methods of providing said housing shall be determined as described in Section 16A-4-420,Methods of Complying With Requirements. (d) Size Ranges of Restricted Dwelling Units. Table 4-6, Size Ranges of Restricted Dwelling Units, establishes the minimum and maximum size range of restricted dwelling units, to ensure that the size of dwelling units contributed by a developer is appropriate. All units contributed by a developer shall meet these size limits. TABLE 4-6 SIZE RANGES OF RESTRICTED DWELLING UNITS Minimum Size(sq.ft.) Maximum Size(sq. Type of Unit ft.) Studio 448 550 One-bedroom 550 750 Two-bedroom 750 1080 Three-bedroom 1150 1350 (f) Summary of Formula. In summary, the total restricted housing square footage the developer shall provide shall be calculated in accordance with the following formula: Number of jobs generated/1.3 x 448 square feet (Ord.4-1998 §1;Ord. 11-1998 §0 Sec. 16A4420. Methods of complying with requirements. Restricted housing shall be provided as follows: (1) Housing shall be provided as follows: a. At conceptual review of the project, the Town Council shall, using adopted guidelines, determine the mix and configuration of restricted units to be provided, fair and reasonable rental rates for each type of restricted unit, estimates of occupancy rates and operating budget including maintenance and operating, and the effect of the proposed restricted units on the overall restricted housing inventory in the Town. The criteria shall be the Comprehensive Plan, the most recent estimations of housing needs and rental rates based on a minimum of twenty-four percent(24%)of an employee's gross annual income. The Town shall undertake a study every other year to provide estimates of average employee income and a determination of housing needs. b. Developer responsibilities. The developer shall be responsible for planning and development approvals for any housing proposed to mitigate employee impact. The developer shall provide adequate land for project and shall be responsible for the full costs of constructing of the project. Upon issuance of a certificate of occupancy,the developer shall convey the project free and clear of any monetary liens or restraints on alienation to the Town,which shall thereafter own and manage any restricted units. The developer shall warrant that the project is free of any construction defects for a period of one(1)year from the issuance of an unconditional certificate of occupancy for the project or as occupancy of individual buildings by the Town occurs, whichever first occurs. (2) Units or lots associated with a free market project. When restricted units are included in a free market project and are provided for the employees of the project, such restricted units or lots shall be provided as follows: a. The units or lots shall be restricted at the same rates charged by the Town for similar size units or lots with similar amenities. If there are no comparable units,the Town and the owner shall agree on an amount which may be charged for rent,or a maximum sales price. Rental or sales prices shall be adjusted annually based on the inflation index used by Town. b. Annual notification to Town of prices. The owner shall notify the Town, on or before September 1 of each year,of the rental or sale prices to be charged in the coming year. (3) Cash-in-lieu. The Town may, at the Town Council's discretion, accept cash-in-lieu of restricted employee housing in the following instances: a. The Town Council may accept cash-in-lieu of restricted housing the development is minor in nature(such as,but not limited to,an addition to an existing structure),the Town Council may permit a developer to contribute cash-in-lieu to meet his or her entire restricted housing requirement. b. Costs to be included. Cash-in-lieu of employee housing shall include an amount of cash sufficient to cover and purchase land and all related planning, construction and construction management costs of the project, in current dollars; which would be incurred by the Town in order to provide the required amount of restricted housing. (4) The Town shall grant to the developer of one-family lots restricted in a manner approved by the Town Council, employee housing credits in an amount equal to 448 (or new figure) square feet x the average occupancy for single family homes according to the most recent US Census statistics as determined by the Planning Director for each restricted lot created. (Ord.4-1998 §1;Ord. 11-1998 §3) Land Use and Development Code X-1-� §16A= Division 4. Standards for Restricted Housing TABLE 4-5 a trm .JOB GENERATION RATES o Sec. 16A-4400. Purpose. PER TYPE OF USE .:Thwr Recognizing the shortage of adequate housing Type of Use Number of Jobs for persons of low, moderate or middle income, Genera` adequate,pggvisions,for comfortable and afford- Commercial 5.57 jobs per 1; able housmginsuitable locations shall be made to �» interior s iiaic accommodate such persons and their families q employed ii'sa7iFs@t of the construction,operation Office 3.78 jobs per 1,000: or use proposed in a subdivision, PUD or special interior square feetM review application. (Ord.4-1998 §1) Multi-family _: 0.50 jobs per uni8; Sec. 16A-4-410. Restricted housing ',."a VA ' - requirements. Single-family .030 jobs per lot Hotel/f:odge Room -0.44 jobs per (a) Job Generation Rates. Job generation rates and the number of employees generated by Ski Area Restaurants 4.58 jobs per 1,000-v',,* development vary by the type of land uses which interior square few uW comprise the development. In order to adequately determine the number of jobs which will result Ski Areas 82.6 jobs per from a project, the job generation rates found in skiers at one tim0.6"0 . Table 4-5,Job Generation Rates Per Type of Use, 'Conference Center °0.97 jobs per 1', shall be applied to each type of use in the devel- interior square f opment that creates a wintertime impact.on the community, For any use not listed, the Planning Health Cldb 1':1-.47 jobs perl;0 r Director shall-determine the applicable job gen- interior square feet eration rate by consulting recognized professional •'�. publications of studies completed for resort com- °t 1 Pu p ,..(b) „Average Ntimbei of Jobs Per munities similar to the Town. The number of jobs generated by all types 0 4 as determined in Subsection (a),'Job on Rates, shall be divided by one and. tes (13),the average number of jobs per employ�,to determine the number of new employees tl'rat will be generated by the development. ,,rte • .trbfaxr: 16A-77 Supp.4 Land Use and Development Code §16A-4410(c) (c) One Hundred Percent (100% of Number of jobs generated/ 1.3 x 411 square feet. Employees Shall Be Housed. The Town Council has determined that it is desirable to house one TABLE 4-6 hundred percent(100%) of new employees in the SIZE RANGES OF RESTRICTED Town. The Town Council has further determined DWELLING UNITS that the developer, in order to assure housing opportunities for all employees generated by their Minimum Maximum - development, shaill be responsible for providing Type of Unit Size ft. Sizes a affordable restncted housing for one hundred per- ( . ) ( q '>= cent(100%)of the new employees generated. Dormitory 185 300 (d) Sgaaze Footage Per Employee. For that Studio 375 450 number of employees required to be housed in One-bedroom 550 750 restricted housing, as determined in Subsections (a) througlf-"(c)-'above, the developer shall be Two-bedroom 750 1080 responsible for the creation of a total square foot- age equal to four hundred eleven(411) square feet Three-bedroom 1150 1350 (as treasured in Section 16A-3-210(b),Measuring Floor Area) for each employee to be housed. The (Ord.4-1998 §1;Ord. 11-1998§1) total square footage for which the developer shall be responsible shall be provided in dwelling units Sec, 16A-4-420. Methods of complying with whose size shall be within the range of sizes requirements. tend described in Subsection (e), Size Ranges of a xl Restricted Dwelling Units. The unit mix and Restricted housing shall be provided as fol= methods of providing said housing shall be deter- lows: don; mined as described in Section 16A-4-420, Meth- -------__. . \._ ods of Complying With Requirements. -(1) Project in which Town may pat�tici-, '. pate. When a restricted housing project-is (e) Size Ranges of Restricted Dwelling single-family attached or multi-family, in Units. Table 4-6, Size Ranges of Restricted nature and includes restricted rental or a cook, Dwelling Units, establishes the minimum and bination of rental and sales units, the housing maximum size range of restricted dwelling units, shall be provided as follows: to ensure that the size of dwelling units contrib- uted by a developer is appropriate. All units con- a. Mix, configuration and other proj- tributed by a developer shall meet these size lim- ect elements. Prior to or during concep- its• tual review of the project, the Town Council and the developer shall, using (f) Summary of Formula. In summary, the adopted guidelines, agree on the mix and total restricted housing square footage the configuration of restricted units to be pro- developer shall provide shall be calculated in vided, fair and reasonable rental rates for accordance with the following formula: each type of restricted unit provided, rea- sonable estimates of occupancy rates and anticipated operating budget, including maintenance and operating reserves as are 16A-78 Supp.4 Land Use and Development Code §16A4400 Division 4. Standards for Restricted Housing TABLE 4-5 JOB GENERATION RATES See. 16A-4-400. Purpose. PER TYPE OF USE Recognizing the shortage of adequate housing Type of Use Number.of Jobe A for persons of low, mpderate or middle income, i' Generated • adequate.p isions for,comfortable and afford- Commercial '5.57'obs per 1 able housing-in stritable locations shall be made to .. accommodite such persons and their families interior square ed empt6yyed as m-0t of the construction,operation Office 3.78 jobs per 1,000 or use proposed in a subdivision, PUD or special interior square feet review application. (Ord.4-1998 §1) • •� Multi-family :0.50 jobs per unit.-Am Sec. 16A-4-410. Restricted housing ' "` _.. _..._ Single-family .030 jobs per lot;, requirements. _.... HoteULodge Room 0.44 jobs per room."-W (a) Job Generation Rates. Job generation rates and the number of employees generated by Ski Area Restaurants 4.58 jobs per 1,000 development vary by the type of land uses which -interior square fat` +'t comprise the development. In order to adequately Ski Areas 182.6 jobs per 1 determine the number of jobs which will result ,QOO�t,v from a project, the job generation rates found in :skiers at one time,.,,r•. Table 4-5,Job Generation Rates Per Type of Use, Conference Center 10.97 jobs per I,0 shall be applied to each type of use in the devel- interior square opment that creates a wintertime impact on the cormnunity:. For any use not listed, the Planning Health Club - 141.47 jobs per'r,06W 4, Director shall determine the applicable job gen- interior square fed erasion rate by consulting recognized professionals f publications or studies completed for resort com- '(b) Average Number of Jobs Per loge. munities similar to the Town. The number of jobs generated by all`types o ,- ­em R,determined in Subsection (a), Job Get�etahon Rates, shall be divided by one and thra-ren (1.3),the average number of jobs per ern oyeet,to determine the number of new employees [fiat will be generated by the development. r� Uec 16A-77 Supp.4 �;t Land Use and Development Code §16A-4410(c) (c) One Hundred Percent (100%) of Number of jobs generated/ 1.3 x 411 square feet. Employees Shall Be Housed. The Town Council has determined that it is desirable to house one TABT E 4-6 hundred percent(10030) of new employees in the Town. 'Me Town Council has further determined SIZE RANGES OF RESTRICTED that the developer, in order to assure housing DWELLING UNITS oQportunities for-all employees generated by their Mlnimum Maximum develo�menL s I be msponsible for"providing Type of Unit Size(sq.%) Size(sq.fM" affordabje resind housing for one hundred per- cent(100%)of the new employees generated. Dormitory 185 300 lorp (d) _,Square Footage Per Employee. For that Studio 375 450 _ number of employees required to be housed in One-bedroom 550 750 t' restricted housing,.as determined in Subsections (a)"though-(cam above, the developer shall be Two-bedroom 750 1080 responsible for the creation of a total square foot- age equal to four hundred eleven(411)square feet 'Three-bedroom Am SO 1350 (as measured in Section 16A-3-210(b),Measuring Floor Area)for each employee to be housed. The (Ord,4-1998 §1;Ord. 11-1998§1) total square footage for which the developer shall be responsible shall be provided in dwelling units See, 16A-4-420. Methods of complying with whose size shall be within the range of sizes requirements. described in Subsection (e), Size Ranges of Restrieted D welling Units. The unit mix and Restricted housing shall be provided as 1561= methods of providing said housing shall be deter- lows: ilir:" rained as described m* Section 16A-4-420, Meth- I . _ ...... , ?, ods of Complying With Requirements. (1) Project in which Town may partk i-- pate. When a restricted housing project is (e) Size Ranges of Restricted Dwelling single-family attached or multi-family Axt# Units. Table 46, Size Ranges of Restricted nature and includes restricted rental or a com Dwelling Units, :establishes the minimum and bination of rental and sales units, the housing. maximum size range of restricted dwelling units, shall be provided as follows: to ensure that the size of dwelling units contrib- uted by a developer is appropriate. All units con- a. Mix, configuration and other proj- tributed by a developer shall meet these size lim- ect elements. Prior to or during concep- its• tual review of the project, the Town Council and the developer shall, using (f) Summary of Formula. In summary, the adopted guidelines, agree on the mix and total restricted housing square footage the configuration of restricted units to be pro- developer shall provide shall be calculated in vided, fair and reasonable rental rates for accordance with the following formula: each type of restricted unit provided, rea- sonable estimates of occupancy rates and anticipated operating budget, including maintenance and operating reserves as are 16A-78 Supp.4 Und Use and Development Code §16A-4-420(1)' customary for buildings of like age, qual- shall be agreed upon by the developer and ity and construction, and the effect of the the Town Council on a project-by-project proposed-restricted units on the overall basis. restricted housing inventory in the Town. "IS bases"fdr these,criteria shall be the c. Determination that Town should not C6mprehensive Plan, the most recent participate. If the Town Council deter- Lestiffiatiohs W"bousing needs and rental mines'died the Town should not be fit=- -iaterbased'on a minimum of twenty-four cially involved in providing.such restr c red , c,,a�� 'M*) of an 'employee's" gross housing 'then sucG`restricted housing sl", annual income. The Town shall under- be provided in accordance with the relevant take a study every other year to provide provisions ofS6bi&iion (2), Units or Lots `estimates of average employee income Associated With a Free Market Project. as determination of housing needs. Y` °, R �" d. Developer `responsibilities. The 71'" li. Determination of Town participa- developer shall-be responsible for planning -'lion: ' Upon conceptual approval of the and development approvals. The developer project and based upon the information shall provide adequate land to facilitate the provided by the developer, the Town project and shall be responsible for con- Council-"shall determine: (1) whether the struction management on the project: Upon project is an appropriate project to be issuance of a certificate of'occupanc} owned operated and managed by the developer shall convey'the proj; fie Q eT6im; (2) whether financial participation clear o any monetary liens or re on by the Town in the project is appropriate in alienation.to the Town, w3dch s light of`other financial requirements and after own'and'`"manage said um�'s*1Tie needs of the Town; and (3) the total antici- develooppe�r'shall wanatrt that the " F .is " paled ncSnstmction cost of the project. free ofany conswction defects fora I3"asedm�pon such consideration, and when of one �1j�yeartioirm'Hie i an "the estimated net operating income is suffi- tmconditional certificate of 6&di a cr�'f& cient to cover debt service therefor, it is the the project or as bectipancy'of indl dual intent of the Town, in order to promote an buildings by the Town occurs, whichever affdiria61e housing project; to attempt to first occurs: AY the era of the one(1)year . warranty n .P d.,, the develo r shift ass gn P Ade tax exempt construction and Pe r- d` rnaeut public fnancing. The net operat- to the Town: . ""ing incotne,'in this context, shall mean the ' 8motmt of revenue generated from the rents 1: Warranty. Any wariimiy con- of a project, less replacement reserve and ceming the project which is then still i.,.'- r operating expense other than debt service. in effect;and When the estimated net operating income ni + ^:,•,. t'ofza project is insufficient to meet the debt 2.' Rights arising out of contracts. service requirements of the restricted units, All rights of the developer arising out of "the deve opoper shall provide to the Town contracts �i ijdf the contractors to build cash`'or other security in a form approved the project, to allow the Town to bring lfy the Tovm,Council in an amount equal to claims against such contractors in the the difference between the project's debt event tl at constriction defects-are dis- service requirements and estimated net covered "after the tem»nation of the operting income. The term of the security developer warranty period. 16A-79 Supp.4 •Vq:i a .., ti Land Use and Development Code §16A-4420(1). e Developer held ham-Jess. Upon or lots containing similar amenities. If compliance with these provisions, the there shall be no comparable units, the developer shall be held harmless from Town and the owner shall agree on an liabilities arising from or related to the amount which may be charged for rent, project,except for: with respect to a rental unit, or a maximum sales price, with respect to a sales unit or :1 y-t,ontinuing warranties. Con- lot. Rental or sales prices shall be indexed �r tinning,watranty obligations which have to an appropriate inflation index used by begirt brought to the developer's attention the Town to make annual price adjust- Rtior to the expiration of the warranty ments. and ti fl od, but which have not been recti- � ed b. A_nnual notification to Town of prices. The owner of the free market proj- 2. ,Sums guaranteed. Any sums ect shall notify the Town, on or before owing to the Town by the developer September 1 of each year, of the rental or arising from any guarantee of operating sale prices to be charged for such units or expense& lots in the coming year. Such units or lots shall at all times remain under the control (2) Units or lots associated with a free of the owner of the free market project. market project. When restricted units or lots, whether one-family, single-family attached, (3) Restricted units or lots developed for two-family or multi-family in nature, are asso- sale. Except with respect to those units or lots dated with and incorporated into a free market described in Subsection (2), Units or Lots project and'are provided for the benefit of Associated With a Trw Market Project, employees of such free market project or the restricted units, which are single-family .owner or owners of.the common elements attached or muld-family. in nature or onto- thereof,including as the context may require,a family and two-family lots which are to be homeowners association, such restricted units developed foi sale, shall be provided as fol- or lots shall be provided as follows: lows: . ., a_ &I...o: f:'yf. .•. .-r, ..1.. •. .. .... eveloper responsibilities. The a Mix, configuration and other project developer shall be responsible for planning, elements. Prior to or during conceptual or obtaining development approvals and preliminary review,the Town Council and financing and constructing the units or the developer shall, based on adopted developing the lots. Upon issuance of a guidelines, agree on the appropriate unit certificate of occupancy with respect to mix, configuration of units or lots to be units, or recording of a subdivision plat developed,recommended maximum allow- with respect to a lot,the developer shall sell able floor area with respect to lots, and such unit or lot,to the owner of the free sales prices, and shall determine the effect market project Ttle units or lots shall be of the proposed project on the overall restticted,�.in a manner acceptable to the restricted housing inventory in the Town. Town Council, to ensure that the rental or The minimum sales price shall be an sales prices charged for such units or lots amount equal_ to the developers cost. For shelf not exceed the rental or sales prices the purpose of'this Section, developer's charged by the Town for similar size units costs shall mein all expenses incurred for the direct benefit of the restricted units or 16A-80 Supp.4 rsit ntey�ciir.rr- Land Use and Development Code §16A-4-420(3) lots (including amenities and common area meet or exceed the developer's carrying improvements), including without limita- cost for that unit; tion-all planning, design, consulting, arehi- tecmral, engineering, legal, financing and 2. Available for purchase. Avail- carMng, construction and approval costs, able for a period not to exceed sixty(60) but shall not include the purchase of the days, for purchase by the Town or, at the discretion of the Town, by the d fwtY gn a cn Aspen-Pitkin Housing Authority, at the rut 0 v6kMePper "responsibilities. The I d&eloper'scost;or t ' developers i be responsible for planning, -"&'``oBM&ng'dWel6*ent-approvals, provid- 3'` Sold on free market. Sbld'on the c mg-lind'af no coif, and financing and con- free market, with a good faith effort by s(iucting;_ respect to units or develop- the developer to sell the unitor•lot for 'ing',' -Wrespect to lots, and marketing the maximum possible price. such unitsots. When permitted by all applicable federal, state and local laws, in d: Terms of free market sales. Any order to produce a more affordable project free market sale made pursuant to this Sub- -r-the Town may, at its discretion, provide section (3) shall be without restriction. construction financing for a term of up to When a unit or lot shall be sold on the free one (1) year after the issuance of a certifi- market for an amount which exceeds that cate of occupancy, with respect to a multi- portion of the developers cost, which is firmly project, or from the fulfillment of attributable to the unit or lot, the developer the requirements of an applicable public thereof shall pay to the Town, at closing of ' 'improvements agreement, with respect to such"sale,an amount equal to the difference 16ts. between the sales price and developers cost . plus ttie acdral costs and expenses�ot'sttclt �`Restricted to guidelines. All units sale less any rents received for sdcR prn� 'WcYTots provided in this manner shall be erty by the developer pursuant to Siibpara- restricted to all We and resale guidelines of graph(3)c3,Sold on Free Market. tie'Town. Atfer a period of one (1) year `from tlte'issuance of a certificate of occu- (4) Cash-in-lieu. The Town tray, at the pancy,"wit�" respect to a single-family Town Council's discretion, accept cash-in-lieu attached or muhi-family project, or one (1) of restricted employee housing in the follow- year after the recording of a subdivision ing instances- plat, with respect to lots,any unsold unit or lot m�X a at the Town Council's discretion, a. Developer has met seventy-five per- q'-bg;ing, cent of obligations. The Town Council 111'`'`1 to may accept cash-in-lieu of restricted hous- "urt'" XTi>tented. With respect to the ing when a developer has met':ire- e A tmiis tented on the restricted or free seventy-five percent (75%) of his or her ryry -. rnsi�cet for a period of one (1) year, employee housing requirements or the daring which period rents generated applicable development in a manner 111"U"be used to pay the developer's car- described in Subsections (1) through (3) �tng costs; provided, however, that no above; provided, however, that when the �` 'tinif shall be rented on a restricted basis Town Council shall determine that a devel- umtess"the gross rent therefrom shall opment is minor in nature(such as,but not 16A-81 Supp.4 Init- Land Use and Deveiapment Caue §16A-4420(4) limited to, an addition to an existing struc- a. Discount rate. A markdown ture), the Town Council may permit a factor of twelve and five-tenths percent developer to contribute cash-in-lieu to meet (123%) shall be utilized to calculate the his or her entire restricted housing require- discount rate attributable to the expan- ment. sion of existing commercial Floor area. b,,Costs to be included. Cash-in-lieu of b. Construction costs. Construction employee h&ising,shall include an amount costs for employee housing shall be of cash suEh'eient to cover and purchase and defined and updated.annually by the all related planning, construction and con- Town Housing Department. The con- .struoon.,Maoagement costs, in cttrrent struction cost is based on recent avail- dollars,which will be incurred by the Town able housing, project cost information in.order to provide the required amount of and is subject to change in accordance restricted housing, with consumer price index (CPI) and local industry adjustments. c... Minor.development proposal. In cases where the development proposal c. Unit cost per square foot. T submitted by the developer is minor in divided by the proposed total commer- nature,which does not significantly change cial square footage requested=unit cost the use:(such as, but not limited to, an per square foot. addition to an existing structure) and 1. involves the redevelopment, or expansion (5) Lots restricted in a manner approved of floor areas within an existing commer- by Town Council. The Town shall grant to the cial development, the Town Council, at its developer of one-family,lots,developed pursu- disctetion, may accept cash-in-lieu of ant to the planned unit development or subdi- employee housing, to address the costs vision regulations and which shall be restricted associated.with planning, design, construe- in a manner approved by the Town Council; tion and project management which are employee housing credits in an amount equal necessarx,to provide and satisfy restricted to two thousand four hundred sixty-six(2,466) employee housing requirements. square feet for each restricted lot created. ..,.:r,,,,:, W, I Credit for fulfillment of restricted housing ,d Minor development formula. For requirements shall be granted to a developer minor development proposals which satisfy upon the issuance of a certificate of occupancy the cash-in-lieu criteria specified in Sub- for units or upon fulfillment of the subdivision section (4)c above, the amount required improvements agreement for lots. shall be.determined according to the fol- lowing formula: (6) Other means. Such other means as may be agreed upon by the Town and the T= (Nurmber of jobs generated/1.3)x 411 x cc x 125% developer of a project requiring restricted housing, as required by this Code. In the where: T°total cash-in-lieu of fees required instance where the vacancy factor in the then- .,,.;,. , to satisfy restricted employee current restricted housing inventory exceeds a housing requirements;and five percent(5%),the Town and the developer cc-construction costs. shall agree.upon an appropriate time frame, The following assumptions shall be used in which may be longer than the requirements of this calculation: this Code, in which to provide restricted housing for a development. (Ord. 41998 §1; Ord. 11-1998 §3) 16A-82 Supp.4 alum` MK CENTENNIAL 402 SEVENTH STREET I TEL 970/928-8699 ATRIUM SUITE 111 P.O.DRAWER 909 FAX 970/928-8526 OQNTQNNIAL QNOINQQRINO. INC. OLENWOOD SPRINGS,CO 91602 • DATE: February 2, 2000 • TO: Snowmass Village Town Council • FROM: Joe Kraculn, PE • SUBJECT: Snowmass Village Transit & Parking Plaza Town Council Package - 7 Feb 2000 Meeting Transmitted herewith are the following documents for the Council Meeting on 7 Feb. Parking Requirements Decisions Memo - Memo identifying the needed decisions on the parking requirements for the project. Conceptual Layout Memo - Memo describing a conceptual layout initially suggested by T. Michael Manchester. Attachments to memo include layout drawings and profile view. Copies of these memos will be mailed to RFTA, SRA, Aspen Ski Company and the potential partners in the project on 3 Feb. Copies have been delivered to key TOSV Staff on the evening of 2 Feb. MK CENTENNIAL 402 SEVENTH STREET I TEL 970/928-8599 ATRIUM SUITE I 17 P.O.DRAWER ER SSa FAX 970/928-8526 OlrarQNNwI QNOINQQnINO.H+a. GLENWOOD SPRINGS,CO 87602 • DATE: February 29 2000 • TO: Gary Suitor • FROM: Joe Kracum, PE • SUBJECT: Snowmass Village Transit & Parking Plaza Parking Requirements Decisions The following decisions on parking are necessary for advancing the design of the project. According to the project schedule, these questions are posed to the Town Council for decision for the 7 Feb 2000 Council Meeting. 1. Shall all of the parking spaces displaced by the Transit Plaza be replaced In the same relative area of Lots 4, 5, and 6? In discussions at the Kick-Off Meeting for this project, it was suggested that the parking displaced by the Transit Plaza be replaced in the same relative area as they were displaced, as opposed to including them in the Parking Structure above Elbert Lane. A total of 98 spaces are displaced by the Transit Plaza as conceptualized in the '99 Conceptual Layout, the same as with the plan currently under consideration. Issues: Cost considerations for construction of parking structure under transit plaza. Location of replacement parking if displaced from Lots 5, 6, and 7. Parking demand considerations. • Construction phasing constraints. 2. How many net new parking spaces should be considered In the Final Conceptual Design? Design criteria developed in 1999 required 100 to 200 net new parking spaces for the project. The '99 Conceptual Layout showed a total of 104 net new parking spaces for the project. The Parking Structure was conceptualized for 348 parking spaces with space allocation is as follows: Snowmass Village Transit & Parking Plaza Parking Requirements Decision 28 Jan 2000 Page 2 of 2 146 Spaces replaced from Lots 8 and 9 for construction of Parking Structure 98 Spaces replaced from Lots 4, 5, 6, and 7 for Transit Plaza 104 New Spaces 348 Total Spaces If all of the parking displaced by the Transit Plaza were replaced in the same relative area of Lots 4, 5, and 6, the Parking Structure space allocation could become: 146 Spaces replaced from Lots 8 and 9 for construction of Parking Structure 202 New Spaces 348 Total Spaces Issues: • Comprehensive Plan considerations. • Cost considerations for parking structure. Base Village parking considerations. Parking demand. 3. If the proposed parking structure above Elbert Lane is eliminated, will the Transit Plaza and Its replacement parking proceed as scheduled? Discussions during and following the Kick-Off Meeting questioned whether the Transit Plaza would still be advanced through design and constructed if the Parking Structure above Elbert Lane was eliminated. Issues: • Parking demand • Construction phasing impacts • Project budget considerations JK CENTENNIAL 102 SEVENTH STREET I TEL 9701928-8599 ATRIUM SUITE 111 P.O.DRAWER 309 FAX 970/828-8526 oeNTlNNwL lNauNlesalNO.INC. GLENWOOD SPRINGS,CO 61602 • DATE: February 2, 2000 • TO: Gary Sulter • FROM: Joe Kracum, PE • SUBJECT: Snowmass Village Transit & Parking Plaza Conceptual Layout Attached to this memo is the layout of the Transit Plaza first suggested by T. Michael Manchester. The overall concept of the layout was to determine if the transit level could be located within the boundaries of the Mall, relocated Elbert Lane, relocated Snowmelt Road, and Daly Lane extended out to relocated Snowmelt Road. In this conceptual layout, Daly Lane would be the same elevation as the transit plaza. Parking displaced by the transit plaza would be replaced in the same relative area (Lots 4-6). The pedestrian level would be reduced in size from the original conceptual layout. Loading and delivery access would remain the same as in the original layout. Access to the transit plaza would be from extended Daly Lane, rather than off Brush Creek Road and under Elbert Lane as in the original layout. The Welcome Center was removed from the project in this layout. The criteria established for the layout includes the same relative area as the original layout, except that relocated Snowmelt Road was pushed further towards Brush Creek about 10 feet to gain more area for the transit plaza. This move towards Brush Creek makes a retaining wall height of approximately 12 feet on the Brush Creek side of relocated Snowmelt Road (as opposed to 5 -6 feet with the original layout). Other boundaries remain the same. The conceptual layout presented here provides a plan which should realize cost savings over the original layout, primarily from the elimination of the Welcome Center and extensive pedestrian plaza. The addition of the Daly Lane extension will add cost, however, should be relative to the savings of not providing the separated bus access off Brush Creek Road and under Elbert Lane. Further cost analysis will be undertaken if this layout is generally acceptable and moves into final conceptual design. The downside of this layout is the overall reduction in how many buses the plaza can handle efficiently. Snowmass Village Transit & Parking Plaza Manchester Conceptual Layout Issues 2 Feb 2000 Page 2 of 4 No major consideration was given to the parking structure above Elbert Lane pending decision of the number of required parking spaces. One consideration was given to the kiss-n-ride area, in that, it is considered separate from the parking structure, in the same general location and open above. Once the parking requirements are defined, the parking structure will move into final conceptual design. This layout considers three levels: Parking Level, Transit Level, and Pedestrian Level. Each level is discussed below and each layout is attached along with a profile view. Parking Level The parking level would extend from Lot 4 up through the lower edge of relocated Elbert Lane. Access to the Parking Level would be on existing Snowmelt Road at the Campground Lane intersection. There are 312 existing parking spaces in Lots 3 - 7.Only a portion of Lots 3 and 4 are used for the transit plaza and related roadway relocations, and maintain approximately 74 of their the existing spaces, leaving a total of 238 spaces to be included within the area of replacement parking. Approximately 242 parking spaces could be provided with this layout, with 99 surface spaces and 143 covered spaces. This conceptual plan has not been optimized for parking efficiency, but will should the overall concept be acceptable and advance to design. Parking Level Issues • Providing the covered spaces in the area between the Mall and Daly Lane provides an enhancement to the overall experience for the visitor. • Access to the parking level at the intersection of Snowmelt Road and Campground Lane will provide a good entrance and exit to the parking in this area, allowing for a single entry and exit point. • Access at the intersection of Snowmelt Road and Campground Lane does have some congestion issues, primarily at the peak afternoon hours when several buses would be traveling down Snowmelt Road, which could create backups in the parking level. • Means of pedestrian access from the parking level include stairs, ramps, elevator, or out at grade at Campground Lane. Location of access, ADA requirements, space constraints, and costs will drive the selection. • If the covered parking can be naturally ventilated through its sides, the cost of mechanical ventilation and sprinkler system can be reduced significantly. Snowmass Village Transit & Parking Plaza Manchester Conceptual Layout Issues 2 Feb 2000 Page 3 of 4 Transit Level The Transit Level extends between the Mall and relocated Snowmelt Road and from Daly Lane to the lower edge of relocated Elbert Lane. Access to the transit plaza is made off the extension of Daly Lane from Brush Creek Road, allowing access from either direction on Brush Creek Road/relocated Snowmelt Road. The extension of Daly Lane is actually an extension of the transit plaza level and has enough room for TOSV Shuttles to enter or exit the transit plaza from either direction on Daly. An enclosed waiting area and pedestrian access to the pedestrian level have not been conceptualized in this layout. Either an extension of the pedestrian level can cover the transit plaza or a separate roof can be provided. Two moving ramps, up and down, were on the original layout, as well as stairs. Consideration should be given to eliminating the down-moving ramp. Providing only one moving ramp in the up direction would provide cost savings over the original layout. Stationary ramps and/or stairs could be provided for additional up capacity and down movements. A crosswalk from the plaza across the bus circulation path can connect to the intersection of Daly Lane and Snowmelt Road. Transit Level Issues • By constraining the transit plaza between Daly Lane and relocated Elbert Lane, the transit plaza size has been reduced to hold 2 RFTA coaches, 2 RFTA articulated coaches, and 6 TOSV shuttle buses using a straight curb (as opposed to sawtooth). This is a reduction from the original concept of providing bays for 3 RFTA coaches, 2 RFTA articulated coaches, and 8 TOSV shuttle buses. • Transit operations may be more congested in the plaza area than in the original layout. • Access efficiency for the buses is less than that of the original layout with separate entrance and exit. • Extension of Daly Lane may be placed on the transit plaza deck or on a separate structure - operations-wise, there is no difference; selection will be made on cost considerations. • Bus movements within the transit plaza are somewhat more constricted than in the original layout. • Some congestion would be expected along Daly Lane with buses and commercial vehicles. • Consideration should be given to excluding private traffic from the extension of Daly Lane in this layout for safety. Snowmass Village Transit & Parking Plaza Manchester Conceptual Layout Issues 2 Feb 2000 Page 4 of 4 • The crosswalk across the bus path to access the Daly Lane / Snowmelt Road intersection is contrary to the original design criteria of not having pedestrian movements in the bus path. Pedestrian Level The pedestrian level attaches to the Mall at the area shown in the attached photograph and could extend to the edges of the transit level or just to the transit waiting plaza. Connection to the Kiss-n-Ride area is made at the same grade as the transit level. The extent and amenities of the pedestrian level will be advanced once the transit level and parking level get to a more final form and will include architectural design and aesthetic input. Pedestrian Level Issues • Overall extent and amenities on the pedestrian level. • Size and configuration of a welcome center. Further Discussion and Direction The conceptual layout presented here is only in draft form, as field surveys and geotechnical investigations need to be complete prior to finalizing the conceptual design. Comments are requested on this conceptual layout prior to further work on this concept. Attachments: Profile View of Transit Plaza Transit Plaza Parking Level Transit Plaza Transit Level Transit Plaza Pedestrian Level Photo of Mall indicating Pedestrian Level omtm w aca®w arts®w o,Ultrttb w ORKm M Ol0®w • DATE OF FLOTt 02/97/M • z m ,c: �. 10 B64U it 444 / i i i r - i !i �(_ I ' •I I `D I '/ Sri / � � '� / a o- rn 1. � I � II I BER �NE EXTENS�N '1 (3'1/ EL � II it ELANE RT i,, z , L ---- 30 0 U ORicw& SCALE,K!30 �RELOCAT� SNOAELT ROAD % i G LEVEL T LEVEL 1 PROFILE MATCHLME TRUCK LAN ----- _- -- --- �. w w — - - -- Ly- O ,WMASS Q "ALL-.,' o _ ---- 5 V I Lt,AGE fKANS 1 T Parking Level P ARK I N G P L A Z A DATE: 02.0,.00 SHEET OF .............................................................................................. ............................................................................................... DATE GF PLar. 62/02/m o rn i / i c � it ... -- "` � �,I �' I � ` / I , 03 EXTEN lb FLBER L ELBERT LANE J. -SN 53 3 0 30 0 ORIGIN& SMEI I'O0' REL0CATR6 SN0WAMELT R(OAD `/ 111 _ NG L1/EL ,-IT LIEVEL' PROFILE wrcwa� .L I! _ I+ i Llj -RUCK .LAN Ld--_ � SS -_ - -- - �6 V I LLA&f; 'fKANS 1 T Transit Level PAKK I N& PLAZA �ArE{ o2.oi.00 � ^-~-^^'--'~^---^~'-^~~''-~^--^^~^~-~'-'^~~-^~-^^~~-^-^^~''-~~-'^~^^~~-^^~~^~~~^''~^''--~'~-^~~-^^---^'---^'---^ HELP DATE OF PL Crr, 82/02/0 rn ji ` � � | - � T LANE� ��°~ ��� - �) --------- - - 30 0 '30 ORIGINAL SCALEIV40' RELOCATED-,,SN W�MELT RCFAD X, n Level PROFILE MATCHLWE L Uj _j z _j 0 -)WMASS ,,,- _j ty- MALL--, ,/" C) ------------- )6 V I IAA&ff fKAN6 I f Pedestrian Level PAKK, I N& f2tAZA DATE: 02.01.00 SHEET OF i ,N7, 7 JOE MEN IMEMME MEMMEME "HIM MOOMME MEMNON L: ..<: :: I { . ... ....... . , . .. .. IF l5 ° 18 l9 V I AAA&E VANS 1 T 1 P K I N6, PLAZA DATE, SHEET of .- - Snfl may mail to Mall Elevation ~PCt3eSit�QPluaf'fEB1t�fi61T ,N I / I I I Pr 97 0 I I I - / i I / 1 ZN Ell mpF ® i Ay �- ) I J I I / - F I {_ 980 I � ,o C3 PF- 8 Mqi � ,o / / \ 121.5 2 TO 1 (MAX) TO 2 TO 1 (MAX) TO MATCH EXISTING GRADE MATCH EXISTING GRADE I 5' $ $�0QQ/o CA o tIp 1 1/2" SCREENED ROCK w°r'+ '<ti:f:> »;•r;,ti ^'� ;i WASHED SAND MATERIAL °.<_ V ono$ao�aovo 2-3' Coo° �cPO 0 MIRAFI N140 Oo°o aO��oO FILTER FABRIC 1 1/2" SCREENED ROCK 3' —^{ FILTER TRENCH TYPICAL (CROSS SECTION N.T.S. �2 IDS \ //AiM � S _I ', 0 k>> ,I N\ U�� .sue 2 TO 1 (MAX) TO 2 TO 1 (MAX) TO MATCH EXISTING GRADE MATCH EXISTING GRADE 5- 1 1/2" SCREENED ROCK 0 WASHED SAND MATERIAL o$,� o8igo°8Qp o 2_3' Wyk°o 1 0, MIRAFI N140 Oho°oaeO�voO FILTER FABRIC 1 1/2" SCREENED ROCK 3' FILTER TRENCH TYPICAL CROSS SECTION N.T.S. ►1 os --- - � \ Ell rL Nr 1 ' Will � Am RP Wv NIN"A - ; •, A? � 1J✓n L1C ��' �� � f 1 a � .� f►001 hql PAP '95 <D�N r� � \ FF a M \ ks pp - � o — -� curuk 0 1221� �\ — AIL 40TE: 1. DUST CAUSED BY EXCAVATION, TOPSOIL REMOVAL OPERATIONS, OR ROAD BASE PLACEMENT SHALL BE CONTROLLED BY THE 2. MAINTENANCE CONTRACTOR AT HIS EXPENSE. THE ENGINEER MAY REQUIRE THE CONTRACT THE CONTRACTOR AT ANY TIME TO DISCONTINUE CONSTRUCTION MAINTENANCE 1 ACTIVITIES UNTIL DUST CONDITIONS ARE REDUCED TO THE OF THE PROJEf ENGINEER'S SATISFACTION. THE CONTRACTOR WILL BE REQUIRED TO FURNISH AND APPLY A 3, ALL DISTURBED DUST PALLIATIVE ON THE SITE AS DIRECTED BY THE ENGINEER. DUST PALLIATIVE MAY CONSIST OF WATER OR A SOLUTION OF WATER AND MAGNESIUM CHLORIDE OR OTHER APPROVED SUBSTANCE. 4, ALL CUT AND SPREADING OF WATER OR WATER MIXTURE SHALL BE DONE WITH ACCEPTABLE SPRINKLING EQUIPMENT. ALL DUST CONTROL SHALL EXTEND BEYOND THE CONSTRUCTION AREA PROPER TO THE SIDE STREETS ENTERING AND EXISTING THE PROJECT, WHERE MUD AND DIRT FROM CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT, AS WELL AS LOCAL TRAFFIC, MAY GET ONTO THE SIDE STREETS. CLEANUP OF THESE AREAS WILL BE REQUIRED AS NECESSARY OR AS DIRECTED BY THE ENGINEER. lowI m FF a 122.8 III R �brIN-30 DUST CAUSED BY EXCAVATION, TOPSOIL REMOVAL OPERATIONS, OR ROAD BASE PLACEMENT SHALL BE CONTROLLED BY THE CONTRACTOR AT HIS EXPENSE. THE ENGINEER MAY REQUIRE THE CONTRACTOR AT ANY TIME TO DISCONTINUE CONSTRUCTION ACTIVITIES UNTIL DUST CONDITIONS ARE REDUCED TO THE ENGINEER'S SATISFACTION. THE CONTRACTOR WILL BE REQUIRED TO FURNISH AND APPLY A DUST PALLIATIVE ON THE SITE AS DIRECTED BY THE ENGINEER. DUST PALLIATIVE MAY CONSIST OF WATER OR A SOLUTION OF WATER AND MAGNESIUM CHLORIDE OR OTHER APPROVED SUBSTANCE. SPREADING OF WATER OR WATER MIXTURE SHALL BE DONE WITH ACCEPTABLE SPRINKLING EQUIPMENT. ALL DUST CONTROL SHALL EXTEND BEYOND THE CONSTRUCTION AREA PROPER TO THE SIDE STREETS ENTERING AND EXISTING THE PROJECT, WHERE MUD AND DIRT FROM CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT, AS WELL AS LOCAL TRAFFIC, MAY GET ONTO THE SIDE STREETS. CLEANUP OF THESE AREAS WILL BE REQUIRED AS NECESSARY OR AS DIRECTED BY THE ENGINEER. 2. MAINTENANCE OF PRO THE CONTRACT IS ES° MAINTENANCE OF SAII OF THE PROJECT WILL 3. ALL DISTURBED AREA 4. ALL CUT AND FILL SL( 3 .pool V Ml rig i lk J 930 o I _ Lis ♦ i TRpII { T �— ASP/ I•i I',,, `' -': � l 'IR ) a zw G7 •`_ w. e• .n {„r a \ '•i.'• .•,.•_,�, • � �— -tea-• �pN Arl- ti wool N \ N OII, a i X � � m cnl Cal [if _III= ' , , , 64 \ o J oz Cf) w Owe} �- ~ , \ N� : 3 QV) Q 1 \ 1 Dw o a Lj r \\ \\\\\ \\ \ Q � 0 \ 0>- Z w N \ \ � v ^ � , zaO w m O a _o LLI Ilk co LLJ LLJ IC � \ ^\ 6 11 Irr/+rI/ +r/+Y'+r/ ZCL WW F - lol uj XOQO N: WWQW �\ \ af \\\ \ \ \ \ \\ \ \ a°° � . - .'-�-n-�• �, :'--� \ •\• ..•t\�„�ti\•. `T' ,ice'.\, �•t� ` .\.. N _ MA lb i — r I—Rb' s / \ ^• — 1 del 1JYH I i D I I I I III l lie, )-00/ I . III I I / w � Cf� � � \I 11 � � 11� 1111 II;II � I I I I Q I II � t l , J f � I I I I I I ► � � � II111 � 1 II / I I 1 1 ► t � / „ I II � i � { � I I ; I hill . i \ \ 940 I I I l l l l l ► I r .;i _ I , :'_"1 a:,. ':fig .. . / •any•'a' •R It :�. •••:\, :�'••• GRAPHIC SCALE 30 15 70 00 120 � lK FEET 1 inch = 30 ft, SEDIMENT CONTROL LEGEND �0—�- SILT FENCE 4' ORANGE CONSTRUCTION FENCE ® FILTER TRENCH N0. DATE REVISION BY 0 TEMPORARY SEDIMENT BASIN • , n STAGING & CONSTRUCTION PARKING FARAWAY RANCH SOUTH ® SALES PARKING SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO TEMPORARY BUILDINGS THE TIMBERS EROSION AND SEDIMENT CONTROL PLAN SOPRIS ENGINEERING, LLC. IVIL CONSULTANTS 502 MAIN STREET, SUITE A3 DES. YTN CK. FILE NO. SHEET CARBONDALE, CO 81623 98100.01 C12 :7.10 aA EST (970) 704-0311 DR. MAB DATE 1/25/00