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07-17-00 Town Council Packet 160 /-o;z- zrUCo ��AUIER 'PAekET SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL WORK SESSION 07-17-2000 2:00 - 2:30 P.M. NWCOG PRESENTATION -- Gary Severson. . . . . . . . . . . . . -. . .No Packet Information 2:30 - 3:30 MALL TRANSIT PLAZA DISCUSSION — Joe Kracum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . Page 1 3:30 - 4:00 DRAFT GREENWAY MASTER PLAN (COUNCIL - SEE ATTACHMENT "A") — Bernadette Barthelenghi/John McCarty. . . . . . . . . Page 2 4:00 - 4:30 TIMBERLINE LEASE AMENDMENT -- Gary Suiter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 3 4:30 -4:45 RESTRICTION OF TURF GRASS LAWNS — Jack Hatfield . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . No Packet Information 4:45 - 5:15 BALLOT ISSUE DISCUSSION - Steve Connor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 4 5:15 - 6:15 ENTRYWAY/COMMUNITY POOL CONCEPTS -- Craig Thompson/Bernadette Barthelenghi. . . . . . .Page 22 6:15 — 6:30 CALENDARS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 23 NOTE: ALL ITEMS AND TIMES ARE TENTATIVE AND SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT FURTHER NOTICE. PLEASE CALL THE OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK AT 923-3777 ON THE DAY OF THE MEETING FOR ANY AGENDA CHANGES. JUL-14-2000 08:09 MK CENTENNIAL P.02 MK CENTENNIAL 402 SEVENTH STREET I TEL 97019384599 . ATRIUM SUITE III P.O.DRAWER set FAX 970/9284526 OlNTlNNI/IL tkNO1NlO�INO•INC. GLENWOOD SPRIN0S,DO t/te3 • DATE: July 14, 2000 • TO: Snowmass Village Town Council • FROM: Joe Kracum, PE ■ SUBJECT: Snowmass Village Transit S Parking Plaza Preliminary Cost Ranges ONES As of Friday morning, 14 July, we are continuing to develop layouts and cost ranges for the options wa discussed at the last meeting and provided to us on Wednesday afternoon. I am forwa;ding this draft information at this time In order to give you a rough idea of the parking net gains and costs. These are only rough guesstimates at this time and not based on engineered plans. We will be continuing our work on this over the weekend and will be able to provide additional information by Monday's Council Meeting. option Parking Total Net New Range Displaced Parking Parking of Costs 1 Transit Plate&Pedestrian Dock Upper&Lower Parking Structures 384 616 232 $15.5-S16.S 2 Transit Plaza&Pedestrian Deck Lower Parking Structure 238 292 64 $11.0-$12.0 3 Transit Plaza&Pedestrian Deck Upper Perking Structure w/Lot 8 KnR&SMR Entrances 272 300 28 $112-0-11111 0 4 Transit Plaza&Pedestrian Dods Upper Parking Structure w/Lot 6 KnR&OCR Entrance 272 324 52 $13.5-$75.5 5 Transit Plaza&Pedestrian Deck Upper Parking Structure w/Lot 5 IGss•n•Rida 316 384 68 572.5-$13.5 6 Transit Plaza&Pedestrian Deck Lower Parking Structure w/Lots 6&9 DeokOvert; 384 552 166 $12.5-$14.5 TOTAL P.02 COUNCIL COMMUNIQUE Meeting Date: July 17, 2000 Presented By: Bernadette Barthelenghi and John McCarty Subject: Snowmass Village Greenway Master Plan Background: In 1998 Snowmass Village Building and Planning Department successfully pursued a Great Outdoors Colorado Grant to fund a comprehensive park, trails, open space and recreation master plan. Snowmass Village's Landscape Architect requested a total of$40,000 from Great Outdoors Colorado to match Snowmass Village's $11,500 cash plus $11,000 in-kind (staff time) a total project estimate of $62,500. In October 1998 Great Outdoors Colorado awarded the Town a sum of$20,000, fifty percent of the original amount requested. Staff had two options to consider when receiving word of the reduced amount: 1- Reduce the project scope to match the level of funds committed or 2- Wait until the next budget process and request an increase in funds in order to complete the document as described in the grant. Town staff opted to postpone the project until 1999. Town Council increased the budget amount to a total of $35,000, still below the original proposed amount. Town staff took two actions 1- recruit the services of Otak/Rock Creek Studio to assist with the project, and 2- request another extension from Great Outdoors Colorado. Great Outdoors Colorado granted another extension to July 28, 2000. Otak/Rock Creek Studio revised the scoped the project to match the available financial resources. The new scope was approved by the Snowmass Village Community Development Director and Great Outdoors Colorado Trust Fund Board. Overview: John McCarty will present the goals and conceptual thinking behind the plan to Town Council. Staff requests Town Council to review and comment on the plan which is included as an attachment within your packet. Recommendation: Staff recommends that Town Council adds a separate sheet to the Master Plan that prioritizes a list of projects for funding and construction over the next five years. t COUNCIL COMMUNIQUE MEETING DATE: July 17, 2000 BY: Gary Suiter STAFF: Steve Connor SUBJECT: TIMBERLINE LEASE AMENDMENT OVERVIEW: As you know, AT&T Wireless has entered in a lease agreement with Timberline Condominiums for expansion of their facility adjacent to Upper Parking Lot 13. Recently, Town Council approved an amendment to the Timberline SPA (Ordinance No. 13, Series of 2000) allowing an expansion of the footprint for these wireless facilities. In 1986, the Town granted a land lease to the Timberline Condominium Association that allowed construction of the maintenance facility on Lot 13 and defined the area of the Lot hat could be used. Additionally, the lease describes permitted uses which are limited to maintenance and shop facilities, laundry, housekeeping operations, general storage, and a kitchen for the exclusive use of Timberline employees. The lease terminates in 2007 and the lessee (if not in default) has the sole right to renew the lease for another twenty years, under the same terms and conditions, with advance written notice. At the termination of the lease, Timberline either removes the buildings and equipment or they become the property of the Town. To complicate matters, I understand that the Town Planner granted approvals in 1991 and 1993 to allow construction of employee housing and the existing cell site, without amending the SPA and without amending the lease. The SPA amendment was approved by Council at your June 19`h meeting. The lease now needs to be amended to reflect the additional uses of employee housing and antenna reception and transmission devices. Because the Timberline is receiving benefit from the AT&T lease, and because the land belongs to the Town, I believe the Town should be entitled to remuneration for the beneficial use of its land. Currently, we receive an annual payment of $7,542 from the Timberline, which is subject to escalation. AT&T has offered a lump sum payment of $10,000 as consideration for the lease amendment. STAFF RECOMMENDATION: Staff recommends that Council direct staff amend the lease to allow for the additional uses and negotiate with AT&T for additional funds, either in the form of a larger lump sum payment or an increase in lease payments to Timberline, to be rebated to the Town. - 3 - TOWN COUNCIL COMMUNIQUE Meeting Date: July 17, 2000 Presented By: Gary Suiter Staff: Steve Connor Trudi Worline Overview: Attached is a list of potential ballot questions and issues that are being considered for possible inclusion on the November 7, 2000 Pitkin County Election ballot. State of Colorado ballot questions and issues are also attached, followed by a summary of issues, which would create a fiscal impact. The list includes only the questions that would be voted on by the Snowmass Village electorate. The list is preliminary, as some entities are still considering the issues or questions for possible inclusion on the Pitkin County ballot. All entities will be coordinating their elections with Pitkin County. Council has the option of coordinating the Town's Election with Pitkin County by adopting the Uniform Election Code specifically and only for the November 2000 Election. Under the Uniform Election Code, candidates can begin circulating Nomination Petitions on August 8. The deadline for candidates to certify Nomination Petitions to the County Clerk is August 28. The deadline to certify the Town's ballot to the County Clerk is September 13. Title 31, CRS, the Municipal Election Code, is the Election Law the Town is to use when conducting its own Election. If Council chooses for the Town to conduct its own Election, candidates can begin circulating Nomination Petitions on September 18. The deadline for candidates to certify Nomination Petitions to the Town Clerk is October 6. The Municipal Election Code does not designate a specific date for the ballot to be certified to the Town Clerk, although a September 8 deadline would meet the need for the electors to be properly and timely informed so they may submit pro or con statements to the Town Clerk (per the Tabor amendment). If Council chooses to coordinate the Town Election with Pitkin County, staff could arrange for large newspaper display ads to inform the public of the Council candidate deadlines. Council may want to discuss possible ballot issues for the Town: - Rodeo purchase/Entryway improvements; - Mall Transit Plaza; - Employee Housing; - Other � y � Page 2 Recommendation: - Discuss and determine any ballot issues or questions Council wishes to submit to the electorate on November 7; - Discuss and determine if Council wishes to coordinate the Town's November Regular Election with Pitkin County; - Coordinate 2000 Snowmass Village Regular Election with Pitkin County due to the importance of the RTA ballot issue, convenience for the voters by not having to obtain absentee ballots from both the County and the Town and the cost savings that would be realized by the Town h hhareO c ml cammunipue shell (master w"piny lam dark cempWr/fiWnsw/general) Page 1 of 5 PITKIN COUNTY POTENTIAL BALLOT ISSUES 11/07/00 ELECTION ENTITY QUESTIONASSUE FINANCIAL IMPACT Aspen School District Bond for renovation—remodel, Amt: $45 million range addition for Aspen High School, bus Mill levy: estimated 1 mill; barn, etc. property tax increase Colorado Mountain College Using options within TABOR to Amt: $4.2 million per year keep/redirect surplus revenues; Mill levy: no increase Need simple majority to determine (currently 3.997) Colorado State Govt See Proposed Initiatives List See Proposed Initiatives List attached attached Pitkin County Open Space /� cent sales tax increase for Open Considering 25-year sunset & Trails Space acquisition w/value of$40-50 million Pitkin County RTA financing Reallocation of existing sales and use tax collected Town of Snowmass Village RTA formation Reallocation of existing sales and use tax collected 6 _. P;\user\rharlowe\Gary\bal loci ssue I i st Page 2 of 5 Return to i'.izcuon Intbrmcmon page. Link to: Colorado General Assembly- Ballot final a. rw`nnu Sta[. 3allot Issues(please use the "back" feature on your browser to return to this page). . Proposed Initiatives for November 7 2000 General Election- Updated as of June 22 2000 Number Name Proponents Issue Committee Fiscal and Status Impact 1997-1998 Medical Martin H. Marshall F. Coloradans for Medical Rights #40 Ballot Use of Chilcutt 1085 Stiles, III 2000 1776 Lincoln St. Ste Initiative Marijuana Lafayette St. 1350 Fairfax 1318 Denver,CO 80203 P.O. N/A #805 Denver, Street Box 44116 Denver,CO CO 80218 Denver,CO 80201-4116(303)753-3625 (303)861- 80220 (303)832-2553(Fax)E-Mail: 4244 j- nche a altoo.cow Web Site: � ���� ni�dir;ilmarliu:uut:om Opposne: Coloradans Against Legalizing Marijuana 5445 DTC Parkway, Ste.850 Englewood,CO 80111 (303) 221-5552(303)221-5559 (Fax)E-Mail- mmonon a nortrntlidaona.com 200(A) Women's Gary Rogers Dr.Edward Women's Right to Information PFA Health P.O. Box Manning Coalition P.O.Box 273145 Ft. Information 273145 Ft. 1700S. Collins,CO 80521 (970)225- Act Collins,CO Irving 0983(970)266-2599(Fax) N/A 80527 (970) Englewood, 225-0983 CO 80527 Sharon Hindman 2843 Mercy Drive Ft. Collins,CO 80526 205 Amend Douglas Jeffrey TAXCUT 2000 4545 Iron Petitions TABOR- Bruce P.O. Wright 2922 Horse Trail Colorado Springs, submitted Tax Cuts Box 26018 Westwood CO 80917 P.O. Box 26018 sufficient Colorado Blvd. Colorado Springs,CO 80936 See Springs,CO Colorado (719)550-0010(Fax same, Summary 80936(719) Springs,CO call first) 550-0010 80918(719) 1 Opposing: Citizens'Coalition 598-9241 Against Bruce 2000 1133 Clayton St. Denver,CO 80206 P.O. Box 480643 Denver,CO 80248(303) 380-4378 http://www.sos.state.co.us/pubs/elect ions/2000_ballot_initiatives.htm 7/14/00 Page 3 of 5 Number Name Proponents Issue Committee Fiscal and Status Impact 215 PFA and Prohibiting Colin Attomev: Sue Alliance For VIA Certain Open Henderson Burch P.O. Responsible Mining, Pit Mining P.O. Box 305 Box 18617 Inc. 18041 County Road 18401 County Denver,CO 15 La Jara,CO 81140 Rd. 15 La Jara, 80218 (303) P.O.Box 1515 Alamosa, CO 81140 698-9545 CO 81140(719)274- (719)274- 0322 (719)274-0400 0322 Cynthia (Fax) M. Medina sa,_,cidom banion.com 10001 State Opposing: Coloradans Hwy 15 La Opposing the Unfair Jara,CO Showdown Amendment, 81140(719) Inc. 1301 Pennsylvania 2744298 St. #900 Denver,CO 80203 (303)507-9350 (303)576-9350(Fax) 235(a)SC Natural Lands Edward Laura McCall Committee to Preserve and Open Embury 1915 2127 Vernon Natural Land in d J d d� Space S.Bryant St. Drive Golden, Colorado 2127 Vernon Conservation Denver,CO CO 80401 Drive Golden,CO Act 80219(303) 80401 (303)975-9336 975-9336 ,( 248(A) PFA Concerning Mark Itkonen Dan Citizens for go 1 t+ U Transportation 2443 Houston Ridgeway Transportation Equity I Waring Cr. 3090 South 2443 Houston Waring d U d .t,d 4 Littleton,CO Decatur Street Circle Littleton,CO 80120(720) Denver,CO 80120(720)283-8470 283-8470 80236(303) (Fax also)E-Mail: 761-9502 marki n:ry.com 251 PFA Capitol Dorothy Richard Building Rupert 970 Hamilton �)0 1�tif c alt Restoration Aurora 57920 US d[ d U� Avenue Hwy 285 P.O. Boulder,CO Box F 80302 State Shawnee,CO Capitol, Rm 80475 80475- 338(303)866- 0230 4872 Number Name Proponents Issue Committee and Status 255 PFA Background John F. Head Arnold SAFE Colorado 1738 Wynkoop Ste. I and SC Checks- 200 Equitable Grossman Denver,CO 80202 P.O. Box 461152 Gun Shows Bldg. 730 7`h 1177 Race Denver,CO 80246(303)563-7233 (303) Street Denver, St. #507 623.4211 (Fax)E-Mail: CO 80202 Denver, ,;,��.;,,hn ado o .%ano -. om Web Site: ionuN <,� rn ur»n� 401 .g^� http://www.sos.state.co.us/pubs/elections/2000_ballot_initiatives.htm 7/14/00 Page 4 of 5 tivol 6000 (303)331- Opposing: Common Sense Campaign 609 Attorney: 9190 W. Littleton Blvd.#206 Littleton, CO Isaacson, 80120(720)283-1376(720) 283-1333 Rosenbaum, (Fax) Woods& Levy, P.C. - Mark Grueskin 633 171h St. Ste. 2200 Denver, CO 80202 256 PFA Citizen Elise Jones John Coloradans for Responsible Growth 1410 and SC Management Colorado Fielder C/O Grant St.Ste B205 Denver,CO 80203 of Growth Environmental Westcliffe (303)861-8819(303)861-2436(Fax) Coalition Publishers Web Site: 1536 P.O. Box olorad:nulitrr:,non,iiilcpn t ut.or See Wynkoop St. 1261 #5C Denver, Englewood, Stmunazy CO 80202 CO 80150 (303)534- (303)935- 7066 ext.204 0900(303) (303)543- 935-0903 7063 (Fax) (Fax) 257 PFA Amendments Jeremiah M. Guy M. and SC to Labor Attridge 2117 Santos Peace Act Eliot Street 9572 Denver,CO Columbine 80211 (303) Drive See 433-3138 Evergreen, S> . CO 80439 (303)674- 7920 258(A) English Tom Tancredo Joe F. Colorado English for the Children P.O. PFA and Language 5471 South Chavez 301 .Box 2303 Denver,CO 80201-2303 2150 SC Education in Estes Street Colorado South Bellaire,Ste. 104 Denver,CO Public Littleton,CO Blvd. 80222(303)766-2591 (Joe C'deBaca) (- Schools 80123 Dr. Denver, 800-819-2343(Dave Gersten) Web Site: See Charles L. CO 80206- ��t�t�.„it�it;uiunu.Jiibleors Shy King 2870 4523 (303) Duke Circle 399-2593 Boulder,CO Attorney: 80303 (303) Hall& 499-7547 Evans, LLC Hugo Teufel 1200 17`h St. Ste. 1700 Denver, CO 80202 (303)628- 3300(303) 628-3368 (Fax) Q� �� 7 ..m. http://www.sos.state.co.us/pubs/elect ions/2000_ballot_initiatives.htm 7/14/00 Page 5 of 5 Number Name Proponents Issue Fiscal and Committee Inpact Status 259 PFA Allergenic John T. Bryan Connie Bradbury 3510 r Materials P.O.Box W. 15011 Ct. Broomfield, and 33386 CO 80233-0386 E-Mail: Substances Northglenn, JO t,",,,,, < 'M 111L d V a in Schools CO 80020 (303)451- 8520 E-Mail: N%an a c,n.net 262 PFA Providing Carry Julie Phillips 2221 1911 Colorado Education ( /� Additional Kennedy 300 Street Boulder,CO 80302 Network P.O.Box K-12 Jersey Denver, 535 Lafayette,CO Funding CO 80220 80026(303)477- fE 2936 E-Mail: i.vi ,u coioeiinrirom Web Site: �� .�� .coluednet.cnm 265 SC Labeling Jeff Peckman Patrick West 322 // Genetically 322 Eisenhower Drive �IC tV1+-0 Engineered Eisenhower Louisville,CO 80027. Foods Drive 1144(303)665-4631 Louisville,CO (Fax also) Vt 80027-1144 (303)665- 4631 (Fax also) *PFA-Petition Format Approved SC-Supreme Court(All titles have been set.) Petitions are due August 7,2000,3:00 p.m.per CRS 140-108 and Articles V, Sec. 1(2)of the Constitution. The last day for the Secretary of State to send notice and certification of General election ballot to county clerks is September 13,2000. (At least 55 days before the General Election.) Election Center I Business Center I Information Center ( Binoo/Raffle License Center Contact Us Home Comments t0 ).u.a — ! d h ttp://www.sos.state.co.us/pubs/elections/2000_ballot_initiatives.htm 7/14/00 summary Page 1 of 11 Ballot Title Setting Board Proposed Initiative Number 1999-2000 #205' The title as designated and fixed by the Board is as follows: AN AMENDMENT TO THE COLORADO CONSTITUTION ESTABLISHING A$25 TAX CUT TO LOWER EACH 2001 STATE AND LOCAL TAX IN EACH TAX BILL FOR EACH UTILITY CUSTOMER AND OCCUPATION TAX AND FRANCHISE CHARGE, VEHICLE SALES, USE, AND OWNERSHIP TAX, INCOME TAX,PROPERTY TAX,INCOME AND PROPERTY TAX EQUAL TO YEARLY REVENUE FROM SALES AND USE TAXES ON FOOD AND DRINK OTHER THAN TOBACCO AND ALCOHOL, AND INCOME TAX EQUAL TO YEARLY REVENUE FROM ESTATE TAXES, AND, IN CONNECTION THEREWITH, INCREASING THE TAX CUT $25 YEARLY; SPECIFYING THAT THE TAX CUTS AND STATE REPLACEMENT OF LOCAL REVENUE SHALL NOT LOWER STATE OR LOCAL EXCESS REVENUE; ALLOWING THE STATE TO LIMIT LOCAL ACTS INCREASING REPLACEMENT COSTS;AND PROVIDING THAT ATTORNEY FEES AND COSTS SHALL ALWAYS BE PAID TO SUCCESSFUL PLAINTIFFS ONLY. The ballot title and submission clause as designated and fixed by the Board is as follows: $HALL THERE BE AN AMENDMENT TO THE COLORADO CONSTITUTION ESTABLISHING A$25 TAX CUT TO LOWER EACH 2001 STATE AND LOCAL TAX IN EACH TAX BILL FOR EACH UTILITY CUSTOMER ANDOCCUPATION TAX AND FRANCHISE CHARGE,VEHICLE SALES,USE,AND OWNERSHIP TAX,INCOME TAX,PROPERTY TAX,INCOME AND PROPERTY TAX EQUAL TO YEARLY REVENUE FROM SALES AND USE TAXES ON FOOD AND DRINK OTHER THAN TOBACCO AND ALCOHOL, AND INCOME TAX EQUAL TO YEARLY REVENUE FROM ESTATE TAXES,AND,IN CONNECTION THEREWITH,INCREASING THE TAX CUT $25 YEARLY;SPECIFYING THAT THE TAX CUTS AND STATE REPLACEMENT OF LOCAL REVENUE SHALL NOT LOWER STATE OR LOCAL EXCESS REVENUE, ALLOWING THE STATE TO LIMIT LOCAL ACTS INCREASING REPLACEMENT COSTS;AND PROV I DING THAT ATTORNEY FEES AND COSTS SHALL ALWAYS BE PAID TO SUCCESSFUL PLAINTIFFS ONLY? The summary prepared by the Board is as follows: This measure amends article X, section 20 of the Colorado constitution, by adding a new paragraph(d)to subsection(8). A$25 tax cut,increased$25 each year,would lower each state and local tax bill for each utility customer and occupation tax and franchise charge;vehicle sales,use,and ownership tax;yearly income tax;property tax;income and property tax equal to yearly revenue from sales and use taxes on food and drink other than tobacco and alcohol;and income tax equal to yearly revenue from estate taxes. The initial tax cut of$25 is applied to tax bills for tax year 2001. The measure specifies that a joint income tax return equals two tax bills. 1. Amend TABOR-Tax Cum 1 qm � ' r mw� Sunny Page 2 of 11 The measure specifies that the tax cuts established by this measure and state replacement of local revenue shall not lower state or local excess revenue. The state may limit local acts increasing replacement costs. Attorney fees and costs are always paid to successful plaintiffs only who seek to enforce this measure. State impacts. The combined state fiscal impact of the tax cuts is a cumulative net negative impact of at least $663.7 million. The state income tax cut would reduce general fund revenue by $283.4 million cumulatively during the 30-month period from January 1,2001,to June 30,2003. For this same 30-month period,the cumulative loss of revenue to the state of sales and use taxes paid on vehicles is estimated to be$35 million,the impact of an income tax credit for the sales and use taxes paid on the purchase of food and drink other than alcohol and tobacco is estimated to be $183.5 million cumulatively,and the impact of an income tax credit for estate taxes is estimated to be$160.7 million cumulatively. In addition, the cut in the state utility customer tax would reduce the growth in state general fund revenue by a significant but indeterminate amount during the 30-month period beginning January 1, 2001. The state would incur costs of at least$1,100,000 to administer the tax cuts established by this measure. If the state replaces lost local revenues, the fiscal impact of the measure to the state would increase by the amount of any such replacement. Local impacts. The overall fiscal impact of the measure on local governments is indeterminate. If the state replaces local revenue lost due to the tax cuts, it is possible that there will be no direct fiscal impact on local governments. If there is no state replacement,the measure would have a substantial negative fiscal impact on local governments. The lost revenues from sales and use taxes paid on vehicles at the local level is estimated at $38,929,052 for the 2001 local government fiscal year,while the cumulative impact of the proposed tax cut on specific ownership revenues would result in $58,190,300 in lost revenues for the same fiscal year. Without state replacement, it is estimated that the measure would,at a minimum,reduce local government utility customer tax revenues by$39,061,150 for the 2001 local government fiscal year and reduce revenues from utility occupation taxes and utility franchise charges by$71,595,581 over the same fiscal year. The lost local revenues from the property tax cut would be$114,352,350 for property tax bills due in 2002. The property tax cut equal to yearly revenue from sales and use taxes on food and drink other than tobacco and alcohol would cause local property tax revenue to decrease by a substantial but indeterminate amount. The requirement that attorney fees and costs are always be paid to successful plaintiffs could have a considerable, though indeterminate, fiscal impact on local governments. 2 .-. i .OL ONEW Sui=aiy Page 3 of 11 Ballot Title Setting Board Proposed Initiative Number 1999-2000# 256' The title as designated and fixed by the Board is as follows: AN AMENDMENT TO THE COLORADO CONSTITUTION CONCERNING THE MANAGEMENT OF DEVELOPMENT,AND,IN CONNECTION THEREWITH,SPECIFYING THAT LOCAL GOVERNMENTS,UNLESS OTHERWISE EXCEPTED, SHALL APPROVE DEVELOPMENT ONLY WITHIN AREAS COMMITTED TO DEVELOPMENT OR WITHIN FUTUREGROWTH AREAS IN ACCORDANCE WITH VOTER-APPROVED GROWTH AREA MAPS, REQUIRING SUCH LOCAL GOVERNMENTS TO DELINEATE AREAS COMMITTED TO DEVELOPMENT, REQUIRING LOCAL GOVERNMENTS PROPOSING A FUTURE GROWTH AREA TO SUBMIT A GROWTH AREA MAP TO A VOTE AT A REGULAR ELECTION, SPECIFYING THE CONTENT OF GROWTH IMPACT DISCLOSURES TO BE DISTRIBUTED TO VOTERS IN CONNECTION WITH SUCH ELECTIONS, AND SPECIFYING THE TYPE OF ALLOWED ACTION OR DEVELOPMENT WITHIN GROWTH AREAS,COMMITTED AREAS,OR OUTSIDE SUCH AREAS. The ballot title and submission clause as designated by the Board is as follows: SHALL THERE BE AN AMENDMENT TO THE COLORADO CONSTITUTION CONCERNING THE MANAGEMENT OF DEVELOPMENT, AND, IN CONNECTION THEREWITH, SPECIFYING THAT LOCAL GOVERNMENTS,UNLESSOTHERWISE EXCEPTED,SHALL APPROVE DEVELOPMENTONLY WITHIN AREAS COMMITTED TO DEVELOPMENT OR WITHIN FUTURE GROWTH AREAS IN ACCORDANCE WITH VOTER-APPROVED GROWTH AREA MAPS,REQUIRING SUCH LOCAL GOVERNMENTS TO DELINEATE AREAS COMMITTED TO DEVELOPMENT, REQUIRING LOCAL GOVERNMENTS PROPOSING A FUTURE GROWTH AREA TO SUBMIT A GROWTH AREA MAP TO A VOTE AT A REGULAR ELECTION,SPECIFYING THE CONTENT OF GROWTH IMPACT DISCLOSURES TO BE DISTRIBUTED TO VOTERS IN CONNECTION WITH SUCH ELECTIONS, AND SPECIFYING THE TYPE OF ALLOWED ACTION OR DEVELOPMENT WITHIN GROWTH AREAS,COMMITTED AREAS,OR OUTSIDE SUCH AREAS? The summary prepared by the Board is as follows: The measure adds a new article XXVIII to the Colorado Constitution. The measure states that the people find that rapid, unplanned, and unregulated growth through development and subdivision is a matter of statewide significance and concern. The measure states that its purpose is to require citizen management of growth by providing voters with information concerning growth impacts, by providing voters with control over growth areas in their communities, and by requiring coordination among local governments with respect to proposed growth areas. The measure states that it shall pre-empt any inconsistent provision of the Colorado Constitution, state statute, local ordinance, or other provision of law. The measure specifies that local governments, unless excepted in accordance with its 1. Citim Management ofGromh summary Page 4 of 11 provisions,shall approve development only within areas committed to development or within growth areas in accordance with voter-approved growth area maps. The measure defines "committed area" to mean an area of land that has been committed to development in that the land meets one of three criteria as specified in the measure. The measure defines "development" to mean commercial, residential, or industrial construction or other activity that changes the basic character of the land so as to permit commercial, residential, or industrial construction. The term "development" shall not include the construction, operation, maintenance, repair or replacement of facilities for telecommunications, public utilities, mining of minerals and construction materials, oil and gas exploration and production, or for the diversion, storage, transportation, or use of water within the State of Colorado. The measure defines"growth area"to mean an area shown on a growth map approved by the voters as an area within which development may occur. The measure defines "local government" to mean all statutory, charter and home rule cities and towns, home rule and statutory counties, and cities and counties. The measure specifies that its terms shall apply to all counties and city and counties with a population in excess of 10,000 residents according to the most recent decennial census or, if more than five years have passed since such census,the population as projected by the department of local affairs as of the beginning of the fifth year following the date of the census. The governing body of any county whose population is less than 25,000 residents may submit a referred question to the voters exempting for a period of four years the entire county and all local governments within it from the requirements of the measure. This four-year period may be renewed or extended by a subsequent referred question. The measure specifies that its terms shall apply to every city or town with any portion of its corporate limits located in any county to which the proposed amendment applies. Cities or towns whose population is less than 1,000 residents shall not be required to prepare a growth map; except that such cities or towns shall not approve any development that would cause the city's or town's population to exceed 1,000 until the voters of that jurisdiction have approved a map for such jurisdiction in conformity with the requirements of the measure. The measure requires every local government subject to its tetras to delineate its committed area no later than December 31, 2001, or within one year of becoming subject to the requirements of its terms, whichever occurs later. The measure specifies that a growth area map shall include a map and text describing a proposed growth area and shall identify the general locations of each proposed land use and the general range of development densities within such growth area. No proposed growth area may be designated on a growth area map unless the development in such area shall be served by a central water and sewer system and roads satisfying the criteria specified in the measure within ten years following voter approval. For every city, city and county,or town,each proposed growth area shall Suntrary Page 5 of 11 abut along one-sixth or more of its perimeter to a committed area or to one or more growth areas that were previously approved by the voters of that jurisdiction. The measure requires each growth area map and its text to be consistent with growth impact disclosures set forth in the measure,developed with citizen participation,and consistent with growth proposed by other local governments. The measure requires each local government proposing a growth area to refer each proposed growth area map to a popular vote at a regular election. The measure specifies requirements for the ballot title and submission clause for such referendum. Under the measure, the proposing local government shall also provide growth impact disclosures that describe the impacts of development allowed by the proposed growth area map. The measure specifies how such disclosures are to be distributed to voters. Such disclosures are to describe the elements of the proposed growth area and the anticipated effects of the proposed growth area. The measure specifies that all growth impact disclosures shall be based upon the best generally available data routinely used by local government planners in Colorado in the preparation of master or comprehensive plans. The measure requires development or subdivision of land within a voter-approved growth area to be undertaken in accordance with the growth area map. Development or subdivision of land within a committed area may be completed without voter approval if the development is completed in accordance with approved plans and any applicable regulations and guidelines. No development or subdivision of land shall be approved for land not included in a committed area or growth area; except that a local government may approve or allow development or subdivision activity with respect to such areas pursuant to eight different exceptions as specified in the measure where such activity satisfies such jurisdiction's land use rules and regulations. Those exceptions are specified as follows: • Development that does not require any further local government approvals or requires only the issuance of a building permit; • Development or subdivision of land consistent with a valid development application in conformity with the provisions of the measure; • The creation of no more than three lots of no more than two acres each to accommodate residences of immediate family members of an agricultural property owner; • A division of land that is not subject to control as a subdivision of land based upon statutes in effect at the time such land is subdivided; • Publicly owned facilities necessary for the public health, safety, or welfare; • A division of land that is permitted by statute as a rural cluster development as of the effective date of the measure; • Non-residential development of less than ten thousand square feet to permit retail or service use where no other retail or service uses are located within one mile of the site; and • Commercial or industrial development, other than confined animal feeding Summary Page 6 of 11 operations or related facilities, that provides only goods or services to support nearby agricultural operations in an area where there are no other commercial or industrial sites within one mile. The measure specifies that it is not intended to affect other constitutional protections afforded to private property. The measure states that its provisions are to be liberally construed to effectuate its purposes. The measure provides that any laws enacted in derogations of the measure are to be strictly construed. State impacts. The proponents intend that existing estimates be used to satisfy requirements for municipal population data. If that approach is adopted, there will be no significant state fiscal impacts. If new projections are required, the Department of Local Affairs estimates that it would require an additional six full-time employees at a cost of$347,846 to fulfill the requirements of the measure. At this time, there does not appear to be any additional state fiscal impact. Local impacts. Actual fiscal impacts on local governments are indeterminate. Local governments would assume direct costs in complying with the following five tasks required by the measure: 1)Delineating"committed areas";2)Developing"growth area maps';3)Referring growth area maps to a popular vote at a regular election; 4) Providing growth impact disclosures; and 5) Distributing the growth area map and associated impact disclosures to voters. The Department of Local Affairs estimates that the aggregate total direct costs of initial compliance with these five requirements on the part of local governments could possibly be as high as $60 million. Only limited data exists regarding the cost to local governments of complying with an additional requirement under the measure: Ensuring that growth area maps are consistent with growth proposed by other local governments. These costs could be similar in magnitude to those associated with delineating committed areas and developing growth area maps. Estimates of direct costs do not include the cost of updating zoning or other land use regulations in order to achieve consistency with committed areas and growth areas or the cost to be incurred by other political subdivisions(such as special districts or school districts)in complying with the measure as required by section 6 of the measure. In the event of an unsuccessful election or in the event that growth area maps are revised in the future to reflect changing conditions, these direct costs will continue forward as recurring costs associated with local government planning efforts. Indirect fiscal impacts on local governments are indeterminate. Possible indirect positive fiscal impacts to local governments would result from the control and possible reduction of some of the negative impacts of growth cited in section I ("Purpose") of the measure. There could be a significant reduction in the cost of building new roads and extending water and sewer service to low mow 1p sr' Summary Page 7 of 11 density development. It is impossible to quantify the dollar value of these positive impacts. Indirect negative impacts are similarly impossible to quantify and thus are also indeterminate. The measure could result in negative fiscal impacts from delays in, or prohibition of, certain development, either in the short term as growth area maps are created and voted upon along with other planning tasks imposed by the measure or in the long term should citizens vote to curtail certain development. Hearing May 3, 2000: At request of proponent, technical correction allowed in text of measure to delete material shown in strikeout type in Section 2(2)(c) and Section 4(4)(b). Single subject and jurisdiction approved; staff draft amended: titles and summary set. Hearing adjourned 5:32 p.m. Hearing May 17, 2000: Motion for Rehearing submitted by Jerry G. Percy denied with respect to jurisdictional grounds specified in paragraph 1, relating to changes made to text after the legislative staff review and comment hearing. All Motions for Rehearing that raised single subject objections denied with respect to those objections. Motions for Rehearing granted in part, to the extent that two changes were made to titles and that fiscal impact portion of summary was amended. Motions for Rehearing denied in all other respects. Hearing adjourned 5:03 p.m. Summary Page 8 of 11 Ballot Title Setting Board Proposed Initiative "1999-2000 #2571" The title as designated and fixed by the Board is as follows: AN AMENDMENT TO THE COLORADO REVISED STATUTES CONCERNING AN EXTENSION OF THE RIGHTS OF COLLECTIVE BARGAINING TO DOMESTIC SERVANTS, PUBLIC EMPLOYEES OF THE STATE OR ANY POLITICAL SUBDIVISION THEREOF,AND FARM AND RANCH LABOR WORKING FOR ANOTHER FOR HIRE IN THE STATE OF COLORADO IN A NONEXECUTIVE OR NONSUPERVISORY CAPACITY. The ballot title and submission clause as designated and fixed by the Board is as follows: SHALL THERE BE AN AMENDMENT TO THE COLORADO REVISED STATUTES CONCERNING AN EXTENSION OF THE RIGHTS OF COLLECTIVE BARGAINING TO DOMESTIC SERVANTS,PUBLIC EMPLOYEES OF THE STATE OR ANY POLITICAL SUBDIVISION THEREOF,AND FARM AND RANCH LABOR WORKING FOR ANOTHER FOR HIRE IN THE STATE OF COLORADO IN A NONEXECUTI V E OR NONSUPERV ISORY CAPACITY? The Summary prepared by the Board is as follows: This measure requires amendments to sections 8-3-104 (11) and (12), Colorado Revised Statutes, to delete language excluding domestic servants, public employees of the state or any political subdivision thereof, and farm and ranch labor working for another for hire in the state of Colorado in a nonexecutive or nonsupervisory capacity, from joining together for the purpose of engaging in collective bargaining. Extending collective bargaining rights to public employees under state law would have an impact on personnel related costs of the state and local governments in Colorado. Each level of government would be required to implement collective bargaining rights and to develop mechanisms for that purpose. The Department of Local Affairs estimates that there would be a potentially significant negative fiscal impact to any local government whose employees choose to invoke these rights. The Office of State Planning and Budgeting estimates that there will likely be a fiscal impact to the state but, because the number of entities that would petition to collectively bargain and the number of petitions for votes that would be filed with the Department of Labor and Employment are unknown, the precise amount of the fiscal impact cannot be determined. Hearing April 19, 2000: Single subject approved; staff draft amended; titles and summary set. Hearing adjourned 4:58 p.m. 1. Amendments to the Labor Peace Act '0� I8'-. 1 Sumnasy Page 9 of 11 Ballot Title Settin¢ Board Proposed Initiative "1999-2000 -#258(A)"' The title as designated and fixed by the Board is as follows: AN AMENDMENT TO THE COLORADO CONSTITUTION CONCERNING ENGLISH LANGUAGE EDUCATION, AND IN CONNECTION THEREWITH, REQUIRING ALL CHILDREN IN COLORADO PUBLIC SCHOOLS TO BE TAUGHT ENGLISH AS RAPIDLY AND EFFECTIVELY AS POSSIBLE; REQUIRING EVERY CHILD TO BE TAUGHT IN ENGLISH, EXCEPT FOR CERTAIN CHILDREN WHO PRIMARILY SPEAK A LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH; REQUIRING SUCH CHILDREN TO BE EDUCATED THROUGH A SPECIFICALLY DESIGNED ENGLISH IMMERSION PROGRAM DURING A TEMPORARY TRANSITION PERIOD NOT NORMALLY INTENDED TO EXCEED ONE YEAR AND TO THEREAFTER TRANSFER SUCH CHILDREN WHO HAVE ACQUIRED A GOOD WORKING KNOWLEDGE OF ENGLISH TO AN ENGLISH LANGUAGE MAINSTREAM CLASSROOM; EXCEPTING CERTAIN CHILDREN WHO PRIMARILY SPEAK A LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH FROM SUCH ENGLISH IMMERSION PROGRAM WHEN THE PARENT OR LEGAL GUARDIAN PROVIDES A WRITTEN INFORMED CONSENT WAIVER;ESTABLISHING THE PARENT OR LEGAL GUARDIAN'S LEGAL STANDING TO SUE FOR ENFORCEMENT OF THE MEASURE AND, IF SUCCESSFUL,TO COLLECT ATTORNEY'S FEES AND ACTUAL DAMAGES;ESTABLISHING THAT THE AMENDMENT SHALL NOT AFFECT ANY CHARTER SCHOOL;SPECIFYING THAT THE AMENDMENT SHALL NOT AFFECT ANY FOREIGN LANGUAGE INSTRUCTION PROGRAM, EXCEPT FOR NATIVE SPEAKERS OF ANOTHER LANGUAGE, WHO ARE LIMITED TO ONE CLASS PERIOD PER DAY WITHOUT A PARENTAL WAIVER;SPECIFYING THAT THE AMENDMENT SHALL NOT PREVENT ANY TEACHER OR AIDE FROM PROVIDING SUPPLEMENTAL ASSISTANCE IN A NATIVE LANGUAGE TO A CHILD FOR TRANSLATION OR CLARIFICATION OR PREVENT ANY SCHOOL PERSONNEL FROM USING A LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH FOR NON-INSTRUCTIONAL PURPOSES; AND CLARIFYING THAT THE AMENDMENT SHALL NOT BE CONSTRUED AS IMPOSING OR MANDATING ANY LIMITS ON THE AMOUNT OF TIME A CHILD MAY RECEIVE SPECIALIZED ASSISTANCE IN ORDER TO LEARN ENGLISH. The ballot title and submission clause as designated and fixed by the Board is as follows: SHALL THERE BE AN AMENDMENT TO THE COLORADO CONSTITUTION CONCERNING ENGLISH LANGUAGE EDUCATION, AND IN CONNECTION THEREWITH,REQUIRING ALL CHILDREN IN COLORADO PUBLIC SCHOOLS TO BE TAUGHT ENGLISH AS RAPIDLY AND EFFECTIVELY AS POSSIBLE; REQUIRING EVERY CHILD TO BE TAUGHT IN ENGLISH, EXCEPT FOR CERTAIN CHILDREN WHO PRIMARILY SPEAK A LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH; REQUIRING SUCH CHILDREN TO BE EDUCATED THROUGH A SPECIFICALLY DESIGNED ENGLISH IMMERSION PROGRAM DURING A TEMPORARY TRANSITION PERIOD NOT NORMALLY INTENDED TO EXCEED ONE YEAR AND TO THEREAFTER TRANSFER SUCH CHILDREN WHO HAVE ACQUIRED A GOOD WORKING KNOWLEDGE OF ENGLISH TO AN ENGLISH LANGUAGE MAINSTREAM CLASSROOM; EXCEPTING CERTAIN CHILDREN WHO PRIMARILY SPEAK A LANGUAGE 1. English Language Education in Public Schools I - 19 - Summary Page 10 of 11 OTHER THAN ENGLISH FROM SUCH ENGLISH IMMERSION PROGRAM WHEN THE PARENT OR LEGAL GUARDIAN PROVIDES A WRITTEN INFORMED CONSENT WAIVER;ESTABLISHING THE PARENT OR LEGAL GUARDIAN'S LEGAL STANDING TO SUE FOR ENFORCEMENT OF THE MEASURE AND, IF SUCCESSFUL,TO COLLECT ATTORNEY'S FEES AND ACTUAL DAMAGES,ESTABLISHING THAT THE AMENDMENT SHALL NOT AFFECT ANY CHARTER SCHOOL;SPECIFYING THAT THE AMENDMENT SHALL NOT AFFECT ANY FOREIGN LANGUAGE INSTRUCTION PROGRAM, EXCEPT FOR NATIVE SPEAKERS OF ANOTHER LANGUAGE, WHO ARE LIMITED TO ONE CLASS PERIOD PER DAY WITHOUT A PARENTAL WAIVER; SPECIFYING THAT THE AMENDMENT SHALL NOT PREVENT ANY TEACHER OR AIDE FROM PROVIDING SUPPLEMENTAL ASSISTANCE IN A NATIVE LANGUAGE TO A CHILD FOR TRANSLATION OR CLARIFICATION OR PREVENT ANY SCHOOL PERSONNEL FROM USING A LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH FOR NON-INSTRUCTIONAL PURPOSES; AND CLARIFYING THAT THE AMENDMENT SHALL NOT BE CONSTRUED AS IMPOSING OR MANDATING ANY LIMITS ON THE AMOUNT OF TIME A CHILD MAY RECEIVE SPECIALIZED ASSISTANCE IN ORDER TO LEARN ENGLISH? The summary prepared by the Board is as follows: The measure amends the Colorado constitution by declaring that the English language is the common language of the United States and of Colorado and that English proficiency is a prerequisite for economic opportunity. In addition,the measure declares that full proficiency in a new language is best developed through high levels of classroom exposure to the language at an early age. The measure requires all children in Colorado public schools to be taught English as rapidly and effectively as possible. The measure defines "English-learner" to mean a child who is not able to participate meaningfully in an English language mainstream classroom and primarily speaks a language other than English. The measure defines "structured English immersion" to mean a program of instruction specifically designed to teach English and academic subjects to English-learners, in which all instruction is in English at a level appropriate to the English proficiency of the class of English- learners. The measure specifies that English-leamers shall be educated through a program of structured English immersion during a temporary transition period not normally to exceed one year. The measure specifies that all students,except students whose parents or legal guardians have given written informed consent and signed a written waiver, shall be taught in English. Upon acquiring a good working knowledge of English, the measure requires English-leamers to be transferred to English language mainstream classes. The measure specifies that nothing shall be construed to impose or mandate any limit on the amount of time an English-leamer may receive specialized assistance in order to learn English or academic subject matter. The measure allows a student to be excepted from the structured English immersion education requirement upon the prior written informed consent of the student's parent or legal guardian. The measure identifies requirements of the written consent waiver, including a mandatory visit by the parent or legal guardian to the school to apply for the waiver and the provision to the parent or legal guardian, in a language they can understand, of a description of the educational materials and 2 � � SOWN Sumnary Page 11 of 11 program of instruction offered at the school or at another school in the same school district. The measure specifies that if a parent has executed a waiver,the child may be transferred to classes where the child is taught English and other subjects through bilingual education or other generally recognized methodologies permitted by law. The measure requires schools that do not offer bilingual education to allow a parent to transfer his or her child to a school within the child's school district that does offer such a program, if one is available. The measure specifies that nothing shall be construed to affect foreign language instruction programs designed to teach English-speakers another language and provides that native speakers of other languages who do not have a good working knowledge of English shall not be allowed to participate in any foreign language program for more than one class period per day without prior written informed consent of such child's parent or legal guardian. The measure specifies that nothing shall be construed to prevent a teacher or instructional aide from providing supplemental assistance in the native language to English-learners for purposes of translation and clarification or to prevent school personnel from using languages other than English for non-instructional purposes. The measure grants a child's parent or legal guardian the legal standing to sue for enforcement of the provisions of this measure. If successful,the measure authorizes the court to award the parent or legal guardian normal and customary attorneys' fees and actual damages. The measure specifies that the constitutional amendment shall take effect upon proclamation of the vote by the governor and shall apply to public schools in school districts with school terms commencing on or after sixty calendar days of such proclamation. The Department of Local Affairs has determined that there would be no fiscal impact on local governments other than school districts resulting from the enactment of this measure. The Office of State Planning and Budgeting has determined that full compliance with the language of the measure would likely have a state fiscal impact. However, the Office of State Planning and Budgeting has determined that it is not possible to estimate the magnitude of the fiscal impact of the measure at this time because the specifics of the implementation and enforcement of this measure would be decided by school districts, the General Assembly, and the Governor at a future date. Hearing April 19, 2000: Single subject approved; staff draft amended; titles and summary set. Hearing adjourned 9:55 p.m. Hearing May 3, 2000: 3 Al a COUNCIL COMMUNIQUE Meeting Date: July 17, 2000 Presented By: Bernadette Barthelenghi Subject: Entryway/Community Pool Design Discussion Overview: Design charette Work Session with Town Council for the Entryway/Community Pool design. Staff has provided base maps of all Entryway properties including Community Park, Rodeo Grounds, templates of pools, recreation center, parking, and sport fields for Town Council members to use as part of this exercise. The purpose of the design charette is to look at the users needs, requirement and attitudes objectively. We should interactively work together building framework pieces until the project is clearly defined. �OOL amp Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday 1 Jul y 2000 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 T.C.Mtg. 2:00 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 -T.C.Mtg. -T.C. 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Greenway Overview The Plan The Village II. The Stream Corridor Restoration III. Stream Segments Divide Village Community Golf Course Entry/East Brush Creek IV. Next Steps on the Trail • Town of Snowmass village Greenway Master Plan 1 List of Figures ' Stream Segment Characteristics 11 ' Divide Stream Segment Existing Conditions 14 Divide Stream Segment Recommended Improvements 16 Village Stream Segment Existing Conditions 19 ' Village Stream Segment Recommended Improvements 22 Community Stream Segment Existing Conditions 24 ' Community Stream Segment Recommended Improvements 26 ' Golf Course/Entry Stream Segment Existing Conditions 29 Golf Course/Entry Stream Segment Recommended Improvements 31 Stream Segment Goals 33 , Proposed Parks Improvements 34 ' 1 1 1 1 L Greenway Overview "greenways'.- from which many of the community's neighborhoods, commercial and recreational destinations can be reached. The Town's common areas also serve ns wildlife corridors during migration and severe winters. Residential subdivisions have incor- • '• y , porated extensive common open areas. Many other public areas and trails have been cre- r ated by easement. Connecting these corri- dors, using the creek as the spine, establishes { a system of greenways through which people is and animals can move with minimal car conflict. This document also guides implementation of The Plan the Environmental Resources and Transpor- This document is intended to be used as a tation sections of the Town of Snowntass working plan, a decision making framework Village Compreltensiue Plan (January, 1999), for work in progress. Because stream restora- the Wildlife Enhancement and Management tion efforts have been underway since 1992, flan, and A Road, a Creek, and a Community and continue as this plan is produced, it in Maturation (BTA, January, 1993) plan serves the community by providing a compre- documents. It incorporates past planning hensive view of the stream as a whole and a efforts, and proposes improvements to bring context for future improvements and commu. the stream back to the community. nity investments. Greenway Plan Goals The primary goal of this plan is to restore 1. Restore stream function and aquatic Brush Creek to the community as a valued habitat. resource available to wildlife, residents and 2• Restore riparian vegetation. visitors, while preserving and restoring its 3. Concentrate park access to stream along function as a headwater of the Colorado River. community & village stream sections. It does this by identifying problems and 4. Improve pedestrian & connections trail opportunities along the stream channel and taking a comprehensive look at the stream throughout the Brush Creek Corridor to corridor as it interacts with the surrounding access surrounding land uses. land uses. 5. Increase public awarenesss, education & _ stewardship of riparian, aquatic & animal A greenway is defined as a linear corridor of habitat. natural open space. Greenways can provide Greenway Plan Objectives waterway protection from non-point source The greenway plan addresses four (4) major pollution, movement corridors and habitat for community objectives: 1) water quality, 2) birds and animals, community identity; they education, passive and active recreation, also create a centralizing focus for community stream and land use access and overall town public spaces. Brush Creek acts as a spine for pedestrian circulation, and 4) wildlife habitat - a system of natural open space corridors - protection and restoration. G r e e n w a y M a s t e r P I a n 7 Water and :lesilhc/it Quality - h'c•ctoralion 41� of Brush Creck - Since 1995 the Town has restored and/or r enhanced 1,300 linear feet, of the strewn. The �a . remaining length of the stream poses greater challenges. As the central water course through the Snowmass Valley, and a hcadwa- ter f'or the Colorado River, it is a vital part. of �� the area's ecosystem. Preserving and restor- ing its aesthetic and functional qualities are essential elements of this plan. Education, Passive and Active Recreation - Park Opportunities In 1992, the Town commissioned Ben Thomp- son Associates (BTA) to prepare a beautifica- tion plan for Snowmass Village. Reflecting Wildlife Habitat Preservation, Conservation the values expressed by residents, this plan and Protection , encouraged environmental stewardship by Brush Creek still provides habitat for birds, identifying five (5) park opportunities along fish and a variety of terrestrial species. As the ' Brush Creek for public access and interpretive variety of vegetation type increases, so does nature centers (A Road, a Creek, and a the number of animal species. Riparian Community in Maturation) . This plan still habitats account for the greatest species forms the framework for re-connecting the diversity, especially those sections bordering , town with the creek, and has guided many of Federal lands where still water dominates. the improvements already undertaken by the The Wildlife Enhancement and Management town. Providing access and encouraging good Plan's goals, objectives and proposed actions stewardship through nature and environmen- have been incorporated into this document, tal education is still a main objective in com- munity use of and appreciation of this natural The Village ' asset. Access and Circulation - Pedestrian Mobility V Snowmass Village has an extensive trail 1 system including routes within town, single track bike trails in more remote areas, and ' trail access to the National Forest. However, there are many gaps in the existing system as well as many opportunities to connect com- mercial, neighborhood and recreational desti- nations through a trail system. Brush Creek provides an opportunity to increase non- 1 motorized mobility throughout the community ' by linking land uses along either side of the stream and road, and more smoothly connect- ing transit with the existing and proposed trail system. 2 T o w n Of S n o w m a s s V i l l a g e \When Snownnass Village was originally envi- 4. 'transit stops that are not celebrated as a sioned as a world class ski village in the transition from vehicle to foot. 1950's, it was to include several snail pecks- 5. Connections between non-auto modes and trial' alpine villages on the slopes of Burnt uses along both the 1 strwun and the rad and Baldy Mountains. People would get o have not been clarified. around during the ski season by foot, and by an accessible transit system. By the time the first.Town of Snowmass Village Master Plan was adopted in 1980 the resident population was estimated at 984 people with a peak ski season population estimated at 5,904. By e 4^ 1998 there were estimated to be up to 3,639 -- dwelling units, a resident population of more than 2,000 and a peak seasonal population of more than six times that, more than 12,000. During the 1990's the Town began sponsoring many year-round and summer events, effec- tively expanding the range of outdoor activi- ties and use of the town. Between the year 2000 and 2020 an increase in peak population of up to 2,500 people and an additional 700 residents are estimated to visit and live in the village. As with any major resort destination, the population fluctuates seasonally and, with it, the use and activity of the town. Summer music festivals, rodeos, balloon festivals, mountain biking and hiking, golf and art events bring people into the community on a year-round basis. The natural beauty and t assets of the valley are one of the main attrac- tions to visitors, and set the stage for these offerings. Lodging, housing, commercial activities, recreation and event sites are dispersed on either side of Brush Creek Road and Brush Creek. While the distance between these places is relatively short, unless you know the town well, getting around by means other than a car appears a bit risky. There are -- several factors that contribute to this: 1. Lack of clear signage, directions and distance markers. 2. Lack of clear and direct access to trail systems from the surrounding land uses. 3. Intersections that do not clearly alert drivers or give clear priority to trail trav- _ elers. G r e e n w a y M a s t e r P I a n 3 1 II. The Stream Corridor Brush Creel: is a small, high mountain tribu- and quality of the stream varies as it _runs I:uy of the Roaring Fort: Diver Nait.hin the through town. Upper Colorado River Basin. The headwaters Of Brush Creel: originate on Mount. Bald), in Restoration the Elk Mountain Range, where it then flows seven miles northwest to its confluence with the Roaring Fork River near Woody Creek. Brush Creek is the main watercourse flowing through the Town of Snowmass Village, from ' the Divide into the Roaring Fork River. 1 The past thirty }-ears of development in the _ valley have severely impaired the stream channel's ability to function naturally. As construction has moved through the valley, ' erosion, sediment, debris and road construc- tion have restructured the stream. Presently, excessive sediment from erosion and run-off , from roadways and parking lots pose the most True restoration of Brush Creek is not achiev- significant negative impact to water quality able because of encroachment into the and stream channel stability. stream's flood plain by roads, parking lots and ' building structures. Restoration in the true Brush Creek's hydrological modifications sense of the term would require relocating began when the agricultural community these features, making the project , moved into the valley in the late 1800's to unaffordable and politically unpopular. There- produce food for the growing mining commu- fore, the term. "restoration"is used in the sense nity of Aspen. The agrarian character of the of restoring hydrological stability and ecologi- ' valley began to change with the expansion of cal viability to the stream corridor. the ski industry from Aspen into Brush Creek in1967. Construction of new roads, hotels, Studies were conducted over a three-year , lodges, large parking lots, removal of hillside period to develop a thorough understanding of vegetation for ski trails and culverting of how the stream functioned naturally and the stream crossings contributed to changing development impacts that caused the stream ' patterns in natural drainage courses and to adjust to its present conditions. Studies increased the overall volume of drainage included the physical analysis of the existing during spring runoff and during significant stream channel, monitoring of the annual ' weather events. Adjustment of drainage hydro-graph, land use impacts, water quality patterns and volume caused considerable sampling, and assessment of the aquatic impact to the natural channel characteristics biology. These studies continue, as projects ' of Brush Creek. The stream incised as much are completed to monitor each project's suc- as 12 vertical feet through the underlying and cess. highly erosive Mancos shale formation. ' After the three-year study period, the 'Town Brush Creek runs almost 3.2 miles from the had the information needed to begin designing Ditch Trail terminus, through Town to the and implementing stream improvement , confluence with the East Brush Creek. The projects. Being located in a quasi-urban stream is crossed and culverted by road ways resort based community, the stream projects at eight (8) points through town. The width included improvements that extended beyond ' 4 T o w n o f S n o w m a s s V 1 1 1 a 9 e ' projects. Being located in a quasi-urban Natural Conditions resort based community, the stream projects included improvements that. extended beyond traditional natural resource restoration. In addition to correcting the impacts to the sta•cam, tile 'Ibwn was interested in creating small, passive pocket areas along key loca- t*4­_ tions within the community that include II recreational access trails, picnic tables, pak r benches, and environmental interpretive - displays. The first project was designed and imple- mented in 1995, which involved stabilization i of 900 feet of eroding stream bank along a stream reach that flowed by the Snowmass Chapel and Community Center. The project's central location near a community focal area t :-:- provided the Town Council with a model r y demonstrating the value of stream restoration projects to the community. This project also included the park-like amenities that inter- ested the Town Council, including an environ- mental interpretive display explaining the importance of such projects. The enhanced The stream, riparian and flood plain areas are area was named Yarrow Park and was all intact. The willows are overhanging the funded in part by a Great Outdoor Colorado water. The stream has a meander with pools Grant. The project was awarded a Grand and riffles. The system is intact with a Award by the Associated Landscape Contrac- healthy and balanced ecological system. tors of Colorado in 1997. Development Impacts The first project stabilized and enhanced only Impacts on stream corridors may originate four percent of the stream corridor located many feet or even miles away from the within the Snowmass Village Town bound- stream. Interception of natural water runoff aries. The following tells the story of the patterns by development will concentrate second stream restoration project undertaken higher flows and redirect water patterns by the town, Woodbridge Reach. This section either in a new direction or force higher was defined by two culverts, between the volumes down a historical drainage. If the Woodbridge Condominium Association and flow is diverted and not developed in a proper the drive into the Community Center. This manner to handle the scouring force of the area was used as a biological and water runoff, gully erosion will occur, causing an monitoring station during farrow Park con- eventual and choking discharge of sediment _ struction. into the stream system beyond. ' G r e e n w a y M a s t e r P l a n 5 {'� !} f(.ti i�l�S♦1'<�v+r. � 7�����rY'�fJj t �t��c� Mrf � � 1 \ t+TY�\ Y• A _ • . • • • . mot. < •�.a, � �f� .4- e,1� lvf�`�¢ ✓ 1``-Da�,.'Lir,r� i^...1.-ten+-s..�• �1.� f'Y.�FI` y 9,� r; . .•• • V "YLf yy�1 Steps During Restoration NICLhoCs eonst� act a new stream channel Construction using Ingo oversized rocks to withstand spring runoff flows. The upland slopes are A backhoe fills in on top of fabric separator being graded back at a lesser gradient to placed at the existing strrurnbed elevation. reduce the erosion and sedimentation poten- Fill is composited to simulate a natural cobble tial i,, the strc;un's new channel. stream bed. The material is sized large The stream edge is re-constructed using rock enough to stabilize the stream bed and protect and wetland topsoil embedded an erosion it from incising again. In this particular area control fabric that is planted with rooted the stream bed is being raised six feet and willow, sedge plugs and wetland seed mix. being reconnected to the abandoned flood The fabric will bio-degrade as the vegetation plain and associated riparian vegetation. matures, creating a riparian corridor similar to an undisturbed natural stream channel. Areas along the stream where the streambed cannot be raised high enough to stabilize the bank, innovative methods are used to stabilize the banks. In this case, the stream bank is being reconstructed using boulders to protect against lateral scour while the slope is being reconstructed using a geotextile slope stabili- zation system. A geotextile fabric grid is placed horizontal to the ground and back thirteen feet behind the slope surface. Eigh- teen to twenty-four inches of fill is placed on top and compacted. This practice is repeated until 16 vertical feet of unstable slope is re- constructed. R r � t �V Regraded upland slopes are then seeded with xi a mix including native wildflower, grasses, AY; ky ' and shrubs. Slopes are then mulched with __ ®�• straw, and draped with an erosion control fabric that holds the mulch in place and protects the slope from adja- cent roadway sheet runoff. b ■ ' G r e e n w a y M a s t e r P I a n 7 1 After Stream Restoration \\ illoa cultings arc then pl:uctcd ;Hunt; the The stream aquatic lift• is mcasurod and , stroani ed o to reinforce the hank w it li vcp- monitored both hcforo and nller the stro:un ctotivc roots, vchile providing shade cover oXrr proioels arc complcic to assess the project's the pools kcoping hiological success . for oqualic life (fish and insects). As the VA'iIIoAA's grow within the flood plain, they will help reinforce the flood plain soils and slow the velocity of rising and flooding waters, p thereby reducing water flow scouring poten- tial and keeping the flood plain intact. The a willow planting program shown in this photo was sponsored by the Roaring Fork Outdoor r Volunteers. Mill � 1 w rr hf r The biologist's activity catches the public's , y' attention, prompting inquiries which result in environmental education opportunities. The pre-schoolers of Camp Snowmass observe an ' aquatic biologist assess the project's biologi- cal success. It took,approximately two weeks • Stream banks are stabilized with boulders after construction was completed for the Stream banks edges are reinforced with stream offerings to be rediscovered. , • erosion control fabric allowing re-estab- lishment of sedges and willows ' • Flood plain re-established 8 T o w n o f S n o w m a s s V i l l a g e , \ t •. � 114 r)W�i•Yi f(in il.l) 1 i ty aJ! I N•y,.. yl i s��� J'}� r }i iiiti I \•J�It'6'_�hC•i� e ¢...f =� .y�•fl4 r_ .)ToSt IT �{' i;, .p 1 •.• �t�Y'�'+. "` („':r" • a- Rp 'p '. ��(���}�✓ �•. ./yt j�—`4 A � �HZ eta. G ,, ftcN,i, lw OO L ;i Gtr, — .:�.. •- • • • MT III. Stream Segments ' The stream can be viewed in segments as it side of Brush Creek Road and stream, this runs through the village. As it winds through section can serve a critical role in bringing the different land uses, cutting into the land at community together. ' different grades, varying in characteristics, vegetation, widths, flows and levels of deterio- Golf Course Entry and East Brush ration, the stream varies in its needs. In Creek Tributary ' planning for the stream's restoration, similar stream characteristics have been grouped into Beginning at the Brush Creek Road intersec- segments creating a comprehensive view of tion with Owl Creek Road, the stream begins , Brush Creek. its diversion away from Brush Creek Road as it crosses back under the road. The land Divide surrounding the stream becomes relatively , flat and rolling as it runs through this portion This area begins where Brush Creek Road of the valley. Vegetation along the stream curves into the Village center and crosses the varies as it opens up along golf through-ways stream. Divide Road continues west toward and closes up again as it runs through resi- , the White River National Forest, more or less dential developments. ending with Ditch Trail which runs along the Brush Creek drainage. This area is charac- The stream is prominent in its lack of celebra- ' terized by thick vegetation, a relatively intact tion as it crosses again under Brush Creek stream bed and no development adjacent to Road at the entrance to Snowmass Village at the stream. The Road poses the only environ- the intersection with Highline Road. , mental impact to the stream. The East Brush Creek tributary runs along Village Highline Road and dumps into Brush Creek , This stream segment generally begins as it as it nears the Snowmass Club Lodge. Sew- runs under the Upper Brush Creek Road age treatment facilities are also located near culvert. It is heavily incised in portions and the Club Lodge. Parts of the East Brush ' characterized by steep slopes defining the Creek tributary offer heavy vegetation along stream channel. It is surrounded by village the stream while others run through the golf commercial and residential uses, with park- course. There is a considerable amount of , ing areas and roadways defining much of the sediment discharge into the stream from the greenway edge. Snow gets pushed off roads steep un-vegetated road cuts rising above and and parking lots into the steep stream em- below Highline Road. ' bankments causing further erosion of un- vegetated slopes. Community ' This segment runs between the intersection of Brush Creek Road with Woodbridge and Owl Creek Roads. It is located in the geographic and cultural center of the community, and is diverse in topography and vegetation . The ' creek is culverted under roadways a minimum of five (5) times, running under intersections and access drives to commercial and residen- tial uses. With civic and year round services provided in the Community Center and the Anderson Art Ranch running along the other , 10 T o w n o f S n o w m a s s V i I I a g e ' Stream Segment Characteristics Legend Siream Segment Town Boundary /� Existing Park/ / �/ Road - - Stream Improvement Stream Building • '•••.: Existing Trail Entry W Road/Stream Crossing •III• with Significant Opportunities *Unc,- • r• .• 0.1 0 0.1 Miles �' •.,Q f *Poor N 1:12000 1..= 1WO ? de7 L _ _ - --- Community *Year-Round Residential, Goods and Services *Multi-Family Housing *Anderson Ranch Arts Center Village • *Unstable dt Steep Slopes , "Multi-family Housing •.•• *Village Mall Commerce & Lodging • *High Volume of Seasonal Traffic Divide -/ *Relatively Intact Stream Bed ,y j' \ ••` "'_ *High Natural Vegetation *Vertical Slope Conditions i a, Golf Course * acv, *Relatively Flat & Open A 0 ass *Non-Native Vegetation • �- •: .. .(Ia Visage M r " "�• *Multi-family6Town-hour u y � 1 : • ' ;•" •... e"rl'�ROCK ,}? C ' ............. Horse Ranch ,,,.UKee • T. _:.. SIUDIn . t + braced Stream Crossing -/ Opportunity k ....... rail Connection -et Crossing r . , ' ♦ !�' r Snowmass Club M r t ' �{die • ' ,� � � � )'d• sue" � r . .. V� ,'ems •�� • /\/ �i vy East Brush Creek *Incised Banks *Thick Vegetation '� residential �_�'• � r 4 !° fit.,•••.. • y;Os" ro�q r.•..n. VI �ae° 9 h �s din sfD.E r t - Y .� I D ���, i Dvt (,•'k?.T �y�'A�n.��y`Y.�t�k4 � x 1 Divide Stream Segment ' Existing Conditions f eI� f Steep slopes I, • , �. / Brush Greek Rood Present Throughout Elevated Above Segment Stream and CulveMed i 1 I Improvised Community Strew m Access ` Blvsh Creek i Diversion i Natural Scream i Conditions Throughout Segment iii r -i �♦.at = �-s.a. ► t,F �.� Natural Hey _ Around StreoIt / Resort Story r / Telling Area + f �f► �\ - Resort Vill a Center , i � s.w„u:s ' Mr+ \ i . 1 EzisLng TraJ IF ' Easement , �I Legend •"°`"° ®zoo o � ^ 1 14 T o w n Of S n o w m a s s V i l l a g e Y U•� 1'r' / r �r� ,xi r dy � Iy r7' i t �. • I t l �x * e 1� .ty„ by •. f ���t i. j 11t C+ ,��'YrU "{L� .t, � ' � e � I ,. � On Cot:t�t�,y}.D + tj� I } -)S" r 1•.t:k , } �'. , /f ..ePTyt� Y'W� �' i • i' i I I �t1 i. f ¢ ,I `o,ifi t �' 0-cyy t v 3'�nt y ��,�. T et ..�r� {•.+ . i x;� nl shy+"1 �y ill.. i �I:�w' G'' F, i t � t5 t.[.rr Trr df� <'k"i NtY�j r I. i • t< t ,4 r ��{ I'(J 'T41� ✓ t r � tY Eh4 i�+t,+ 1 '{ `T. CM tti w .t , ''S.. ':,v nb s JI li •yi !r � rAr t r Yb YtkhN Vt�+r}���r�+W l f]�{'t � w.�t{(.>,f jy.h Fro '+. •• ! .j,p Rti o U,t Y a v + ) w '4 h4f +l�i %��Id t� kf If`•^ r4� •w �✓�;.t )n If r •7Ki, ktv Yy .Cft} �I t ll + �"�5>< wht k t [x t r,7 , k f, RMLwa Cl a a t h F fr j`9' v Y S..A + y, i' }♦ t ^ A6A 1` y.i3�7 +1 fr a i •{�t i , F l Y� •rlt.t`r > 4' (�[ki.t( c , • . • �..,:t?. . x 1-:a 'T/.'.�.Y�.x ,j.j,:.:7+re�h�rj..,i, tZya.»X.Al.�r.:;'i:� • 1 1 1 •• i 1 1• "1 • ' i X1. 1 • � 1. 1 Divide Stream Segment ' Recommended Improvements 1 III , i BTA Proposed Chiming Bells Park/ ^' ir,/ Bridged Creek Crossing Improvement a �, r // '. \ Improve Trail Connection and Sigwge \ v' t{ Improve Access to Nature Trod/Brush Creek J 4 r i v t w 5 `ems Preserve Natural Integrity I of the Segment :I „ '� �Potentiol Troll Lonnechon� Pro sed T05V Troll r Legend ft w ' v ...��.. ®2o. 210 reel ' \ 16 T o w n Of S n o w m a s s V i l l a g e , Village Substantial improvenxuats are reconunended for this segnunat: Due to the often extreme elevation changes 1. Improved signage and wayfiuding from hotween the stream valle'N' and till. village and the resort village to surrounding trail resicicntial developments, access to the opportunities, stream from the village is limited. Allich of 2. Benedict Corridor ancl '1'wiuberry park village stream fl-ontage is parking 1'or village development, activities with access limited to one point 3. Re-establish stream ballk vegetation, and, from the parking lot. Access from residential and lodging sites is fairly limited as well, 4. Re-construct stream channel to handle With a f'ew informal foot trails being created increased flows associated with the Vidal by residents. Brush Creel: ]Load and Snow- Gulch Diversion. melt Road circle the stream here and many of the water quality issues associated with this segment are caused by road and parking area run-off.. Winter snow removal also contrib- utes heavily to both slope erosion and water quality as it gets pushed off roadways and parking lots into the drainage channel. �l 4 jr Y 11 V Benedict Corridor & Park When the village area was initially developed, - a public trail carried visitors through a pre- served natural area where a babbling brook cascaded down the hillside into Brush Creek. Over time, portions of the trail were re- Goals: moved, and water was diverted into the upper 1. Stabilize stream function and; reaches of Brush Creek through the Vidal 2. Improve pedestrian corridors and access Gulch. Nevertheless, this linear path still between land uses and the stream. runs parallel to the ski slope, extending from the lower elevations of the village where it meets with Brush Creek to the highest eleva- tions above the village mall. Condominiums, lodging and the village commercial core are wrapped around this neglected greenway. One section of this greenway has already been reclaimed, and neighboring property owners are now looking for similar enhancements for their greenway segments. G r e e n w a y M a s t e r P l a n 17 1 with the suIn nwr I ra Its on the ski slopes' as well as the Sleigh Ride Trail which , (y , connects to the Divide residential au•cn• and finally to the Ditch 'frail that provides 14 access to the Ala roou Bells/Snowmass ' Wilderness Area. 3. Restore the perennial stream corridor as an aesthetic water feature, which in turn restores the remaining riparian vegeta- tion. 4. Create aesthetic water pool features ' '? within the stream course to serve as storm water infiltration galleries and redevelop the Tamarack detention pond at the , confluence with Brush Creek, replacing the existing detention basin. 5. Create natural a , ppearing boulder land forms planted with native perennials to Benedict Park - The Alpine Garden at create aesthetic beauty and indigenous Snowmass Inn and the Mountain Chalet. character. ' A cooperative effort between the Town, the 6. Create a focal area where the Benedict Resort Association, the Snowmass Inn and Greenway intersects with the Brush the Mountain Chalet, resulted in the renova- Creek Greenway, at the Tamarack Condo- , tion of a half-acre site along this corridor miniums, through a series of pools and between the two resort properties. This waterfalls. segment of the greenway between Daly Lane 7. Create a more aesthetic and environmen- , and Campground Lane is owned by two resort tally functional storm water facility that properties. The project has transformed the can provide riparian habitat. , neglected space into an alpine garden, with the stream flow reintroduced through the use of waterfalls and pools. The pools serve many purposes: 1) aesthetic enjoyment, �I 2) raising the water table, bringing back the naturally occurring riparian vegetation, ' 3) infiltration for storm-water drainage from the extensive nearby impervious Village surfaces, and ' 4) wildlife, primarily bird, use. Recommended Site Specific ' Improvements 1. Create a linear open space park that , serves as a unifying element of the resi- dential and resort based accommodations within the Village area. s � 1 2. Establish a trail linkage from Brush Creek Trail to the Village Mall, that links 18 T o w n of S n o w m a s s V i I l a g e ' Village Stream Segment wr . Existing Conditions I w r fPoor Pedcsirion Crossing _ Tamarack.Poorly �EmP1.Ycc H.usi Functioning Detention Pond ♦ ♦ w ' 1 Pedestrian Bridge y \\` \ Stream Crossing �...rw �, r .r _ ► R _ r,.. V 'pen reT,c Stam Erosion h- ♦ ♦ Ste<p rb � Problems Embankment ilgia -. ,",y Y �', _ a , ' . ° ' Poorly Functioning , r s Detention Pond .. i� Culverted Streom r � Pedestrian Bridge ,x l tream Scream Crotsmg I S Runs - y�t ws I 1 Intermitantly Aboveand Below r — '\ Ground l. i v ♦ �: v e Benedact Restore ME .�. -. - ` •, �( —°= Alp me 6crden Park .r f Resort Village o Diffi<uit,Isolated ,' } Cater - r _- Access to Nature Tad WI IN I , - Legend Y�I ?�. � -; r :.Sol 000 M. . / .� / ; A6 As . �m •••reu•° ®200 0 200 Feet t' Greenway Master Plan 19 Twinberry Park ' ']'his area was originally proposed in the BTA plan as an entry feature to the 1111111. This plan recommends that the park extend from the southwest quadrant of the intersection of ' Brush Creel: Road with Woodbridge Road, up Snowmelt Road to the Benedict. Corridor confluence. A trail link up Benedict Corridor, to the mail r ' will solve one of the more difficult pedestrian connections from Brush Creek Road to the Village Mall facilitating pedestrian mobility between Snowmass Mall, Snowmass Center, ski mountain, National Forest, lodging and employee housing developments. The stream was relocated to create a deten- tion pond for treating parking lot runoff. Recommended Site Specific However, the stream reconfiguration was not done in a manner that promotes quality improvements: , aquatic habitat. The detention pond serves a 1. The culverted Wood Road crossing over valuable role in theory, but has not been the stream should be replaced with a maintained adequately and does not function bridge spanning adequately over the , appropriately. Brush Creek Road ascends in stream to allow natural stream flow. elevation much more rapidly than the stream 2. The elevation differences on either side of corridor, creating a steep roadway embank- the culvert allow for a very dramatic , ment that is a source of sediment discharge cascading step pool type fall under the into the stream. proposed bridge. This would create a beautiful stream feature to be viewed from , The Wood Road culvert was designed in a way Brush Creek Road as travelers ap- that circumvents the ability for fish to navi- proached the gateway intersection to the gate upstream. As a result, a November 1993 resort. , fish population survey revealed a much lower Brook Trout population in stream reaches 3. Re-construct the non-functioning deten- above this point. tion facility as an integral part of the , stream system by installing a storm water The area above and directly south of Twin- treatment vault where the storm water berry Park is known as the base area of the presently discharges into the detention ski mountain. This area is destined for ski pond. Replacing the storm water detention , base village expansion. Twinberry Park could function with a sediment vault will allow serve as a focal point and a transition be- the detention pond to be re-contoured into tween the Town's commercial center and the a form allowing a portion of the stream ' resort area, especially during the summer flow to flow into and out of the pond area, months. creating an expanded wetland environ- ment and creating waterfowl habitat as a ' part of the stream corridor. 4. Small islands could be created within the ' wetland area with boardwalk access being routed through the park area. The islands could accommodate picnic facilities. Fish- , ing holes can be created within the wet- 20 T o w n of S n o w m a s s V i I I a 9 e ' land area with fishing activity taking place from the deck of the boardwalk 5. The unique features of the site offer opportunities for nature interpretation education kiosks. 6. Provide traditional park furniture such as benches and picnic tables. G r e e n w a y M a s t e r P l a n 21 1 Village Stream Segment ' Recommended Improvements Iy - - 1 - r d Tw tI , t �BTA nb Perrory posePork -- �� Opportunity for Bridged r.r I Sirwm Crassi g with Waterfall Feature _ r , Improved Detention Pond d Twinberry Park, \ Waterfalls 6 Pools -Cormectlon between Benedict Stream Corrdor . + r Improve Sig . '�' � � � • � \ for Pedestrian Tra Is treatment ,j . p, Sediment VOUlt Improved Pedestrian Access and 'y ♦: I, �' Way Finding y, w . f 1 0! . y , e•. if He T y Benedict Corridor -� Proposed Restored Improve Tra I r. / '•N I y - Perennial Str m Corridor e 1 Legend r8_ st. � ' ®200 0— 200 Feel � 4 22 Town 0 f S n o w m a s s Village ' Community This segment of the stream begins as it West of the Community Center are the West. crosses north under Brush Creel: Road at the Village Mall; the employee housing areas of Woodbridge and Snowmelt. ]toad intersection. Creekside, Palisades and Brush Creel: The stream stays on the north side of the road Condominiums; and connections Lo the until it crosses under Brush Creel: Road Nature Trail, Sleigh Ride 'frail and Ditch again at the Owl Creek ]toad intersection. Trail. Two other trails leading to the west. include - the Par Course 'frail and tile. Moun- Tile stream goes through two culverts under tain View Trail which link the Snowmass drives into the Woodbridge Condominium Center with the Mountain View nttilti-family complex and the Season's Four Condominium affordable housing community. East of the Complex. Community Center are Yarrow Park and the Goals: Snowmass Chapel & Community Center. 1. Stabilize and restore stream function; The only pedestrian overpass over Brush 2. Create a pedestrian priority area in and Creek Road, easily connecting development around the community center. on the north side of Brush Creek Road with that on the south, is located near the en- trance to the Woodbridge Condominiums mended for this segment: and the Community Center. This wooden pedestrian and ski bridge overpass links the 1. Improved signage and wayfinding to & from the community center; northerly multi-family residential areas and commercial services with the Ski mountain. 2. Sidewalks and landscaping from transit and trails to and from the community center; 3. Bittercress Park development; and 4. Irrigation ditch trail development. Bittercress Park Located immediately west and north of the intersection of Brush Creek Road and Woodbridge Road, Bittercrest Park was > - proposed in the BTA plan. This area is the transition point between the community commercial center, housing, trail access points and access to the ski mountain. This section of the stream is seriously compro- mised by the culverted crossing of Woodbridge Road which is inadequate to handle peak water flows. Northwest of the park lies the Snowmass Center, a community commercial center where year around services such as the local bank, grocery store, pharmacy/liquor store and post office are located. Multi-family residential development is located northeast -- of the community center. G r e e n w a y Master Pla n 23 1 Community Streom Segment ' - - - - - ' Existing Conditions j9V ae ' SLCOm ResroroLan � - � Irn ouon Drf c� Sro.vmoss CcNe t,�' 0 Year Round Sc v ces v �F4,G c meet Fo Les \ O V ' Poor Access to q' Sc nccs from Trails i I and 7ront1l Stops ♦ �•.- �\(�//qy / WT I / g Woadbrldge q'qM iy Per � ��'C� � ���yyy Sfr mResmrato ' x�r Wet � Dedesfrion C ss g :� }„/ � � �.• �. ran Cer� -4p 1yj 5 �\00 Culmrted Stream Crossin P. !' T m6ers Perennial Stream Channel At Day Skier aril High Sediment Fbw � Event Parkug aril � ' �_ - I Proposed Baze I i � Legend . -...� p , ♦ , - wno.a 1 ®xoo a me feri � 1 24 T o w n of S n o w m a s s V i l l a g e ' Recommended Site Specific banks, providing a natural surface path and Improvements: access to the stream and flood Plain, a scaling area, and nature interpretive signs. This 1. This culvert. should be removed and re- project took approximately it year to design placed with a bridge that adequal.cly and construct. spans the stream allowing the stream course to flow unrestricted, minimizing Season's Four Restoration the scouring presently occurring on the This stream segment runs approximately 500 downstream side of the culvert. feet, between the restored Woodbridge area 2. A bridge would aesthetically frame the and Farrow Park. It will serve to connect two stream in a more respectable manner and restored segments and provide continuation of _ better represent the community's commit- stream access. This segment, is planned for ment to environmental values. completion in 2001. 3. The natural surface trail started down- stream from Bittercress Park, paralleling Lower Woodbridge Road, should be ex- -- '� tended into Bittercress Park connecting C the stream with this important intersec- tion. , n 4. The park should accommodate shaded picnicking opportunities and environmen- tal interpretation. 5. The proposed stream side trail should w} •+ continue to the west edge of the park site where the stream crosses to the south side of Brush Creek Road. This culverted stream crossing should be replaced with a � ,- • q a , broader span structure, either a bridge or y ; a double concrete box culvert. S G. The crossing needs to be designed in a manner that allows the stream-side trail to be extended under Brush Creek Road and connect to the Brush Creek Trail. 7. There is an irrigation ditch diversion that _- has its own impact on the stream, it also provides an opportunity to create an attractive water feature. 8. A small pedestrian bridge at the stream and irrigation diversion would expand the useable area of Bittercress park. Woodbridge Restoration This stream restoration was completed in 2000 with the citing of park sculptures. Roughly 900 feet of Brush Creek was restored in this project consisting of raising the stream -- bed, stabilizing re-vegetation of the stream ' G r e e n w a y M a s t e r P l a n 25 1 Community Stream Segment ' Recommended Improvements PfOPCSCd Ira�ta •• . Hersc Ranch — . ._ - — -_'. . S•�• � I I . V6i rg E.'sLn y i Proposed Vehicular ,• 1 17rrigabon Duch Bridge Stream Crossing I 'I 4. 'BTA Proposed qlp BAlarcress Park J I \ iJ Uwtc _ . Improve Way findng • � A '. •¢� J _ "f and Pedestrian j Priority Areas � -I f -� c r �J , r .1 Completed Stream Restoration , // w/woi�r�p�'W O Proposed sed meni• 'V i,,.'.. .. u it ";QL J Brush Creek Road mnaice, J Bridged Steam Crossing w' , J sun a a i i r P` f Improve Way Finding and Pedestrian .gyp • ' Priority Areas *At s. � IL }� I Legend J ' 0 % '07 AF n. M. n,L ®zoo a zoo Faai I _ • ..// 26 T o w n 0 f S n o w m a s s V i I I a g e , Golf Course Entry and East Brush Creek Tributary As the majority of this portion of knish Creek conuuunit;v ga rdens and the internntionalh' is surrounded by privateh' o�rued laud, rec- renowned Anderson Arts Ham h. onnnendations our limited to suggestions for habitat and water quality improvenu nls. Park development included: Goals: stream restoration, private meditative areas, ]. Enhance town entry by celebrating stream _ assets; and intimate picnic areas, 2. Restore the stream's riparian and habitat a handicap accessible deck overhanging function. the stream, and colorful perennial gardens. Yarrow Park Yarrow Park is the first of the five originally Yarrow Park is a cross-road between the two (1993) proposed parks to be constructed. principal paved trail corridors - Brush Creek Located near what many consider to be the Trail and Owl Creek Trail. Park development community's spiritual center, the Snowmass transitions seamlessly with surrounding land Chapel and Community Center, this land uses without property lines being obvious. area also marks the geographical center of Contiguous property owners were open and the town. The park property is privately supportive of this concept, and have started owned by Chaffin and Light, and is zoned improving their own grounds to match those Open Space. Other community facilities of the park. contiguous to the park include the Snowmass/ Wildcat Fire Department, Snowmass Village's Snowmass Golf Club W. •Y- qua: V'• I Brush Creek flows from Yarrow Park onto the _ Snowmass Club golf course. While the major- ity of the stream corridor is unsafe for public access due to golf activity, the golf course area could play an important role with respect to •s the overall stream ecology, while at the same time enhancing the stream visually for the public. G r e e n w a y M a s t e r P I a n 27 �lucli of the sU'c:un corridor is cxln•ricncing Brush ('ICCk lo:n'os Iho fast rut% of'I'( n ' ibc s;mu• impacts obscrwed in the• upper hones ;tad ruin under 1111• street through a ' Pea Clles. The SUram is inei si ng causing uII- restricted concrete culvert. ,Phe iml tacl.s of stable banks. In many pinces, the rilun-ian the culvert are sipilillcant. Drum this point regetnt ion is complotoh' rcnuovcd, forward, the Mic:nn is significanth' incised , and the riparian vegetation un-manaj;cd. The advanhtgc on the golfcout:se is lh:it there Wecd species have invaded t11c corridor and IS lateral room to enhance the stream. The sediment discharges into the stream front the constraints imposed on other projects - roads, unstable banks. This reach is, for the must parking lots, buildings are at a minimum. part., non-accessible unlike the reach up- Thc stre:un could be enhanced in a manner stream. that habitat and spawning areas are maxi- mized. This area could serve as the stream's primary natural fish rearing area. Without public access, fish populations could increase without pressure from recreational angling. This area has huge potential in relation to the '1 upper reaches of the stream corridor. , The stream corridor flows from the golf course into the Country Club Town home area. Both banks are bordered by Town homes, but are fortunately setback enough to not crowd the stream. The outdoor area around the Town homes and the stream are considered common area owned by the Town home owners asso- ciation. While not owned by individuals, some ' of the Town home owners have exercised With the series of irrigation storage ponds variable levels of stream stewardship and and fairways as the main entry landscape into should be commended and encouraged in their town there is an opportunity to both increase ' efforts. the golf course vista and provide habitat and cover for wildlife. Re-establishing islands of native shrub vegetation between fairways and , re-introducing wetland and riparian vegeta- tion surrounding the irrigation storage ponds t.'1 would both enhance the views coning into town and provide islands of refuge for wildlife. r e ....1.Y..i f 28 T o w n 0 f S n o w m a s s V i l l a g e ' Golf Course /Entry Stream Segment *,,�j ♦ , , ,, , Existing Conditions \\\ f�.♦ .'� SeecF St'.1, l� unity } r'�,` Music Festivals I ;raa �. ,♦ / Important Intersection 1 - , ,L •d Uncelebrated Entry to Srowrmes Village 1 �'•r-- �•t, ♦r J : 1 + -CuNerted Stmm Crossing y .� 7 ,. • + i ♦,' -Poor Pedestrian Access to Highlim,Trail 1 t Ex isfi Exist Irry tron D tch ° ' a' 1 L * 1 ♦ ' r � Y Snonna„Club _- ai Ex st Trail Easemen - - q 1 ti 1 r � t �%. + / � '♦ I �� Culrerted Stream Sn F r Lad � � tat a. 0. i e �.A. ♦ ° `a 91<< J r ♦ f 4' $ -Siiowmass Ogb ”_ ! r: 1 • ,.y F .Gdl Course + •ya Sriow,0az I r b•"t � ' r:r+ea +♦ rs/ Cy and Corn ry Umer ram i�r .ten`°; Or I VL ' • y ► w Stream Segment Surrounded by } �_ •� Private Ownership .j ; -no public access �� •••I, -incised banks ' : `y ♦ •.N•. •. -unmoroged riparian vegetation �. Il '`:. v Legend a •••♦ 1 �i 4 t« .r r........ ..,a u.. 0 IW Feet C i1 _ G r e e n w a y M a s t e r P I a n 29 1 East Brush Creek Ihcrehy reducing the uvcrall sediment load lh'cr the years the main stem of IS rush Crock reaching the Gold Mcdal Waters of the Ro:u'- flowing :dung the eastern lu•rinielcr of the ing Fort: ]fiver. golf course has been largely pushed east against the toe of llighline I?Oa(FS Cnibank- The realignment would allow a series of'drop mcnt slope. 'There is a considerable amount et.ructurcs to be incorporated into the fallout of sediment discharge into the stream scstem of the second pond crenting a dranuttic view of front the steep 1111-reveget.ated road cuts the stream as people driving to Snowmass rising above and below the I lighlinc Road V'illage first enter the community. Al the embankments. A small scale effort of reveg- present time, the stream culverted under the ctal.ing the road cuts was attempted six years road remains largely un-noticed as people ago, which proved successful. llowpver, in enter Town. order to reduce the erosion of soils from the steep slope, a larger scale supplemental Spikerush Park vegetation effort is needed. The property on which Spikerush Park would occupy is commonly referred to as the 7-Star Triangle, which is part of the Seven Star , Ranch. 7-Star Ranch presently lies outside ' Snowmass Village's jurisdictional boundaries, however, the property owner has been seri- ously considering annexing into Snowmass ' Village. Spikerush Park was identified in the BTA plan as an entry feature to the town. It is located at the intersection of Brush Creek ' +" Road and Highline Road, and would serve visitors as they enter the community. Whether the owner of 7-Star Ranch annexes ' into Snowmass Village or not, the Town remains interested in acquiring the triangu- lar shaped property as it would serve many , iy' possible functions: • Relocating the ski season vehicular inter- ' Considerations have been given to realigning cept function to this location the stream corridor pulling it away from the . Visitor Center embankment toe of Highline Road. The Town and the Aspen Skiing Company discussed and ' Nature Center developed a design realigning the stream • Wetland restoration, beginning at the irrigation diversion head- • Passive park with picnic tables and fish- ' gate and routing the stream through two ing access irrigation ponds on the golf course. Realign- ment would reduce the amount of sediment Acquisition of the Rodeo Grounds fishing ' reaching the stream from Highline Road. The pond for youth fishing purposes stream being routed through the ponds would • Boardwalk through the restored wetlands also provide the opportunity to slow the flow • Entry welcome function ' of the water, allowing a significant amount of the suspended sediments already in the water to drop out before continuing downstream ' 30 Town of Snowmass V i IIage ' Golf Course/Entry Stream Segment + Recommended Improvements 4 Proposed Trial P u p to Horse Ranch L • 1 s`J_ Using Existing •� Crn muirq ,� Irrigation Ditch ngs,.i 1 1L� . ,+ �� L ♦ ,- _ - -.I Intersection Improvements- �r- ✓J ••.- 1 'r i,` -Pedestrian Crossings ♦ �. `` -Way Finding f N ♦ 1 it \ i - -Stream and Sign Entry Features 1 � w 3 ' r Stream Segment is Ideal Location BTA Proposed 1 J. for Stan=Ecology Improvement . . . . . Spikerush Park / •I / •s. -Riparian Habitat for Birds and Fish it 1 dl�., • jj -Develop Fish Spawning Habitat ♦ - vmas Club Irs� � .1. r AI� C Passible Trail Extenfion 1r 7 \ •{s to Brush Creek Rood ` " - ♦ bo Ili AL _ F V A \ r � �i I � •. I � j I t �� �,t t •t Vr., t 4• - , i v s. � ♦ K � - T o ,w .Gd,. Snowmass Club r 1 Course •I •A jar � f 11 _ is $ICM'aA5 (MI \ 1 �.\ a w 1 ^y .! r . ♦ I?! and Com Iy Ce ia, R�xnse `t'tiijl��r •, '4 A 7ersan s i �ra{o Rwx - z '. s. banks SlKam r rr � i s et banks with NoLve Vegetation I , IIICIY. j" •+ Ms • ` 1 Supplcmerrtal Vegetation Reccomended ' is Legend w e •�� six - 200 0 ]00 Feel G r e e n w a y M a s t e r P l a n 31 IV. Next Steps on the Trail ' ']'his docwnent loofa at the stre:uu channel in 3. Setting priorities, scheduling and estab- ' it.s entirety as it flows through Town, and lishing funding sources provides a 11•:uucwm'k for moving forward. 1L 4. Determining a rouge of costs for site and is intended to complement the watershed segment specific improvements management plan and wort: with established site monitoring stations to improve water 5. Involving Volunteer Organizations & quality. Home Owner Associations in implenumtn- lion efforts As a working plan for Brush Creek's restora- tion to the Town of SooWma9S Village, this Summary of Improvements document is intended to form the basis of Recommended in this Plan: establishing a five (5) year Capital Improve- 5 bridges over currently culverted strewn , ments Program for stream enhancement. segments that would provide water qual- Many of the improvements recommended ity, fish habitat and movement, animal over the years, such as replacing culverts corridor movement, and aesthetic celebra- ' with bridges, are multi-million dollar, multi- tion of the stream. year projects that require substantial commit- 2 reconstructions of inadequate detention anent over a period of time. ponds that would serve to improve aquatic ' In "year 2000 dollars" stream segment resto- biology, increase sediment capture, and provide wetland, waterfowl and waterfall ration can be estimated at $300-$500 per opportunities for increased aesthetic , linear foot. For example, the Woodbridge enjoyment of the stream channel. Reach restoration was accomplished for roughly $300,000 dollars, with another Wayfinding signage with mileage, destina- roughly $100,000 or more in volunteer efforts tions, land access points and interpretive , and in-kind community contributions. nature education incorporated into pedes- trian oriented markers. These would be In Closing located at origin points: transit stops, ' While the rimar commercial centers, trail access points, p y goal of this plan is to parks, lodging and residential develop- restore Brush Creek to the community as a ' meats valuable resource for wildlife, residents and visitors, it does not propose a traditional Re-vegetation and riparian habitat build- greenway that is a linear corridor of natural ing for stabilizing slopes and providing open spaces. The Snowmass Greenway plan species habitat. , is a unique and creative idea that seeks a 1 pedestrian bridge to increase park balance between all human impacts and access and utilization existing and restored natural integrity. Hu- . Park amenities, kiosks and furniture man impacts have permanently altered the corridor. Therefore, the creation of a • Restoration and reconstruction at the greenway is achieved in the context of the recommended park sites of Chimingbells, , surrounding culture. Objectives and recom- Twinberry, Bittercress and the Benedict mendations of this plan recognize this Corridor greenway as a corridor of open space that is a Entry stream crossing celebration ' managed resource for the benefit of a diverse Stewardship Brochures for homeowner group of residents, visitors and wildlife. involvement and contributions Next Steps on the Trail: Restoration of Village reach segment of ' 1. Public input, review and priority setting the stream 2. Private property owner participation ' 32 T o w n o f S n o w m a s s V i I I a 9 e , r Stream Segment Goals 1 ) r , i `f . \ - \ Divide: - r •, r ♦ r — 40 ^ ♦ 1 ) 1 I Retain tJaturol Conditions N � \ 1 r 1 \ '1 Village: I �.— _ _ \K• 1.Stabilised Restore Stream Function .Y • '' %'� ♦ •� 2.Improve Pedestrian Corridors d Access 1 ♦ ♦ P j + `♦\ Between Land Uses and the Stream 1 it f •r r I /\�r'. •� Community. ♦ ♦ �. J 1.Stabile d Restore Stream Function ♦ 1 2.Create a Pedestrian Priority Area in r ♦ \ \ ` 1' 1;G;,•• / • 1 \ and Around the Community Center ^ ♦ ``// J \ .♦ r /^_ry 1 �♦ �.. �.'• • ,• �i 1 ) ).� 1� ,•/ :i i;°t 1. .�/ '• •� •. I'', ♦r '•(, 111 '. ••.. Golf Course,Entrance d Eat Brush Creek L Enhance Town Entry by Celebrating r ( ♦ ... Stream Assetls \ I _ ••,` \ 2.Restore the Strums Riparian and ♦ Aquatic Habitat Function 1 J 1 I'--'�'_•••••''' r ♦ � I 1 •, • r 1 Legend 01 Was r /♦� �___.\`.I\• • .•,••. r. ,/ - , Ow \`•..�u.. a uuw mva ♦ I l \ y� i r ♦ . . - ♦ 1 • r G r e e n w a y Master Plan 33 1 1 1 BLANK - INSERT PROPOSED PARKS ' IMPROVEMENTS 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 34 Town of Snowmass Village , Proposed Parks/Improvements � Legend /Proposed Town Boundary Park/Improvement Road Exiling rrip.. J Stream Improvement Stream Evlsting Trail i 0.1 0 0.1 Miles N 1:12000 1" 1000 Confluence Improvement Area I a ,a Ditch Trail Linkage Opportunity to Potential for r Pot Enhancement Improve Stream Improved Trail Access Corridor Access ± ' to c and MlwiY- A4 Si gfCS Y� tq t ,' yy ')P1M'}"tSR Enhance Linkage to Story Park / GMk Road sea Mtn ie no o ene i oay �e p aRo� d, Proposed nor Be ark 5,10WRICA55 P Village Mall - - Horse Ranch �,.a, CKEEK T.?.'. STUDIO The Crossings `\ Park Community Park ,r Propose to for Conflu a ntry Impr men trial to Enhance Snowmass Club z ail Linkage °s umunity Center ittercress Park Yew�a7 owl Creek Roptl �o at Robinson Park k E� coF r< c z „ Pate cess O art ' ^4 � 4 s Improveme e 'w , w' ood Road " Intersection to 1 O CI O OV N T i i I MEMBER SERVICES GUIDE JuLY. 2000 i I I I " Northwest Colorado Council of Governments P.O. Box 2308 249 Warren Ave. Sliverthorne, CO 80498 (970) 468-0295 www.nwc.cog.co.us WHAT IS NWCCOG ? NWCCOG was established as Colorado Planning and Management Region XII in 1972 by Executive Order of the Governor In response to the Federal Intergovernmental Cooperation Act of 1968. Regional planning was Encouraged as a means to avoid overlap, duplication and competition between local planning activities. Today, NWCCOG serves a five county region including Eagle,Grand,Jackson, Pitkin,and Summit counties and the towns therein. MISSION STATEMENT , The purpose of the Northwest Colorado Council of Governments is to be responsive to our members' needs and interests by providing guidance and assistance in problem solving, Information sharing and partnership building,advocating members' interests and needs with local, state, and federal entities, and providing quality services to our membership that are relevant,effective,and efficient. NEW DIRECTIONS In 1999,'Northwest Colorado Council of Governments embarked on a bold new course to serve its membership and the region with contemporary and relevant services. The program was simply named New Directions. New Directions contained three basic elements: • MAINTAIN THE VIABILITY AND STRENGTH OF THE CORE PROGRAMS • ADDRESS CURRENT ISSUES OF RELEVANCE AND IMPORTANCE TO THE REGION • PROVIDE CUSTOM DESIGNED, SPECIALIZED SERVICES TO MEET THE NEEDS OF INDIVIDUAL MEMBERS , Since the initiation of New Directions, on January 1, 1999,we can'report the following ac- complishments: • PRODUCTION NUMBERS.IN ALL OF THE CORE SERVICES HAVE INCREASED • THREE NEW INITIATIVES WERE STARTED ADDRESSING THE IMPORTANT REGIONAL ISSUES Or COLLABORATION WITH FEDERAL LAND MANAGEMENT AGENCIES, - EMPLOYER ASSISTED HOUSING, AND MULTI-JURISDICTIONAL DATA SHARING THROUGH GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS • A TOTAL OF THIRTY-Six SPECIALIZED SERVICES HAVE BEEN PRODUCED AND DELIVERED TO SEVENTEEN MEMBER JURISDICTIONS In addition, Northwest Colorado Council of Governments has represented its members in the legislative arena by providing testimony to house and senate committees of the Colo- rado Legislature and to the Congress of the United States. , 1 Northwest Colorado Council of Governments is a customer focused organization, so our regional initiatives and specialized services will remain grounded in the needs and expecta- tions of our members. The customer focus goal of NWCCOG is to meet the needs of our 1 valued members, while exceeding their expectations. REGIONAL ISSUES MANAGEMENT Many social,economic,and environmental issues cross jurisdictional boundaries. NWCCOG will identify these re- gional Issues and provide a forum for coalition building,strategy development, implementation,monitoring and evaluation. The following are regional initiatives that NWCCOG is currently coordinating: FEDERAL LANDS MANAGEMENT - The federal government is the largest landowner In the region encompassed by Northwest Colorado Council of Governments. The United States For- est Service, the Bureau of Land Management, and the National Park Service make decisions regarding federal lands that often Impact private lands in county and municipal jurisdictions. Northwest Colo- rado Council of Governments has embarked on a cooperative project with the White River National Forest to develop a process for multi-jurisdictional collaboration regarding land management. The effort Is known as the Building Bridges Project and has selected the Blue River watershed as the pilot area'for development. The Building Bridges Project will develop the tools and processes necessary to Initiate multi-jurisdictional collaborative efforts with federal land management agencies. The tools and processes will then be exported to other areas of the Northwest Colorado Council of Governments region. REGIONAL GIS PROJECT — In April of 1999,NWCCOG was awarded a grant from the Colorado Department of Local Affairs for $100,000 for the development of a regional GIS effort to serve local governments in Region XII. The scope of services of this project includes the develop- ment of a regional needs assessment and Implementation plan,the establishment of a regional GIS ad- visory group, the purchase of hardware, software, and data to'Implement the plan, and training and education. The needs assessment portion of the project has been completed, and the project Is now In the local application phase in which $80,000 will be granted to NWCCOG member jurisdictions to assist with the implementation of local and regional GIS plans. EMPLOYER ASSISTED HOUSING PROGRAM — Many employers within the region encompassed by Northwest Colorado Council of Governments are facing increasing difficulty in re- cruiting and retaining employees. Demographic projections to the year 2020, indicate that the short- age of workers will increase dramatically from current levels. One reason for the difficulty is a short- age of housing that can be attained by employees moving to the region. Northwest Colorado Council of Governments, in cooperation with FannieMae, the Colorado Housing and Finance Authority, and area chambers of commerce, have begun an effort to determine the needs of employers and to devise mechanisms to assist employers with housing their employees. 2 DESCRIPTION OF SPECIALIZED SERVICES PROGRAM Northwest Colorado Council of Governments has a regional focus, but it also recognizes the needs of Individual members as well. For instance, the needs of Pitkin County, a county with a population of 14,400 with over 200 employees has very different needs than the Town of Montezuma with a popula- tion of 73 and zero employees] Through NWCCOG's Specialized Services Program, members can utilize NWCCOG as extended staff to complete a variety of projects that are customized depending on each member's unique needs. Every year, each NWCCOG member In good standing receives a "grant" worth $1,000 to be used towards any specialized services they need. The cost of the service Is dependent on the amount of time required to complete the project by the NWCCOG staff person assigned to the project. After the $1,000 has been used, members will be billed for any additional cost of the project above and beyond the $1,000. SPECIALIZED SERVICES AVAILABLE The following art services offered through the NWCCOG's Specialized Services Program: (description of each service on pages 5 8t 6) i♦ COMMUNITY SURVEYS I♦ RESEARCH SERVICES ♦ COMMUNITY ISSUES MANAGEMENT ♦ INFORMATION FORUMS ♦ WORKSHOPS/TRAINING COURSES: ICI ♦ CUSTOMER FOCUS TRAINING ♦ PRIORITY SETTING ♦ T{.OWN/COUNTY ELECTED OFFICWS/STAFF RETREATS ♦ z:ROSION AND SEDIMENT CONTROL ♦ POWERPOINT ♦ 'POWER OF THE PEOPLE: WORKING WITH GRASS ROOTS ACTIVISM TO RESOLVE COMMUNITY ISSUES ♦ IMPROVING QUALITY THROUGH WORKFLOW ANALYSIS ♦ MANAGING YOUR MEETINGS 3 For more information, or to request a Specialized Service for your jurisdiction, please call Rachel Lunney, Director of Member Services at 970/468-0295 x123. SPECIALIZED SPECIALIZED SERVICES SERVICES RATES COMPLETED TO DATE The first $1,000 per calendar year Is freel After that, specialized services are billable according to the WORKSHOPS / TRAINING COURSES following rates: ♦ Work Flow Assessment—Grand County GARY SEVERSON, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR ♦ Work Load Assessment—Town of Dillon Gary Severson, Executive Director of Northwest Colorado ♦ Communications Workshop for Elected Officials— Council of Governments, Is the developer and principal Grand County Instructor for the Elected OlfeAds, Managers and Staff ♦ Leadership Direction Consensus Workshop—Grand Timing Cut7ftlum. He has been an Instructor In both County the public and private sectors as classroom teacher for the ♦ Vision and Values Workshop—Town of Dillon,Town Denver Public School System, lead facilitator for the USDA of Frisco Forest Service, adjunct professor for Colorado State Uni- ♦ Priority Session Workshop—Town of Frisco versity, national training team member for Amoco Oil ♦ Erosion Control Workshop—Town of Basalt, Grand Company, and principal Instructor for GJS Br Associates. County Other NWCCOG staff personnel will assist Severson In ♦ Customer Focus Training—Town of Dillon, Summit the presentation of training courses. He provides facllha- County tlon services,training services,Issues management,etc. ♦ PowerPoint—Town of Dillon,Town of Frisco Rate: $7S/hour ♦ Goal Setting Workshop—Summit Water Quality Committee . LINDA VENTURONI, DIRECTOR OF SPECIAL PROJECTS COMMUNITY SURVEYS Linda has been with NWCCOG for 19 years and throughout those years has become the data "gum" of NWCCOG. ♦ Town of Dillon Linda Is responsible for maintenance of the regional database ♦ Town of Frisco and linkage to other local, state and national databases. She ♦ Town of Silverthorne—review of survey questions Is available to conduct data research and to design and Im- plement custom surveys for NWCCOG members. She is also an experienced focus group moderator and can produce BOARD RETREATS Issue Analysis reports on a variety of topics. Linda also ♦ City of Aspen coordinates the Planners' Resource Network and Is available ♦ Town of Frisco to plan and Implement other communication forums. Rate: $SS/hour ♦ Town of Kremmling ♦ Town of Granby ROBERT RAY, DIRECTOR OF WATERSHED SERVICES ♦ Town of Vail Robert Ray has been with NWCCOG as Director of Water- ♦ Grand County shed Services since 1993. Robert has a B.S. In Biology and an M.S. In Marine Science. He has over 13 years of experi- RESEARCH 8i DATA SERVICES ence In environmental analysis In local, state, and regional ♦ Issue Analysis for Future Ballot Initiative— govemment. Rate: $55/hour Grand County RACHEL LUNNEY, DIRECTOR OF MEMBER SERVICES ♦ Aging of Aspen PowerPoint Presentation— Rachel Lunney has been with NWCCOG since January of Firkin County 1999. She has a B.A. In Economics and an M.B.A. -Rachel ♦ Study on Municipal Annexation Policies— has over 5 years of experience In municipal government, Town of Grand Lake mainly In the areas of public Information, program and proj- ♦ Study on Home Rule Status—Town of Grand Lake ect management, conducting research and studies, and man- ♦ Employee Benefits Survey—Town of Silverthorne agement analysis. She has previously worked as Assistant to ♦ Survey Analysis—Summit County the Town Manager for Sllverthome, Colorado as well as COMMUNITY ISSUES MANAGEMENT Management Analyst for the City of Solana Beach,Callfornla. Rate: $50/hour ♦ Facilitation of Housing Task Force-Town of Frisco 4 COMMUNITY SURVEYS NWCCOG offers assistance with surveys and question- naires. NWCCOG can offer advice on planning and de- POWER OF THE PEOPLE' WORKING WITH signing the survey, sample selection methodology, con- GRASS ROOTS ACTIVISM TO RESOLVE structing effective questions, avoiding instrumentation bias and analyzing the results. Members can also con- COMMUNITY ISSUES tract with NWCCOG to complete the survey from start This one to three day training session bresents easy to to finish, Including performing the survey, entering the grasp concepts and techniques in ways to utilize the power data, compiling and analyzing the results, and preparing of grass roots involvement in resolving community issues. and presenting the final survey report. This course is highly customized to address an emerging or existing issue in your community. The course Includes: RESEARCH a DATA SERVICES • Understanding the dynamics of issues NWCCOG provides research services using focus group . Issues prevention and issues intervention methodology. Services In this area range from assistance • Understanding a community's sense of well- with focus group design to full implementation of the being methodology, including designing, organizing, moderat- • Knowing the community and how it communi- Ing, analyzing and reporting. NWCCOG also performs cates studies on certain issues and functions of interest to • Designing workable strategies municipal governments, including salary surveys and surveys on municipal policies and procedures. The fol- lowing are examples of the research services provided ACHIEVING QUALITY IN-A CUSTOMER through the Specialized Services Program: FOCUSED ORGANIZATION Issue Analysis for Open Space Ballot Initiative This four-hour course presents a systematic six-step proc- Study on Municipal Annexation Policies ess to Improving an organization's quality performance by Study on the Costs/Benefits of Home Rule Status focusing on customers. The course includes: Resort Area Town/County Benefits Survey . Identifying the customers of your organization Defining quality in your organization COMMUNITY ISSUES MANAGEMENT . Determining the cost of achieving quality NWCCOG will review the issues member jurisdictions . Understanding how the customer influences face and will provide situation assessment, strategy de- what you do and how you do It velopment, Implementation, monitoring, evaluation, and . Examining the customer/supplier chain staff training to effectively manage these issues. NWCCOG staff will also facilitate community meetings to address these issues. EROSION CONTROL WORKSHOP This workshop, provided by NWCCOG's Watershed Serv- INFORMATION FORUMS ices Program,focuses on the following issues: This service provides assistance to member jurisdictions • The relationship between water quality and "dirt" in developing, organizing, and facilitating forums in • Keeping soil on site which Issues of interest to members can be discussed in . Federal, State and Local regulations and Best Man- a positive and constructive environment. Recent infor- agement Practices regarding erosion and sediment mation forums have been offered on the following top- control ics: . Do's and Don'ts of erosion and sediment control Public Sector Employment Issues . This workshop is appropriate for planning staff, Options for Health Insurance Pools elected officials,and the development community. 5 - --- !ORKSHOPS / TRAINING COURSES OWN OR COUNTY BOARD / MANAGING YOUR MEETINGS IAFF RETREATS This four-hour course examines the need for meetings and any county boards and town councils find value in pert- ways to improve the effectiveness of meetings to get more tically getting away and spending concentrated time to out of participants'time: The course includes: scuss Items of Importance to the jurisdiction, work Determining whether or not a meeting is neces- rough issues, and to strengthen personal relationships. sary sually It is helpful to have an outside facilitator mange the • Preparing for a meeting: purpose, process, and Meat and to keep the group moving towards identified environment ,jectives. Northwest Colorado Council of Governments • Determining the roles of the chair, the facilita- n help you plan, facilitate,and summarize your retreat to tor,the recorder,and the participants list you in getting the most out of the time spent to- • Achieving participant ownership `her. • Meeting facilitation attitudes, skills, and tech- niques USTOMER FOCUS TRAINING local government, it is extremely important to constantly IMPROVING QUALITY THROUGH WORK me our customer service skills, since we deal extensively FLOW ANALYSIS in both external and internal customers on a dally basis. This four-hour customized session critically examines how Js training course offers one full-day section. The morn- your organization produces its products and services and session focuses on knowing and understanding cus- reveals ways in which modifications can be initiated to In- -mers and involving them in determining the products and crease efficiency and effectiveness. The course includes: Aces we produce. The afternoon session focuses on . Understanding the relationship between qual- owing, understanding and implementing customer needs Ity and work processes A expectations in refining the products and services we Identifying customer and supplier relation- -liver. Each jurisdiction can customize this training ships in work processes .urse depending on your needs and time constraints. Examining the process utilized to produce a product or service • Identifying key decision and monitoring points RIORITY SETT4NG in the work process e demands placed on local governments are increasing • Identifying necessary modifications to the Ith each passing year. How do governing boards and work process to improve quality ,uncils respond to the Increasing demands of constitu- ds without overwhelming the staff? The answer lies in iective priority setting. This half day course examines the POWERPOINT -Lure of constituent demands, current workloads, the Public presentations are becoming more and more required •ailability and skill level of staff, and the process used to In the field of local government. In this "high tech"era we negate work. Course participants identify criteria that are in, professional, electronic presentations are just a c Important to the community and organization and ar- mouse click away with Microsoft PowerPoint. This work- nge and weight the criteria for effective priority setting. shop provides an overview of the basics of PowerPoint and provides tips on how this software can help you develop more effective presentations. 6 Alpine Area Agency on Aging Elevator Inspection Program AAAA Is the designated regional planning and service NWCCOG Elevator Inspection Program provides elevator agency for services to seniors in Region XII. Federal Older inspection and permitting service, with the goal of ensur- Americans Act funds are used In conjunction with state, ing safe elevators in the region. The program began its county, and local funds to develop and implement a com- first year of operation in 1993. Prior to that time, most prehensive and coordinated system of service to the elderly elevators in the region had not been Inspected. Member In the region. These services include: transportation, jurisdictions are Invited to sign a "Letter of Agreement" homemaker and personal care services, congregate and with NWCCOG. jurisdictions then agree to pass an or- home delivered meal services, Information and referral, out- dinance authorizing the service and establishing the fee reach to minorities and low Income seniors,Medicare coun- per inspection. Building Departments and NWCCOG's selors, ombudsman services in nursing homes, legal serv- elevator Inspectors work cooperatively to Implement the Ices,and the Old Age Pension Dental Care program. program in each locale. In addition to providing the serv- ices to NWCCOG members, the Elevator Inspection Pro- Community Development gram also provides services to Routt County, Clear Creek The Community Development Program lends technical assis- County,and the City of Glenwood Springs. tance to towns and counties. This Includes project plan- ning, grant assistance, facilitation, regional data develop- Planners' Resource Network ment and networking of resources. In addition, members This service provides member agencies with a forum for may apply for and receive technical assistance grants.a clearing house for demographic Information as Community Development Program also serves sharing Information between jurisdictions and a clearing as a cleari N house of Information related to common growth related NWCCOG is a State Data Center Affiliate. planning Issues. The information includes standards, guidelines,agreements,regulations,MOU's, etc. Materi- Technical Assistance Grant Program als can be ordered on-line through NWCCOG's website NWCCOG receives funding from the Colorado Depart- (www.nwc.cog.co.us),and planners can share Information ment of Local Affairs through the Energy and Mineral via e-mail.Also,the Planners' Resource Network offers Impact Assistance Program. A portion of this funding two workshops per year on issues of the greatest Interest Is then earmarked for grants to NWCCOG members to NWCCOG members. Past workshops have Included: for a variety of projects. Grants are usually in the ♦ Design Guidelines for Mountain Communities $500-$3,000 range and can be either cash grants or ♦ Cooperative Planning professional assistance by NWCCOG staff. Priority is ♦ Housing the Workforce In Mountain Communi- given to communities with mining, oil,and gas employ- ties ment and small towns,particularly those that are eco- ♦ Improving the Development Review Process nomicalty challenged or lack planning staff. Awards are ♦ Growth Management in Mountain Communities made at the December board of directors meeting for projects beginning the following January. NWCCOG's Website -A wealth of demo- graphic Information as well as plannng resources can be found on our Website at www.nwc.eog.eo.us. 7 Regional Business AFFILIATED SERVICES Regional business assures accountability of NWCCOG programs and services to our member governments and Northwest Loan Fund our federal, state and local funding sources. Working closely with the town and county officials on the The Northwest Loan Fund Is a non-profit corporation tha NWCCOG board, regional business is responsible for provides start-up and/or expansion financing for smal facilitating the direction of the organization and Its pro- businesses that are unable to secure conventional financini grams and implementing the organizational policies and In Region XII and Garfield, Moffat, and No Blanco Coun mission. ties. The goals of the fund are to create and retain fobs fo Individuals of low to moderate Income and diversify th, Watershed Services economy throughout the service area. Funding come The Watershed Services Program provides NWCCOG from the State through the Governor's Office of Busines membership with expertise in water quality planning, Development, and Internally from loan origination fees Interest income,and revolved (paid-back) principal. regulatory monitoring, and technical assistance. NWCCOG has been the designated regional water quality management agency since 1976. In that capac- Writer Quality / Quantity Committee Ity, NWCCOG completes and updates a water quality management plan for Region XII In compliance with (QQ) Section 208 of the Clean Water Act. Other functions The mission of the QQ Committee is to enable Its mem of the program Include regional permit reviews bers to protect and enhance the quality of Colorado's wa [discharge permits, Environmental Impact Statements, ters while facilitating the responsible use of those re site applications, 401 permits); technical assistance sources for the good of all Colorado citizens and its envi (project development, grant and loan applications re- ronment. The QQ contract staff provide members wits lated to water quality, land use Issues related to water monitoring of legislative issues, water quality Information quality Impacts); and advocating for local interests on litigation and advocacy support, transmountain diversioy water quality and environmental regulations. oversight, and participation in intergovernmental matter. providing for increased cooperation on water matters an( Energy Management improved political clout with state and federal agencies. The Energy Management Program helps low and mod- erate Income households reduce their fuel consumption and heating costs through services such as installation of caulking and weatherstripping, Insulation, storm win- dows and furnace tune-ups. NWCCOG Is a local ad- ministering agency under the Weatherization Assistance Program. Weatherization has helped preserve afford- able housing units In the region and, by reducing a household's energy consumption and expenditures, Increases the amount of money that these households have available to spend in their local communities. This program is utilized by Chaffee, Clear Creek, Lake, Park, and Routt counties as well as NWCCOG member juris- dictions. NWCCOG also participates In a memoran- dum of understanding with agencies in Garfield, No Blanco, Moffat, and Pitkin counties to provide weath- erization services. 8 REPORTS & STUDIE,S PRODUCED BY NWCCOG ♦ Growth Management in Mountain Communities Qune 2000) • 1999 Workforce Housing:Trends and Indicators Qune 1999) ♦ Town of Dillon (1998)—report available ♦ Town of Frisco Ouly 1999) —report available ♦ Employer Assisted Housing(March 2000) ♦ Municipal Annexation Policies [April 2000) ♦ The Costs/Benefits of Home Rule Status (May 2000) • Cost of Living Study(May 1998) ♦ The Aging of Aspen:A Community for Family Members of All Ages (Report/Slide Show) (February 2000) ♦ Water Quality Management Plan (208 Plan) (1998) OTHER STUDIES/REPORTS AVAILABLE THROUGH NWCCOG • Reducing Housing Costs Through Regulatory Reform: A Handbook for Colorado Communities (Colorado Division of Housing,June 1998) ♦ Colorado Association of Ski Towns Alternative Transportation Project(December 1998) • Summit County Commuter Connections Project Oune 1998) • The Status of Housing in Colorado (March 1997) ♦ Colorado Looks at Growth in the Northwest Region 0anuary 1995) PROJECTS FUNDED BY NWCCOG ' S TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE GRANT PROGRAM Eagle County Senior Needs Assessment (August 1999) Alternative Parking Ratio Analysis for the Vail Village and Lionshead Core Areas—Vail,Colorado (November 1999) Town of Walden Business Attraction Plan (December 1999) Shaping Our Summit Survey(1998) Town of Frisco Open Space Plan (November 1998) Model Transit-Oriented Development Program for Small Rural Communities In the Roaring Fork Valley (December 1998) • Residential Use Patterns and Workforce Dynamics in Pitkin County • Pitkin County Residential Construction Workforce Dynamics Qune 1999) • Post-Construction Residential Workforce Dynamics in Pitkin County Qune 1999) Jackson County Senior Citizen Survey(1998) Grand County Senior Citizen Survey To request a copy of any report listed above, please call NWCCOG at 970/468-0295 x123. 9 2000 NWCCOG BOARD OF DIRECTORS NWCCOG STAFF COUNTIES DORIS BELLAMENTE Director,AAAA,x107,ssaaa @nwc.cog.co.us EAGLE COUNTY STEVE GETZ "Johnnette Phillips,Commissloner Director, Energy Mgmnt Prog.,x103, sgetz @nwc.cog.co.us GRAND COUNTY BARBARA GREEN, Sullivan Green "Robert Anderson,Commissloner General Counsel, 303/355-4405,lawgreen @eanhllnk.net JACKSON COUNTY TAYLOR HAWES *Tootle Crdwnep Commissloner Co-Director,Water QQ Comm.,x117,ggwater @colorado.net PITKIN COUNTY ANN MARIE JENSEN "Leslie Lamont,Commissloner Fiscal Assistant,x112 SUMMIT COUNTY DOUG]ONES "611[Wallace,Commissloner Weatherizatlon Installer,x103 :UNICIPALITIES FRANK KILIAN _ Elevator Inspector,x108 ' .SPEN GYPSUM ony Hershey, Coundlmember Jeff Shroll,Town Manager MICHAEL KURTH .VON HOT SULPHUR SPRINGS Fiscal Officer,xt 12 III Eking,Town Manager Brenda Morrow,Trustee RACHEL LUNNEY Director of Member Services,x123, dunney @nwc.cog.co.us -ASALT KREMMLING ecque Whhsht,Trustee *Peg Toft,Mayor RICK PAYNE Director,Elevator Inspect. Prog.,x106,elevator@nwc.cog.co.us =RECKENRIDGE MINTURN :!n Lamb,C6uncilmember Alan Lanning,Town Manager ROBERT RAY Director,Watershed Sgrvices.,x104—wq @nwc.cog.co.us ,ILLON MONTEZUMA udee Cathrall, Coundlmember Kent Lange,Trustee GARY SEVERSON _ Executive Director,xt 10,gls @nwc.cog.co.us OGLE RED CLIFF '.filly Powell,Town Manager Betty Sandoval,Mayor NATE SPEERSTRA BASER SILVERTHORNE Weatherizatlon Installer,x103 shuck Reld,Town Manager Sheila Groneman,Coundlmember LINDA VENTURONI Director,Special Projects, 262-0739,Ilndav @nwc.cog.co.us RISCO VAIL JUNE WALTERS aavld Amll,Coundlmember *Sybil]Navas,Mayor Pro Tern _-RANGY WALDEN Director,Northwest Loan Fund,xi 19, nIQune @colorado.net tick Thompson,Mayor Kyle Flinlau,Mayor CORA WINTERS BRAND LAKE WINTER PARK Administrative Assistant,x100,cwintem @nwc.cog.co.us Im Peterson,Trustee Daryl Shmm,Town Manager LANE WYATT "ExecnzNe committee Co-Director,Water QQ Comm.,x 1 16,gglane @colorado.net 10 k3k � Y �' �4; s Fx G,2�M e�gxi Mt� ' e i «x �t No *zcaescCok ra,do COUNCIL OF GOVERNMENTS NORTHWEST COLORADO COUNCIL OF GOVERNMENTS 1999 ANNUAL REPORT MESSAGE FROM THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR...... i HISTORY AND MISSION STATEMENT................. 2 DESCRIPTION OF NWCCOG'S SERVICES............. 3 EAGLE COUNTY.............................................. 5 Town of Avon........................................ 5 Town of Basalt........................................ 5 Town of Eagle........................................ 5 Town of Gypsum.................................... 6 Town of Minturn.................................... 6 Town of Red Cliff.................................... 6 Town of Vail.......................................... 6 GRAND COUNTY............................................. 9 Town of Fraser....................................... 9 Town of Granby...................................... 9 Town of Grand Lake............................... 10 Town of Hot Sulphur Springs..................... 10 Town of Kremmling................................. 10 Town of Winter Park................................ 10 JACKSON COUNTY.......................................... 1 1 Town of Walden..................................... 1 1 PITKIN COUNTY.............................................. 12 City of Aspen....................................... 12 SUMMIT COUNTY............................................ 13 Town of Blue River................................... 13 Town of Breckenridge............................. 13 Town of Dillon....................................... 14 Town of Frisco....................................... 14 Town of Montezuma................................ 14 Town of Silverthorne................................ 14 REGION-WIDE SERVICES................................... 7 1999 FINANCIAL INFORMATION...................... 15 NWCCOG BOARD OF DIRECTORS St STAFF........ 16 NORTHWEST COLORADO COUNCIL OF GOVERNMENTS-1999 ANNUAL REPORT r January,2000 Thank you for your continued membership in Northwest Colorado Council of Governments. You are the reason NWCCOG exists. On behalf of the Executive Committee, Board of Directors, and Staff of NWCCOG, I invite you to spend a few minutes scanning the pages of this Annual Report for 1999. 1999 was the year of New Direction for NWCCOG. The membership through its Board of Directors launched NWCCOG oil a bold course in 1999. The direction was clear and simple: I. Maintain the level and quality of service the membership deserves in the Core Programs,and 2 Make NWCCOG relevant to the membership by meeting the current and future Individual needs of the members as well as the collective needs of the region. NWCCOG responded to the challenge by reorganizing the staff, implementing a new employee performance review and recognition system, introducing an awareness of Customer Focus, initiating a program of new member services, creat- ing four new regional initiatives,and forging new relationships with other organizations. In the core programs,Alpine Area Agency on Aging (AAAA) increased the number of nutritional meals served to sen- iors by 4% over 1998 and refurbished three senior nutrition sites. Elevator Inspection increased the number of eleva- tors inspected by 9.1% over 1998. Energy Management completed a decade of excellence in weatherizing homes of low-income families and seniors,with no major or minor findings of violations from state inspectors for ten years. The Water Quality Program continued its high level of permit reviews and was awarded nearly $30,000 by the Environ- nleutal Protection Agency for the development of a plan to restore the Blue River above Dillon Reservoir. NWCCOG initiated new member services through a program called Specialized Services. NWCCOG Specialized Serv- ices responds to requests for assistance from individual member-jurisdictions for specific needs. 1JWCCOG member Jurisdictions in good standing are entitled to the first$1,000 worth of services free of charge, subsequent services are then billed at a reduced rate. In 1999, eleven member jurisdictions took advantage of Specialized Services by request- ing assistance with a total of twenty-three different projects, with six members requesting assistance beyond the $1,000 level. In addition,NWCCOG initiated four new region-wide programs in 1999 to address current needs of numerous mem- ber jurisdictions. These four initiatives include the development of a regional geographic information system (GIS), an employer assisted housing program, preparation for the 2000 census, and a collaborative planning process with the United States Forest Service. In the Affiliated Services of NWCCOG the Water Quality and Quantity Committee (QQ) remained active and vital during 1999 with continued work on the Upper Colorado Project and legislative activity. In addition,QQ added Park and Gunnison Counties to its membership. The Northwest Loan Fund provided financial assistance to 5 business to- taling$228,000. 1999 was a very good year for NWCCOG as it set about implementing the New Direction. 2000 promises to be an exciting year as we strengthen the programs of 1999 and focus on building new regional partnerships to address the challenges facing our region. Our new motto for 2000,which encompasses our focus for the new year is, "Together,We Can..... Once again, thank you for your membership in NWCCOG. Our primary purpose Is to give our members value for dollars pended. We look forward to serving your needs in the future. LUM Sin e , J. Sev son . Executive Director r NOR,HWE'T COLCI"M)COUNCIL OF GOVERNMENT'-1999 ANNUAL REPORT HISTORY NWCCOG was established as Colorado Planning and Management Region XII in 1972 by Executive Order of the Governor in response to the Federal Intergovernmental Co- operation Act of 1968. Regional planning was encouraged as a means to avoid over- lap, duplication and competition between local planning activities. Today, NWCCOG serves a Five county region including Eagle, Grand, Jackson, Pitkin, and Summit coun- ties and the towns therein. MISSION STATEMENT The purpose of the Northwest Colorado Council of Governments is to be responsive to our members' needs and interests by: •Providing guidance and assistance in problem solving, information sharing and partnership building; *Advocating members' interests and needs with local, state, and federal entities; •Providing quality services to our membership that are relevant, effective, and efficient. A PLEDGE TO OUR CUSTOMERS At Northwest Colorado Council of Governments we know and act on the require- ments of each customer we serve and we understand how our performance ultimately satisfies all of our customers. NORTHWEST COLORADO COUNCIL OF GOVERNMENTS--1999 ANNUAL REPORT 2 wibiwwamfti"l Northwest Colorado Council of Governments Core Services Atfi liatetl Services` Specialized Services" Area Agency Northwest Gom munity Issues on Aging Loan Fund Management Community Water quality Regional Issues Development and Quantity Management Elevator Data Inspection and Research Regional Surveys and Business Studies Water Planners' quality Resource Network Energy Information Management Forums CORE SERVICES Alpine Area Agency on Aging Elevator Inspection Program AAAA is the designated regional planning and service agency NWCCOG Elevator Inspection Program provides elevator inspec- for services to seniors in Region XII. Federal Older Americans tion and permitting service,with the goal of ensuring safe elevators Act funds are used in conjunction with state, county, and local in the region. The program began its first year of operation in funds to develop and implement a comprehensive and coordi- 1993. Prior to that time, most elevators in the region had not Rated system of service to the elderly in the region. These serv- been inspected. Member jurisdictions are invited to sign a "Letter Ices include: transportation, homemaker and personal care of Agreement" with NWCCOG. Jurisdictions then agree to pass services, congregate and home delivered meal services, inform- an ordinance authorizing the service and establishing the fee per tion and referral, outreach to minorities and low income sen- inspection. Building Departments and NWCCOG's elevator in- iors, Medicare Counselors, ombudsman services in nursing spectors work cooperatively to Implement the program in each homes, legal services, and the Old Age Pension Dental Care locale. In addition to providing the services to NWCCOG mem- program. bers, the Elevator Inspection Program also provides services to Routt County, Clear Creek County, and the City of Glenwood Community Development Springs. The Community Development Program lends technical assistance to towns and counties. This includes project planning, grant Regional Business assistance, facilitation, regional data development and network- Regional business assures accountability of NWCCOG programs ing of resources. In addition, members may apply for and re- and services to our member governments and our federal, state ceive technical assistance grants. NWCCOG's Community De- and local funding sources. Working closely with the town and velopment Program also serves as a clearing house for demo- county officials on the NWCCOG board, regional business is re- graphic information as NWCCOG is a State Data Center Affili- sponsible for facilitating the direction of the organization and its ate. programs and implementing the organizational policies and mission. 3 NOFTlIWFfI Col c," C)COUNCIL OF GOVERNMENTS-1999 ANNUAL REPORT CORE SERVICES ( CON 'T . ) SPECIALIZED SERVICES Hall[ Specialized Services are custom deslgned for individual numbers and Water Quality e,o%red on a fee far,,r,Iry basis. Members In good standing rc- The Water Quality Program provides NWCCOG membership with ceire the first 81,000 of any specialized Service hue. expertise in water quality planning, regulatory monitoring, and techni- cal assistance. NWCCOG has been the designated regional water Community Issues Management quality management agency since 1976. In that capacity, NWCCOG NWCCOG will identify the issues Region XII jurisdictions face completes and updates a water quality management plan for Region XII and will provide situation assessment, strategy development, In compliance with Section 208 of the Clean Water Act. Other fume- implementation,monitoring,evaluation,and staff training to tions of the program include regional permit reviews (discharge per- effectively manage these issues. mits, Environmental Impact Statements, site applications, 401 per- mits); technical assistance [project development,grant and loan appii- Regional Issues Management cations related to water quality,land use issues related to water quality Many social,economic,and environmental issues cross juris- Impacts); and advocating for local interests on water quality and envi- dictional boundaries. NWCCOG will identify these regional ronmemal regulations. issues and provide a forum for coalition building, strategy Energy Management development,implementation, monitoring and evaluation. The Energy Management Program helps low and moderate income households reduce their fuel consumption and heating costs through Data and Research services such as installation of caulking and weatherstripping, insult- This service includes internal database development and man- tion, storm windows and furnace tune-ups. NWCCOG is a local ad- agement, database linkages,defining research parameters,and ministering agency under the WeatherilatlOn Assistance Program. database research. Weatherizatlon has helped preserve affordable housing units In the region and, by reducing a household's energy consumption and expen- Surveys and Studies ditures, increases the amount of money that these households have NWCCOG will assist members with surveys to include defin- avallable to spend lu their local communities. This program is utilized ing the need to be addressed,defining the data that needs to by Chaffee, Clear Creek, Lake, Park, and Routt counties as well as be collected, designing a survey instrument,data compilation, NWCCOG member jurisdictions. NWCCOG also participates in a and report preparation and presentation. memorandum of understanding with agencies in Garfield, Rio Blanco, Moffat,and Puldn counties to provide weatherization services. Planners' Resource Network AFFILIATED SERVICES This service provides member agencies with a forum for shar- Ing information between Jurisdictions and a clearing house of Northwest Loan Fund information related to common growth related planning is- The Northwest Loan Fund Is a non-profit corporation that provides sues. The information includes standards,guidelines,agree- start-up and/or expansion financing for small businesses that are tun- ments,regulations,MOU's,etc. Materials can be ordered able to secure conventional financing in Region Al and Garfield,Mof- on-line through NWCCOG's website[www.nwc.cog.co.us), fat,and Rio Blanco Counties. The goals of the fund are to create and and planners can share Information via e-mail.Also,the Plan- retain jobs for Individuals of low to moderate income and diversify the ners'Resource Network offers two workshops peryear on economy throughout the service area. Funding comes from the State issues of the greatest interest to NWCCOG members. Past through the Governor's Office of Business Development, and Internally workshops have included Design Guidelines for Mountain from loan origination fees, interest income, and revolved (paid-back) Communities, Cooperative Planning,Housing the Workforce principal in Mountain Communittes,and improving the Development Water Quality/ Quantity Committee IQQ) Review Process. The mission of the QQ Committee is to enable Its members to protect Information Forums and enhance the quality of Colorado's waters while facilitating the re- This service provides assistance to member jurisdictions in sponsible use of those resources for the good of all Colorado citizens developing,organizing,and facilitating forums in which issues and its environment. The QQ contract staff provide members with can be discussed in a positive and constructive environment. monitoring of legislative Issues, water quality Information, litigation and advocacy support, transmountain diversion oversight, and partici- pation in intergovernmental matters providing for increased coopera- tion on water matters and improved political clout with state and federal agencies. NORTHWEST COLORADO COUNCIL OF GOVERNMENTS—1999 ANNUAL REPORT 4 Alpine Area Agency on Aging Elevator Inspection Program • AAAA operates three a notion sites in Eagle County. They • Inspected 143 elevators. are located in Eagle, EI Jebel,and Minturn. Energy Management Program • AAAA and Eagle County Council on Aging split the cost of • Weatherized 2 mobile homes in the Edwards area. NWCCOG a new commercial rauge and over. staff resolved a carbon monoxide problem in one house,in- • AAAA worked cooperatively with the director of health and stalled several new storm windows in the other,and installed human services on a Y2K Readiness Plan. additional Insulation and checked furnace efficiency in both. • In 1999,AAAA provided the following to Eagle County: Allocution of0/derAmeticins Act Title lufunds: Water Quality Program Nutrition—$38,838 (8,752 meals served) • Participated in Eagle River Watershed Plan Implementation Com- TYansportation—$8,673 [11,311 units of service) mittee. Homemaker—$5,500(92 units of service) • Provided assistance on preparation of 319 grant request for a Community Development watershed coordinator position. Reviewed Two Rivers Village site application. • Eagle County completed a Senior Citizen Survey with the assistance of a$2,000 technical assistance grant awarded Participated in discussions with Vail Resorts regarding a poten- by NWCCOG in 1999. e site application for Red Sky Ranch. • Reviewed Ute Creek at Wolcott development proposal. Town of Avon Alpine Area Agency on Aging Specialized Services • Town of Avon seniors can obtain services from three sites in • Conducted preliminary work on a visioning process for the Eagle Comity: Eagle,EI Jebel,and Minturn. Town Council. Elevator Inspection Program Water Quality Program • Inspected 43 elevators. • Provided town with copy of model Water Quality Control Standards. Town of Basalt Alpine Area Agency on Aging Water Quality Program • AAAA worked closely with the Eagle County cook and sen- • Provided copy of model Water Quality Control Standards. for coordinator at the nutrition site in El Jebel to prepare • Reviewed and commented on Basalt Sanitation District's site for the move to a new site in Basalt in 2000. application and amendment. • AAAA served 2,942 meals at the El)ebelBasalt site in • Provided information regarding magnesium chloride to the 1999. Town. Elevator Inspection Program Specialized Services • Inspected 9 Elevators. • Consulted on the Town's realignment with Pitkin and Eagle Counties. Town of Eagle Alpine Area Agency on Aging Energy Management Program • AAAA served 4,171 meals at the Eagle site in 1999. • Weatherized one unit in 1999. HWCCOG technicians Installed a new 80%efficient furnace,storm windows,a new door,and addi- Elevator Inspection Program tional insulation. • Inspected 13 elevators. Water Quality Program • Consulted with town staff on site application for Adam's Rib "Frost Creek"proposal. Reviewed the Town's 1041 permit for water tank. 5 NORTNICIFCT Cello"[(1 C011NCn OF GOVFRNMFNTC- 1999 ANNNAI.REPORT Town of Gypsum Alpine Area Agency on Aging so that heated air is delivered to the house instead of the • T own of Gypsum seniors can obtain services from three crawispace. Weatherstripping and caulking were also per- sites in Eagle County. Eagle,El Jebel,and Minturn. formed. At the job's completion,the clients reported that `since the work w,is done outhouse is much warmer and lye Elevator Inspection Program cdn now/o verour thermostat". • Inspected 5 elevators. Water Quality Program Energy Management Program • Reviewed the 1 own's site application for expansion of a • Weatherized one unit in 1999. The owners of this house wastewater treatment facility. had been unable to keep it heated due to duct problems in the crawispace. NWCCOG repaired and sealed the ducts Town of Minturn Alpine Area Agency on Aging Water Quality Program • NWCCOG operates a Seniors'Nutrition Site in Minturl. • Participated In Eagle Mine Site monitoring and review of The site served 1,639 meals to seniors in Minturn,Red cleanup activities. Cliff and surrounding areas in 1999. • Provided information on magnesium chloride to the Town Manager. Specialized Services • Provided town with a copy of model Water Quality Protection • NWCCOG assisted the Town of Minturn with a land ex- Standards. change with the US Forest Service for the construction of a new Town Public Works shop. The funding for the shop will come from a Department of Local Affairs Energy and Mineral Impact Assistance Grant which NWCCOG as- sisted the town obtain. Town of Red Cliff Alpine Area Agency on Aging • Town of Red Cliff seniors can obtain services from three sites in Eagle County: Eagle,Minturn,and El Jebel. Town of Vail Alpine Area Agency on Aging Specialized Services • Town of Vail seniors can obtain services from three sites in • Consulted with Town officials on Town marketing strategy. Eagle County: Eagle,Minturn,and EI Jebel. • Facilitated Town Council retreat. Community Development Water Quality Program • Granted the Town$3,000 in technical assistance funds for • Participated in Black Gore Creek Steering Committee, indud- the completion of a Shared Parking Study. ing providing coordination for biological sampling. • Provided information regarding magnesium chloride to the Elevator Inspection Program Town. • Inspected 174 Elevators. NORTFRVEST COLORADO COUNCIL Or GOVERNMENTS-1999 ANNUAL REPORT 6 DATA / REPORTS / RESOURCES ORA - Regional Geographic Information System (GIS) Responding to a request hour the Town of Kremmling, NWCCOG applied to the Department of Local Affairs (DOLA) for a grant from =the Energy and Minerals Impact Assistance fund for the develop- meat of a regional GIS system to accomplish wo objectives: (I) to OTHER REGIONAL PROTECT$ make a GIS system available to member jurisdictions that do not currently have access, and (2) to enable member jurisdictions who Employer Assisted Housing Program have systems of their own to link with one another to provide a re- lu response to a growing shortage of available housing for workers gional view. NWCCOG received $100,000 from DOLA to fund and an increasing number of jobs within the region, NWCCOG en- the project. NWCCOG also received a grant worth approximately tered into an association with FannieMae and the Colorado Housing $25,000 from FRSI, a leading manufacturer of GIS products that and Finance Authority to introduce an employer assisted housing provides hardware, software, and training. During the year, program to area employers. FannieMae awarded NWCCOG a NWCCOG convened a Regional GIS Users Group to assist in guid- $2,500 grant to help jump-start the information program. lu addl- ing the Project and awarded a contract to a finn to conduct a re- tlon, the NWCCOG Board authorized up to $7,500 to gional needs assessmenl, support the effor. NWCCOG awarded a contract Planners' Resource Network to a mountain area housing specialist to develop a Regional planner's workshops have been oBered which give planning regional needs assessment and design a program for NWCCOG employees. NWCCOG staff in the area a chance to Per together and share information.Tlie will be working planners who attend these events select each workshop topic.Work- with mountain area chambers of commerce and county shop presenters are selected because of their expertise in applying housing authorities during the year 2000 to present the planning concepts in mountain resort and mountain rural settings. program. ]A NWCCOG's Planners' Resource Network sponsored two workshops Collaboration with U.S. Forest Service In 1999: Housin, The Workforce in Mountain Comnrmtiiies in The majority landowner in the NWCCOG region is the May 1999 and ImpruPing air Development Review Process in NO- federal government. This unique land ownership pattern l_--i ventber 1999. influences local governments' decision making on a daily Data and Research Center basis. As a result of the release of the controversial White NWCCOG is a clearing house for demographic information such as River National Forest Proposed Forest Plan Revision and a population, retail sales, assessed valuation, housing prices, skier subsequent request from Eagle County, NWCCOG began visits, employment, etc This information can be obtained on working with the United States Forest Service (USES] to NWCCOG's website wervi.nwc.cog.co.us. MNCCOG's website develop a process for closer collaboration. _ NWCCOG applied to th offers a variety of resources including Census infomration (2000 e U:)1­3 for a census information to come!), Pbnners' Resource Network $24,000 Rural Communities Assistance grant (information on land use, growth, environmental issues, sample to accomplish five objectives: EAGLE agreements, plus links to other websites). The website was updated (1) Integrate community and regional desires to include 1997 and 1998 figures. for the future into the White River National Forest Plan revision process; (2) COmmuld- Census 2000 care the important relationships between The Department of Local Affairs awarded NWCCOG $10,000 in communities and public lands as it 1999 to assist In preparing member jurisdictions with the task of relates to urbanization; (3) Establish completing the 2000 census. lu response, NWCCOG provided ongoing partnerships within local PITS information and technical assistance workshops for members communities to collaborate In identi- IV throughout the year for this all-important event. Further,NWCCOG fying common goals and issues with has been instrumental in negotiating for changes in the way the Cell- regard to social, economic and ecological sus will operate in this region in order to avoid undercounting. For sustainabiliry; (4) Work to integrate national and instance, NWCCOG was successful in ensuring that the Census will regional perspectives on forest management with local priori- begin a month earlier this year (in March), wages for Census work- ties; and (5) Foster grassroots participation and inter-community ers will be higher,and extra efforts will be made to assure the return cooperation, collaboration and joint action. of Census forms. At the time of the writing of this Annual Report,the USES has ver- bally approved the grant application and work will commence in Survey January 2000. NWCCOG provided assistance to several communities regarding survey design and review including data provision, review of ques- Transportation — NWCCOG is a supporter of the Colorado tions,and addition of demographics to enhance analysis of results. Intermountain Fixed Guideway Authority(CIFGA0 , and has partici- pated in CIFGA meetings as well as provided 7 NORTINVFfa COLORADO COUNCIL OF GOVERNMENTS—1999 ANNUAL REPORT support for grant proposals. ALPINE AREA AGENCY ON AGING Z Regional Coordination of Senior Services — --—---°'-""The Alpine Area Agency on Aging is guided by a Regional Advisory - - _-Council (RAC) which is made up of two senior citizen representatives ___ _---- from each county in Region XII,one elected official from the region as a ---- ----"whole, as well as optimal representatives from businesses, agencies an REGIONAL WATER QUALITY PLANNING community services of import to seniors. The RAC is instrumental in 999 Upper Colorado River Water Quality assisting AAAA accomplish its mission and vision. tandards Hearing-NWCCOG is currently representing local Medicare 2000 -What You Need to Know Iterests in updating water quality standards in our region. Alpine Area Agency on Aging presented a total of eight Medicare 2000 -olorado Mixing Zone Policy Work Group - presentations regionally in 1999.Materials and support from the Colo- 'WCCOG is participating in the development of a mixing zone pol- rado Division of Insurance Senior Health Insurance Assistance Program y that addresses EPA concerns while providing flexibility to dis- made these presentations possible.Topics included new preventative ilargers. screening benefits, how to report suspected Medicare fraud, et pro- Colorado 401 BMPs Work Group NWCCOG is grams that may help with Medicare premiums available to low income P— seniors. working to improve best management practices in wetland disturbance pennits. Colorado State Share Increase Thanks to the hard work of Triple A's across the state and the support ,,. Nonpoint Source Council Represents- of a number of groups, Colorado increased its state share from 4.5%to lion - Assisting two grant applicants and repre- 9.5%of the Federal Older Americans Act program dollars received by SON rented the region on non-point source controls. Colorado.This amounted to additional general fund dollars statewide of Provided Support for "Good Samari- $356,272. Our region's allocation is$6,680.These new dollars are allocated at the local level to meet critical needs!it the areas of in home tan" Issue—Forwarding federal legisla- services and transportation. tlon to reduce state and local government -rr v liability in abandoned mine cleanup ac- ELEVATOR INSPECTION PROGRAM bons. RAND Non-member Inspections xkv.a"n", Produced "White Paper" on In addition to the 751 elevators inspected and certified in NWCCOG ° BLM Lands and Impact of P member jurisdictions, the Elevator Inspection Program Inspected 32 �^ "Conservation Wilderness Pro- elevators in Glenwood Springs, 5 in Clear Creek County, 72 in Routt ry e• - -� posal° County, 11 in Craig, 1 in New Castle,and 3 in the lows of Hayden. NWCCOG QQ Committee ENERGY MANAGEMENT PROGRAM +•;+�- """"""" Q/Q accomplished the following in 1999: Improving Heath and Safety Advocated Headwater interests In 401 The majority of homes weatherized in the High County Weatherization SUMMIT certification hearings before the Water Qual- Region have pre-existing health and safety problems that are remedied as ity Control Commission — succeeded in rte- pail of the weatherization process. Mobile homes are significatnly mom gonating amendments to the rule favorable to likely to have health and safety problems than site-built homes. Every headwater interests. home using propane or natural gas receives a minimum of two sets of Advocated regional interests in the triennial review of water safety Inspections. Items such as gas leaks and carbon monoxide am quality standards in the Upper Colorado River Basin before the checked and corrected If problems are found. Water Quality Control Commission —was successful in achiev- Energy Cost Savings ing amendments to standards and ciassiFlcations favorable to All energy-saving improvements must return at least $2.00 of energy headwater Interests. savings over the expected useful life of the improvement for every$1.00 Managed the Upper Colorado River Project(Phase II). of labor and materials Invested. Costs of providing weatherization aver- . Succeeded in diminishing negative effects of FIB 99-1280 aged approximately$3,000 per unit in 1999. This includes the cost of (Vested Rights Bill). labor,materials,administrative costs and overhead. Analyzed and recommended changes to ensure members' corn- pliance with 1999'5 Vested Rights and Takings bills. Other Areas Weatherized - Reviewed and advocated for changes to the White River Na- In addition to the units weatherized in member jurisdictions, NWCCOG tional Forest Plan HIS on behalf of Q/Q Committee. also weatherized 62 homes in the counties of Chaffee, Clear Creek, Represented regional water Interests at various conferences Lake,Park,and ROLItt in 1999. including CML, CCI, and the Interim Legisla- tive Committee or) Growth. NORTHWEST COLORADO COUNCIL OF GOVERNMENTS—1999 ANNUAL.REPORT 8 ,�,•, � �'` 4„� t;it , r'i ..���frr ..Fr ���t.� «a .� iw; sg*,_i!t '�,g",:.'¢` �f n T Alpine Area Agency on Aging Water Quality Program • AAAA operates two senior nutrition sites in Grand County. • Reviewed the TabeniasIt Meadows Treatment fadllty site plan. lhey are located in Granby and In Kremuling. • Met with Fraser River dischargers on change in recreation • In 1999,AAAA provided the following to Grand County: classification proposed for Fraser River and ammonia waste A//o cation ofO/decAmedcaas Act Title///lands: load allocations. _ Nutrition- $28,444(6,523 meals served) • Provided information to East Grand Water Quality Board on 1ransportatlon- $9,756 (13,205 units of service) grant sources for watershed coordinator and Summit Water IlealticUellness- $3,500 (889 units of service) Quality Committee's Erosion Control Specialist position. Elevator Inspection Program • Reviewed Winter Park Water and Sanitation District's site application. • Inspected 76 elevators. • Provided technical assistance In the preparation of an appllca- Speclalized Services tion fora Clean Lakes Assessment grant for Granby,Shadow • Facilitated a work flow assessment workshop with County Mountain and Grand Lakes. Commissioners and staff. • Participated by providing information and educational pro- • Conducted sessions to improve communications between grams at the Grand County Water Festival for fourth and fifth elected officials and staff. grade students. • Coordinated a visit with staff horn the Colorado Office of • Reviewed Anny Coats of Engineers report on Shadow Moun- Economic Development and County Commissioners to open tain sedimentation. the lines of communication between the organizations. town of Fraser Alpine Area Agency on Aging • Town of Fraser seniors can obtain services from the site ill Granby. Water Quality Program • Provided review of Grand County Water and Sanitation Dis- trict site plan for the Town of Fraser. • Consulted with the]own on Individual Sewage Disposal System Task Force White Paper. Town of Granby Alpine Area Agency on Aging Specialized Services • The senior nutrition site in the Town of Granby served • Consulted with Town staff and elected officials on annexation 2,069 meals in 1999. issues. • AAAA purchased a new commercial Geezer for the Granby • Coordinated a visit with staff from the Office of Economic nutrition site in 1999. Development and Town officials to open the communication lines between the two entities. Energy Management Program • Weatherized one home in 1999. This home had a badly cracked heat exchanger,which presented a health and safety problem. This furnace was replaced with a new 80% effi- cient furnace. The [ionic also received storm windows and weatherstnlpping. 9 NORTNWU r COLORADO COUNCIL OF GOVERNMENTS- 1999 ANNUAL REPORT Town of Grand Lake Alpine Area Agency on Aging Energy Management Program • Town of Grand Lake seniors can receive services at the site • Weatherized one home in 1999. NWCCOG con ected a in Grauby. problem whereby carbon monoxide was present in the home, and installed storm windows,weatherstripping, and calking. Water Quality Program At the end of the lob,the client commented that the • Assisted in coordinating the Colorado Water Quality Con- NWCCOG team members "were very helpful,and kept me trol Commission retreat in Grand Lake. from getting sicker than/already was front high levels ofcar- • Provided technical assistance in the development of a moni- bon monoxide from myheatei: We rea0yappreciate it and toring plan for stonnwater outfall to Grand Lake. are very thank @d" Specialized Services • Coordinated a visit between town officials and Office of t oo- nomic Development staff to open the communication lilies Town of Hot Sulphur Springs Alpine Area Agency on Aging Energy Management Program • Town of Hot Sulphur Springs seniors can receive services at • Weatherized one home in 1999. NWCCOG corrected the site in Granby. health and safety problems in the mobile home and installed a new door,storm windows,and insulation. Town of Kremmling Alpine Area Agency on Aging Community Development • The senior nutrition site in the Town of Kremmling served • Provided 80 hours of staff technical assistance to assess 4,454 meals in 1999. several water quality and quantity issues for the Town. • AAAA purchased a new commercial dishwasher for the Specialized Services Kremmling nutrition site in 1999. • Coordinated a visit between town officials and Office of Energy Management Program Economic Development staff to open the communication • Weatherized three homes In 1999. These units were mobile lines between the two entities. homes, and all three had health and safety problems in that Water Quality Program the fumes from gas-fired water heaters were not properly • Provided technical assistance, through NWCCOG's grant exiting the buildings. NWCCOG technicians corrected the program, to develop a Source Water Protection Program. problem in all three homes,and all three had storm windows This project will continue in 2000. Installed. Additional floor and ceiling Insulation was added • Provided technical assistance on various water supply tl Issues. at one home. Town of Winter Park Alpine Area Agency on Aging Water Quality Program • Town of Winter Park seniors can obtain services from the • Provided letter of support and technical assistance in a grant site in Granby. application for Grand County 111 Water and Sanitation District's Energy and Mineral Impact Assistance Grant for Elevator Inspection Program biosolids disposal at Henderson Mill. • Inspected 32 Elevators. • Reviewed and commented on Grand County Water and Sanitation District's site application. NORTHWEST COLORADO COUNCIL OF GOVERNMENTS-1999 ANNUAL REPORT 10 Wkwoobwalft. Alpine Area Agency on Aging Community Development • AAAA provides funding to the Jackson County Council on • Jackson County completed enhancements to their Geographic Aging [jCCOA) to provide information and referral and Information System with the assistance of a $3,000 grant transportation services for seniors. from NWCCOG's technical assistance grant program. • AAAA funds the Jackson County Nursing Service pCNS) to - provide homemaker and personal care services to seniors. Specialized Services of • In 1999,AAAA provided the following to Jackson County: • Coordinated a visit between County officials and Office es Economic Development staff to open the communication lines Allocation of OtderAneticans Act RtlefUfunds.' between the two entities and to facilitate the conveyance of To JCCOA for Information ai Referral: Jackson County's needs and issues to the OED. $3,636 (5,400 est. units of service) To)CCOA for Transportation Services: $2,885 H 125 est. units of service) To JCNS for Homemaker services: $1,835 (203 est. units of service) To)CNS for Personal Care services: - $1,563 (173 est. units of service) Town of Walden Alpine Area Agency on Aging Energy Management Program • Town of Walden seniors can obtain services through the • Weatherized one home in 1999. This home had 2 health and Jackson County Nursing Service and Jackson County Coun- safety problems that were resolved by NWCCOG staff. Fur- cil on Aging, both of which are partially(ended by nace efficiency work was performed, and storm windows and NWCCOG's AAAA. insulation were installed. At the end of the job, the client commented that "these young men worked very hard, and I've Community Development never seen or been treated any nicer. Thank you so very • The Town of Walden completed a Business Attraction Plan much." with the assistance of a $2,000 grant from NWCCOG's technical assistance grant program. Specialized Services • Coordinated a visit between Town officials and Office of Eco- nomic Development staff to open the communication lines between the two entities and to facilitate the conveyance of the Town of Walden's needs and Issues to the OED. }1 NORTNWfST COLORADO COUNCIL Or GOVERNMENTS-1999 ANNUAL REPORT a Alpine Area Agency on Aging Water Quality Program • AAAA operates a senior nutrition site in the City of Aspen. • Provided technical assistance for issues regarding ammonia • In 1999,AAAA provided the following to Pitkin County: modeling for wasteload allocations in the Roaring Fork. Allocation ofOlderAtnedcans Act Title///funds: • Facilitated three Mid-Valley Wastewater Treatment Op- Nutrition- $36,386 (7,395 meals served) tions meetings. Info. ez Referral-$7,075 (16,928 units of service) • Reviewed and commented on the Roaring Fort Conser- Health/Wellness-$1,848 (27 units of service vancy's "Water Quality Monitoring Inventory Report". awarded to Columbine Home Health Services) • Provided assistance to Roaring Fork Conservancy in devel- oping grant source for water quality monitoring program. Elevator Inspection Program • Reviewed and commented on ASPCOL development site • Inspected 106 elevators (Aspen&Pitkin County). application for wastewater treatment. Energy Management Program Water Quality/ Quantity Committee • NWCCOG participates in a memorandum of understanding • Coordinated with Aspen and the River District regarding with the Roaring Fork Energy Center in Carbondale to pro- Homestake alternatives to understand potential impacts in vide weatherization services to Pitkin County. the Roaring Fork Basin. Specialized Services • Assisted Pitkin County with the Aspen Continuum of Care Project,a research and presentation project designed to edu- cate the public regarding the need for more extensive long term care services. City of Aspen Alpine Area Agency on Aging Specialized Services • The Aspen nutrition site served 7,395 meals in 1999. • Facilitated City Council Retreat. Elevator Inspection Program Water Quality Program • Inspected 106 Elevators (Aspen 8i Pitkin County]. • Provided Information regarding magnesium chloride to the Clty. NORTHWEST COLORADO COUNCIL OF GOVERNMENTS—1999 ANNUAL REPORT 12 ^"/eq�'r.., y, a AV, Alpine Area Agency on Aging Elevator Inspection Program • In Summit County,AAAA provides legal services through • Inspected 86 elevators. Northwest Colorado Legal Services, homemaker and per- sonal care services through Bristlecone Health Services,and Specialized Services information and referral services through Summit County • NWCCOG facilitated a workflow analysis training session for Sellers. Summit County staff and elected officials. • AAAA operates a nutrition site located In Frisco. • NWCCOG conducted a Customer Focus training session for • In 1999,AAAA provided the following to Summit County: Summit County staff and elected officials. Allocation of Older Americans Act Title///hinds: • NWCCOG facilitated a meeting of elected officials and manag- Nutrition- $16,538 (3,075 meals served) ers of all towns in Summit County to discuss common goals Info. 8t Referral-$3,733 (33,148 units of service) with respect to the USES White River National Forest Plan revi- Legal Assistance-$3,074 (I I I units of service) Sion. Personal Care- $4,729 (59 units of service) Homemaker Services- $1,745 (22 units of service) Water Quality Program • Provided technical assistance to the Summit Water Quality Community Development Committee. • Provided 40 hours of staff technical assistance to Shaping . Participated in Snake River Watershed Task Force. Our Summit for the analysis and presentation of program • Reviewed monitoring and related activities at Wellington-Oro evaluation results for 'How to Shape Our Summit"confer- Mine. ence and for the completion of the initial phase of the devel- • Sponsored EPA grant request for Blue River Restoration Mas- opment of a Community Indicators Project. ter Plan. Energy Management Program • Reviewed and commented on 404/401 permit application for • Weatherized two homes in Unincorporated Summit County Keystone Resort snow making expansion. In 1999. Health and safety problems were identified and • Reviewed and commented on CDOT Highway 6 expansion at solved in both homes. Storm windows were installed and the Snake River inlet. furnace efficiency work was performed In both homes, and floor insulation was installed in one home. Both Families Water Quality/ Quantity Committee were extremely pleased with the work performed,and one of • Participated in Environmental Impact Statement process for the households reported that 'We had a lot of cold air Arapahoe Basin's snowmaking diversions by advising the Suun- blowing through the trai ler and It's much better now...keep unit County Commissioners on the potential impacts and re- up the good work!" The other household reported that sponding to Arapahoe Basin regarding the authority of the Town of Blue River Alpine Area Agency on Aging • Town of Blue River seniors can receive services from the center in Frisco. Town of Breckenridge Alpine Area Agency on Aging Water Quality Program • Town of Breckenridge seniors can receive services from the • Provided Information on NWCCOG approach to USFS White center in Frisco. River National Forest Plan to the Breckenridge Open Space Advisory Council. Elevator Inspection Program • Reviewed Town golf course 404/401 permit application. • Inspected 97 elevators. 13 NOR7kUY/E.4 COLORADO COUNCIL OF GOVERNMENTS-1999 ANNUAL REPORT Town of Dillon Alpine Area Agency on Aging Specialized Services (con't) • Town of Dillon seniors can receive services at the center in • Completed the 1999 Town of Dillon Community Survey Frisco. • Provided PowerPoint training to Dillon staff. Elevator Inspection Program Water Quality Program • Inspected 13 elevators. • Provided technical assistance in development of Straight Creek sediment TMDL. Specialized Services • Provided two days of staff time in field monitoring of • Conducted a Vision and Values workshop for staff. Straight Creek. • Provided assistance in with the Dillon Community Survey. Town of Frisco Alpine Area Agency on Aging Specialized Services • The Frisco nutrition site Is located at Third and Granite • Facilitated Work Flow Assessment workshop. streets in downtown Frisco. The site served 3,075 meals in • Facilitated Priority Setting Workshop. 1999. • Facilitated a Housing Task Force meeting. • AAAA hired and it a new cook for the Frisco nutrition • Provided PowerPoint training session to town staff. site In 1999. Water Quality Program Elevator Inspection Program • Assisted the Town and Division of Wildlife in determining • Inspected 20 elevators. appropriate mitigation for Meadow Creek fish kill. Town of Montezuma Alpine Area Agency on Aging Specialized Services • Town of Montezuma seniors can receive services at the center • Met with the US Forest Service on behalf of the Town of in Frisco. Montezuma to assess the status of road access to private Community Development properties. • The Town of Montezuma completed a Three Mile Plan with the assistance of a$3,000 grant from NWCCOG. Town of Silverthorne Alpine Area Agency on Aging Elevator Inspection Program • Town of Sifverthorne seniors can receive services at the cen- • Inspected 10 elevators. ter in Frisco. Water Quality Program Energy Management Program • Provided technical assistance with the development of Town's • Weatherized two homes In 1999. These units received caulk- wetlands ordinance. Ing,weatherstripping and heating system efficiency work. • Provided review of Ponds at Blue River and made a site visit Further,NWCCOG staff discovered and repaired gas leaks, to Three Peaks Filing#I to ensure compliance with wetlands and insulated several areas that were lacking Insulation. regulation. • Met with Three Peaks development staff to discuss site appli- cation information needs for proposed lift station. NORTHtlV T COLORADO COUNCIL OE GOVERNMENTS-1999 ANNUAL REPORT 14 a 1999 Revenues Total = $1,255,729 Other NWCCOG Dues $25,300 142,584 2% QIQ Dues 11% $149,370 12% Program Fees $147000 - Federal 8t State 12% Donations Grants Local $684,860 $99,615 $7,0D0 54% 8% 1% 1999 Expenditures Total = $1,374,985 Q/Q AAAA $196,057 $247,331 Water Quality 14% 18% Community $100,293 _. Development 7% / $84,949 6% Regional Business $180,962 - 13% Elevator Inspection Specialized Services $1 17 9/o 0,810 4,994 - Energy Management 0% $442,589 33% 'Please note these are unaudited figures for 1999. 15 NORTHWLST COLORADO COUNCIL OF GOVERNMENTS—1999 ANNUAL REPORT 1999 BOARD OF DIRECTORS STAFF EAGLE COUNTY FRISCO GARY SEVERSON *)ohnette Phillips,Commissioner Michael Jordan,Council member Executive Director,xl 10 GRAND COUNTY GRANBY gjs@nwc.cog.co.us *Robert Anderson,Commissioner Ed Raffety,Mayor DORIS BELLAMENTE ACKSON COUNTY GRAND LAKE Director,Alpine Area Agency on Aging,x107 ssaaa @nwc.cog.co.us *Tootle Crowner,Commissioner Jim Peterson,Trustee RICK PAYNE PITKIN COUNTY GYPSUM Director, Elevator Inspection Program,x108 *Shellie Harter,Commissioner )eff Shroll,Town Manager elevator @nwc.cog.co.us SUMMIT COUNTY HOT SULPHUR SPRINGS STEVE GETZ *Bill Wallace,Commissioner Rachel)aramillo,Trustee Director, Energy Management Program,x103 ASPEN KREMMLING ROBERT RAY Tony Hershey,Councilmember *Peg Taft,Mayor Director,Water Quality Program,x104 AVON MINTURN wq@nwc.cog.co.us Bill ERing,Town Manager Alan Lanning,Town Manager LINDA VENTURONI BASALT MONTEZUMA Director, Special Projects,970/262-0739 Jacque Whitsitt,Trustee Kent Lange,Trustee lindav @nwc.cog.co.us BLUE RIVER RED CLIFF ROB CASTOR Darcie Lystlund,Trustee Betty Sandoval,Mayor Weatherization Inspector,x103 BRECKENRIDGE SILVERTHORNE DOUG)ONES Michael Bertaux,Councilmember Sheila Groneman,Councilmember Weatherization Installer,x103 DILLON VAIL NATE SPEERSTRA )a Laird,Councilmember *Sybill Navas,Councilmember Weatherization Installer,x103 EAGLE WALDEN RACHEL LUNN EY Willy Powell,Towlt Manager Kyle Fliniau,Mayor Community Development Coordinator,x123 r1unney@nwc.cog.co.us FRASER WINTER PARK Chuck Reid,Town Manager Daryl Shrum,Town Manager FRANK KILLIAN Elevator Inspector,x108 Executive Committee TAYLOR HAWES Co-Director,Water Quality/Quantity Comm.,xl 17 q q wa to r @co to ra d o.n e t Northwest Colorado Council of Governments IAN E 249 Warren Ave. Co-D P.O. Box 2308 WYATT Co-Director,Water Quality/Quantity Comm.,x1 ib Silverthorne, CO 80498 gglane @colorado.net Phone: (970) 468-0295 )UNE WALTERS Fax: (970) 468-1208 Director,Northwest Loan Fund,xl 19 website: www.nwc.COg.CO.uS nlfjune @colorado.net NORTHWEST COLORADO COUNCIL OF GOVERNMENTS—1999 ANNUAL REPORT 16 NORTHWEST COLORADO Bulk Rate US Posnige Nartxv&Cd"ado COUNCIL OF GOVERNMENTS PAID Post Office Box 2308 Permit No.n Silverthorne, Colorado 80498 Dillon,CO 80435 • / / / d Northwest Colorado Coull( il of Governmellis owl #j Gland County, Fi,isei, County, Aspvil, Suffinlit County, BILIC RiV01, PA 0A0111 111'1C, [Alon, Fi co, Hontc:urv, SlIvc-1111c),lie . Crnnifrnae NWCCOG SPONSORS GROWTH MANAGEMENT JULY CALENDAENDA R IN MOUNTAIN COMMUNITIES WORKSHOP JULY 10-12 WQCC Basic Standards Hearings Over 50 people attended the NWCCOG Planners' lie related growth statistics from around the state Denver,CO Resource Network workshop on Growth Manage- and stressed the importance of looking at the Contact: Roben Ray,x1 04 ment held in Vail on June 2, 2000.The workshop jobs to housing balance when considering JULY 11 i started out with presentations on the demograph- growth management planning. 10 am-12 pill ics of the region by Linda Venturoni,NWCCOG, Rich McClintock,CoPIRG's Executive Director, Workshop on Health Insurance Pools Silverthorne sown Hall-Silverthorne,CO Ford Frick, BBC Research and Consulting;and explained the Responsible Growth Initiative that Contact: Rachel I unney,x123 Cindy DeGrcen, State Demography Section. his group will be sponsoring as a ballot initiative JULY 12 Linda Venturoni started the for the fall election, and 10:30 am-3 pm workshop with a Chris Castilian from Colo- AAAA Regional Advisory Coundl pow,erPoint presentation %GIOW[II IB POpB18[IOB 1990-1998 rado Counties, Inc.ex- Silver Spruce Senior ApLs.-kremmling,CO plained some of the con- Contact:Dons Bellamente,x107 describing the growth trends in Region XII.She terns that county commis, JULY 13 explained that Colorado sinners have regarding the 1 pm-4 pm 41% GIS User's Group has been growing at almost r�, initiative Bill Lamont rep- Dillon lown Hall-Dillon,CO three times the national ••' ti% resented the Colorado ConlAd:I inrla Venturoni,262-0739 ° Chapter of the American average and this region has JULY 20 Planning Association and � been growing even faster, at Is 11:30 am- 3:30 p"' li an average of 40%as the „ M ,,,_•,•,,,_ related their view of the Dept.of Local Affairs Budget Workshop chart to the right displays. types of planning princi- Silverthornr Recmation Center Contact: Rec Center,262-7370 or Cathy lea that need to be inco- Y The fastest growing towns Shipley,468-2183 in the region include(in posted into growth man- JULY 27 order of growth rate)Silver- POpU18[IOp Pr01®CIIOpS plans.agement implementation 9:30 am-1 pm Gyp- NWCCOG 1011-1171 plans. DRCOG's Scott Thorne, Frisco, Basalt, L°°L° Board of Directors ., Woodard presented the I ras. r town Hall : sum and Avon. u°e° - '"--- r.r "Metro Vision" model in �-. Contact:Ga ry Severson,x110 The growth in this region is 10� which the metro area in- AUGUST projected to continue, as men --��� risdictions are (ormulat- AUGUST 9&10 the"Population Projec- loon ing intergovernmental Western Slope Legislative Assembly lions"chart to the right de- ° agreements,which facili- Holiday Inn-Grand Junction,CO f 281, 211, me 2015 our pitting projections from the rate their implementation Contact:Doris Bellamente,x107 ,„,,,, ,,,M„�,,,,s,,,,",,, State Demographers' Office of 2020 Vision devel- Hot To ics in 23/25 Hot Topics in Smart Growth shows. oiled amongst the(rout Regional Forums Ford Frick discussed changes that have been occur- range communities. I Sponsored by CML,Colorado Dept.of Lo- ring in the traditional ski towns as they evolve into The luncheon speaker was Bob Brooks, Execu- cal Affairs,and CCI mountain resort communities.Cindy DeGroen live Director, Colorado Department of Local Pueblo/l t.Collins/Durangn/Grand Junction Contact:Dept.of t oval Affairs Office of explained the studies the State Demography Sec- Affairs.Bob explained the role his department Smart Growth,303/866-2353 tion is conducting into the economic base econo- will play in distributing some Smart Growth AUGUST 25 noes of the states industries,currently focusing on funds around the state.The afternoon panel con, 9:30 am-I pm tourism and its'primary and secondary impacts. sisted of local elected officials and planners from NWCCOG Executive Committee/Staff The morning panel explored legislative attempts to Region XIJ who described growth related plan- Strategic Planning Session ol springs lodge-Glenwood Springs,CO ' address growth management concerns,and other ning initiatives from their individual jurisdic- I{ H Gary Severson,x110 models and perspectives on what needs to happen Lions.The panelists included Keith Montag,Ea- Contact: in the future.State Senator Bryan Sullivant(R- gle County;Amy Ito,Town of Frisco;Jacque SEPTEMBER StrTln/ala 2e District 13)explained the legislation he sponsored Whitsitt;Town of Basalt;Lurline Underbrink 9:30 am-1 pm in the past session,the Responsible Growth Act, Curran,Grand County;and Mick Ireland, Pit, NWCCOG Board of Directors and why it did not pass. kin County.c8 Basalt lown Hall-Basali,CO PAGE 1 MESSAGE FROM THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR . . . Have you ever noticed how management Geographic Information System(GIS)that would link the governmen- buzzwords seem to fill our vocabularies like tal jurisdictions of our region. NWCCOG also received a small grant a swelling tide and then eventually fade from FannieMae to explore employer assisted housing programs in our from consciousness like a wisp of smoke in five county region. Then in 2000,NWCCOG received a grant from W_ an evening breeze.' Remember the words the USDA Forest Service to develop a process of collaboration between and phrases of the recent past such as bias the Forest Service and local governments. Also, in 2000,NWCCOG for action, valuedriven, biggest bang for the back, received a grant from the US Environmental Protection Agency to up- netvvorking, dovetailing,downsizing, or total date the region's water quality plan. In a recent discussion with Bob quality management? The concepts repre- Brooks, Executive Director of the Colorado Department of Local Af- sented by the words are usually nothing fairs,NWCCOG has determined that it will apply for a Colorado Gory Smmon,Iae<ume IArecrm more than new packaging of common Smart Growth Grant to develop a model for tracking and projecting sense principles that cause organizations social and economic trends to provide information to decision makers. to send legions of managers and employees to training sessions and What is the nexus for these different projects? The display of interre- put new wealth in the pockets of the management consultants plying lated data on maps to provide the public with better understanding and the training trade. Before you think I have become a total cynic, let elected officials with more reliable information on which to base deci- me say that revisiting many of the time-tested principles for working sions. I firmly believe that all of these projects overlap with one an- with one another in an efficient and effective manner is a good other and will be efficiently and effectively addressed by NWCCOG thing,so 1 will probably sec you at a future management training ses- and its members and cooperators. Sion. So, in this current nexus age it is nice to know that Northwest Colorado One of the newest management buzzwords currently making its way Council of Governments is a nexus and provides a nexus for our valu- into boardrooms is the word nexus. I have to admit that when I first able customers, the county and municipal governments of northwest saw the word nexus it was the name on the label of a bottle of hair Colorado. Shampoo that my wife and I used several years ago. But the way the Cheers! word nexus is being used today does not have anything to do with washing one's hair. For example, "We have to develop a nexus be- Gary Severson, Executive Director cA tween our customers' needs and our product offerings in order to capture market share to maintain share holder sustainabiliry" After looking up the word nexus in the dictionary I boldly offer a literal translation of the aforementioned phrase, "We have to produce products that our customers will buy so our stock holders will be N W C C 0 G Now OFFERS happy." The word nexus simply means a connection; a link or a tie. PNWCCOG EROSION CONTROL What does the word nexus have to do with Northwest Colorado Council of Governments? I have discovered that it has a lot to do WORKSHOP with our organization in terms of who we are and what we do. o w offering a workshop on Erosion and Sediment NWCCOG is a nexus. It is a link between county and municipal gov- ernments;a connection between local governmental jurisdictions Control through its Specialized Services Program. The workshop separated by distance and dramatic geographical features. The mem- focuses on the following issues: her needs assessment that Rachel Lunney,NWCCOG's Director of • The relationship between water quality and dirt" Member Services has been conducting, asks the question, "Why do * Keeping soil on site you [)(,long to NWCCOG"' Many of the member jurisdictions have • Federal, State, and Local regulations regarding responded with, "because it is the only organization that brings both erosion and sediment control the towns and counties of the region together to discuss needs and • Best Management Practices regarding erosion and issues." T he regional forum for counties and municipalities is the sediment control foundation upon which NWCCOG is built and we will never lose ♦ Do's and Don'ts of erosion and sediment control Sight of that important fact. This workshop is presented by Robert Ray, Director of NWCCOG's Secondly,Northwest Colorado Council of Governments provides a Watershed Services Program. Robert has a B.S. in Biology and an nexus for addressing separate,but related issues. For example,we M.S. in Marine Science and has over 13 years'experience in have discovered linkages between rapid population growth,transpor- environmental analysis in local, state and regional government. The tation, affordable housing,public lands management,geographic in- workshop is appropriate for planning staff,elected officials,and the formation systems,water quality and quantity, senior care,and the development community. Erosion and Sediment Control improvement and maintenance of existing hou mg stock and c om- Workshops have been offered to the Town of Basalt and Grand menial building space. It has been amazing to .ne to discover the County thus far. Please call Robert Ray,Director of Watershed interrelationships between ash seemingly disparate topics. Services at 970/468-0295 x104 for more information or to schedule a workshop. In 1999,NWCCOG was successful in obtaining a grant from the Energy and Minerals Impact Assistance Fund to build a Pace 2 REGIONAL INITIATIVES NWCCOG RECEIVES BUILDING,, RIArF fRO°;1ECT $ 53 , 000 GRANT TO KICKS OFF JONE 8TH UPDATE On Thursday,June 8th, stakeholders in the Building Bridges Project,a proj- 208 PLAN ect initiated by NWCCOG to develop a communication platform for locally The US Environmental Protection Agency Ad elected officials,community leaders,and decision level personnel of federal has awarded the Watershed Services land and resource management agencies to communicate better, kicked off Program a grant to revise the Northwest Colorado Council of with a meeting in Idaho Springs. Those present included Bill Wallace and Governments'Regional Water Quality Management Plan. Gary Lindstrom,Summit County Commissioners;Peg Toft,Mayor of I he$53,311 grant will allow the Watershed Services Program Kremmmling and Chair of NWCCOG;Martha Ketelle, Forest Supervisor, to develop a comprehensive revision of the Plan. The current USES White River National Forest;Jamie Connell, Dillon Ranger District, Plan was last updated in 1998. The Regional Water Quality USFS;Bob Dettmann, Director of the Rural Communities Assistance Pro- Management Plan is also called the 208 Plan, as Section 208 of gam,USES;Jim Westeott, State Demographer;Dr.George Wallace,Proles- the Federal Clean Water Act requires regional water quality sor of Forestry and Natural Resources, Colorado State University; Kate Faye, Planning and management strategies. Anticipated revision }executive Director of the Colorado Center for Healthy Communities; and areas of the plan include: Gary Severson,Robert Ray, and Rachel Lunney of NWCCOG. The ses- • Addition of new water quality data and data analysis; sion was facilitated by Connie Lewis of the Meridian Institute and Jack Tay- • Recommendations for water quality standards; for of the Rocky Mountain Resource Center. • A process for approving site applications and expansions of wastewater facilities; the impetus for this project was • New population projections and wastewater treatment "The West i5 filling up, and the identification by NWCCOG's plant needs to meet population demands; the resources are limited. membership that there needs to be • Discussion regarding water quality impacts of septic We all have to do a better better communication between systems and management/operation recommendations; job of working together." federal land management agencies . Agreements to advance nonpoint source and stormwater - Bob Dettmon, USFS and local jurisdictions in this re- management with various entities; gion because so much of the land • Recommendations for nonpoint source projects and n this region is owned and man- aged by the 11SFS. priorities. The Watershed Services Program will begin the update process NWCCOG was awarded a$23,600 grant from the USFS through the Rural by working with local watershed groups and then will move to Communities Assistance Program for this project,which will focus on public discussions with local government staff,elected officials and land issues within the Blue River Watershed from Hoosier Pass to finally,out-of-area stakeholders such as trans-basin water users, Kremmling as the pilot area. NWCCOG has been working with Bob Dett, state officials,etc. The update process is expected to take I t/z man, Director of the RCA Program,who identified a real need for this proj- years,with a COG Board approval anticipated by November of ect in this area. "Ilie West is filling up, and the resources are limited.We all 2001. if you have questions,comments,or ideas you would like have to do a better job of working together" said Bob Dettman at the June to have explored in the development of the 208 Plan revision, 8th meeting. please contact Robert Ray, Director of Watershed Services at The meeting was mainly a brainstorming session to determine project vision, 970/468-0295 x104.eae roles of participants,potential outcomes, a workplan and a timeline. What Are the End Products? At the meeting,the group began to form preliminary visions of what the end ' products would be. It was determined that what would eventually result • • 1 ORS would be a memorandum of understanding between all parties and a "toolkit" for collaboration and cooperation between governmental entities regarding the management of public lands. This MOU and toolkit will de- scribe "how we will talk,when we will talk, and what we will talk about". Some of the"what's"mentioned during the meeting were issues such as dis- ease control, fire mitigation,water quality,growth and development,and wildlife patterns, and how these issues impact both public and private lands. G iH Vidal, The next step in the process will be the establishment of a steering committee - ,r,Denver Regional COG made up of elected officials from Grand and Summit Counties as well as Fred Van Antwerp, USFS and BLM decision makers. I he steering committee will further define ",,, txecutive Director,Pikes Peak Area COG what the products are and how they will be used. For more information about the Building Bridges project, please contact Gary Severson at 970/468- 0295 x110 or Rachel Lunney at x123ra PAGE 3 ALPINE AREA AGENCY ON AGING • FIB 1072, sponsored by Representative Frana Mace,was and Aging Services,requested a budget increase to be used for signed into law at a ceremony with Governor Owens,May funding community based programs. The Department re, 23rd.This bill provides$3 million for SFY 2000 -2001, ceived an increase of$186.198,which is to be distributed to for community based programs for Coloradoans 60+.The AAAs. bill stipulates that the dollars are for funding for one year, May was the national celebration of Older Americans Month. and cannot be used to start new programs.The Colorado The theme this year was,"In the New Century,the Future is Association of Area Agencies on Aging appreciates Rep. Aging".As part of the celebration,AAAA recognized Seniors Mace's hard work, the support of the Governor, of the Year and Friends of the Seniors for each county,as well W NW CLOG, CM L, CARC,the Older Americans Coalition, as a regional award,at our May Regional Advisory Council as well as the many seniors who actively participated in help- meeting. Congratulations to those receiving the Senior of the ing this become a reality.Triple A Directors are continuing Year awards!Eagle County: Gertrude Medina; Grand County: to work on funding beyond this one year and will be seek, Fern Neal& Inell Harvey;Jackson County: Full Porterfield; Q ing Your support. Pitkin County: Ramona Markalunas;Summit County:Alyce At the same time I IS 1072 was being proposed,the Cola &Jim Miller; Region XII:Virginia Rose from Eagle County. rado Department of I luman Services, Division of Adult (continued on page 6) QCOMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT T he Community Development program staff has been meet, Report will also be available to all members. ing with members since February as part of NWCCOG's News from the Department of Local Affairs Member Needs Assessment. All meetings have been com- The next deadlines for Energy and Mineral Impact Assistance pleted and the information regarding members needs and Grants are August 1 and December 1, 2000. Please contact the resources that would help meet those needs is being com- Cathy Shipley, 970/468.2183 or Rachel Looney 970/468- piled into a report that will be used at the August Executive 0295 x123 for more information. CQ Committee Strategic Planning Session. The final ELEVATOR INSPECTION The Elevator Inspection Program has been receiving numery in attracting customers. Presently there are 916 units in the ous telephone calls from architects and building engineers elevator program,with approximately 30 more units coming regarding the requirements for upgrading elevators in exist, on line before the end of 2000.The Town of Carbondale has ing buildings.As the number of skier days decline, managers recently expressed interest in possibly joining the program as and building owners in the resort communities look to at- well. There are 8 units in the town currently and 2 more tracting more summer visitors,and there is a desire to up- that are now being installed.NW CCOG has also scheduled grade their facilities so they can be more competitive in at- a meeting with the Town of Snowmass Village to discuss the tracting the visitor to their place of business.phis is a pru- possibility of the town joining NW CCOG, and therefore dent investment on their part as a lot of the elevators are ap- joining the Elevator Program.For more information,please preaching 25-30 years of age. Modernizing the elevator as call Rick Payne,Director of the Elevator Inspection Program part of the building's overall upgrade is a good invesnnent of at 970/4684295 x108. c�3 V time and resources as it will help the owners/managers ENERGY MANAGEMENT O Weatherization enters the new century with new income have jobs,but who are still struggling every month due to guidelines - A recent approval by the Department of Energy lower than average wages. The higher income guidelines will allow Colorado's Energy$aving Partners(E$P)Program have also been brought about, in part,by drastic increases in to offer higher income guidelines for weatherization recipi- the operating efficiencies of Colorado's State and local cuts. Weatherization agencies. Barfield recently released figures Gene Barfield,State Weatherization Director for the Gover. that show that, in the period of time from 1996 to 1999,of- nor s Office of Energy Management and Conservation fice and administrative overhead has decreased by 30%! In (OF.MC), stated "the Federal poverty guidelines really 1996,office and administrative overhead costs consumed haven't kept pace with the rising cost of housing in Cola 29%of the statewide budget;by 1999,that figured had been rado.° One response to this problem will be higher income pared to only 20%. This has released$730,000 annually that guidelines for the weatherization program. The higher an, used to be spent on overhead; these funds are now available nual income limits will allow weatherization agencies across for labor and materials to work on additional homes. Colorado to better serve the working poor - families who (continued on page 6) PAGt 4 NORTHWEST LOAN FUND The Northwest Loan Fund is enjoying a busy Spring. Several Funds are still available for financing viable start-up and/or loans have been closed throughout the territory including young, expanding businesses. Please contact June Walters, Roby's Internet Cafe in Redstone;Red Hill Animal Health Director at 970/468.0295 x 119 for more information. (Q Center in Carbondale;Wetland Studies,Inc.in Carbondale; Smed's Pro Irrigation Service in Rifle; B& B Restaurant in O Dinosaur;and Sahnana Foods, Inc. in Dinosaur. SPECIALIZED SERVICES NWCCOG staff has been very busy providing a variety of Spe- ♦ Summit County Seniors-Continuum of Care Focus C) cialized Services to members in the second quarter of 2000 Groups and Issue Analysis including: ♦ Grand County - Issue Analysis on Possible Trails and ♦ Town of Frisco- Town Council Retreat;Community Open Space Ballot Initiative; Erosion Control Train- Sw • Town of Dillon - Customer Focus Training ♦ Town of Grand Lake - }Ionic Rule Status Study ♦ Town of Kremmling- 'I own Council Retreat ♦ Town of Basalt/Pitkin County - Erosion Control ♦ Town of Granby- Town Council Retreat Training • Summit County - Cultural Diversity Project;Shaping For more information regarding NWCCOG's Specialized air Summit Community Indicators Project Services contact Rachel Lunney at 970/4680295 x 123.cQ WATERSHED SERVICES The Watershed Services Program (WS)is working with the Q/ for$10,000 from the Colorado River Water Conservation Q Committee to Provide testimony to the State Water Quality District for additional data collection and hydraulic model- Control Conunission on basic standards and methodologies ing. The WS program continues to participate in and pro- rule making hearing. The hearings are set for July 10-13. The vide technical assistance to several watershed groups in- WS program is working with the state on the Fraser River eluding the Snake River Task Force,French Gulch Reme- Nonpoint Source sediment project as well as the Clean lakes diation C)pportunities Group, the Eagle River Watershed Assessment grant for Granby,Shadow Mountain and Grand Council,and the Black Gore Creek Steering Committee. Takes. The WS program is also working with the State to de- In the next several weeks, the WS program will be develop v velop an improved state certification process for 404 permit- ing a workplan for the$53,311 EPA grant it received to ting. revise the Regional Water Quality Management Plan(208 Work is continuing on the Blue River Restoration Master Plan). For more information on the Watershed Services Plan,and the WS program has obtained an additional grant Program,please contact Robert Ray, Director,at 970/468- 0295 x104. .cQ WATER QUALITY / QUANTITY COMMITTEE The QQ Program will follow up its May 17'Forum on developed a state sponsored water project designed to divert Growth and Water with two additional meetings. The May 120,000 acre feet of water from either the Colorado or Gunni- Forum brought together elected officials from the Front son River Basin. Summit County Commissioner Tom Long and Range and I leadwaters communities to begin a discussions Grand County Commissioner James Newberry will represent on growth policies and how those policies effect communi- QQ. ties on the opposite side of the Continental Divide. Grand Another outcome is a meeting of elected officials from both the County Commissioner and QQ Chairman James Newberry Front Range and Headwaters to continue the dialogue initiated at facilitated the discussion and helped represent headwater the Forum. The purpose of this meeting will be to develop a bet, interests in the panel discussion. The Forum was well at- ter mutual understanding of surface and groundwater manage- tended and was seen as a positive step toward improved com- ment and to improve our awareness of each other's approach to munication with Front Range policy makers. growth and water management. This meeting is still being One outcome from the Forum was an invitation to Headwater planned and will likely occur sometime late this summer or early • communities by Arapahoe County Commissioner to attend the fall. June 29a'meeting of the Colorado Water Partnership(CWP). The For more information on QQ,please contact Lane Wyatt at CW P is an affiliation of Front Range local governments that intro xI 16 or Taylor Hawes at xI 17. cat duced a bill in the 2000 legislature which would have Pace 5 PROGRAM UPDATES (CON'T) Alpine Area Agency on Aging(con't from page+): $ 80 ,, 000 I N GRANTS A V A I L A B L Friend of the Senior award recipients were: Eagle THROUGH N W C C O G t s County:Jo Ann Moore;Grand County: Denise His REGIONAL GIS PROJECT His- cocks& Rosie O'llotto;Jackson County: Mary Kellog; Pitkin County: Marilyn Rice;Summit County:Town of The regional GIS project has completed the needs assessment portion of the project Frisco;Region XII:Representative Frana Mace.Con- plan.The next step is the local application phase. NWCCOG will distribute ap- grandations to all who make our communities a better proximately$80,000 in Department of Local Affairs funds to assist NW CCOG it', place for the seniors we serve.The Jackson County risdictions in implementing their local and regional GIS plans. The information Council on Aging hosted the meeting.We thank them for the wonderful lunch they provided. below outlines the time line for the grant application and implementation process: Doris Bellamente will be visiting with each sub, Grant Application Available April 30, 2000 grantee through June and July.She will be conducting County Meetings April 20W program assessments for 1999. Dev.of Coop.Strategies/Work Plans April-July, 2000 Grant Application Due Date July 31, 2000 AAAA is working with western slope AAA Directors Grant Completion Date June 30, 2001 and the Colorado Senior Lobby to present the Western Slope I egislative Assembly in Grand Junction Wednes- T he nerd meeting of the Region XII GIS User's Group will be Thursday,July 13'", day,August 9 and Thursday,August 10,at the Holiday from 1:00 - 4:00 p.m.at the Dillon Town I hall. For more information contact Inn.There will be small group discussions regarding Linda Venturoni 970/262-0739 or e-mail Iindav@nwc.cog.co.us2CQ federal or state policy initiatives and legislation affect- ing seniors.Questions and concerns will be shared with legislators in attendance as well as others.If you would like to attend,or know someone who should,please COMMUNITY RESOURCES CORNER ask hinr/lrer to call Doris Ilellamente at 970/4680295 FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES X107. As part of an Adult Day/Assisted Living Task Force in AOL Rural Telecom Leadership Awards Summit County,AAAA has been involved in the prey Recognizing and promoting telecommunications innovations that strengthen entation of an educational piece,"Summit County...A rural communities. Community for a Lifetime".The task force contracted Deadline: July 14. with NWCCOG's Linda Venturoni to create this edu- wuav.ruraltelecon.org/aolawards.mp cational piece. The purpose of the presentation is to Department of Local Affairs educate the community regarding the continuum of Energy and Mineral Impact Assistance Grants care, inventory what is currently in place,and identify Deadline: two cycles remain for 2000 -August 1 & December I the missing components on the continuum.This will Contact: Cathy Shipley, 970/468-2183 or Rachel Lunney 970/468-0295 x123. be followed by focus groups of citizens who are facing a .state.co.w/data2/fs/emia.htm some issues regarding the availability of services in our Colorado Division of Housing- Housing Development Funds community for those of all ages who may need assis- Grants or loans for development of housing for low-income households-pub- tance. tic/private partnerships between community groups and developers are encour- Energy Management(con't from page 4) aged. The new income guidelines will allow'E$P to increase the Deadline: Applications accepted on a continuous basis. amount of Public Service Company funds that can be lever- Contact: 303/86&2033 aged into the program. Also,6$P has started to attract fund- u .state.co.us/dot/doh.htm ing front private foundations,such as the Colorado Energy Colorado State Trails/GOCO Assistance Foundation(CEAF). Public Service Company '1 rail project planning,trail research,capacity building. (PSCo)also recently instituted an inflation factor,so that Deadline: December 1, 2000. funds made available by PSCo will increase every year. Contact: Jack Placchi 303/866-3203 x338 or Chris I lolm 970/434-6862 The new Weatherization income guidelines in effect as GIS/ GPS Projects of July 1, 2000 are as follows:(the following are listed State&Local Government GIS/GPS Demonstration Project Program. in this order: family size/annual income guideline) l/ Deadline: August 31, 2000. $15,448; 2/$20,813; 3/$26,178;4/$31,543; 5/ Contact: Christopher Thomas,ESRI,909/793.2853. $36,908; 6/$42,273;for each additional member add uvrw .eni.com/indusrries/localgov/e�i_leica_announce.htrrd $5,365. If you know of a family in your community that you RESOURCES / TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE think could benefit from W eatherization,please have The following are some interesting websites that offer a wealth of resources: them call NWCCOG's Energy Management Director www.notat.org/nose -National Center for Small Communities Steve Getz at 970/468-0295 x103 www.smartgrowth.org/index_fromeset.htmi -Smart Growth Net, work www.sustainable.org -Sustainable Communities Network PAGE 6 www.reap.org -Rural Community Assistance Program IMAW PEOPLE NOTES "�" �' �° '"..,`MEMBER SPOTLIGHT: Linda Venturoni completes q-. Bob Anderson O 19 Years of Employment at t Grand County Commissioner NWCCOG Vice-Chair, Congratulations to Linda Venturoni, Director '' NWCCOG Board of Directors of Special Projects,on her 19th anniversary of Bob Anderson is in his 8th year as a Grand employanent with NWCCOG. Linda's skills County Commissioner, and in addition is and talents,coupled with her knowledge of the Bob Anderson currently serving as the Vice-Chair of the region provide an invaluable service to NWCCOG Board. Bob was born in Iowa, but has made Granby his home NWCCOG. We appreciate her initiative,urea- for more than 35 years. His active involvement with the republican party tiveness and professionalism producing products prompted him to run for office. Bob has many goals as a commissioner, in- and services for our members. eluding facilitating the formation of a county-wide health district. Bob has been on the NWCCOG board for 6 years, and is a strong believer in region- alism. "It used to be that Summit and Grand County had very little in com- O Rachel Lunney is Promoted to mon. Now, with so many people living in Kremmling and commuting to Director of Member Services Summit County for work, it is so important that the two counties work to- Rachel looney, previously Office Coordinator ion o t many issues. Regionalism is the key," states Bob. Asked his a has ion on the change and growth in Grand County over the 35 years he has and Community Development Coordinator,has lived there, Bob states "I've seen progressive change that is healthy and good. been promoted to Director of Member Services. I am an advocate of growth, and I'm not afraid to say it." Bob, his wife Rachel's main responsibilities in this role will be JoAnn, their son, daughter, son-in-law, daughtenin-law and 3 grandchildren to be knowledgeable of the current needs of our all live in Granby. Bobs favorite thing in life is to go on vacations with his members and to implement programs and serv- entire family. As far as other hobbies, Bob states, 'other than vacations with ices to meet those needs. Congratulations,Ra- my family, I don't have any other hobbies. Being a county commissioner is chel! like a hobby because I enjoy the challenge so much...and I have no plans to retire any time soon!"cal Welcome New Town Managers° NWCCOG would like to welcome the new town managers to its membership: STAFF SPOTLIGHT: Tim Gaagen- Tam 4 13rcdmridge Tom Hak- Tainof GranhV .• Doris Bellamente Kt�in lle0wWer- Tarn of Sdwrdiome Director, O Alpine Area Agency on Aging NWCCOG would like to extend a Welcome "CONGRATUI-ATTONS!" to Doris Bellamente, Di- New Board Members rector of NWCCOG's Alpine Area Agency on Aging (AAAA). She placed second in her age group at the NWCCOG would like to welcome the following , Park City Marathon in Park City, Utah on June 10". new members to the Board of Directors: Jim Laub- QamciLirmbm,Tmn of lkedcerridge i :,�•A n Doris has sensed as AAAA director since July of over 15 mdee Cadrall-Qxmdlnrnbeq ToanoflMkn and has been involved in senior services for over 15 J Doris Bellamente IAw Anti-Coumciln"oler,Tacn of lirism years. "My goals for the AAAA program are to break IWO Mayo,Tam of Gra,rby down stereotypes that society continues to carry about Dick 7homixn-May Brenda Mors,-Trustee,Tmm of Hot Sulphur Sprinp;. aging, to educate our communities about the growth we are experiencing in NWCCOG would like todmk you for wrvingon the senior population, and to help communities prepare so that we can put the NWCCOGBoardofDirectors! systems into place that will serve this population," states Doris. Doris lives a O very active lifestyle and has been running since 1986. She has run three 'R,p.dgv5nir,p.�liVa.fr@�bt'c`" marathons and is an avid hiker, cyclist, crossscountry skier and snowshoer.as well According to Doris, the best thing about completing the Park City Heidi Duston,the labor attorney who Marathon was running the entire race side by side her daughter, Rachel. gave a presentation on Public Service Lmploy- When asked to sum tip the feeling of her accomplishment, Doric stated nient Issues Workshop in March, has joined a "Running shoes-$90; running shorts-$25; the experience of running with new law firm. I leidi is now with Holland and my daughter in her first marathon -priceless!"cat Hart in Denver, and can be reached at 303/295- 8000. rn Puce 7 NWCCOG BOARD OF DIRECTORS NWCCOG STAFF DORIS BELLAMENfE RICK PAYNE EAGLE COUNTY FRISCO Director,AAAA,x107 Director,Elevator Inspect. og' Pr x108 'Johnnelte Phillips,Commissloner David Amli,Counalmember ssaaa @nwc.cog.co.us elevator @nwc.cog.w.us GRAND COUNTY GRANBY STEVE GETZ ROBERT RAY 'Robert Anderson,Commissioner Dick Thomps. n,Mayor Director,E nergy Mgmnt Prog.,x103 Director,Watershed Services.,x104 JACKSON COUNTY GRAND LAKE sgelz @nwc.cog.co.us wq @nwc.cog.co.us 'I ootie Crowner,Commissioner Jim Peterson,trustee BARBARA GREEN,Sullivan Green GARY SEVERSON PITKIN COUNTY GYPSUM General Counsel,303/355-4405 Executive Director,x110 'I eshe Lamont,Comnusaoner Jeff Shroll,Town Manager lawgreen @earthlink.net gjs @nwc.cog.co.us SUMMIT COUNTY HOT SULPHUR SPRINGS TAYLOR HAWES NATE SPEERSTRA 'Bill Wallace,Commissioner Brenda Morrow,Trustee Co-Director,Water QQ Comm.,xt 17 Weatherization Installer,x103 ASPEN KREMMLING q gwater@co lorado.n et Tony l lershey,Counclmember 'Peg Ioft,Mayor j DOUGJONES LINDAVENTURONI AVON MINTURN Weatherization Installer,x103 Director,Special Projects,970/262-0739, linclav@nwc.cog.co.us Bill f fling,low,Manager Alan Lanning,Town Manager FRANK KILLIAN JUNE WALTERS BASALT MONTEZUMA Devator Inspector,x108 Director,Northwest Loan Fund,x119 Jacque Whitcitt, Kent Lange,irustee RACHEL LUNNEY CORAWINTERS BLUE RIVER REDCLIFF Director,Member Services,x123 Administrative Assistant.,x100 Darcie lystlund,trustee Betty Sandoval,Mayor rlunney @nwc.cog.co.us cwinters@nwc.cog.co.us BRECKENRIDGE SILVERTHORNE LANE WYATT Jim I am[),CounolmeriMr Sheila Groneman,Councilmember Co-Director,Water QQ Comm.,xl 16 DILLON VAIL gglane@colorado.net Jude('Cathrall,Councilmember 'Sybil)Navas,Mayor Pro lem NWCCOG was established as Colorado Planning and Management Region EAGLE WALDEN XII in 1972 by Executive Order of the Governor. NWCCOC's mission is to Willy Powell,Town Manager Kyle Fliniau,Mayor be responsive to our members'needs and interests by providing guidance and assistance in problem solving,information sharing,and partnership building;advocat- FRASER WINTER PARK ing members'interests and needs with local,state,and federal entities;and providing Chuck Reid, Town Manager Daryl Shrum,Town Manager quality services to our membership that are relevant,effective,and efficient. 'Executive Committee Editor: Rachel 1 unney Bulk Rate US Postage NORTHWEST COLORADO COUNCIL OF GOVERNMENTS PAID Post Office Box 2308 Permit No. 17 co c�4ovrinM�i SiNerthorne, Colorado 80498 DTao4s5D INSIDE THIS ISSUE ♦ NWCCOG SPONSORS GRGwTH MANAGEMENT WORKSHOP- PAGE 1 ♦CALENDAR- PAGE 1 ♦ MESSAGE FROM THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR- PAGE 2 ♦ NWCCOG OFFERS EROSION CONTROL WORKSHOP- PAGE 2 ♦ BUILDING BRIDGES PROJECT- PAGE 3 ♦WATERSHED SERVICES PROGRAM RECEIVES EPA GRANT- PAGE 3 ♦ PROGRAM UPDATES- PAGES 4 @ S ♦ NWCCOG OFFERS GRANTS FOR GIS PROJECTS- PAGE 6 ♦ COMMUNITY RESOURCES CORNER- PAGE 6 ♦FOCUS ON NWCCOG PEOPLE- PAGE 7 nmwwmqiii� I • COURIER Api H 2000 Not-111%vest Colorado C0111161 of Governillents sel�'jn� Eagle County, A\'o I I, B,isili, E,� '10, Ul�1) LI I)I, t-li III�I III, Red C I 1r, VIj I, Gi and County, Fi I, I, County, AsIpin, Summit County, MLIC kl' C I, DiC6XII I J_'�, DI I 100, Fi LIW I,, �1, 11110 111 f3yos Cattyrnt in Gm,d County,Colorado NWCCOG TESTIFIES BEFORE U . S . SENATE CALENDAR On February 23, 2000 Gary Severson,Executive ♦ A multi-jurisdictional collaborative process APRIL Director of Northwest Colorado Council of Gov- must be established for the identification, APRIL 27 ernments testified on behalf of member jurisdic- planning, management, and monitoring of 10:00 am—1 pm 1 Lions before the Senate Subcommittee on Forests intermixed and/or adjacent lands of other NWCCOG Executive Committee and Public Land Management. The hearing was I jurisdictions that are of concern to those Eagle County Courthouse called to collect testimony from Colorado groups Contact: Gary Severson,x110 and organizations on the proposed revision of the Jurisdictions. MAY White River National Forest land and Resource ♦ A collaborative process must be established MAY 10 Management Plan. NWCCOG members Commis to identify goals and objectives for multi- 10:30 am—3 m sioner Tom Stone from Eagle County and Commis jurisdictional management actions that will f AAAA Regional Advisory Council stoner Dorothea Farris from Pitkin strive to sustain community vitality Soil Conservation Office— I County were also invited to testify by corn• and healthy ecosystems on a re- Walden,CO mittee chairman Senator Larry Craig from gional basis. Contact: Doris Bellarnente,x107 Idaho. In addition,Severson entered into In addition,Severson hand carried a MAY 11 the official record a response from the letter from Bob Brooks,Executive j 1 pm—4 pm Summit County Board of Commissioners. Director of the Colorado Depart- I Region Al GIS User Group Severson's testimony focused on the NWCCOG ment of Local Affairs and had it entered into the Eagle County Courthouse—Eagle,CO record. Senator Ben Nighthorse Campbell read response to the White River National Forest Plan. Contact: Linda Venturoni,262-0739 Due to the diversity of its membership,NWCCOG the following from the Brooks letter to the com- MAY 17 does not identify a preferred management alterna• mittee members and witnesses: "The National 9 am—3:30 pm Live,but rather calls for the inclusion of three items Forest system has profound effects upon the economy, Water Quality/Quantity Board of into whatever plan is adopted. land use and growth patterns,and law enforcement Directors efforts of neighboring local governments. Fm this rea Silverthorne Recreation Center— • The effects of urbanization (growth) on multi, son, it is important that formal mechanisms be in Silvenhorne,CO jurisdictional planning and management must eluded in your]White River National Forest]plan Contact:Taylor Hawes,x117 be assessed in collaboration with appropriate whichwill effect collaboration and cooperation with MAY 25 local general-purpose governmental jurisdic- those local agencies. The recommendations of the 9:30 am—1:30 pm tions and local, state, and federal land and re- Northwest Colorado Council of Governments,were NWCCOG Board of Directors source management agencies. they embraced by the Forest,would provide such a WattenburgCenter—Walden,CO process.11(Q Contact: Cary Severson,x110 MAY 29 Memorial Day- NWCCOGOffices NWCCOG EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE MEMBERS FOR 2000 Closed At the January 27th, 2000 Board of Directors meeting,the NWCCOG board elected 7 executive com- ;I JUNE mittee members and appointed officers. The Executive Committee members for 2000 are as follows: NO BOARD MEETING IN JUNE Peg To$Ma}or,Town ofKrenunding(Chair) Bob Anderson,Chard CounryCommissioner Nice Chair) { ♦ � � .� Toone Croatia,Jackson CounryCnnmtissbrer(Secrerary/freaatrer) '�'l..• r_ I Johnnette Aullipa,Este CountyCormassbner Bill Wagam,Summit CourryCocmnssianer aN Leslie Imnmt,Pitkin County Commissiorer R Sytilli Naws,Mayor Pro 1em,Tam o(Veil Alternate:JefShroll,Tosco Manager,T own ofCrypam Alternate: Alari Larming,Towrn Manager,Town ofMintum NWOMG would W to thank all elected officials andstaff f ont our memberjundictions • {"7 p,4:, _ who sztve on the NWGCOG Board of Drectarsl PAGE 1 HWCCOG P.O. Box 2308 249 Wanen Ave. Silvertboine, CO 80498 1, 970/468-0295 . Fax 970/468-1208 . www.nw(.co,,,.Co.uS MESSAGE FROM THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR . . . As I was flying back to Washington,D.C. message of cooperation,not confrontation. While other groups and on February 22, 2000 to testify on behalf of organizations are frequently quoted in the media regarding the White the twenty-six member jurisdictions of River National Forest,NWCCOG's message is often unreported simply Northwest Colorado Council of Govern- because it is not controversial. Forest Service Regional Forester Lyle ments to a Senate committee,I began mus- Laverty mentioned NWCCOG by name in his testimony to the Senate ` '•-� ing about the chain of unpredicted events Committee,and he spoke of the cooperative effort currently underway that led me to be on that airplane. The by his agency and NWCCOG to construct a cooperative process for chairman of the Sub-committee on Forests land use management with local governments. and Public Land Management,Senator Where will this effort lead NWCCOG? Based on the unpredicted 'IT Larry Craig of Idaho,had called the hearing events that have occurred so far,I would not even attempt a guess. But Gary Severson, and invited NWCCOG to testify. The pur- I do know that the message of cooperation and collaboration has drawn Erecutim Director pose of the hearing was to receive testimony positive attention from numerous quarters. I am confident that if from Colorado groups and organizations NWCCOG remains focused on cooperation rather than division,we concerning the proposed revision of the White River National Forest will readily attract others who will want to participate. Besides,what's Land and Resource Management Plan. the old y' g? The journey is half the fun. When I was first approached about the possibility of NWCCOG re- Che s viewing the proposed Forest Service plan on behalf of its member- ship in the Spring of 1999,little did I realize all of the places where it Ga verso would lead and the doors that it would open. As I began talking to E u ve Directorcg our member jurisdictions and representatives of the Forest Service at the Regional Office in Lakewood and the Forest Supervisors Office in Glenwood Springs, a definite theme began to emerge. There had not been extensive interaction between county and municipal COMMUNITY RESOURCES CORNER elected officials and Forest Service decision level personnel regarding UNDING OPPORTUNITIES the proposed plan revision. Furthermore,the Forest Service did not The following lists some grant opportunities that may be of interest: have a process or mechanism for cooperative involvement of locally elected officials outside of their normal public involvement process. Colorado State Trails -svwn:dnnstate.co.us/traih Recreational Trail Grant information -contact Stuart Macdonald, As we began to analyze the best place for NWCCOG to focus its re- 303/866.3203 x306 or MacTrail@aoi.com view of the proposed revision,we had to look at the reality of the Off-highway Vehicle grant information-contact Jack Placchi, 303/866- situation. The Forest Service documents were voluminous,weighing 3203 x338 or Cotrails@aol com. about fourteen pounds. The disciplines of forestry,wildlife biology, soils, range,economics,hydrology,and law were all necessary to pro- Department of Local Affairs vide for an objective and inclusive review and evaluation. When we Energy and Mineral Impact Assistance Grants matched the size of the task with the size of our budget and available Deadline: three cycles for 2000 -April 3,August 1,December 1 staff we realized that we had to narrow our review to those things in Contact: Cathy Shipley,970/468.2183 or Rachel Lunney 970/468- which we had expertise. In addition,Eagle and Summit Counties 0295 x123. were beginning their own exhaustive technical reviews of the docu- Arts and Rural Community Assistance Grants ments. Therefore,we made the decision to focus on intergovern. Partnership between Nat'l Rural Development Council,Nat'l Endow, mental cooperation in the areas of population growth,adjacent pub- ment for the Arts,and USDA Forest Service lic and private land management,and economic and community Deadline: postmarked by April 14,2000 sustainability.The mission of NWCCOG is to build partnerships to Contact: Bob Dettmann,Rural Development Branch Chief, 303/275- address regional issues. At the direction of the NWCCOG Board of 5741. Directors,the partnership building does not end with our members, but reaches out to other organizations that have a stake in the issue. Do Something BRICK Awards That includes the United States Forest Service. Therefore, Grants to encourage young people to serve as community leaders to ef- NWCCOG had the idea of building a multi-jurisdictional collabora- fect positive change. tive process regarding land use management that would include mu- For more information: Tina Moore or Lara Galinski,212/523.1175 or nicipal,county, state and federal jurisdictions. The process will have wcw.dosorneddng.org to be formal enough to insure that it is implemented,but flexible RESOURCES/TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE enough to be responsive and meaningful. The following are some interesting websites that offer a wealth of re- To our amazement,the message resonated very well with our mem- sources: bers,the Forest Service,Colorado State University,Representative -b www.philanthropysearch.corn -provides links to informa- Scott McInnis,Senators Campbell and Allard,and others. Ours is a tion about charitable giving,volunteering,fundraising,grants, message of bridge building,not bridge burning;a foundations,and other non-profit issues. � www.colorodocenter.com -Colorado Center for Health PAGE 2 dhm Communities IMI REGIONAL INITIATIVES qr NWCCOG AND USES KICK- OFF REGIONAL GIS UPDATE Northwest Colorado Council of Governments staff,Forest Service personnel,Summit Geographic Information Systems(GIS)are impor- and Grand County Commissioners,and representatives from the towns of Silver- tant to local governments because they combine thorne,Kremmling, and Breckenridge gathered at the Dillon Ranger District offices on map information with database numbers.They al, February 24, 2000 to initiate a collaborative planning project. In addition,a Colorado low you to combine data in unique ways that en- State University professor,the director of Shaping Our Summit,NWCCOG's legal hance the ability to see the results of specific plan- counsel,and the State of Colorado's demographer were also in attendance. ning initiatives. The purpose of the meeting was to review the objectives,deliverables and proposed In April 1999,NWCCOG was awarded a contract work plan for executing a USDA Forest Service Rural Communities Assistance grant from DOIA for$100,000 for the development of a awarded to NWCCOG. The purpose of the grant is to develop a collaborative process regional GIS to serve local governments in Region between local governments and the United States Forest Service regarding land use XIL Our scope of services includes the following: planning and management. 1. Development of a regional needs assessment On the advice of Colorado State University to identify a pilot area in which to build a and implementation plan. prototype process,the NWCCOG Board of Directors selected the Blue River drainage. 2. Establishment of a regional GIS advisory The advantage of the Blue River is that it is a readily definable area,is experiencing group. rapid changes in land use, involves two counties, seven municipalities,two national 3. Purchase of hardware,software and data to im- forests,and two federal agencies. plement the plan. 4. Training and education. The project is anticipated to last approximately fifteen months and produce a process The regional needs assessment and implementation that can be exported to other areas where the federal government is the primary land- plan are now complete.The NWCCOG Executive owner,with adjacent local government jurisdictions. NWCCOG and the USFS will Committee selected Alternative#3 - "The Coordi- keep interested organizations informed of the progress of the collaborative effort. ca nated Local Implementation"model.A copy of the Needs Assessment report and the Alternatives re- port were sent to each jurisdiction in the region. The next step for implementing this model will be county meetings in April.The county GIS directors WATERSHED SERVICES PROGRAM BEGINS well host meetings to discuss ways to coordinate GIS between the county and the jurisdictions within the UPDATE TO 208 PLAN county.The meetings will also be used to review the NWCCOG application for GIS funding and help - - potential applicants plan for the best use of the The Watershed Services Program has begun the process of updating the Regional W a- funds in their area.Please contact your county GIS ter Quality Management Plan(208 Plan). Section 208 of the federal Clean Water Act director for the time and place of your meeting: requires regional plans to be updated on a regular basis. The NWCCOG has been the Eagle County John Staight 328-3553 designated planning agency for our area since 1976. The 208 Plan assess water quality in the region,provides direction for wastewater treatment facilities and nonpoint Grand County Kim Adams 7234660 x234 source water pollution reduction and prevention. The plan also provides local direc- tion on water quality standards to the state, and outlines the region's management of Pitkin County Mary Lackner 9203106 water quality issues. Summit County Rich Ferris 6684222 The current 208 Plan was updated in 1998 and was used to provide direction to the The next meeting of the Region XII GIS User state for water quality standards at the 1999 Upper Colorado River Basin Standards Group will be on May 11, 2000 at the Eagle County hearings. Because of the success of this approach,Watershed Services has begun the Building from 1:00 -4:00 p.m. For more informa- process of updating the Plan with the intent of having the Water Quality Control Com- tion contact Linda Venturoni 970/262-0739 or e- mission approve NW CCOG's updated Plan prior to the next Upper Colorado River mail lindav@nwc.cog.co.us.cae Basin Standards hearing in 2002. Watershed Services will be working with local watershed groups and local elected offi- cials and staff to being compiling and assessing water quality data,and determining ap- propriate Plan changes. We encourage your participation in this process,and look for- ward to your input. If you have questions,comments,or ideas you would like to have - explored in the development of the 208 Plan update,please contact Robert Ray, Direc- tor of Watershed Services at 970/468-0295 x104.cQ PAGE 3 4UDoris PINE AREA AGENCY ON AGING Bellamente,as Chairperson of Colorado Associa- May Regional Advisory Council meeting. of Area Agencies on Aging, attended a roundtable HB1072,establishing the Older Coloradoans Fund and seek ssion with Assistant Secretary for Aging,Dr.Jeanette ing$10 million from the State for Older Americans Act serv- I akamura.The topic was"America's Families Care:Voices ices was postponed indefinitely in Appropriations on 3/10. from the Community".This roundtable provided an oppor- On 3/14, house Appropriations voted 9-2 to reconsider tunity for Dr.T akamura to hear the stories and struggles of H131072,establishing the Older Coloradoans Fund with a$3 W providing care for older persons first hand, from metro million fiscal note.The bill passed in House Appropriations area and rural Coloradans alike. on March 17th with a vote of 11,0. It now goes to the full his floor of the House. We will keep you advised on the progress May is Older Americans Month.The national theme t year is"In the New Century...The Future is Aging".We will of this bill. For more information the Alpine Area Agency x1 Aging,please call Doris Bellamen te at 970/468-0295 be honoring seniors throughout our region at the x107. cxt QCOMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT NWCCOG sponsored a Public Sector Employment Issues News from the Department of Local Affairs Q Workshop for members on March 24th. Heidi Duston,la- There are three cycles for 2000 for DOIA's Energy and Min- bor attorney with Otten,Johnson,Robinson,Neff,and eral Impact Assistance Grants. The deadlines for these three Ragonetti was the presenter. Topics covered included at will cycles are April 3,August 1,December 1. DOIA is revising status vs.right to work status,hiring and dismissal policies, the EIAF program guidelines and application. These revi- employee handbooks, and wage and overtime law. sions will be completed soon...look in NWCCOG's July NWCCOG would like to thank Otten,Johnson,Robinson, newsletter for details! Please contact Cathy Shipley, Neff and Ragonetti and Heidi for presenting this workshop 970/468.2183 or RachelLunney 970/468,0295 x123 for at no coed more information.caa ELEVATOR INSPECTION At the committee advisory meeting in September,the mem- permitting.Forecasting for the year 2000,the Elevator In- I Building Officials predicted another year of continued spection Program should see approximately the same number growth in our region.This prediction seems to have come to of units as we have experienced in previous years. In 1999 pass,as requests for new installation permits continue at ap- NWCCOG Elevator Program issued a total of 119 permits, proximately the same pace as has been experienced for the and as of March 20'we have issued 29 permits. This is a last 4 years. Commercial installation permits do seem to combination of both residential and commercial units.With have slowed down sonic but we are seeing a continued the new construction that we have been made aware of,this growth in new residential permits.Commercial permit appli- trend should continue for the remainder of the year. For cations seem to start arriving in the 2"a quarter of each year more information,please call Rick Payne,Director of the as that is the time of year for building planning and Elevator Inspection Program at 970/468-0295 x108.(Q ENERGY MANAGEMENT V The NWCCOG Weatherization Program is currently con- has been one barrier preventing weatherization programs ducting a pilot project with the Colorado Office of Energy nationwide from regularly installing high-efficiency furnaces. Management and Conservation(OEMC). The goal of this However,the Department of Energy is currently reviewing ffi O pilot program is to determine exactly how much energy is rule changes that would allow higher material costs for wea- saved by replacing an old low,eciency furnace with a new therized homes that receive "capital-intensive"energy im- hig1wfficiency one. provements. Currently in the Weatherization Program,only furnaces with Another problem is that very little data exists on the operating effi- cracked heat exchangers or other major health and safety ciency of old furnaces,particularly those installed in mobile homes. problems may be replaced with program funds. This information has been sought by OEMC so that they can NW CCOG's research will provide insight on whether some evaluate the economics of replacing a furnace for efficiency reasons. models of older furnaces should be replaced to gain an effi- NWCCOG is trying to solve this problem by conducting short- ciency upgrade,even if the old furnace is still functioning term monitoring of old mobile home furnace fuel use. First,the safely. old fumace Is assessed using a Pacific Science and Technology While a new high-efficiency furnace(>80%efficient fuel use) SmardloggerT for three to four weeks would obviously save energy compared to an older less- (continued on page 6) PAGE 4 efficient model(60.700/o),the high capital cost of furnaces NORTHWEST LOAN FUND OV The Northwest Loan Fund has been fairly active in the first approval by the NWCCOG board,Mr.Jeff Pexton,Presi• quarter of 2000. Five new microloans, all for$20,000 or less, dent of Community First National Bank in Kremmling will have been approved,and several new applications are Pend- officially fill the spot. Welcome Jeff,and Thanks! for volun- ing. In addition,a candidate for the Grand County vacancy teering for this valuable business development program in PU on the Fund's Board of Directors has been found. Pending our region. Please contact June Walters, Director at approval by the Grand County BOCC and final 970/4684295 x119 for further information.cQ O SPECIALIZED SERVICES NWCCOG staff has been very busy providing a variety of Spe• ♦ Erosion and Sediment Control Training- offered by cialized Services to members in the first quarter of 2000 in- NWCCOG's Watershed Services program -provides eluding: an overview of current and pending regulations re- 4 Aspen Continuum of Care Project- research and pres- garding erosion and sediment control as well as best entation project designed to educate the public regarding management practices to minimize sediment impacts the need for more extensive long term care service. from construction sites on water quality. One session ♦ Annexation Policies Study - a compilation of annexa• was offered to Grand County building officials on tion policies and goals of all NWCCOG's member mu- March 23rd,and one is scheduled for the Roaring nicipalities. This study was requested by the Town of Fork watershed on April 19th. Grand Lake but will be made available to all members. ♦ Customer Focus Training-a training session will be ♦ Home Rule Status Study-a study of the costs and bene- provided for the Town of Dillon staff on May 18th. fits of transitioning from statutory status to home rule Representatives from other member jurisdictions are status. This Project is in the works and will be available welcome to attend. For more information regarding by the end of May. NWCCOG's Specialized Services contact Rachel Lun- ney at 970/4684295 x 123ce WATERSHED SERVICES The Watershed Service Program is currently developing an appropriation of the$100,000. Notice of congressional EPA grant request to assist in updating the existing Regional action is expected within two months. Water Quality Management Plan(208 Plan). The grant re- The program assisted Roaring Fork Conservancy in obtain- quest is for$53,300,and will allow Watershed Services to de- ing$1,000 to improve their water quality monitoring ef• vote adequate time(65%)over the next IVz years to updating forts in the Roaring Fork watershed. The grant will allow the Plan. the Roaring Fork Conservancy monitoring effort to moni• NWCCOG through the Watershed Services and Quality/ for dissolved metals concentrations,which the State uses as Quantity Committee staff is participating in the Snake River standards to protect aquatic life. Task Force, in Summit County. The Task Force is attempting Summit County Environmental Health Department is up- to improve water quality in the Snake River,which is im- dating their individual sewage disposal system regulations patted by inactive/abandoned mines. NWCCOG has agreed (septic systems). The Watershed Services program partici- to act as sponsor for an Army Corps of Engineers pated in reviewing the regulations and attended two meet, "Remediation of Abandoned Mine sites(RAMS)project. ings to discuss proposed changes. The program is monitor, RAMS funding of$100,000 for the Snake River has passed ing the State's development of regulations for stormwater the first hurdle, through Congressional subcommittee ap- permits for smaller municipalities. proval of a study resolution. The final step is congressional (continued on page 6) WATER QUALITY / QUANTITY COMMITTEE QQ spent much of the winter following bills in the State leg- was not introduced,but discussions on Front Range growth islature. Though there were many growth bills this year, QQ and West Slope water will most likely continue through the stayed neutral on the bills to see which ones would survive. spring and summer. On that note,QQ's next Board meet, As of the end of March,all of the major growth bills had ing will focus solely on the growth in Colorado as it affects been "postponed indefinitely." We therefore expect to see a West Slope water resources. The meeting will be on May citizen's initiative on growth this fall. As for other bills, QQ 17"from 9:30 to 2:30 at the Si1wrthome Recreation Cen- was instrumental in defeating this year's vested rights bill(SB ter. If you cannot make the entire meeting,we encourage 96). folks to come until noon to listen to Jo Evans discuss the Finally,the focus shifted late in the session to a proposed bill upcoming ballot initiatives, Front Range elected officials by Representative George that attempted to address water speak about their water needs and cooperative growth man- needs on the Front Range. After much discussion and de- agement initiatives on the Front Range. bate in the Colorado Water Congress,the draft For more information on QQ,please contact Lane Wyatt at x116 or Taylor Hawes at xl 17caa Pace 5 PROGRAM UPDATES (CON'T) EMPLOYER ASSISTED HOUSING Energy Management Imn't frompage4) In May 1999,NWCCOG sponsored a workshop ntitled "I lousing he the Smartl-ogger�'"monitors and stores the lengths y sponsored g by of time the furnace is on and off. This data is later Workforce o Mountain Communities". he workshop was well attended es downloaded to a computer program that calculates Planners, housing authority staff and board members and employers.Interest in energy consumption and furnace efficiency. After the this topic remains very high as employers and local governments in this area re struggle with the mixture of high housing costs,labor shortages, and more co • old furnace has been assessed,a new furnace is in- stalled and evaluated by the same instrumentation Petition for tourism dollars. over a similar length of time. The workshop sparked interest on the part of the NWCCOG membership to So far Chris Fuller,Energy Services Specialist for pursue partnerships related to employee housing options.NWCCOG met with OF is monitoring two sets of mobile home fur, representatives from the Colorado Housing and Finance Authority and Fannie naces for NWCCOG. Additional research will be Mae.Both organizations indicated an interest in helping to expand some conducted this Spring if weather permits and enough "Employer Assisted Housing"options to Region X11. data logging equipment is available. Trend Analysis: The results of the testing at NWCCOG,and also NWCCOG then gathered information related to labor force projections,com- from the Arapahoe County Weatherization Program, muter projections,cost of living, housing costs,and costs of employee turnover. will be used by OF MC in deciding whether or not to The information was then organized into a PowerPoint presentation and shared implement furnace efficiency replacements in Weath• with elected officials,county housing authority staff members and directors of erization agencies throughout Colorado. eQ chambers of commerce in the area.The chamber directors agreed to partner Watershed Services(con't frompage 5) with NWCCOG to host employer focus groups.the focus group methodology A group has been formed which will address designs- would allow its to present the PowerPoint information, obtain feedback from tion criteria. l he criteria will be included in the employers regarding their reactions to these trends,explain an array of possible State's regulations that are required under Phase lI of "Employer Assisted Options"that could be of benefit to them and hear directly the Clean Water Act stormwater provisions. from the employers which options they think would work best in their area. the program director gave a presentation on the Four focus groups were conducted in Summit County,Vail Valley,Grand French Gulch Remediation Opportunities Group County and Aspen. Thirty-three different employers participated in the focus (FROG)at the Colorado Section's annual symposium groups.They represented a good cross section of the various economic sectors of the American Water Resources Association. The and also included various sizes in terms of numbers of employees. presentation focused on development of community Labor Force: based cleanup goals,and the time,effort,and money involved in providing this kind of approach. Watershed Services is involved in efforts to address sediment impacts from 1.70. A sediment TMDI- Eagle County hill(l otal Maximum Daily Load)has been drafted for Labor Force Suppy and Demand 1990.2020 i Y Straight Creek.Several goals have been identified, including attaining five age classes of fish in the creek, moon, increasing the depth of pools, increasing the average OX�: 'A'do Sol size of the substrate in the creek,and increased revege- 344M cation on the cut slopes. A group in the Gore Creek 2Q90oo mo>oa a ro 2aas o�s a { area(Black Gore Creek Steering Committee)is work- ing to protect the aquatic resource in Black Gore = 19Dar/d Creek.Currently,Watershed Services is acting as the group's facilitator/convenor. The Colorado State Demographer's Office As the table above indicates,the labor force Watershed Services is very pleased with the efforts as- produced reports,which projected labor force shortage is projected to grow from about sociated with the Blue River Restoration Master Plan. supply and demand through the}ear 2020. 10,000 in 1997 to over 35,000 in 2020.The A Steering Committee has been established and has The chart above illustrates the numbers for estimated number of commuters that would selected a contractor(1 etra Tech ISG). Another grant Eagle County.As one can see,labor force de- be needed to fill the projected jobs at this nand is already exceeding the existing supply time,would be 31,500.T o provide some request has been submitted for this project,to the and the situation is projected to get far worse perspective on this number,31,500 people is Colorado River Water Conservation District. The by the year 2020. roughly the current population of Eagle request will allow l etra l ech to better characterize the County. ground water hydrology in the project area. The mas• ter plan for restoring a trvo-mile section of the Blue, l hese charts and tables were generated for each of the five counties and then com- impacted by historical mechanical dredging, should be piled into regional totals.Labor force demand was projected to exceed supply in all of completed by September of this year the counties with the exception of Jackson County. A full report of the Employer Focus Group findings and recommendations is avail, able at the NWCCOG office.Please call 970/468-0295 x123 if you are interested in receiving a copy.ca8 PAGE 6 rw -r. kE.Ra r � MEMBER SPOTLIGHT: WTI sr� WAA f0u MwPeg Toft W. W,Nook Affi ± ayor of Kremmling, NWCCOG Chair 0 11 Peg Toft, Mayor of Kremmling and Chair of NWCCOG, has seen plenty of growth and change in her lifetime in Colorado. She was born, raised, and still resides in the Town of Kremmling, and has been there the entire 65 years of her life. She was born into a ranching family, and has been involved in ranching for most of],ter life. Peg got into the restaurant Peg Toft business in 1973 when she built the Wagon Wheel Resllaurant which she owned and oper- ated for the next 25 years. Peg has a strong interest in ensuring that her community main- tains the quality of life it is famous for, and at the same time believes in the importance of keeping up the economic vitality of the community. It was these community interests that spurred her on to becoming in- volved in local government. Peg was appointed to the Kremmling Town Council in 1986, and has been on the council ever since, currently serving as Mayor since 1989. In addition to her interest in her local community, Peg strongly believes in re- gionalism,and believes that "if we keep the region intact,we can accomplish more if we work together and can take our values farther." She has served on the NWCCOG board since 1987 (she currently serves as Chair) and also serves on the boards of O the Colorado Rural Development Council,Club 20, Middle Park Water Conservancy, Grand County land Conservancy,and Middle Park Fair. In addition, she is a member of the Middle Park Stockgrowers, and was a 4-H Club horse leader for 15 years. Peg is married and has 4 childreWnd 8 grandchildren, all of whom are involved in livestock ranching. In her free time, (when she finds it!)she enjoys hunNg,fishing,and golfing. cQe STAFF SPOTLIGHT: • Z Frank Kilian ' Elevator Inspection Program Frank Kilian joined NWCCOG in February of 1996 as a part-time elevator inspector with the Elevator Inspection Program. Frank's position was created to handle the increased work- load from growth in the Elevator Inspection Program,which has grown from 491 elevators in 1993 to 887 elevators in 2000. Frank is responsible for conducting 2 inspections per year on elevators throughout NWCCOG's region. He is certified as a Qualified Elevator Inspeo for by the National Association of Elevator Safety Authorities and is requ*d to take continu- Frank Kilian ing education courses every year to keep this Certification active and current. Frank has extensive experience in the "ups and downs"of thellevator business,and has been working in this industry for 51 years. He worked for Otis Elevator Company for 30 of those years,during which time he was living in London and traveled all over Europe insptting Elevators, Frank first moved to Colorado in 1971,left in 1984,then returned in 1995 after retir- ing from Otis in 1994. He returned to Colorado to be with his two children and 5 grandchildren. He and his wife Carolyn O live in Breckenridge,and in his spare time he enjoys spending time with his family and working around the house.cQ NWCCOG WELCOMES n Cora Winters Office Coordinator/ Administrative Assistant .'NWCCOG would like to welcome Cora Winters to its team. Cora joined NWCCOG in Febru- ary as Administrative Assistant/Office Coordinator. She and her husband Paul are originally from Columbus,Ohio. They have spent many vacations in Colorado,and given their love of the mountains and outdoor-oriented lifestyle they decided to make Summit County their home 2 O years ago. Cora brings to NWCCOG exceptional computer and organizational skill&at she Cora Winters acquired and honed during her 25 years of office experience. Most of her career has been in medical office nihnagement,having worked for the quality assurance department for Children's Hospital of Columbus and various doctors offices. In her free time she enjoys snowshoeing,hiking,and rooting on her be- loved Ohio State Buckeyes(she is an avid fan!) Cora,her husband Paul,and their three cats live in Silverthorne. c�R Pace 7 NWCCOG BOARD OF DIRECTORS NWCCOG STAFF EAGLE COUNTY FRISCO I GARYSEVERSON STEVE GETZ 'Johnnetle Phillips,Commissioner Michael Jordon,Counalmember Executive Director,x110 Director,Energy Mgmnt Prog.,x103 gjs @nwccog.co.us sgetz @nwcmg.co.us GRAND COUNTY GRANBY DORIS BELLAMENTE ROBERT RAY 'Robert Anderson,Commissioner Ed Raffely,Mayor Director,AAAA,x107 Director,Watershed Services.,x104 JACKSONCOUNTY GRAND LAKE ssaaa @nwc.cog.m.us wq @nwc.cog.co.us 'l ootie Crowner,Commissioner Jim Peterson,Trustee RICK PAYNE RACHEL LUNNEY PITKIN COUNTY GYPSUM I Director,Ilevator Inspect.Prog.,x108 Community Development Coordinator,x123 4eslie tanlonl,Commissioner Jeff Shroll,Town Manager elevator @nwc.cog.m.us rlunney @nwc.cog.m.us SUMMIT COUNTY HOT SULPHUR SPRINGS LINDA VENTURONI CORA WINTERS •Bill Wallace,Commissioner Rachel laramillo,trustee Director,Special Projects,970/262- Administrative Assistant.,x100 ASPEN KREMMLING 0739,lindav @nwcmg.co.us cwinters @nwc.cog.co.us Tony Hershey,Coundlmember 'Peg Tofl,Mayor LANE WYATT TAYLOR HAWES Co-Director,Water QQ Comm.,x116 Co-Director,Water QQ Cornm,x117 AVON MINTURN gglane @cnlorado.nel ggwaler@mlorado.net Bill I(ling, town Manager Alan tanning.Town Manager BASALT MONTEZUMA DOUG JONES ROB CASTOR Wealherization Installer,x103 Wealherization Inspector,x103 Jacque Whitsi6, ImAec Kentlange,1rustce NATE SPEERSTRA JUNE WALTERS BLUE RIVER RED CLIFF Wealherization Installer,x103 Director,Northwest loan fund,x119 Darcie lysllund,lrusteu Betty Sandoval,Mayor FRANK KILLIAN BRECKENRIDGE SILVERTHORNE Elevator Inspector,x108 Michael Berlaux,Councilrnember Sheila Groneman,Councilreember OILLON vALL [.� NWCCOG was established as Colorado Planning and Management ; Julian Ilarriq ebuncdrnrmber •Sybil)Navas,Mayor Prolem 11V Region XII in 1972 by Executive Order of the Governor. NWCCOG's mission is to be responsive to our members' needs and interests by EAGLE WALDEN providing guidance and assistance in problem solving, information sharing, Willy Powell, Iown Manager Kyle f liniau,Mayor and partnership building; advocating members' interests and needs with FRASER WINTER PARK local,state,and federal entities; and providing quality services to our mem- Chuck Reid, tour,Manager Daryl Shrunl,Town Manager i klership that are relevant,effective,and efficient. 't xeculive Committee Editor: Rachel l unney Bulk Rate US Postage 7����L-_�T_ NORTHWEST COLORADO COUNCIL OF GOVERNMENTS PAD LK/J7/kgfftC.U�� Post Office Box 2308 Permit ,CO 17 COUNCIL Or GOVERNMENTS Dillon,C Silverthorne, Colorado 80498 80435 INSIDE THIS ISSUE NWCCOG Testifies Before U.S.Sen- ate-Page 1 NWCCOG Board Elects Executive Com- mittee for 2000-Page t Calendar-Page t ivessage from the Executive Director Page 2 Community Resources Comer•Page 2 • NWCCOG and USES Kiclwff Collabora tive Planning Project-Page 3 • Regional GIS Update-Page • Watershed Services Program Begins Updating 208 Plan-Page 3 • ,Program Updates-Page 4115 • Employer Assisted Housing Program- Page 6 • Focus on NWCCOG People- Page 7