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07-01-19 Town Council PacketTown Council Monday, July 01, 2019 4:00 PM 130 Kearns Road Council Chambers Agenda 1.CALL TO ORDER - Mayor Butler called to order the Regular Meeting of the Snowmass Village Town Council 2.ROLL CALL 3.PUBLIC COMMENT - This section is set aside for the Town Council to LISTEN to comments by the public regarding items that do not otherwise appear on this agenda. Generally, the Town Council will not discuss the issue and will not take an official action under this section of the agenda. (Five Minute Time Limit) 4.CONSENT AGENDA - These are items where all conditions or requirements have been agreed to or met prior to the time they come before the Council for final action. A Single Public Hearing will be opened for all items on the Consent Agenda. These items will be approved by a single motion of the Council. The Mayor will ask if there is anyone present who has objection to such procedure as to certain items. Members of the Council may also ask that an item be removed from the consent section and fully discussed. All items not removed from the consent section will then be approved. A member of the Council may vote no on specific items without asking that they be removed from the consent section for full discussion. Any item that is removed from the consent agenda will be placed on the regular agenda. 4.A.DRAFT AGENDAS Draft Agendas Page 3 4.B.MINUTES FOR APPROVAL 1 Town Council Page - 2 05-03-19 Minutes for Approval Page 7 05-20-19 Minutes for Approval Page 13 4.C.RESOLUTION NO. 32, SERIES OF 2019 - A RESOLUTION OF THE TOWN COUNCIL OF THE TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO, APPROVING THE 2nd AMENDED 2019 BUDGET FOR THE PITKIN COUNTY 1/2 CENT TRANSIT SALES AND USE TAX Agenda Summary Reso 32 EOTC Budget Page 17 Resolution 32 Page 19 EOTC Budget Page 21 5.ADMINISTRATIVE REPORTS 5.A.SENIOR HOUSING IN SNOWMASS VILLAGE AND AGING IN PLACE Agenda Summary Senior Housing Page 23 Aging Well In Pitkin County Page 30 Roaring Fork Valley Continuing Care Retirement Community Brochure Page 85 5.B.SNOWMASS ARTS ADVISORY BOARD RECOMMENDATION ON ENTRYWAY ART SELECTION Agenda Summary SAAB Public Art Page 168 Art Acquisition Policy Page 173 Artists PowerPoint with cost Page 182 6.TOWN COUNCIL REPORTS AND ACTIONS - Reports and Updates 6.A.LETTER OF SUPPORT FOR THE WOODY CREEK SOLAR PROJECT WC Solar Letter of Support Page 219 7.ADJOURNMENT 2 DRAFT 2019 Agenda Items • Regular Meetings begin at 4:00 p.m. unless otherwise noted • Work Sessions begin at 4:00 p.m. and aim to end at 6:00 p.m. • The dates on which agenda items are listed are only a best approximation. Agenda items are added to this list as they arise. Agenda items may well be moved to different meeting dates. Agendas are generally not finalized until the Thursday prior to the meeting. • In addition to agenda items, this document also lists expected absences of Town Council members. In compliance with section 2-49 of the municipal code, once the consent agenda is approved, the absences noted will be considered to have received the prior approval necessary of the majority of the Council for members to be absent from meetings. 2019 Meetings Mon. Jul. 1st - Regular Meeting (Madsen, Kinney out) • Senior Housing in Snowmass Village & Aging in Place • SAAB recommendation on entryway Art Selection • Reso 32 – Amend EOTC Budget • Consideration to Draft Letter of Support for Woody Creek Solar Project Mon. Jul. 8th - Work Session (Shenk out) • Brush Creek Pedestrian Crossing design Update • Review Woody Creek Solar Letter of Support??? Mon. Jul. 15th - Regular Meeting (Shenk out) Mon. Aug. 5th - Regular Meeting • Exec Session personnel review Wed. Aug 7th - EOTC All Day Retreat Mon. Aug. 12th - Work Session • Joint Meeting with Snowmass Arts Advisory Board Mon. Aug 19th - Regular Meeting • Exec session personnel review Tue. Sep. 3rd - Regular Meeting (Monday is Labor Day) • 2019 Community Survey Report of Results • Review Proposed Housing Regulations Modifications?? Mon. Sep. 9th - Work Session (Sirkus Out) • Joint Meeting with POSTR Board • Joint Meeting with PTRAB Mon. Sep. 16th - Regular Meeting • Compensation Analysis Review • 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 3 of 219 3 DRAFT 2019 Agenda Items Mon. Oct. 7th - Regular Meeting • 2020 Budget Introduction Mon. Oct. 14th - Work Session • Joint Meeting with Volunteer Board Thurs. Oct. 17th - EOTC Meeting -Aspen to Chair Mon. Oct. 21st - Regular Meeting Mon. Nov. 4th – Regular GID Meeting • GID revised Budget 2019 • GID Budget 2020 Mon. Nov. 4th - Regular Meeting • PH and Reso Adopting 2020 Budget • Public Hearing – Road Mill Levy Mon. Nov. 11th -Work Session • GID Budget approval • Mon. Nov. 18th - Regular Meeting Mon. Dec. 2nd - Regular Meeting Mon. Dec. 9th – Regular GID Meeting • GID – Reso Setting Mill Levy Mon. Dec. 9th - Special Meeting • TC – Reso Setting Mill Levy Mon. Dec. 16th - Regular Meeting 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 4 of 219 4 DRAFT 2019 Agenda Items Topics for Work Sessions or Other Meetings Requested by Town Council Members • Broad discussion regarding dogs on trails and leash law enforcement • Discussion regarding putting a tobacco tax on November ballot • Discussion to consider a ban on the sale of flavored tobacco • Review the outdoor smoking ordinance to consider modifications • Update on Daly Town Home regarding retaining wall • How did they do that? • Environmental Discussions/ Approaches: 1) Meet with EAB and prioritize Sustainability goals 2) update on Solar and Renewable Energy for the Town of Snowmass Village 3) Discuss the Climate Reality Project 4) overview of the Re-Op Fund, its uses and successes. 5) a presentation of the Energy Navigator from the EAB/PW 6) discussion regarding how to move energy conservation efforts beyond town government to a community wide effort enabling individuals to help make progress 7) Update Council on solar project that was included in 2019 budget with findings from FAB, etc • Housing strategy: 1) discuss a potential regional approach to aging in place/ work with Pitkin county and county senior services- 2) find ways to encourage/ allow individuals to move from larger homes to smaller homes 3) meeting other needs- such as specific housing for town employees 4) update on current housing construction project 5) update on meeting the overall housing strategy • Action on Necessary IGA’s or other documents regarding “school property tax” distribution • A discussion on potentially allowing camping (RV or other) within the Village • Schedule Updates will all of the Town Boards to review priorities and current initiatives o EAB o FAB o PTRAB o POSTR o Marketing o Grants – Recent Awards; Review of Criteria; Purpose, etc. o SAAB o Planning • RFTA Strategic Priorities Update w. New Mill Levy 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 5 of 219 5 1 SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL 2 REGULAR MEETING MINUTES 3 MAY 6, 2019 4 5 1) CALL TO ORDER 6 7 Mayor Butler called to order the Regular Meeting of the Snowmass Village Town 8 Council on Monday, May 06, 2019 at 4:01 p.m. 9 10 A complete live recording of this meeting can be found at www.tosv.com under Town 11 Council Meetings. This will be archived indefinitely allowing you to view at any time. 12 13 2) ROLL CALL 14 15 16 COUNCIL MEMBERS PRESENT: Tom Goode, Bill Madsen, Alyssa Shenk, and Markey Butler. 17 COUNCIL MEMBERS ABSENT: Bob Sirkus. 18 STAFF PRESENT: Clint Kinney, Town Manager; Travis Elliott, Assistant to the Town Manager; John Dresser, Town Attorney; Anne Martens, Public Works Director; Jim Wahlstrom, Senior Planner; David Peckler, Transit Director; and Rhonda B. Coxon, Town Clerk; 19 PUBLIC PRESENT: Michelle Wilson, Jeff Kremer, Andrew Wicks and other members of the public interested in today’s Agenda items. 20 3) PROCLAMATIONS AND PRESENTATIONS 21 None 22 23 24 4) PUBLIC COMMENT 25 None at this time 26 27 28 5) CONSENT AGENDA 29 30 A. DRAFT AGENDAS 31 32 33 B. MINUTES FOR APPROVAL 34 April 08, 2019 - Special Meeting 35 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 6 of 219 6 05-06-19 TC Minutes Page 2 of 7 April 15, 2019 - Regular Meeting 36 37 38 Council Member Shenk stated that in the minutes for April 8, 2019 she did not vote on 39 Resolution No. 25, 2019 as she was recused. On the April 15, 2019 minutes line 119 40 "had some suggest" should state "suggested" and on line 162 "is the that" needs to be 41 taken out. 42 43 C. RESOLUTION NO. 27, SERIES OF 2019 - APPOINTING A NEW MEMBER TO 44 THE ENVIRONMENTAL ADVISORY BOARD 45 46 47 D. RESOLUTION NO. 26, SERIES OF 2019 - A RESOLUTION OF THE TOWN 48 COUNCIL OF THE TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO, 49 APPROVING THE AMENDED 2019 BUDGET FOR THE PITKIN COUNTY 1/2 50 CENT TRANSIT SALES AND USE TAX 51 52 53 E. RESOLUTION NO. 28, SERIES OF 2019 -A RESOLUTION OF THE TOWN 54 COUNCIL OF THE TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO, 55 AUTHORIZING THE FILING OF APPLICATIONS WITH THE FEDERAL 56 TRANSIT ADMINISTRATION, AN OPERATING ADMINISTRATION OF THE 57 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION, FOR FEDERAL 58 TRANSPORTATION ASSISTANCE AUTHORIZED BY 49 U.S.C. CHAPTER 53, 59 TITLE 23 UNITED STATES CODE, AND OTHER FEDERAL STATUTES 60 ADMINISTERED BY THE FEDERAL TRANSIT ADMINISTRATION. 61 62 63 F. SECOND READING - ORDINANCE NO. 08, SERIES OF 2018 -AN 64 ORDINANCE AMENDING CHAPTER 10, ARTICLE V OF THE TOWN OF 65 SNOWMASS VILLAGE MUNICIPAL CODE BY MOVING THE ENTIRETY OF 66 ARTICLE V OF CHAPTER 10 TO THE NEWLY CREATED CHAPTER 9 – 67 MARIJUANA, TOBACCO AND SMOKING AS ARTICLE III THEREOF 68 69 70 G. RESOLUTION NO. 29, SERIES OF 2019 - A RESOLUTION OF THE TOWN 71 COUNCIL OF THE TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE INITIATING AN 72 AMENDMENT TO THE OFFICIAL ZONE DISTRICT MAP OF THE TOWN OF 73 SNOWMASS VILLAGE FOR RE-ZONING OF PARCEL F, HORSE RANCH 74 SUBDIVISION 75 76 77 Tom Goode made the motion to approve by a roll call vote all those items listed on 78 today's consent agenda. Bill Madsen seconded the motion. The motion was approved 79 by a vote of 4 in favor to 0 opposed. Council Member Sirkus was absent. 80 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 7 of 219 7 05-06-19 TC Minutes Page 3 of 7 81 Voting Aye: Tom Goode, Bill Madsen, Alyssa Shenk, and Markey Butler. 82 83 Voting Nay: None. 84 6) POLICY/LEGISLATIVE PUBLIC HEARINGS 85 86 A. SECOND READING OF ORDINANCE 04, SERIES OF 2019 - AN ORDINANCE OF 87 THE TOWN COUNCIL OF THE TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO 88 AMENDING THE SNOWMASS VILLAGE MUNICIPAL CODE TO RAISE THE 89 MINIMUM AGE FOR THE PURCHASE, POSSESSION AND CONSUMPTION OF 90 TOBACCO PRODUCTS AND TO ESTABLISH THE MINIMUM AGE FOR THE 91 PURCHASE, POSSESSION AND CONSUMPTION OF ELECTRONIC SMOKING 92 DEVICES AND RELATED SUBSTANCES BY ADDING CHAPTER 9, ARTICLE 2 93 TO THE MUNICIPAL CODE 94 95 96 Mayor Butler had a comment on line 486 she asked why the "up to" language was taken 97 out, Brian Olson, Chief of Police and John Dresser, Town Attorney decided that is 98 should state "with a maximum" in lines 486 through 491 regarding the summons 99 amount. Council Member Madsen referred to the fine page which was page 73 of 112 100 in the packet. The fines for "Sale by a retail Clerk" fee need to be switched with fines 101 for "Under 21 person". Council Member Shenk stated on line number 99 the "roll-you-102 own" should be "roll-your-own" and on line 143 "any premise were" should be "any 103 premise where". After discussion Council decided that within 143 through 146 should 104 include vehicle and mobile cart be listed. On line 198 should state "TOBACCO 105 PRODUCTS, AND/OR POSSES'S ELECTRONIC" adding the word "Possess". On line 106 542 it should read "the Ordinance shall not". Throughout the ordinance "Tobacco 107 Product" should be "Tobacco Products" for consistency. 108 109 Tom Goode made the motion to approve at second reading by a roll call vote Ordinance 110 No. 04, Series of 2019 - Raising the age to Purchase Tobacco Products in Snowmass 111 Village to 21. Bill Madsen seconded the motion. The motion was approved by a vote 112 of 4 in favor to 0 opposed. Council Member Sirkus was absent. 113 114 Voting Aye: Tom Goode, Bill Madsen, Alyssa Shenk, and Markey Butler. 115 116 Voting Nay: None. 117 7) ADMINISTRATIVE REPORTS 118 119 120 CONSIDERATION/APPROVAL OF MOUNTAIN VIEW TRAIL CONSTRUCTION 121 122 123 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 8 of 219 8 05-06-19 TC Minutes Page 4 of 7 Andy Worline, Parks, Trails and Recreation Director and Jeff Kremer from the POSTR 124 Board were present for this discussion. The POSTR board is here today to seek 125 support for a new trail called Hawkridge Trail above Mountain View. It is a connector 126 trail and it is .03 miles and the POSTR Board is recommending this new trail due to 127 safety reasons. The current trail now empties into the Mountain View parking lot. 128 POSTR Board did meet with the Mountain View Homeowners and addressed their 129 concerns. At this time the Town Council would like to approve the construction and 130 design but not the use of the trail. 131 132 Tom Goode made the motion to approve construction and design of the new Hawkridge 133 Trail. Bill Madsen seconded the motion. The motion was approved by a vote of 4 in 134 favor to 0 opposed. 135 136 Voting Aye: Tom Goode, Bill Madsen, Alyssa Shenk, and Markey Butler. 137 138 Voting Nay: None. 139 2020 CENSUS PRESENTATION 140 141 Jim Wahlstrom, Senior Planner and Julie Ann Woods, Community Development 142 Director started this discussion he noted that the credit needs to go to Phillip Supino, 143 Principal Long-Range Planner, City of Aspen and Kara Silbernagel, Assistant to the 144 Pitkin County Manager who will be arriving momentarily and they are collaborating on a 145 yearlong Census support campaign in coordination with the State of Colorado and U.S. 146 Census. They provided a PowerPoint Presentation for the Town Council. 147 148 Every 10 years, the U.S. Census bureau completes a complete count of every person 149 residing in the United States. The results of this count are essential for federal, state 150 and local funding, and representation. The State of Colorado estimates that each 151 person counted represents $2,300 annually in federal, state and local dollars. In Pitkin 152 County this represents approximately $40 million dollars annually. These dollars support 153 everything from funding for roads, health and human services and innumerable indirect 154 opportunities. Research completed by the City of Aspen in 2018 estimates that 1-3% of 155 Pitkin County was undercounted leading to an estimated $400,000 annually that was 156 not distributed back to the community. In 2010, there was significant federal funding to 157 support local outreach efforts due to the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act 158 (ARRA). 159 160 Wahlstrom stated that in 2020, funding for census outreach and workers has been 161 severely reduced, making local campaigns even more critical to get a full count. 162 Compounding the limited funding in 2020, this Decennial Census represents the first 163 time it will be completed online. Although the Census Day is April 1, 2020, individuals 164 will be able to complete the Census beginning on March 19, 2020. It is not currently 165 known if there will be a hard-copy option for completion. Secondarily, the Census will 166 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 9 of 219 9 05-06-19 TC Minutes Page 5 of 7 also occur in the middle of the 2020 presidential primaries. It is essential for a local 167 campaign to get the message out given the changes and competing interests occurring 168 next year. In 2018, the City of Aspen budgeted $15,000 to support research and 169 planning for the 2020 Census. The research focused on identifying areas of undercount 170 in the 2000 and 2010 Census. Pitkin County allocated $15,000 in the 2019 budget to 171 support the development of an outreach strategy to encourage participation in the 2020 172 Census. The County, in partnership with City of Aspen and Town of Snowmass Village, 173 are collaborating to develop an outreach campaign to encourage Census participation in 174 2020. That campaign plan, along with staff analysis of the potential obstacles to a 175 complete count in the Roaring Fork Valley, and potential strategies to overcome those 176 obstacles, will be presented to Council at a future work session. This is an update only 177 and no input is needed from Town Council at this time. 178 179 RENEWABLE ENERGY (SOLAR) CIP PROJECT UPDATE AND 180 CONSIDERATION 181 182 183 Travis Elliott, Assistant to the Town Manager and Andrew Wicks, Chair of the 184 Environmental Advisory Board presented this item. As requested at the February 4, 185 2019 Town Council meeting, the following information is being presented to Town 186 Council as an update for the Town’s renewable energy projects that have been included 187 in the 2019 CIP budget. Since that meeting and presentation, the Town has secured 188 another grant from the Colorado Department of Local Affairs (DOLA) in the amount of 189 $200,000 for these combined renewable energy projects. We have also issued an RFP 190 and received four bids for the solar PV project. Staff is recommending the Town Council 191 direct staff to move forward with the renewable energy projects and execute a contract 192 with Sunsense to begin working to make these projects a reality in 2019. 193 194 The renewable energy projects that were included in the 2019 CIP budget emerged 195 from conversations with the Town Council in May of 2018. During those conversations, 196 the Town Council evaluated a variety of initiatives that would assist the Town in meeting 197 our 20 by 20 carbon emission reduction goals. This included participating in Holy Cross 198 Energy’s (HCE) Renewable Energy Purchase Program (REPP), and an evaluation of 199 large ground mount solar arrays. The Town began participating in REPP in January, but 200 the Town Council elected to not pursue large ground mount solar arrays. Instead, the 201 Town Council directed staff to pursue the smaller solar and micro hydro projects. It was 202 determined that these small projects, albeit more expensive per watt, are more suitable 203 with the community’s aesthetic preferences, and would also preserve the future use and 204 value of the land that the large ground mount solar projects would occupy. The resulting 205 renewable energy projects that are now being considered at this Town Council meeting 206 were largely designed back in 2013. Since then, the economics of these projects have 207 improved greatly. This is partially due to the $360,000 in grants and rebates that the 208 Town has secured through partners like the Community Office for Resource Efficiency 209 (CORE), DOLA, and HCE. The revenue incentives for these projects have also 210 increased, which makes the value of the electricity produced much higher. The Town 211 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 10 of 219 10 05-06-19 TC Minutes Page 6 of 7 has applied and reserved space in the HCE Generation Tariff program, which will pay 212 the Town guaranteed revenues for at least 20 years for the energy that is produced. 213 This program and offer to the Town expire in 2019. The Town issued an RFP for the 214 solar projects on March 7, 2019, and we received four bids. A cost breakdown these 215 bids are attached (Attachment B). An evaluation committee of four people (three TOSV 216 staff members and one EAB member) reviewed the proposals and selected Sunsense 217 as the best bid. Although specifics of the proposal still need to be finalized, most of the 218 committee (3 out of 4) felt their documentation, plans, designs, and total bid far 219 exceeded the quality of the other proposals we received. 220 221 Tom Goode made the motion to approve moving forward with this project. Bill Madsen 222 seconded the motion. The motion was approved by a vote of 5 in favor to 0 opposed. 223 224 Voting Aye: Tom Goode, Bill Madsen, Bob Sirkus, Alyssa Shenk, and Markey Butler. 225 226 Voting Nay: None. 227 8) TOWN COUNCIL REPORTS AND ACTIONS 228 229 Council Member Goode asked about the Closing of Carriage Way. Mayor Butler signed 230 all the documents on Friday, May 03, 2019. 231 232 Mayor Butler announced the closing of Carriage Way apartments, announced as Public 233 Health Board Meeting and she will be late to the CML Meeting in Carbondale. There is a 234 RFTA Board meeting also. 235 236 Council Member Shenk will be attending the meeting in Carbondale. 237 238 Joseph Goodman a member of the Environmental Advisory Board introduced himself 239 and commended the Town Council on the project and looked forward to continuing 240 service on the Environmental Advisory Board. 241 242 9) ADJOURNMENT 243 244 At 5:57 245 246 Alyssa Shenk made the motion to adjourn the Regular Meeting of the Snowmass 247 Village Town Council on Monday, May 06, 2019. Tom Goode seconded the 248 motion. The motion was approved by a vote of 4 in favor to 0 opposed. Council 249 Member Sirkus was absent. 250 251 Voting Aye: Tom Goode, Bill Madsen, Alyssa Shenk, and Markey Butler. 252 253 Voting Nay: None. 254 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 11 of 219 11 05-06-19 TC Minutes Page 7 of 7 This set of Regular Meeting minutes was approved at the Regular Meeting of the 255 Snowmass Village Town Council on Monday, July 01, 2019. 256 257 Submitted By, 258 259 ________________________ 260 Rhonda B. Coxon, CMC 261 Town Clerk 262 263 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 12 of 219 12 1 SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL 2 REGULAR MEETING MINUTES 3 MAY 20, 2019 4 5 1) CALL TO ORDER 6 7 Mayor Butler called to order the Regular Meeting of the Snowmass Town Council on 8 Monday, May 20, 2019 at 4:08. 9 10 A complete live recording of this meeting can be found at www.tosv.com under Town 11 Council Meetings. This will be archived indefinitely allowing you to view at any time. 12 13 2) ROLL CALL 14 15 16 COUNCIL MEMBERS PRESENT: Tom Goode, Bill Madsen, Bob Sirkus, Alyssa Shenk, and Markey Butler. 17 COUNCIL MEMBERS ABSENT: All council members were present. 18 STAFF PRESENT: Clint Kinney, Town Manager; Travis Elliott, Assistant to the Town Manager; Anne Martens, Public Works Director and Rhonda B. Coxon, Town Clerk 19 PUBLIC PRESENT: Rosemary Strong, David Pesnichak and other members of the public interested in today’s Agenda items 20 3) PUBLIC COMMENT 21 22 23 Rosemary Strong would like to ask that .4 mile of Tom Blake trail be equestrian 24 friendly. She provided a map for the Town Council review. This would allow a loop for 25 riders. Mayor Butler suggested this go before the POSTR Board and then it would 26 come back to Town Council. Clint Kinney, Town Manager will follow-up with Ms. 27 Strong. 28 29 4) CONSENT AGENDA 30 31 A. DRAFT AGENDAS 32 33 34 Town Council consensus was to cancel the June 10th, 2019 Work Session due to lack 35 of quorum. 36 37 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 13 of 219 13 05-20-19 TC Minutes Page 2 of 4 Tom Goode made the motion to approve those items listed on today's consent agenda. 38 Bob Sirkus seconded the motion. The motion was approved by a vote of 5 in favor to 0 39 opposed. 40 41 Voting Aye: Tom Goode, Bill Madsen, Bob Sirkus, Alyssa Shenk, and Markey Butler. 42 43 Voting Nay: None. 44 5) ADMINISTRATIVE REPORTS 45 46 A. EOTC AGENDA SETTING MEETING 47 48 49 David Pesnichak, Regional Transportation Administrator was present to review the 50 agenda and get feedback on the agenda for the upcoming EOTC meeting on June 20, 51 2019. 52 53 B. CONTINUED DISCUSSION ON OWL/BRUSH CREEK ROUNDABOUT 54 55 Anne Martens, Public Works Director presented traffic counts and levels of service for 56 Owl Creek Road and Brush Creek Road. She also noted that in the 2019 Budget, the 57 Town Council appropriated $330,000 to continue the development of design drawings 58 for the proposed improvements at the Brush Creek and Owl Creek intersection. This 59 funding amount is expected to get the design to about a 50% completion level. Tonight, 60 is a continuation of the Council discussion regarding two options for the Owl Creek 61 Road and Brush Creek Road intersection design. Attached are the exhibits that 62 compare option A, a full-size roundabout with option B, a smaller size roundabout. Both 63 designs include a roundabout with a bypass right turn lane onto Owl Creek Road as the 64 intersection improvement. Each design also includes transit stops for both RFTA and 65 the Town Shuttle, Pedestrian Crossings, and associated facilities. The project also 66 includes design to cross the Brush Creek stream utilizing either a bridge crossing over 67 Brush Creek or box culvert that incorporates a pedestrian underpass. Lastly, the project 68 includes pedestrian access in the project area such as the Brush Creek Trail. All the 69 utility owners have infrastructure in the project area that are aging and would be 70 upgraded as part of the improvement project. The project construction schedule has not 71 been recommended at this time and will be further discussed as cost estimates become 72 available and funding options are discussed. At this point in the design, staff would like 73 to provide clear direction to SGM (the Town’s engineers) about which option (A or B) to 74 continue forward with on design. Town Council is concerned with preserving rural 75 character in Snowmass Village and they have concerns with the Faraway Road 76 intersection and Sinclair Road intersection not only pedestrian safety on Brush Creek 77 and Owl Creek. Town Council would like to see designs on all three of the intersections 78 before deciding on a design for just Brush Creek and Owl Creek intersection. 79 80 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 14 of 219 14 05-20-19 TC Minutes Page 3 of 4 C. RESOLUTION NO. 30, SERIES OF 2019 - A RESOLUTION AUTHORIZING 81 THE ENTRANCE INTO AN INTERGOVERNMENTAL AGREEMENT BETWEEN 82 THE TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE AND THE ASPEN SCHOOL DISTRICT 83 REGARDING VOTER-APPROVED TAX FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES 84 85 86 Clint Kinney, Town Manager stated that the Town of Snowmass Village voters approved 87 a property tax for five years to supplement funding to the Aspen School District for 88 educational purposes and this Intergovernmental Agreement formalizes the 89 arrangements. The first year of funds has been collected and this allows the payment. 90 91 Alyssa Shenk made the motion to approve as amended Resolution No. 30, Series of 92 2019 and the IGA with the Aspen School District for the voter approved tax for 93 educational purposes. Bill Madsen seconded the motion. The motion was approved by 94 a vote of 5 in favor to 0 opposed. 95 96 Voting Aye: Tom Goode, Bill Madsen, Bob Sirkus, Alyssa Shenk, and Markey Butler. 97 98 Voting Nay: None. 99 6) TOWN COUNCIL REPORTS AND ACTIONS 100 101 Council Member Sirkus gave kudos to the staff in preparing an Emergency 102 Preparedness Plan. 103 104 Council Member Goode spoke to his C.O.R.E. meeting, and thanked staff for Town 105 Clean Up Day. 106 107 Mayor Butler spoke to RFTA meeting and purchasing of new buses and working on 108 Strategic Plans. 109 110 7) ADJOURNMENT 111 112 At 5:38 p.m. 113 114 Tom Goode made the motion to adjourn the Regular Meeting of the Snowmass Village 115 Town Council on Monday, May 20, 2019. Bob Sirkus seconded the motion. The motion 116 was approved by a vote of 5 in favor to 0 opposed. 117 118 Voting Aye: Tom Goode, Bill Madsen, Bob Sirkus, Alyssa Shenk, and Markey Butler. 119 120 Voting Nay: None. 121 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 15 of 219 15 05-20-19 TC Minutes Page 4 of 4 This set of Regular Meeting minutes was approved by the Snowmass Village Town 122 Council at their Regular Meeting on July 01, 2019. 123 Submitted By, 124 125 ________________________ 126 Rhonda B. Coxon, Town Clerk 127 128 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 16 of 219 16 Town of Snowmass Village Agenda Item Summary DATE OF MEETING: July 1, 2019 AGENDA ITEM: Resolution #32, Series of 2019 – 2nd Amended 2019 Budget for the Pitkin County 1/2 Cent Transit Sales And Use Tax. PRESENTED BY: David Pesnichak, Transportation Administrator David Peckler, Transportation Director BACKGROUND: Staff requests Council’s approval of Resolution #32, Series of 2019 to approve a 2nd amended 2019 Elected Officials Transportation Committee budget for the Pitkin County ½ Cent Sales and Use Tax. The Aspen City Council, Pitkin County Commissioners and Snowmass Village Town Council met together as the Elected Officials Transportation Committee (“EOTC”) on June 20, 2019. The 2nd amended 2019 budget for the ½-cent transit sales and use tax was approved by the EOTC at that meeting; see the Resolution’s attachment. The purpose of this amendment is to reallocate $70,000 of matching funds from 2020 to 2019 for the Federal Lands Access Program (FLAP) grant, which will fund improvements to the Brush Creek Park and Ride. FINANCIAL IMPACT: The Amended 2019 budget summary: Total 2019 Net Revenues (after RFTA contribution) $ 2,696,350 Total 2019 Expenditures 2,971,911 Annual Surplus (Deficit) $ (275,561) Cumulative Surplus $ 9,382,605 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 17 of 219 17 APPLICABILITY TO COUNCIL GOALS & OBJECTIVES: Approval by resolution of all three jurisdictions that comprise the EOTC is necessary for appropriation of the Pitkin County ½ Cent Sales and Use Tax. COUNCIL OPTIONS: 1. Approve the Resolution 2. Amend the Resolution 3. Deny the resolution STAFF RECOMMENDATION: Approve the resolution. At the June 20, 2019 EOTC meeting all the parties approved the amended budget for 2019. ATTACHMENTS: 1. Resolution #32, Series of 2019 - 2nd Amended 2019 Budget for the Pitkin County 1/2 Cent Transit Sales and Use Tax 2. 2019 EOTC Budget and Multi-Year Plan - Amended June 2019 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 18 of 219 18 TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE 1 2 RESOLUTION NO. 32 3 SERIES OF 2019 4 5 A RESOLUTION OF THE TOWN COUNCIL OF THE TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE, 6 COLORADO, APPROVING THE 2nd AMENDED 2019 BUDGET FOR THE PITKIN 7 COUNTY 1/2 CENT TRANSIT SALES AND USE TAX 8 9 WHEREAS, the Town Council of Snowmass Village, the Aspen City Council and the 10 Pitkin County Board of County Commissioners (the "Parties") have previously identified 11 general elements of their Comprehensive Valley Transportation Plan (the "Plan") which are 12 eligible for funding from the Pitkin County one-half cent transit sales and use tax; and 13 14 WHEREAS, by intergovernmental agreement dated September 14, 1993, the Parties 15 agreed: 16 17 a. To conduct regular public meetings as the Elected Officials Transit Committee 18 (“EOTC”) to continue to refine and agree upon proposed projects and 19 transportation elements consistent with or complimentary to the Plan; and 20 21 b. That all expenditures and projects to be funded from the County-wide one-half 22 cent transit sales and use tax shall be agreed upon by the Parties and evidenced 23 by a resolution adopted by the governing body of each party; and 24 25 WHEREAS, at the EOTC meeting held on June 20, 2019, the Parties considered and 26 approved the attached amended 2019 budget for the Pitkin County one-half cent transit 27 sales and use tax; and 28 29 WHEREAS, the Town of Snowmass Village Council now desires to ratify the budget 30 approval given at the EOTC meeting by adoption of this resolution. 31 32 NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED by the Town Council of the Town of 33 Snowmass Village, Colorado, that the attached amended 2019 budget for the one-half cent 34 transit sales and use tax is hereby approved as summarized below: 35 36 Total 2019 Net Revenues (after RFTA contribution) $ 2,696,350 37 Total 2019 Expenditures 2,971,911 38 39 40 READ, APPROVED, AND ADOPTED by the Town Council of the Town of 41 Snowmass Village, Colorado on the 1st of July, 2019, upon a motion made by Council 42 Member _____________________________, the second of Council Member 43 ____________________, and upon a vote of ______ in favor and ______ opposed. 44 45 46 47 48 49 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 19 of 219 19 19-32 TC Reso Page 2 of 2 TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE 50 51 52 53 _________________________ 54 Markey Butler, Mayor 55 56 57 APPROVED AS TO FORM 58 59 60 61 ________________________ 62 John Dresser, Town Attorney 63 64 65 ATTEST: 66 67 68 69 _________________________ 70 Rhonda Coxon, Town Clerk 71 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 20 of 219 20 2019 EOTC BUDGET AND MULTI-YEAR PLAN - AMENDED JUNE 2019 PAGE 1 6/24/2019 EOTC Transit Project Funding Projection or Proposed Actual Budget Budget Plan Plan Plan Plan 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 FUNDING SOURCES: a) Pitkin County 1/2% sales tax (5,357,764) (5,626,000) (5,851,000) (6,041,000) (6,237,000) (6,440,000) (6,649,000) less RFTA contribution (81.04% of 1/2% sales tax) (4,341,932) (4,559,310) (4,741,650) (4,895,626) (5,054,465) (5,218,976) (5,388,350) net 1/2% sales tax funding to EOTC (1,015,832) (1,066,690) (1,109,350) (1,145,374) (1,182,535) (1,221,024) (1,260,650) b) Pitkin County 1/2% use tax (1,623,082) (1,400,000) (1,400,000) (1,400,000) (1,400,000) (1,400,000) (1,400,000) c) Investment income & misc. (89,000) (124,000) (187,000) (225,000) (243,000) (317,000) (189,000) Total Funding Sources (2,727,914) (2,590,690) (2,696,350) (2,770,374) (2,825,535) (2,938,024) (2,849,650) FUNDING USES: Ongoing / Operational 1) Use tax collection costs (23,329) (42,614) (93,280) (96,078) (98,961) (101,930) (104,987) 2) Administrative cost allocation & meeting costs (15,104) (22,710) (24,810) (25,554) (26,321) (27,111) (27,924) 3) Country Inn taxi program in-lieu of bus stop safety improvements (2,494) (6,000) (4,000) (4,000) (4,000) (4,000) (4,000) 4) X-Games transit subsidy (115,000) (115,000) (115,000) (115,000) (115,000) (115,000) (115,000) 5) Brush Creek Park and Ride operating costs (29,950) (35,000) (32,000) (33,000) (34,000) (35,000) (36,000) 6) No-fare Aspen-Snowmass-Woody Creek bus service - year-round (615,726) (650,556) (662,158) (799,610) (838,888) (872,400) (907,300) 7) WE-cycle operational support (100,000) (100,000) (100,000) 8) Brush Creek BRT connecting service - spring, summer, fall (50% from Snowmass Sav) (294,000) (419,587) 9) Regional Transportation Administrator (160,000) (141,076) (146,700) (152,600) (158,700) (165,000) sub-total Ongoing / Operational (901,602) (1,425,880) (1,591,911) (1,219,943) (1,269,770) (1,314,140) (1,360,211) net funding available for projects (1,826,312) (1,164,810) (1,104,439) (1,550,431) (1,555,765) (1,623,884) (1,489,439) Projects 10) Grand Ave Bridge construction - transit mitigation funding (335,000) Projects funded from Savings for greater Aspen Area 11) Upper Valley Mobility Study (276,044) 12) Cell phone transportation data collection (70,000) 13) Buttermilk/SH82 Pedestrian Crossing Analysis (40,000) 14) Battery Electric Bus Program carry over to 2019 (500,000) 15) Variable message sign on Hwy 82 consolidate in 2019 (450,000) 16) Snowmass Mall transit station (funded from Snowmass Village Savings Fund) (50,000) (350,000) (5,878,787) 17) EOTC retreat (10,000) 18) Brush Creek Park and Ride improvements (FLAP grant) (EOTC approved 10/20/16) (70,000) (3,830,000) less Federal Lands Access Program (FLAP) grant ((1,900,000) Total Uses (1,582,646) (1,515,880) (2,971,911) (3,149,943) (1,269,770) (7,192,927) (1,360,211) EOTC ANNUAL SURPLUS/(DEFICIT) (1,145,269) (1,074,810) ((275,561) ((379,569) (1,555,765) ((4,254,903) (1,489,439) EOTC CUMULATIVE SURPLUS FUND BALANCE (8,583,356) (9,658,166) (9,382,605) (9,003,036) (10,558,801) (6,303,898) (7,793,337) 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 21 of 219 21 2019 EOTC BUDGET AND MULTI-YEAR PLAN - AMENDED JUNE 2019 PAGE 2 6/24/2019 EOTC Transit Project Funding Projection or Proposed Actual Budget Budget Plan Plan Plan Plan 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 Revenue projections: a) sales tax 4.9%5.0%4.00%3.25% 3.25% 3.25% 3.25% b) use tax 12.8% -13.7%0.0%0.0%0.0%0.0%0.0% c) investment earnings rate 1.0%1.5%1.9%2.4%2.7%3.0%3.0% Projection or Proposed Actual Budget Budget Plan Plan Plan Plan 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 DISTRIBUTION OF ANNUAL SURPLUS (excludes projects funded from savings funds) (1,491,312) (1,271,810) (284,233) ((379,569) (1,555,765) (1,623,883.87) (1,489,439) 25% to Snowmass Village Savings until restored to maximum (372,828) (274,022) (71,058) ((94,892) (233,628) (-  ) (-  ) remainder to Aspen Savings (1,118,484) (997,788) (213,174) ((284,677) (1,322,138) (1,623,884) (1,489,439) Savings Fund for greater Snowmass Village Area Savings Fund maximum (6,278,787) (6,228,787) (5,878,787) (5,878,787) (5,878,787) (-  ) (-  ) share of annual surplus/deficit (372,828) (274,022) (71,058) ((94,892) (233,628) (-  ) (-  ) less 50% of Brush Creek BRT connecting service ((147,000) ((209,794) less Snowmass mall transit station - reduces savings fund maximum ((50,000) ((350,000) (-  ) (-  ) ((5,878,787) (-  ) Savings Fund for greater Snowmass Village Area (6,151,765) (6,228,787) (5,740,052) (5,645,159) (5,878,787) (-  ) (-  ) Savings Fund for greater Aspen Area share of annual surplus/deficit (1,118,484) (997,788) (213,174) ((284,677) (1,322,138) (1,623,884) (1,489,439) less Upper Valley Mobility Study and cell phone data funded from Aspen Savings ((346,044) Savings Fund for greater Aspen Area (2,431,590) (3,429,379) (3,642,553) (3,357,877) (4,680,014) (6,303,898) (7,793,337) 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 22 of 219 22 1 | Page Town of Snowmass Village Agenda Item Summary DATE OF MEETING: July 1, 2019 AGENDA ITEM: Work Session – Senior Housing in Snowmass Village and Aging in Place PRESENTED BY: Betsy Crum, Housing Director Dave Peckler, Transportation Director BACKGROUND: According to the Colorado State Demography Office, Colorado is a very young state. In 2010, only 10% of the population was over the age of 65, and in 2015 we had the 8th lowest share of those 65 and older in the U.S. At the same time, however, Baby Boomers (people born between 1946 and 1964) represent more than a quarter of the state’s population. By 2030, our population aged 65 and older will be 125% larger than it was in 2010. Pitkin County and Snowmass Village are no exception to this trend. As can be seen in the following graphic, the number of people aged 65 and older is expected to continue to grow. 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 23 of 219 23 2 | Page Regionwide, the age group of 65 years and older accounted for more than one-fifth of total population change between 2000 and 2017. Growth in this age group is reflective of the net migration of population at retirement age. Quality of life factors often influence residents’ decisions to remain in place after retirement, particularly in the Aspen to Snowmass Area where the older age cohort accounts for nearly half of projected population growth. There is some anecdotal evidence that life in mountain communities is not particularly friendly to senior citizens due to climate and health issues associated with living at high altitude. In fact, evidence shows that this may be true for recent transplants, where respiratory disease can be more prevalent. On the other hand, aging at high altitude can prolong life and provide a host of other benefits for those accustomed to the conditions, such as long-time residents or natives. In general, and understandably, seniors prefer to stay in their own homes or apartments for as long as possible and continue to be active, vital members of their community. With improved health and greater average life expectancy, seniors can live independently or semi-independently for decades. This is particularly true in mountain communities like Snowmass Village, where people can stay active well into their senior years. In a recent survey done by Pitkin County Senior Services, nearly 90% of all people responding said they wished to remain in their community or in the County upon retirement. “Aging in Place”: In January 2018 Colorado’s Strategic Action Planning Group on Aging issued a summary report, “Conversations on Aging,” that stated: Finding affordable, accessible, and age-friendly housing was expressed as a major concern by attendees. The majority who put forth this topic were mainly concerned about seniors being able to find affordable housing. Many expressed the desire to “age in place,” by improving the capacity to stay in their homes with assistive services and in-home modifications. Public input involved support for implementing universal design elements, addressing laws that restrict home sharing among seniors and unrelated adults, and zoning regulations that affect additional dwelling units and new construction. Access to transportation and mobility services is another large concern for Coloradans. Finding accessible options is difficult, particularly in rural areas. Longer life expectancies can be attributable to advances in medical treatment and a healthier lifestyle; however, living longer means these medical services and treatments need to be available and accessible. It also means that different housing solutions need to be addressed. Elderly households frequently express an interest in downsizing and 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 24 of 219 24 3 | Page lower maintenance living arrangements, but also express frustration that there are so few, if any, opportunities in the Region. Not only does the lack of appropriate housing impact their quality of life, it negatively impacts the community through loss of long-time residents and their many contributions to our economy and vitality. There are many different potential approaches to aging in place, ranging from fully independent living in the community, in-home care, Independent Living Communities (aka “senior housing”), Assisted Living Communities, Memory Care Programs, and skilled nursing facilities. Continuing Care Retirement Communities (CCRC’s) typically offer a continuum of options from full independence to skilled nursing on a single campus. The Greater Roaring Fork Regional Housing Study published in April 2019 had several conclusions relative to the housing needs of Snowmass Village and Aspen seniors. Overall the most prominent theme was a need for more subsidized senior housing options. While approximately 15% intend to use the current home as a retirement residence in the next 5 years, 55% indicated that they are very likely or extremely likely to rent or purchase a smaller home upon retirement. The Study concluded that the Aspen to Snowmass area currently has a 3,000-unit shortfall, which is projected to increase to 3,400 units by 2027. As expected in such a high-priced market, the shortfall is spread across the entire affordability spectrum, except for those with incomes above 160 percent of Area Median Income. Existing Housing Options: There are very few senior housing options in Pitkin County. Aspen-Pitkin County Housing Authority (APCHA) owns and manages Aspen Country Inn, which prioritizes seniors for small independent living rental units. Whitcomb Terrace, which is located on the campus of Aspen Valley Hospital, offers assisted living for 14 seniors with a higher level of service need. Crystal Meadows and Heritage Park in Carbondale offer independent and assisted living at a relatively affordable rate, but currently has a minimum 7-year waiting list. Other market-rate options exist in Glenwood Springs but are prohibitively expensive, particularly for assisted living and long-term care housing. Snowmass Village’s deed restricted Housing Program does have a provision to allow retirees to remain in their homes after retirement, provided they live in the home and work full time at least 10 years prior to retirement, and have reached the age of 62 upon retirement. APCHA allows retirees to remain in both rental and deed restricted housing if they have worked a minimum of 4 years prior to retirement. Both programs are primarily geared toward supporting the local workforce and do not have incentives for retirees to downsize into smaller homes. 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 25 of 219 25 4 | Page Transportation Considerations: It is important to consider access to transit and other alternative modes of transportation as the community focuses on the creation of accessible units in our housing inventory, the aging of renters/owners in our employee housing units, and creation of services that support the elderly staying in the community. The mobility needs of an aging population can cover a wide variety of transportation options. These options should be considered in any development or upgrade to the housing inventory. The options/services can range from improved pedestrian walkways that access public transportation to the creation of Senior transit services. The extent of assistance and support for an individual will be dependent upon their physical and cognitive abilities. With high levels of physical, cognitive and social abilities the use of existing pedestrian facilities, transit services, ride-hailing companies, bicycles, and private automobiles are all options for seniors. Use of existing services is obviously the most sustainable option. Snowmass Village is fortunate to have robust local and regional transit services. These services are focused on the multi-family developments within the community and commercial centers. Fixed route transit services are not available in most of the single-family subdivisions in the community. Narrow streets in low-density areas are not transit friendly or efficient environments. Single-family neighborhoods are also challenging for pedestrians at night or in winter conditions. Ride Hailing services, such as Uber or Lyft, may be a viable service to the single-family neighborhoods. When physical or mental impairments make it impossible for the person to drive a car, local and regional transit services may still be an option. The individual must have the ability to access and use the transit services which is dependent on the infrastructure (safe walkways and accessible bus stops) as well as the person's ability. If the seniors lack the physical and/or mental ability to access and navigate the transit services or have no social network to help them, then the individual could be eligible for senior or paratransit services as defined under the Americans with Disability Act (ADA) or under a Federal Transit Administration Section 5310 grant. Section 5310 grants are specifically for the support services for the physically challenged and seniors. These services are provided as “curb-to-curb” or “door-to-door” depending on the customer’s ability. These services require advanced booking and are mostly focused on medical visits or shopping trips. Senior services could be provided by a transit agency, a taxi company or a ride-hailing service. To contract with an outside agency requires that they follow the guidelines for driver training, drug testing, safety, and maintenance. These requirements can be challenging for the private sector. Assisted Living is another level of senior housing which usually involves greater services and/or provides their own transportation for their tenants. It is extremely important to consider pedestrian circulation in these facilities and provide for access to 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 26 of 219 26 5 | Page wheelchair equipped vehicles. A location that provides easy access to medical care facilities, senior centers and general services/retail help to make them more sustainable, but land costs often determine location. Possible Approaches Local options that might be considered include: • Employee Housing – Deed Restricted: the current Permanent Moderate Housing regulations do enable homeowners to remain in their homes when they retire, provided they have lived in the housing and worked full-time at least 10 years prior to retirement, and have reached the age of at least 62 years. This allows for true aging-in-place; however, there are disincentives to downsizing, specifically in the income and asset limits. Those could be revised or eliminated in cases where seniors wish to downsize to another deed-restricted home in the Village. We could also look to our regulations to ensure that live-in assistants are permitted for those who need them. • Employee Housing – Rental: presently there is no provision to allow retired individuals to live in our rental housing, as it was developed and has been managed as workforce housing. There could be an exception created for individuals who have worked in the Town for a length of time (perhaps 10 or more years) and have reached retirement age. Additional consideration could be given to continued contribution to the community through volunteer hours, as is currently done in other mountain communities. • Employee Housing – Future Development: We might look to ensure that fully- accessible, ground-level housing is included in future development. Universal design features (wheel-in showers, low door thresholds, etc.) enable people to remain in their homes longer and could be built into any housing we develop. We might consider a set-aside or priority for some number of units in all future developments for seniors. Senior-only housing or a Continuing Care Retirement Community (CCRC) is most appropriate as a regional solution. In 2013, the Town of Basalt approved the Roaring Fork Valley Continuing Care Retirement Community, an 18-acre campus along Highway 82. It included 18 separate cottage homes, 78 independent living apartments, 30 assisted living units, and 24 skilled nursing units. Services offered included meals, transportation, homecare, and hospice. The Roaring Fork CCRC was not built; however, it stands as a model that could serve the upper Valley communities with a wide range of senior living options. A copy of the original brochure is attached. 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 27 of 219 27 6 | Page FINANCIAL IMPACT: This is a work session for discussion only, and so there is no financial impact. However, pursuing one or more of the above approaches could have a financial impact, particularly if new senior housing is developed. The costs associated with providing a higher level of services, such as in assisted living, will necessitate subsidizing the operations at some level. APPLICABILITY TO COUNCIL GOALS & OBJECTIVES: The Town Council adopted goals in April of 2019 that include providing a variety of affordable housing options within the Village to build a strong, well connected, and engaged community with a viable workforce. Specifically, the Council committed to a near-term strategy that will update housing regulations, actively identify opportunities and partners to address senior housing needs and incentivize the creation of an additional 200 units. The Housing Department continues to actively pursue the longstanding goal of housing our full-time workforce households that want to live in the community, including developing new opportunities that provide attractive and desirable homeownership opportunities. The Housing Department continues to actively pursue the long-standing goal of housing our full-time workforce households that want to live in the community while also enhancing the opportunities for building a strong and diverse community. Seeking options to enable long-time Snowmass Village residents to age-in-place, both within the Village and more broadly in the Valley, will help to fulfill this latter goal. COUNCIL OPTIONS: No formal action is requested at this time. This is a Work Session for discussion. STAFF RECOMMENDATION: Staff recommends continuing to consider a variety of approaches to both encourage aging-in-place and to pursue potential development opportunities that will support a regional, affordable solution to allow seniors to remain in the upper Roaring Fork Valley as they age and their needs change. It may be useful to schedule a joint work session with Aspen and Pitkin County to discuss regional options. It should be stated that the current need for workforce housing is great, and any homes that are set-aside or otherwise reserved for seniors, whether rental or deed-restricted, will reduce the number available to our full-time, year-round Snowmass Village labor force. For this reason, any reduction in the availability or development of housing for our workforce should be very carefully considered. We recommend a “yes-and” approach to create options for seniors and not an “either-or” choice. 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 28 of 219 28 7 | Page ATTACHMENTS: • ATTACHMENT 1 Pitkin County Aging Well Plan • ATTACHMENT 2 Roaring Fork Valley Continuing Care Retirement Community Brochure 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 29 of 219 29 ! ! ! Aging!Well!in!Pitkin!County! ! Final!Report! Aging!Well!Community!Planning!Initiative!! (AWCPI)! !!!! November!2014! ! ! 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 30 of 219 30 Pitkin!County!Aging!Well!Community!Plan!Final!Report,!November!2014! ! Table!of!Contents! ! Section!1!Facts!and!Trends:!The!Case!for!Action! ! Section!2!Participants! ! Section!3!Mission,!Vision,!Key!Elements! ! Section!4!The!Planning!Process! ! Section!5!The!Future! ! Section!6!Supporting!Materials!! !!6.1!Workgroup!Narratives!–!September!2013! !!6.2!Maps!(prepared!June!2014)! !!6.3!Senior!Summit!Agenda!–!June!2014! !!6.4!Senior!Summit!Goals!Presentation!–!June!2014! !!6.5!Acronym!Key! ! Section!7!AWCPI!Goals!Summary! ! Section!8!Pitkin!County!Aging!Well!Community!Plan! !Goals,!Objectives,!Community!Values,!Action!Steps,!! !Responsible!Parties,!Possible!Partners,!Timing ! 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 31 of 219 31 ! Pitkin!County!Aging!Well!Community!Plan!Final!Report,!November!2014,!section!1,!page!1X1! ! ! ! Section!1:!Facts!and!Trends! The!Case!for!Action! ! ! When!the!Pitkin!County!Aging!Well!Community!Planning!Initiative!(AWCPI)!began!in!early! 2013,!the!case!for!action!was!clear.!Between!2000!and!2010,!Colorado!had!the!fourth! fastestXgrowing!older!adult!(65+)!population!in!the!nation,!and!Pitkin!County!had!the! seventh!fastestXgrowing!older!adult!population!in!the!state.!For!the!first!time!in!Colorado! history,!the!population!over!age!65!grew!faster!than!the!state!population,!and!that!will! continue!until!the!growth!rates!equalize!in!the!decade!between!2030!and!2040.!(Aging!in! Colorado!Report,!July!2012!Colorado!State!Demographer)!! ! Steady!increases!in!the!age!60+!population!in!Colorado!and!in!Pitkin!County!are!projected! through!2040.!In!2010,!Pitkin!County’s!population!in!the!age!60+!demographic!was!about! 3,100!people;!in!2040,!it!is!projected!to!be!about!6,000!people.!Compared!to!1990! population!numbers,!Pitkin!County!projections!for!2040!anticipate!a!sevenXfold!increase!in! the!60+!age!group,!increasing!from!7%!to!approximately!20%!of!the!total!population,!while! during!the!same!fiftyXyear!period,!the!overall!population!is!projected!to!increase!just!2.5! times.!Maps!in!section!6.2!illustrate!the!geographic!impact!of!this!“tsunami”!of!older!adults! in!Pitkin!County.! ! The!most!dramatic!increases!through!2040!are!in!Pitkin!County’s!population!over!age!80,! which!is!the!group!of!older!adults!most!in!need!of!support!services.!In!2010,!Pitkin!County’s! population!in!the!80+!age!group!was!about!240!people;!in!2040,!it!is!projected!to!be!about! 1,400!people.!Compared!to!1990!population!numbers,!Pitkin!County!projections!for!2040! anticipate!a!19Xfold!increase!in!the!80+!age!group,!and!this!projected!increase!is! exacerbated!by!the!fact!that!Pitkin!County!is!ranked!in!the!top!ten!U.S.!counties!for!life! expectancy.!(June!2011!Population!Health!Metrics)!! ! Pitkin!County!citizens’!responses!in!recent!surveys!indicate!a!need!for!public!services!that! target!older!adults.! • The!2010!Community!Assessment!Survey!of!Older!Adults!(CASOA)!showed:! ! 95%!rate!Aspen/Pitkin!County!an!excellent!place!to!live! ! 72%!are!very!likely!or!somewhat!likely!to!remain!in!the!community!through! retirement! ! 91%!evaluate!their!wellXbeing!as!excellent!or!good,!yet! ! 40%!reported!experiencing!problems!in!the!past!12!months!ranging!from! physical/mental!health!to!financial!issues. ! ! 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 32 of 219 32 ! Pitkin!County!Aging!Well!Community!Plan!Final!Report,!November!2014,!section!1,!page!1X2! ! ! • The!2012!Aspen!Area!Community!Plan!process!found:! ! 81%!of!participants!believe!working!residents!should!have!a!reasonable! expectation!to!retire!here!with!affordable!and!accessible!support!services! ! 51%!believe!government!should!focus!on!public!senior!services!like!nutrition,! transportation,!and!home!services! ! 36%!said!there!should!be!a!focus!on!building!longXterm!senior!housing.! ! In!addition!to!demographic!and!survey!data,!local!information!was!collected!about!human! and!medical!service!availability,!social!and!fitness!opportunities,!and!other!older!adult! needs.!In!some!areas,!the!programs!and!resources!were!well!developed;!in!others!there! were!gaps!and!inconsistencies.!! ! Therefore,!the!case!for!action!included!these!aspects:! • Current!and!projected!growth!in!the!60+!and!80+!populations!through!2040! demands!community!attention;!many!of!today’s!older!adults!and!aboutXtoXbe!older! adults!are!planning!to!stay!in!Pitkin!County.! • The!greatest!growth!is!in!the!60+!age!group,!when!prevention!programs!are! effective.! • The!greatest!needs!are!in!80+!age!group,!when!direct!services!and!support!are! required.! • Although!projected!growth!rates!level!out!by!2040,!when!Baby!Boomers!(born! between!1946!and!1967)!have!all!reached!age!65,!the!postXBoomer!numbers!remain! high.!!!! ! Stakeholders!were!key!players!in!the!development!of!a!comprehensive!community!plan!that! will!make!Pitkin!County!a!place!where!residents!through!all!stages!of!aging!will!have!access! to!the!comprehensive!activities!and!services!they!need.!! ! 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 33 of 219 33 ! Pitkin!County!Aging!Well!Community!Plan!Final!Report,!November!2014,!section!2,!page!2X1! ! Section!2:!Participants! ! ! Pitkin&County&Senior&Services!(PCSS)!was!the!convener!and!driver!of!the!planning!process,! the!central!information!resource,!and!a!key!force!for!encouraging!and!garnering!widespread! community!participation.!PCSS!will!monitor!implementation!and!achievement!of!goals!and! objectives!and!will!oversee!processes!to!modify!goals!and!objectives,!if!necessary.! ! The!AWCPI&Project&Management&Team!(PMT)!was!responsible!for!oversight!and!project! support!throughout!the!planning!process;!inXdepth!review!and!revision!of!goals,!objectives,! and!action!steps;!planning!and!participating!in!steering!committee!and!workgroup! meetings;!organizing!and!participating!in!community!meetings!and!the!2014!Senior!Summit;! and!preparing!this!report.!!The!PMT!members!include:! 1. Marty!Ames,!Director,!Pitkin!County!Senior!Services! 2. Debbi!Falender,!Consultant,!Executive!Service!Corps! 3. Laura!Kornasiewicz,!Consultant,!Executive!Service!Corps! 4. Patty!Kravitz,!Project!Coordinator,!Pitkin!County!Senior!Services! 5. Christine!Nolen,!Consultant!and!Executive!Director,!Executive!Service!Corps! 6. Jordana!Sabella,!Public!Health!Planner,!Community!Health!Services,!Pitkin! County!Public!Health! ! The!AWCPI&Steering&Committee,!consisting!of!government,!nonprofit,!and!business!leaders,! and!providers!and!consumers!of!aging!services,!provided!insight!and!guidance!throughout! the!planning!process.!Members!served!on!workgroups,!participated!in!community!meetings! and!the!Senior!Summit,!and!assisted!in!the!review!and!revision!of!goals,!objectives,!and! action!steps.! 1. Tim!Anderson,!Director,!City!of!Aspen!Recreation!Department! 2. Markey!Butler,!Executive!Director,!HomeCare!and!Hospice!of!the!Valley;!Town! Council!Member,!Town!of!Snowmass!Village! 3. Doris!Downey,!past!member,!PCSS!Senior!Council;!Healthy!Community!Fund! Grant!Review!Board! 4. Erin!Fisher,!Program!Specialist,!Alpine!Area!Agency!on!Aging,!Northwest! Colorado!Council!of!Governments! 5. Jessica!Garrow,!Long!Range!Planner,!City!of!Aspen!Planning!Department! 6. Maggie!Gerardi,!Director,!Whitcomb!Terrace!Assisted!Living! 7. Jean!Hammes,!Director,!Alpine!Area!Agency!of!Aging,!Northwest!Colorado! Council!of!Governments! 8. Joe!High,!Patient!Representative,!Aspen!Valley!Hospital! 9. Cindy!Houben,!Director,!Pitkin!County!Community!Development! 10. John!Lutgring,!Licensed!Clinical!Social!Worker ! 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 34 of 219 34 ! Pitkin!County!Aging!Well!Community!Plan!Final!Report,!November!2014,!section!2,!page!2X2! ! 11. Margaret!Maxwell,!Director,!Instructional!Chair!and!Academic!Lead,!Colorado! Mountain!College!X!Aspen!Campus! 12. Sara!Nadolny,!Planning!Technician,!City!of!Aspen!Planning!Department! 13. Peg!McGavock,!Member,!PCSS!Senior!Council! 14. Susanne!Morrison,!Senior!Program!Officer,!Aspen!Community!Foundation! 15. Andrea!Pazdera,!former!Program!Director,!Mind!Springs!Health! 16. Jon!Peacock,!County!Manager,!Pitkin!County! 17. Liz!Stark,!Director,!Community!Health!Services,!Pitkin!County!Public!Health! 18. Nan!Sundeen,!Director,!Pitkin!County!Health!and!Human!Services! 19. Becky!Ward,!Senior!Development!Associate,!Aspen!Institute! ! The!Executive&Service&Corps!(ESC)!provided!consultants!who!served!in!a!variety!of!capacities! and!roles,!including!as!members!of!the!Project!Management!Team;!as!planners,!facilitators,! and!scribes!for!community!meetings,!workgroup!sessions,!and!steering!committee! meetings;!as!scribes!for!all!drafts!and!iterations!of!the!plan!document;!and!as!planners!and! presenters!at!the!2014!Senior!Summit.!Their!primary!workgroup!assignments!are!listed! here:! !Valerie!Borthwick,!Information!and!Advocacy! !Roy!Davidson,!Social!and!Civic!Engagement! !Debbi!Falender,!Project!Management!Team,!Information!and!Advocacy! !Lani!Kitching,!Physical!and!Mental!Health!and!Wellness! !Laura!Kornasiewicz,!Project!Management!Team,!Aging!in!Place! !Ray!Limoges,!Social!and!Civic!Engagement! !Tom!Neel,!Social!and!Civic!Engagement! !Christine!Nolen,!Project!Management!Team,!Information!and!Advocacy! !Bob!Purvis,!Physical!and!Mental!Health!and!Wellness! !Sally!Sparhawk,!Aging!in!Place! !Curt!Strand,!Information!and!Advocacy! ! Community&members&and&leaders!from!government,!nonprofit,!and!business!sectors! attended!community!meetings!and!participated!in!a!number!of!ways.!Many!served!on! workgroups;!others!helped!with!action!steps;!and!others!have!agreed!to!be!lead!entities!or! partners!in!the!implementation!of!the!plan’s!goals!and!objectives.!Their!work!has!been! crucial!in!moving!this!project!forward!and!will!continue!to!be!crucial!in!the!implementation! phase.!We!thank!each!and!every!one!of!these!committed!community!participants.! ! 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 35 of 219 35 ! ! Pitkin!County!Aging!Well!Community!Plan!Final!Report,!November!2014,!section!3,!page!3X1! ! Section!3:!Mission,!Vision,!Key!Elements! ! ! Mission! The!Pitkin!County!Aging!Well!Community!Planning!Initiative!will!develop!strategies!to!build! resources!and!lead!change!so!that,!into!the!next!decade!and!beyond,!Pitkin!County!achieves! its!full!potential!as!a!thriving!community!for!aging!well.!The!Initiative!will!produce!a!viable,! longXterm!communityXwide!plan,!including!goals,!objectives,!and!action!steps!to!address!the! needs!of!a!growing!older!adult!population.! ! ! Vision! Pitkin!County!is!a!thriving!community!for!aging!well.! ! ! Key!Elements!of!the!Initiative! 1.!Develop!community!awareness!of!the!need!for!and!importance!of! comprehensive!community!planning!to!achieve!our!full!potential!as!a! thriving!community!for!aging!well.! 2.!Engage!all!stakeholders!(older!adults,!present!and!future;!families;! caregivers;!support!systems;!providers;!community!organizations;! businesses)!in!an!inclusive!and!efficient!planning!process.! 3.!Establish!a!process!to!monitor!and!ensure!longXterm!achievement!of! the!plan’s!goals!and!objectives!and!to!facilitate!appropriate! modifications,!if!necessary.! 4.!Communicate!continuously!with!all!participants,!and!communicate! findings!to!the!entire!community!at!the!end!of!the!process.! ! ! Overarching!Considerations! ! The!community!plan!is!countywide,!encompassing!rural!areas!of!Pitkin!County!as!well!as!the! more!urban!settings!in!Aspen,!Snowmass!Village,!and!Basalt.!While!the!plan!does!not! directly!apply!to!Garfield!or!Eagle!Counties,!these!contiguous!areas!affect,!and!are!affected! by,!what!occurs!in!Pitkin!County.!Furthermore,!area!residents!usually!identify!with!the! Valley!as!a!whole,!not!with!a!specific!county.!Thus,!regional!resources!and!potential! collaborations!have!been!and!will!continue!to!be!explored.!! ! ! ! 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 36 of 219 36 ! ! Pitkin!County!Aging!Well!Community!Plan!Final!Report,!November!2014,!section!4,!page!4X1! ! ! Section!4:!The!Planning!Process! February!2013!through!October!2014! ! ! Completed!in!December!2012,!the!Pitkin!County!Public!Health!Improvement!Plan! established!priorities!for!Pitkin!County!for!the!next!five!years.!One!of!those!priorities!was!to! “address!the!needs!of!a!growing!older!adult!population”!by!conducting!a!community! strategic!planning!initiative!to!identify!and!implement!strategies!to!create!an!“aging!well”! community.*!Pitkin!County!Senior!Services!was!identified!as!the!lead!responsible!entity.! ! In!February!2013,!Pitkin!County!Senior!Services!(PCSS)!initiated!discussions!with!the! Executive!Service!Corps!(ESC)!to!engage!ESC’s!assistance!in!facilitating!the!community! strategic!planning!process.!Between!March!and!June!2013,!PCSS!and!ESC!together!identified! persons!and!roles!and!responsibilities!for!a!project!management!team,!a!steering! committee,!and!ESC!facilitators!and!scribes.!!! ! In!June!and!July!2013,!the!project!management!team!established!a!timeline!for!what! became!a!yearXlong!planning!process,!including!two!community!meetings,!monthly! workgroup!sessions,!interim!steering!committee!meetings!as!needed,!and!a!communityX wide!presentation!of!the!results!of!the!planning!efforts.!!! ! The!first!community!meeting!was!held!on!July!23,!2013,!immediately!preceded!by!the!first! gathering!of!the!steering!committee.!Invitations!to!the!community!meeting!were! distributed!by!email!and!published!in!local!newspapers!and!in!the!PCSS!newsletter.!SeventyX one!people!attended,!including!seven!people!under!age!40,!and!43!people!age!60!and! above.! ! The!purposes!of!the!July!2013!community!meeting!were!to:!! • introduce!key!people,!including!members!of!the!steering!committee!and!the!project! management!team! • describe!the!mission,!vision,!and!key!elements!of!the!community!planning!process! • acknowledge!work!that!has!already!been!done,!including!steps!in!the!state!and! county!to!assess!older!adult!needs!and!growth!trends!(e.g.,!the!CASOA!survey!in! 2010);!increased!national,!stateXwide,!and!local!research!on!older!adults!in!general! !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! *!In#addition#to#community#strategic#planning,#a#separate,#but#complementary#goal#in#the#Pitkin# County#Public#Health#Improvement#Plan#was#to#“build#a#new#Continuing#Care#Retirement#Community# (CCRC)#in#Basalt#and#recruit#a#medical#director.”#To#aid#in#the#development#of#a#CCRC,#there#were#to# be#community#educational#events#about#issues#of#interest#to#seniors#and#family#members,# professionals,#and#caregivers.#The#Aspen#Valley#Foundation#was#identified#as#the#lead#responsible# entity.#Community#strategic#planning#was#to#be#accomplished#by#2015,#and#the#development#of#a# CCRC#and#recruitment#of#a#medical#director#was#to#be#accomplished#by#2017.## 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 37 of 219 37 ! ! Pitkin!County!Aging!Well!Community!Plan!Final!Report,!November!2014,!section!4,!page!4X2! ! • in!the!past!20X25!years;!the!Aspen!Area!Community!Plan!with!its!chapter!on!lifelong! Aspenites,!emphasizing!public!safety,!selfXreliance,!and!health;!and!the!Pitkin!County! Public!Health!Improvement!Plan,!which!generated!this!planning!process! • share!information!about!local,!regional,!and!national!facts!and!trends!that!supported! the!case!for!action!(discussed!in!section!1!of!this!report)! • identify!essential!and!desirable!elements!for!a!thriving!community!for!aging!well!! • begin!to!organize!these!essential!and!desirable!elements!into!focus!areas!for! workgroups,!and!! • encourage!everyone!in!attendance!to!participate!in!a!workgroup.! ! At!the!July!23!community!meeting,!participants!were!asked!to!brainstorm!ideas!for!a!future! aging!well!community!and!to!put!those!ideas!into!themes!and!categories.!Ten!broad! categories!were!identified,!and!all!comments!were!gathered,!reviewed,!and!reorganized,! first!by!the!project!management!team!and!then!in!a!steering!committee!work!session!in! August.!! ! The!results!of!the!work!in!July!and!August!were!taken!to!a!second!community!meeting!on! September!16,!2013,!where!four!focus!areas!were!identified!and!assigned!to!workgroups:! Aging!in!Place,!Physical!and!Mental!Health!and!Wellness,!Social!and!Civic!Engagement,!and! Information!and!Advocacy.!Each!focus!area!was!described!by!a!narrative!statement!and!a! list!of!potential!subXtopics!prepared!by!the!project!management!team,!which!can!be!found! in!section!6.1!of!this!report.!! ! Approximately!40!people!participated!in!the!four!workgroups,!plus!an!ESC!facilitator!and!an! ESC!scribe!for!each!group.!The!workgroups!identified!preliminary!priorities!and!developed! goals,!objectives,!and!action!steps,!and!in!the!fall!and!winter!of!2013X2014,!the!workgroups,! steering!committee,!and!project!management!team!created,!revised,!and!edited!the! developing!plan.!! ! At!a!steering!committee!meeting!on!April!10,!2014,!followed!by!an!open!house!to!thank!all! workgroup!participants!(and!to!receive!additional!input),!the!project!management!team! presented!the!thenXcurrent!version!(V16)!of!14!goals!and!45!objectives,!with!seven!goals! placed!in!phase!I!and!seven!goals!placed!in!phase!II.!The!phasing!was!shortXlived,!however.!! Folks!with!energy!to!devote!to!some!of!the!phase!II!goals!stepped!up!to!be!sure!those!goals! were!moved!back!into!a!more!immediate!priority.!! ! One!of!the!purposes!of!the!April!2014!meeting!and!open!house!was!to!seek!input!regarding! possible!lead!entities!and!partners!–!persons!who!would!be!responsible!for!accomplishing! the!goals!and!objectives.!During!May!and!June!2014,!the!project!management!team! contacted!suggested!lead!entities!and!partners!to!help!with!action!steps!and! implementation,!and!at!the!same!time,!planned!a!Senior!Summit!where!the!plan!details! would!be!shared!with!the!community.! ! 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 38 of 219 38 ! ! Pitkin!County!Aging!Well!Community!Plan!Final!Report,!November!2014,!section!4,!page!4X3! ! At!the!Senior!Summit!on!June!24,!2014,!the!Pitkin!County!Aging!Well!Community!Plan!was! presented!to!an!audience!of!about!100!community!members!who!heard!about!the!impetus! for!the!planning!process,!the!trends!for!growth!in!the!older!adult!population!in!Pitkin! County,!and!details!of!the!plan.! ! Tony!Vagneur,!a!local!rancher!and!Aspen!Times!newspaper!columnist!(Saddle!Sore),! provided!a!keynote!address!at!the!Senior!Summit,!emphasizing!choices:!!! ! “I#feel#very#strongly#that#forces#other#than#ourselves#will#decide#when#we# need#to#avail#ourselves#of#the#initiatives#discussed#today.#Making#a#choice# today#to#get#behind#this#incredibly#great#program#will#guarantee#that#we# have#help#and#assistance#when#we#need#it,#whether#it’s#our#choice,#or# not.”## ! The!Pitkin!County!Aging!Well!Community!Plan!can!be!found!in!section!8!of!this!report.!All! presentations!at!the!Senior!Summit,!and!the!Community!Plan!in!its!entirety,!can!be!found!at!! ! www.aspenpitkin.com/seniorservices! ! 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 39 of 219 39 ! ! Pitkin!County!Aging!Well!Community!Plan!Final!Report,!November!2014,!section!5,!page!5X1! ! Section!5:!The!Future! ! The!Pitkin!County!Aging!Well!Community!Plan!contains!goals,!objectives,!and!action!steps!to! be!initiated!by!2017.!Many!steps!are!underway.!Pitkin!County!Senior!Services!will!monitor! implementation!and!achievement!and!will!take!stock,!at!least!annually,!to!determine!if! modifications!are!needed.!! ! Pitkin!County!Senior!Services,!in!its!role!as!overseer!during!the!implementation!phase,!will! assure!achievement!of!objectives!and!action!steps,!which!range!from!sustaining!existing! wellXrun!and!wellXfunded!programs!and!services,!to!developing!new!and!newly!funded! programs!and!services!that!comply!with!researched!best!practices.!!! ! Implementation!and!achievement!will!be!possible!with!the!commitment!of!time!and!energy! by!many!Pitkin!County!individuals,!agencies,!nonprofits,!and!businesses.!The!goals!in!this! community!plan!are!community!goals,!and!members!of!the!community!must!work!to! accomplish!them,!if!they!are!to!be!accomplished!at!all.!! ! ! ! ! 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 40 of 219 40 ! ! Pitkin!County!Aging!Well!Community!Plan!Final!Report,!November!2014! ! ! ! ! Section!6:!Supporting!Materials! ! ! ! 6.1!Workgroup!Narratives!–!September!2013! !Pages!6.1X1!through!6.1X5! ! 6.2!Maps!(prepared!June!2014)!! ! 6.3!Senior!Summit!Agenda!–!June!2014! ! 6.4!Senior!Summit!Goals!and!Objectives! !Presentation!–!June!2014! ! 6.5!!Acronym!Key!! ! ! 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 41 of 219 41 ! ! Pitkin!County!Aging!Well!Community!Plan!Final!Report,!November!2014,!section!6.1,!page!6.1X1! ! Section!6.1!!WORKGROUP!NARRATIVES!–!September!2013! ! Social!and!Civic!Engagement!! (formerly!“Connections”)! ! Participation!in!social!and!community!activities!that!involve!other!people!is!a!vital!aspect!of! life!for!many!as!they!get!older.!Communities!that!provide!diverse!and!abundant! opportunities!for!such!involvement!often!thrive.!Those!who!participate!in!these!activities! feel!as!though!their!voices!are!heard!and!their!contributions!are!valued!in!the!community.!! ! Among!people!of!all!ages,!Pitkin!County!conversations!often!mention!balancing!mind,!body,! and!spirit,!which!is!relevant!to!this!focus!area!and!to!the!area!of!Physical!and!Mental!Health,! Wellness,!and!Prevention.!The!phrase,!isolation!relief,!has!been!used!in!connection!with! social!and!civic!engagement.!!! ! Recognizing!that!“Recreation”!includes!recreation!for!fitness!and!exercise,!as!well!as! recreation!for!socialization!and!engagement!with!others,!we!have!chosen!to!place!the! entire!subXtopic!here!rather!than!placing!all!or!part!of!it!in!“Physical!and!Mental!Health,! Wellness,!and!Prevention.”! ! The!likely!subXtopics!for!this!workgroup!include:! 1.!Education! 2.!Volunteerism! 3.!Recreation!and!fitness!(physical!and!social)! 4.!Cultural!programs!! 5.!Intergenerational!connections! 6.!Connections!using!technology!! 7.!Spiritual!aspects! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 42 of 219 42 ! ! Pitkin!County!Aging!Well!Community!Plan!Final!Report,!November!2014,!section!6.1,!page!6.1X2! ! ! Section!6.1!!WORKGROUP!NARRATIVES!–!September!2013! ! Physical!and!Mental!Health!and!Wellness! (formerly!“Health!and!Wellness”)! ! The!projected!increase!in!both!the!percent!and!the!actual!numbers!of!our!senior!population! will!affect!the!provision!of!health!care,!mental!health,!and!wellness!and!prevention!services.!! The!trend!is!that!people!are!living!longer,!and!thus!will!require!more!services!for!a!longer! period!of!time.!Among!people!of!all!ages,!Pitkin!County!conversations!often!mention! balancing!mind,!body,!and!spirit,!which!is!relevant!to!this!focus!area!and!to!the!area!of! Social!and!Civic!Engagement.!This!focus!area!is!primarily!concerned!with!medical!aspects!of! physical!and!mental!health,!wellness!and!prevention.!!! ! Recognizing!that!the!following!subXtopics!could!find!a!proper!home!here!or!in!another!focus! area,!we!have!chosen!to!place!them!in!the!focus!areas!indicated!below:! • Caregiver!support!(Aging!in!Place)! • Transitions!along!the!care!continuum!(Aging!in!Place)! • InXhome!safety!(Aging!in!Place)! • Elder!abuse!(Information!and!Advocacy)! • Recreation!and!fitness!(Social!and!Civic!Engagement)! ! The!likely!subXtopics!for!this!workgroup!include:!! 1.!Care!management! 2.!Crisis!management! 3.!Substance!use!and!abuse! 4.!Cognitive!decline! 5.!Access!to!a!medical!“home”!that!takes!Medicare!and!is!longXterm! 6.!Effect!of!a!changing!health!care!environment! 7.!Wellness!options!(e.g.,!diet!and!exercise!education,!health!fairs)!! 8.!Dental!care! 9.!Emergency!services! 10.!Medical!inXhome!health!care! 11.!Acute!care! 12.!Chronic!care! 13.!EndXofXlife!care!(dying!well)! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 43 of 219 43 ! ! Pitkin!County!Aging!Well!Community!Plan!Final!Report,!November!2014,!section!6.1,!page!6.1X3! ! Section!6.1!!WORKGROUP!NARRATIVES!–!September!2013! ! Aging!in!Place!! (formerly!“Aging!in!Place”,!plus!“Mobility/SelfXReliance”!and!“Housing”)! ! The!Centers!for!Disease!Control!defines!“aging!in!place”!as!“the!ability!to!live!in!one’s!own! home!and!community!safely,!independently,!and!comfortably,!regardless!of!age,!income,!or! ability!level.”!!For!our!purposes,!“place”!refers!to!the!broadest!category!of!homes!of!choice! for!our!seniors,!including!independent!or!assisted!living!facilities,!naturally!occurring! communities,!and!privately!owned!or!rented!residences.!Aging!in!place!can!be!for!those! without!urgent!needs,!those!with!progressive!conditionXbased!needs,!and!those!with!abrupt! or!immediate!changes!brought!on!by!a!crisis!or!trauma.!!! ! The!availability!of!affordable!supportive!services!for!both!seniors!and!their!caregivers!is! critical!to!the!creation!and!maintenance!of!communities!that!are!friendly!to!aging!in!place.! Having!suitable!and!affordable!supportive!services!can!be!the!difference!between! maintaining!independence!and!needing!higherXcost!care!(or!homelessness).!Safe,!easilyX accessible,!affordable,!reliable,!and!convenient!transportation!options!are!critical!to! independence!and!quality!of!life!for!all!seniors,!including!seniors!who!are!more!independent! in!mobility!as!well!as!seniors!who!rely!on!public!systems!to!convey!them!from!place!to! place.!! ! Recognizing!that!the!following!subXtopics!could!find!a!proper!home!here!or!in!another!focus! area,!we!have!chosen!to!place!them!in!the!focus!areas!indicated!below:! • Care!management!(Physical!and!Mental!Health,!Wellness,!and!Prevention)! • Emergency!services!(Physical!and!Mental!Health,!Wellness,!and!Prevention)! • EndXofXlife!care!(Physical!and!Mental!Health,!Wellness,!and!Prevention)! • Elder!abuse!(Information!and!Advocacy)! • Safety!and!security,!i.e.!public!safety!issues!(Information!and!Advocacy)! • Public!physical!accessibility!(Information!and!Advocacy)! ! The!likely!subXtopics!for!this!workgroup!include:!! 1.!Adaptations!for!the!home!living!environment!(including!inXhome!safety!considerations)! 2.!NonXmedical!inXhome!services!(e.g.,!housekeeping,!chores,!light!maintenance)! 3.!Personal!administration!(e.g.,!paying!bills,!filing!insurance!claims,!etc.)! 4.!Meals,!groceries! 5.!Caregiver!support!(including!working!caregiver!issues)! 6.!Day!care,!respite!care!(including!inXhome!respite!care)! 7.!Memory!care! 8.!Transportation!(multiple!modes,!doorXtoXdoor!services)! 9.!Housing!options!(location,!affordability,!design)! 10.!Subsidized!housing!rules!(pets,!retirees)! 11.!Use!of!technology!to!aid!aging!in!place!(including!electronic!monitoring!and!PERS)! 12.!Transitions!along!the!care!continuum! ! 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 44 of 219 44 ! ! Pitkin!County!Aging!Well!Community!Plan!Final!Report,!November!2014,!section!6.1,!page!6.1X4! ! Section!6.1!!WORKGROUP!NARRATIVES!–!September!2013! ! Information!and!Advocacy!! (formerly!“Information!re:!Resources!and!Services”,!plus!“Advocacy”!and!“Educating!the!Public”)! ! Seniors,!or!someone!on!their!behalf,!must!have!access!to!accurate!information!and!be!able! to!navigate!the!varying!degrees!of!complexity!of!governmentXsponsored!and!privately! provided!programs,!services,!and!opportunities,!whether!to!address!basic!needs!or!to! identify!various!existing!support!systems,!and!including!initial!services!as!well!as!followXup! compliance.!Basic!needs!encompass!essential!life!elements!that!older!adults!require!for! simple!dayXtoXday!survival,!such!as!legal!assistance,!assistance!with!finances!or!income,! safety!and!security,!and!assistance!with!insurance!coverage!and!claims.!Expertise!regarding! technology!is!crucial!to!accessing!information!and!resources.! ! Outreach!to!the!wider!community!includes!advocacy!for!changes!to!and!enhancements!in! programs!and!services,!improvements!to!the!public!image!of!aging,!and!informationXsharing! about!the!needs!of!young!people!looking!forward.!!Aging!is!inevitable;!aging!well!should! start!early.! ! Note:!!The!Aging!in!Place!focus!area!contains!a!subXtopic!related!to!inXhome!safety!and! security,!and!the!subXtopic!below!is!concerned!with!safety!and!security!in!public!places.!! ! The!likely!subXtopics!for!this!workgroup!include:! 1.!“How!to”!access!information!about!services!and!resources! 2.!Legal!aspects!(DNR,!advance!directives)! 3.!Elder!abuse!(educating!the!public,!preventing,!reporting)! 4.!Financial!viability!(employment,!financial!planning,!managing!transitions)! 5.!Navigating!systems!(research,!evaluation,!requirements,!compliance)! 6.!Public!services!(foodstamps,!VA,!taxes)! 7.!Public!physical!accessibility!(once!you!get!there,!can!you!get!in!and!get!around)! 8.!Public!safety!and!security!(lighting,!walkways,!curbs,!streets,!public!venues)! 9.!Use!of!technology;!what!technological!expertise!is!required?! ! ! ! 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 45 of 219 45 ! ! Pitkin!County!Aging!Well!Community!Plan!Final!Report,!November!2014,!section!6.1,!page!6.1X5! ! Section!6.1!!WORKGROUP!NARRATIVES!–!September!2013! ! OverWArching!In!Every!Workgroup:! ! Resources!! Existing!(inventory)! Needed!(trends!and!gaps)! How!to!find!and!take!advantage!of!(coordinated!by!Information!and!Advocacy!WG)!! ! ! Cost! What!is!the!cost?! What!help!is!available!to!reduce!the!cost!or!assist!in!paying!it?! ! ! Rural!communities! Consider!the!needs!and!perspectives!of!rural!locations!in!Pitkin!County! ! ! ! CrossWcutting!Topics! The!following!topics!crossXcut!all!Workgroups,!but!we!have!chosen!to!assign!them!as! follows:! ! • Financial!viability!(Information!and!Advocacy)! • Navigation!(Information!and!Advocacy)! • Advocacy!(Information!and!Advocacy)! • Transitions!along!the!care!continuum!(Aging!in!Place)! • Transitions!arising!from!crisis!(Physical!and!Mental!Health,!Wellness,!and!Prevention)! • Transitions!involving!financial!management!(Information!and!Advocacy)! • Technology!(Steering!Committee!and!Project!Management!Team)! • Communication!(Steering!Committee!and!Project!Management!Team)! ! ! ! ! ! ! 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 46 of 219 46 ! ! Pitkin!County!Aging!Well!Community!Plan!Final!Report,!November!2014! ! Section!6.2!MAPS!(prepared!June!2014) 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 47 of 219 47 ! ! Pitkin!County!Aging!Well!Community!Plan!Final!Report,!November!2014! ! ! ! Section!6.3!!SENIOR!SUMMIT!AGENDA!–!June!2014! ! ! Senior'Summit'for'Pitkin'County'' Aging'Well'Community'Planning'Initiative' presented(by(Pitkin(County(Senior(Services( Aspen,(Colorado( June'24,'2014(( ( PLAN'FOR'TODAY( 11:00'a.m.'–'1:00'p.m.( ( ! Welcome' 'Marty'Ames,'Director,''Pitkin'County'Senior'Services' ' Master'of'Ceremonies'' 'Laura'Kornasiewicz,'Executive'Service'Corps' ' Living'Longer,'Living'Better'Health'Spotlight' 'Comments'from'the'Aspen'Institute' 'Christine'Nolen,'Executive'Service'Corps' ' Why'Here,'Why'Now?' 'Liz'Stark,'Director,'Pitkin'County'Community'Health'Services' ' Aging'Well'Community'Planning'Initiative' 'Debbi'Falender,'Executive'Service'Corps' ' Keynote'Remarks' 'Tony'Vagneur,'Rancher'and'Columnist:'Saddle'Sore,'Aspen'Times' ' What’s'Next?'' 'Laura'Kornasiewicz,'ESC' ''Patty'Kravitz,'Project'Coordinator,'Pitkin'County'Senior'Services' ' 'LUNCH' !!! Vision:'Pitkin'County'is'a( thriving'community'for'aging'well( today,'in'2030,'and'beyond' ( !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 48 of 219 48 ! ! Pitkin!County!Aging!Well!Community!Plan!Final!Report,!November!2014! ! Section!6.4!!!SENIOR!SUMMIT!GOALS!PRESENTATION!–!June!2014! !!! Safety' Health'/' Wellness' Connec2on' Informa2on' Pitkin'County'' Senior'Services' Home' Community' Accessibility' Abuse/neglect' Fraud/scams' Educa2on' Community'engagement' Mul2ple'genera2ons' Transporta2on' Volunteering' LifeFlong'learning' Friendships' Medical'resources' Dental/vision/hearing' Mental'health' Fitness/nutri2on' InFhome'services' Caregiver'support' Access'to'info'&'resources' Naviga2on'of'systems' PersonFtoFperson'assistance' Internet' Educa2on' Advocacy' PITKIN'COUNTY'AGING'WELL' COMMUNITY'PLANNING'INITIATIVE' Senior'Summit''June'24,'2014' Find'Aging'Well'Ini2a2ve'details'at'' www.aspenpitkin.com/seniorservices' 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 49 of 219 49 ! ! Pitkin!County!Aging!Well!Community!Plan!Final!Report,!November!2014! ! Section!6.5!!Acronym!‘Key’! ! Throughout!the!Pitkin!County!Aging!Well!Community!Plan!document,!in!the!interest!of! brevity,!the!following!acronyms!are!used:!! ! Acronym!Organization!Name! AAAA!Alpine!Area!Agency!on!Aging,!NWCCOG! ACRA!Aspen!Chamber!Resort!Association! AHS!Aspen!High!School! APA!American!Planning!Association! APCHA!Aspen!Pitkin!County!Housing!Authority! APDHA!Aspen!to!Parachute!Dental!Health!Alliance! ARC!Aspen!Recreation!Center! AVH!Aspen!Valley!Hospital! AWCPI!Aging!Well!Community!Planning!Initiative! BOCC!Board!of!County!Commissioners! C!of!A!City!of!Aspen! CCRC!Continuing!Care!Retirement!Community! CDOT!Colorado!Department!of!Transportation! CMC!Colorado!Mountain!College! EOTC!Elected!Officials!Transportation!Committee! GIS!Geographic!Information!Systems! GRH!Grand!River!Hospital! HCHOTV!HomeCare!&!Hospice!of!the!Valley! HHS!Health!&!Human!Services! HOA!Homeowners’!Association(s)! IT!Information!Technology! MSH!Mind!Springs!Health! NWCCOG!Northwest!Colorado!Council!of!Governments! PC!Pitkin!County! PCCHS!(or!CHS)!Pitkin!County!Community!Health!Services! PCRC!Pitkin!County!Rural!Caucus! PCSC!Pitkin!County!Senior!Council! PCSS!Pitkin!County!Senior!Services! RFTA!Roaring!Fork!Transit!Authority! RTCC!Regional!Transportation!Coordinating!Council# TOSV!Town!of!Snowmass!Village! VVH!Valley!View!Hospital! ! 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 50 of 219 50 ! ! Pitkin!County!Aging!Well!Community!Plan!Final!Report,!November!2014! ! Section!7:!Aging!Well!Community!Plan!Goals! ! GOAL!1:!Pitkin!County!older!adults!will!be!able!to!live!comfortably!and!safely!at!home,!based!on! their!personal!choices,!resources,!and!abilities.!!(“Home”#refers#to#the#broadest#category#of# domiciles,#including#independentO#or#assistedOliving#facilities,#naturally#occurring#communities,#and# privately#owned#or#rented#residences.)!!! GOAL!2:!Family!members,!neighbors,!friends!and!others!who!serve!as!caregivers!of!older!adults!in! Pitkin!County!will!be!physically!and!emotionally!supported.!!! GOAL!3:!Pitkin!County!will!be!a!safe!place!for!older!adults,!both!in!terms!of!the!built!environment,! situational!safety,!financial!exploitation,!and!elder!abuse.!(The#“built#environment”#here# encompasses#physical#spaces.#“Situational#safety”#here#encompasses#emergency#preparedness,#fire# prevention#and#crime.#“Elder#abuse”#here#encompasses#physical#and#emotional#abuse#and#neglect,# and#appropriate#adult#protective#services.)!!! GOAL!4:!Pitkin!County!older!adults!will!have!access!to!a!range!of!medical,!dental,!vision,!and! hearing!services!to!support!their!physical!health.! GOAL!5:!Pitkin!County!older!adults!will!have!access!to!a!range!of!clinical!services!and!education!to! support!their!mental!health.!! GOAL!6:!Pitkin!County!older!adults!will!have!access!to!a!range!of!activities!and!services!to!support! their!wellness.!(Wellness#options#include#nutrition,#physical#fitness#and#recreation,#brain#fitness,# socialization,#and#spirituality.)!!! GOAL!7:!Pitkin!County!older!adults!will!be!recognized!as!an!essential!and!valued!segment!of!the! population,!and!older!adult!perspectives!will!be!part!of!the!fabric!of!community!conversations.! (Aging#is#“cool.”#Aging#is#for#everyone.)# GOAL!8:!Pitkin!County!older!adults!will!have!multiple!opportunities!to!volunteer!in!the! community.!! GOAL!9:!Pitkin!County!older!adults!will!have!multiple!opportunities!to!be!lifelong!learners.! GOAL!10:!Pitkin!County!Senior!Services!will!have!a!facility!(i.e.&“Senior&Center”)!that!is!known!by! all!and!is!properly!sized,!designed,!and!located!to!serve!the!needs!of!a!growing!and!aging!older! adult!population!through!2024!and!beyond.! GOAL!11:!Pitkin!County!Senior!Services!will!be!known!as!a!hub!for!information,!activities,! programs,!and!services!promoting!health!and!independence!for!older!adults.! GOAL!12:!Pitkin!County!will!have!a!centralized,!commonly!known,!easy!to!use,!upWtoWdate,! sustainable!system!for!accessing!information!important!and!relevant!to!its!older!adult!residents.! (This#information#“system”#includes#human#elements,#reachable#by#phone#or#email,#as#well#as#online# resources.)# GOAL!13:!Pitkin!County!older!adults!will!have!access!to!experienced,!trustworthy!advocateW mentors.!(AdvocateOmentors#may#be#paid#professionals#or#volunteers,#will#have#defined#skill#sets# gained#from#experience#and/or#training,#and#will#serve#as#close#advisors,#guides,#and#champions#to# individual#older#adults#who#desire#such#a#relationship.)# GOAL!14:!Residents!of!all!ages!will!understand!the!resources!necessary!for!aging!well.!! (“Resources”#encompasses#the#broadest#array#of#services,#including#financial,#legal,#and#practical# considerations.) 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 51 of 219 51 ! ! Pitkin!County!Aging!Well!Community!Plan!Final!Report,!November!2014! ! Section(8( ( Pitkin(County( Aging(Well(Community(Plan( ( 2014(9(2017( ( In#the#Pitkin#County#Aging#Well#Community#Plan:# • Action#Steps#describe#the#work#to#be#done#to#accomplish#the#objective.## • Timing#refers#to#the#time#when#the#work#is#to#begin.# • Responsible#Party#means#the#entity#or#individual#who#is#responsible#for#seeing#that#the#work#is#done.# • Possible#Partners#include#agencies,#organizations,#and#individuals#who#might#be#called#upon#to#help#with#the#work.#Many,#but#not# all,#of#those#listed#as#possible#partners#are#aware#of#and#have#agreed#to#partnership#rolse.## • Notes#include#progress#reports,#resource#requirements#(financial,#manpower,#materials,#equipment,#other),#additional#possible# partners,#ideas#for#accomplishing#the#work,#etc.## • Updates:#The#plan#will#be#updated#during#implementation,#with#status#reports#and#other#pertinent#information,#and#the#header# will#be#changed#to#indicate#the#date#of#the#update.# # ! 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 52 of 219 52 Pitkin&County&Aging&Well&Community&Plan&& PLAN%MASTER%11/4/14%% % 1% GOAL&1:&Pitkin&County&older&adults&will&be&able&to&live&comfortably&and&safely&at&home,&based&on&their&personal&choices,&resources,&and& abilities.&(“Home”(refers(to(the(broadest(category(of(domiciles,(including(independent:(or(assisted:living(facilities,(naturally(occurring( communities,(and(privately(owned(or(rented(residences.)&& OBJECTIVE&1.1& Ensure&that&accessible,&affordable&transportation&options&are&available&to&older&adults&year& round.((“Accessible”,(in(this(context,(means(‘available(with(proper(planning’.(It(does(not( necessarily(mean(‘available(on(demand’(or(‘door:to:door’,(and(it(is(‘location(dependent’.)& COMMUNITY&VALUE:&Affordable,%well8timed%transportation% options%are%critical%to%maintaining%an%independent%lifestyle%if% an%older%adult%chooses%to%no%longer%operate%a%motor%vehicle,% when%physical%impairments%prohibit%driving,%or%when% personal%choices%focus%on%the%use%of%public%transportation.%& ACTION&STEPS&TIMING&RESPONSIBLE*PARTY* POSSIBLE%PARTNERS%NOTES& Improve%communication%to%Pitkin%County%older%adults%regarding%all%transportation% opportunities%currently%available%to%them,%including,%but%not%limited%to:% • Senior%van% • Other%RFTA%services,%e.g.,%paratransit%services% • Snowmass%Village%shuttle%service%and%seasonal%Dial8A8Ride%% • Senior%½%price%taxi%option% • Veteran%transportation%services% • PCSS%volunteer%transportation%% • Rural%transportation% • RTCC%–%Eagle%&%Garfield%linkages% Underway%% PCSS* RFTA* TOSV** Veteran%service%agencies,% AAAA,%High%Mountain%Taxi% • Use,%e.g.,%existing% materials,%website% information/links,%kiosk% space%at%PCSS,%PCSS% newsletter% Conduct%community%outreach%to%increase%information%sharing;%visit%community% agencies,%doctors’%offices,%etc.%%%Target%information%to%specific%communities,% including%rural%transportation%resources,%e.g.,%upper%Frying%Pan,%Redstone,%etc.%% Underway% Repeat% every%2% years%% PCSS* • Consider%demographic% data,%AWPCI%plan%details% • INTERN?% Increase%volunteer%services:% • Recruit%volunteer%drivers%throughout%county% • Orient,%train,%and%register%in%PCSS%volunteer%system% • Publicize%need%for%volunteer%drivers,%particularly%in%rural%areas% Underway%%PCSS*volunteer*coordinator* Rural%residents%%% Convene%a%group%to%examine%paratransit%needs%in%Pitkin%County%and%make% recommendations%for%service%enhancement%to%the%appropriate%authority.%2016%Valley&Life&for&All& PCSS%Staff,%RFTA,%TOSV,%EOTC% • VLFA%has%submitted%this%as% a%possible%RFL%project% 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 53 of 219 53 Pitkin&County&Aging&Well&Community&Plan&& PLAN%MASTER%11/4/14%% % 2% OBJECTIVE&1.2& Ensure&that&basic,&essential&inOhome&support&services,&both&medical&and&nonOmedical,&are& available&to&older&adults.&(“Basic”(and(”essential”(are(herein(defined(as(‘simple(yet(necessary.’( “Support(services”(is(defined(here(as(assistance(in(the(simple,(yet(necessary(activities( associated(with(maintaining(a(home(and(individual,(personal(health.)( COMMUNITY&VALUE:&Ready%access%to%both%medical%and%non8 medical%assistance%enables%older%adults%to%stay%in%their% homes%longer,%where%they%feel%safe%and%comfortable%and% where%care%may%be%more%cost8effective.& ACTION&STEPS&TIMING&RESPONSIBLE*PARTY* POSSIBLE%PARTNERS*NOTES& Inventory%home%health%agencies,%individual%home%care%providers,%homemakers% and%other%service%providers%who%come%via%recommendation.%Conduct%basic% background%checks%and%compile%referral%list,%segmenting%by%rural%and%urban.% 2015% Annually%PCSS* • Update%more%frequently% as%info%is%available.% • INTERN?% Explore%use%of%web%resources%for%caregiver%matching%services,%including% http://care.com.%2016%PCSS*• INTERN?% Recruit%chore%&%home%visitation%volunteers.%Conduct%basic%background%check%and% compile%referral%list,%segmenting%by%rural%and%urban.%(Coordinate%with%Objective% 1.4.)% 2016% PCSS** Churches,%other%civic% organizations%% • Advertising,%program% management% Investigate%tele8health%systems%and%potential%partners%to%develop%a%tele8health% program%for%the%valley,%to%allow%people%aging%in%place%to%have%health%issues%safely% monitored%from%home.% 2017%%% CHS* Valley%Life%for%All,%Mountain% Family%Health,%AVH,%other% providers% • Training,%hardware,% materials% • Consult%with%partners%and% revisit%annually%to% determine%proper%timing% OBJECTIVE&1.3& Ensure&appropriate&advocacy&channels&for&older&adult&housing&needs&and&issues.& COMMUNITY&VALUE:&Older%adults%need%to%know%what% housing%avenues%are%available%and%appropriate%contacts%to% make%if%they%are%faced%with%housing%needs%and%issues.%Older% adult%perspectives%regarding%housing%needs%and%issues%should% be%part%of%the%community%conversation.& ACTION&STEPS&TIMING&&RESPONSIBLE*PARTY* POSSIBLE%PARTNERS*NOTES&& 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 54 of 219 54 Pitkin&County&Aging&Well&Community&Plan&& PLAN%MASTER%11/4/14%% % 3% Investigate%valley8wide%movements%afoot%for%CCRCs%and%other%Senior%Living% Communities;%communicate%the%status%of%any%and%all%movements%through%the% PCSS%website.% Underway%JoAnne*Andersen* Senior%Council,%PCSS% • Communication%with% housing%departments% • Labor%to%examine%surveys% and%modify%demographics% Form%an%advocacy%group%to%work%with%Pitkin%County’s%housing%authority%to:% • Better%address%the%needs%of%older%adults%living%in%subsidized%housing.% • Advocate%for%issues%like%proactive%building%details%(for%adapting%handrails,%grab% bars,%etc).% • Quantify%subsidized%housing%needs%(current%and%future).% • Work%with%APCHA%to%develop%options%for%older%adults%who%want%to%stay%in%their% subsidized%housing%in%perpetuity.% • Examine%most%recent%housing%surveys%and%data%from%City%of%Aspen/APCHA% commissions%and%the%Town%of%Snowmass%Village%to%update%the%age% demographics%of%residents%occupying%subsidized%housing.% • Follow8up%on%the%Housing%Summit%recommendation%to%create%a%case%manager% position%at%APCHA%whose%focus%is%to%manage%the%dichotomy%between%building% an%adequate%amount%of%subsidized,%workforce%housing%with%the%desire%of%our% older%adults%(leaving%the%local%workforce)%to%age%in%place;%case%manager’s%role% would%also%be%to%ensure%new%housing%features%would%include%adaptable% features.% 2016% PCSS** Valley%Life%for%All,%Valley% Housing%for%All%Task%Force& IDEAS:% • Leadership%and%consistent% involvement% • Facilitation%(development% of%scope%of%work,%goals,% outcomes,%timing)% • Surveys% • Communication%with% housing%departments% • Labor%to%examine%surveys% and%modify%demographics% • Presentation%of%data%% • Word%of%mouth% • PCSS%newsletter,%bulletin% board% • PCSS%website/links% OBJECTIVE&1.4& Ensure&that&information&and&services&are&available&to&address&independence&and& adaptability&of&physical&space&for&older&adults.& COMMUNITY&VALUE:&Older%adults%and%those%who%care%for% them%need%easy%access%to%information%and%services%to% support%appropriate%physical%space%transformations,%so%that% those%who%wish%to%maintain%an%independent%lifestyle%in%the% comfort%and%safety%of%their%homes%can%do%so%successfully.& ACTION&STEPS&TIMING&RESPONSIBLE*PARTY** POSSIBLE%PARTNERS*NOTES& Assemble%inventoried%listing%of%handymen%and%certified%tradesmen%(electricians,% plumbers,%etc)%including%references%and%background%checks,%for%adaptability% projects,%complete%with%contact%names,%phone%numbers,%email,%website% addresses,%and%references.%Publish%via%information%system,%PCSS%website%and% PCSS%newsletter.%(Coordinate%with%Objective%1.2.)% 2015%% Update% every%2% years% PCSS** Habitat%for%Humanity& • Some%projects%will%require% building%permits.%%% • Include%web%links.%% • Include%disclaimer.%% • INTERN%?% 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 55 of 219 55 Pitkin&County&Aging&Well&Community&Plan&& PLAN%MASTER%11/4/14%% % 4% Conduct%educational%sessions%on%how%to%adapt%physical%space%to%improve%safety% for%older%adults.%2016%% AVH*OT*dept* PCSS(( Home%health%care%agencies,% insurance%companies,%CMC,% CHS,%Mountain%Family%Health% • Consider%event%schedule,% facilitator,%advertising,% written%materials% Recruit%volunteers%and/or%civic%groups%to%provide%services.%2015%Young*professionals*groups* Religious%congregations&• Enter%and%update%data%%% Approach%local%builders%and/or%architects%to%form%a%group%to%support%the%retrofit% of%homes%for%seniors.%%2016% PCSS** Builders,%architects,%Habitat% for%Humanity& • Consider%using%a%facilitator% Promote%access%to,%and%use%of,%the%information%system%(Goal%12)%to%support%older% adults’%desires%to%maintain%independence%while%aging%at%home.%%2015%PCSS* • Use,%e.g.,%written% materials,%advertising,% PCSS%newsletter%space% GOAL&2:&Family&members,&neighbors,&friends,&and&others&who&serve&as&caregivers&of&older&adults&in&Pitkin&County&will&be&physically&and& emotionally&supported.&&& OBJECTIVE&2.1& Identify&and&address&the&needs&of&paid&and&unpaid&caregivers&in&the&community.& COMMUNITY&VALUE:&Knowing%the%caregivers%in%the% community%make%outreach%services%more%targeted%and% effective.& ACTION&STEPS&TIMING&RESPONSIBLE*PARTY* POSSIBLE%PARTNERS%NOTES& Conduct%key%informant%interviews%with%known%caregivers%in%order%to%determine% their%physical%and%emotional%needs.%2017% CHS* Pathfinders/Pillars%for%Life,% Mountain%Family%Health,% HCHOTV,%AVH%social%worker& • INTERN?%% 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 56 of 219 56 Pitkin&County&Aging&Well&Community&Plan&& PLAN%MASTER%11/4/14%% % 5% Create%and%maintain%a%system%for%caregivers%to%voluntarily%identify%themselves%for% outreach%assistance;%link%registry%to%PCSS%website%and%Pitkin%County%Community% Health%website.% 2017%PCSS*• INTERN?% Connect%with%local%medical%and%home%care%providers%to%inform/educate%about% caregiver%services%and%resources,%and%to%encourage%referrals%to%those%resources.%2017% CHS* Pathfinders/Pillars%for%Life,% HCHOTV,%Mountain%Family% Health,%AVH%social%worker%& % OBJECTIVE&2.2& Increase&respite&care&and&memory&care&options&and&opportunities.&& COMMUNITY&VALUE:&For%caregivers%to%function%at%the% highest%level%when%assisting%older%adults,%they%need%access%to% a%variety%of%high8quality%respite%and%memory%care%options.%%& ACTION&STEPS&TIMING&RESPONSIBLE*PARTY** POSSIBLE%PARTNERS*NOTES& Identify%or%create%a%regular%caregiver%training%program%and%support%group.%2017% AVH* CHS,%home%health%care% agencies& • Training%materials,% advertising%funds% Develop%communication%mechanisms%for%Pitkin%County%caregivers%via%social% media,%email%and%printed%collateral.%%(Identify%lead%employee.%Include%in%job% description:%proficiency%in%use%of%social%media,%desktop%publishing%and%blast%email% as%communication%tools.)% 2017% AVH** CHS,%home%health%care% agencies& • Funding%for%new%position% or%reallocation%of%current% resources% Identify%home%and%facility8based%respite%care%options%for%Pitkin%County%residents% and%communicate%details%through%information%systems.%2015%PCSS* CHS& • Must%understand% insurance%coverage;% definitions%of%respite%care%% • INTERN?% Meet%with%HomeCare%and%Hospice%of%the%Valley%and%similar%agencies%with% volunteer%networks%regarding%use%of%their%volunteers%for%short8term%respite%and% memory%care%(hours%or%days).% 2015%PCSS* HCHOTV,%CHS%% 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 57 of 219 57 Pitkin&County&Aging&Well&Community&Plan&& PLAN%MASTER%11/4/14%% % 6% GOAL&3:&Pitkin&County&will&be&a&safe&place&for&older&adults,&both&in&terms&of&the&built&environment,&situational&safety,&financial&exploitation,& and&elder&abuse.&(The(“built(environment”(here(encompasses(physical(spaces.(“Situational(safety”(here(encompasses(emergency(preparedness,( fire(prevention(and(crime.(“Elder(abuse”(here(encompasses(physical(and(emotional(abuse(and(neglect,(and(appropriate(adult(protective(services.)&& OBJECTIVE&3.1& Identify&seniorOfriendly&elements&that&ensure&safety&of&the&built&environment&and&are& appropriate&for&Pitkin&County.&(Examples&include&walkways&and&lighting,&longer&crosswalk& signals,&easy&access&to&buildings,&and&pedestrian&safety&on&walking/biking&paths.)& COMMUNITY&VALUE:&Older%adults%with%physical%limitations% require%more%time,%good%lighting%and%gait8friendly%pathways% to%navigate%safely%in%the%community.%It%is%reasonable%to% expect%that%these%common%elements%be%reviewed%annually% and%modified/improved%as%needed.%& ACTION&STEPS&TIMING&&RESPONSIBLE*PARTY* POSSIBLE%PARTNERS%NOTES& Identify%public%places%that%need%physical%improvements%and/or%redesign,%and% identify%currently%accessible%structures%in%the%City%of%Aspen,%Town%of%Snowmass% Village,%Basalt%and%Redstone.%(Develop%mapping.%Conduct%inventories.)% Underway% City*and*County*Community* Development* Challenge%Aspen,% neighborhood%HOAs,% neighborhood%caucuses& • 283%years% Create%and%implement%a%building%audit%and%retrofit%program%for%senior%safety% elements,%such%as%grab%bars,%handicap%toilets,%railings,%etc.%(Identify%need.%Match% need%with%volunteers.)% 2015%Challenge*Aspen* Fire%Districts,%local%contractors& • This%is%for%public%buildings;% similar%action%steps%in%Obj% 1.4%are%for%private%spaces.% Ensure%that%evacuation%plans%for%seniors%and%accessibility8challenged%individuals% are%up8to8date%and%available%for%public%buildings,%hotels,%restaurants,%etc.%2015% Fire*Districts* City%and%County%Community% Development,%local% contractors& % Implement%improvements%identified%in%the%West%of%Maroon%Creek%Plan%regarding% safe%access%to%transportation%and%senior8friendly%recreation.%(Identify%solutions.% Create%funding.%Develop%construction%plans.%Implement.)% 2015% City*and*County*Community* Development* CDOT,%City%and%County%Road% and%Bridge%Depts,%City%and% County%Open%Space%and%Trails& • 283%years% Include%a%section%in%the%Pitkin%County%Rural%Caucus%Master%Plans%on%‘senior8 friendly’%built%environments.%(Develop%language.%Work%with%caucus%groups.%Adopt% plans.)% 2016%County*Community* Development*• 182%years% 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 58 of 219 58 Pitkin&County&Aging&Well&Community&Plan&& PLAN%MASTER%11/4/14%% % 7% Inventory%businesses%in%terms%of%safety%and%access;%pursue%incentives%for%primary% use%businesses,%e.g.,%grocery%stores,%medical%offices,%financial%institutions,% entertainment%venues,%etc.,%to%become%more%senior8friendly.%(Conduct% inventories.%Map%locations.%Publish%locations.)% 2015% City*and*County*Community* Development* PCSS& • 283%years% Identify,%via%GIS,%which%neighborhoods%encompass%most%of%the%senior%population% (>%age%55)%to%determine%the%next%wave(s)%of%senior%population%densities.%(Gather% caucus%data.%Develop%maps.)% 2015%City*and*County*Community* Development*• 2%weeks% Inventory%current%recreation%areas%and%groups,%e.g.,%walking,%cycling%or%hiking% clubs%to%determine%upgrades%needed%to%the%built%environment,%i.e.,%safety,% comfort,%attractiveness,%proximity%to%senior%population%densities,%accessibility,% and%pedestrian%infrastructure%such%as%sidewalks%and%lighting.%Community%gardens% could%also%be%updated%to%include%built8up%garden%boxes%and%wheelchair% accessibility.%(Conduct%surveys.%Conduct%inventories.)% 2015% City*and*County*Community* Development* PCSS,%City%and%County%Open% Space%and%Trails,%Challenge% Aspen& • INTERN/VOLUNTEER?% • Timing%is%dependent%on% volunteer%time% Review%the%area%Broadband%Plan%re:%cell%coverage%in%primary%areas%of%senior%use% (home,%business%and%recreation).%(Match%Broadband%Plan%with%maps%(above).)%Underway%County*Community* Development* • Timing%depends%on% completion%of%Broadband% Plan% Review%the%American%Planning%Association’s%Senior%Aging%Policy%to%determine% applicability%to%Pitkin%County.%(Review%materials.%Compare%with%plan.)%2015%City*and*County*Community* Development*• 2%weeks% Encourage%senior%residents%to%register%with%their%fire%district%so%emergency% service%workers%can%understand%any%special%evacuation%needs%in%the%case%of%an% emergency%event.% Underway%%Fire*Districts* Caucus%notification,%HOAs& • Notice%to%caucuses%is% being%done%now%(2014)%via% community%development.% OBJECTIVE&3.2& Public&safety&officers,&Adult&and&Family&Services&and&business&leaders&will&focus&on& prevention&and&intervention&strategies&for&older&adults&who&are&potential&victims&of&criminal& activity,&fraud,&abuse&and&neglect.& COMMUNITY&VALUES:&All%individuals,%regardless%of%age,% need%to%be%confident%that%public%safety%services%in%their% community%are%employing%best%efforts%to%protect%them%at%all% times.%& ACTION&STEPS&TIMING&RESPONSIBLE*PARTY* POSSIBLE%PARTNERS*NOTES& 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 59 of 219 59 Pitkin&County&Aging&Well&Community&Plan&& PLAN%MASTER%11/4/14%% % 8% Expand%education%and%outreach%in%these%areas:% • Identifying%victims%of%fraud% • Financial%Fraud%% • Identity%Theft% • Caregiver%protocols%–%acceptable%practices% • Physical%abuse%and%neglect,%including%self8neglect% • How%to%report%a%crime%without%fear%of%reprisal% • Driving%safely%% • Pedestrian%safety%% • Safety%at%home% % Adult*and*Family*Services( PCSS,%Aspen/SMV%Police%and% Fire,%Sheriff’s%dept.,%RCA% • Partners%will%identify% timing%and%planning% • Expand%avenues%to%reach% seniors%beyond%the%PCSC,% e.g.,%home%care%agencies,% volunteers,%grocery%stores,% HOAs,%Rotary,%churches,% libraries,%businesses%and% professionals%who%interact% with%seniors,(PitkinAlert% Clarify%process%for%family%members%to%request%a%visit%(welfare%check8up)%of%a% family%member,%and%create%community%awareness.%& PCSS* Aspen/SMV%Police,%Sheriff’s% office,%Dispatch%staff& • Partners%will%identify% timing%and%planning% OBJECTIVE&3.3& Ensure&access&to&timely&information&regarding&emergency&preparedness&and&fire&safety.& COMMUNITY&VALUE:&Everyone%deserves%to%know%what%is% expected%of%him%or%her%in%the%event%of%an%emergency.%Older% adults%may%require%a%different%level%and/or%method%of% communication%to%ensure%thorough%understanding.%%& ACTION&STEPS&TIMING&*RESPONSIBLE*PARTY* POSSIBLE%PARTNERS%&NOTES% Continue%informational%meetings%at%the%Pitkin%County%Senior%Center%to%inform% seniors%of%PitkinAlert%and%provide%enrollment%assistance%as%needed.%%Underway%%PCSS* Dispatch%staff& • Annual,%but%consider%twice% per%year,%various%months% Continue%routine%PitkinAlert%education/public%awareness%campaign%through% Ready,%Set,%Go%meetings%and%other%public%communication%to%make%sure%seniors% are%aware%of%the%PitkinAlert%service%and%are%signed%up.% Underway%%Pitkin*County*Community* Relations*(PCCR)*• Annual%or%more%frequently% Target%the%following%groups%to%educate%and%enroll%people%for%PitkinAlert:%HOAs,% caucus%groups,%churches,%Rotary,%business%lunches,%Woody%Creek%CC,%Crown%Mtn% CC,%other%locations.% 2015%Dispatch*staff* Volunteers%& • Volunteers%will%be% recruited%by%PCSS%and% trained/scheduled%by% Dispatch%staff% 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 60 of 219 60 Pitkin&County&Aging&Well&Community&Plan&& PLAN%MASTER%11/4/14%% % 9% Make%PitkinAlert%a%topic%of%conversation%with%any%work%the%Pitkin%County%Fire% Mitigation%Officers%perform%in%the%field%with%individuals%or%groups.%2015%Pitkin*County*Fire*District*% Educate%the%public%that%dispatchers%can%direct%broadcast%on%100.5%FM%and%93.5% FM%to%notify%the%public%of%major%emergencies.%%2015&Dispatch*staff* Radio%stations,%PCCR%% Educate%the%public%that%the%Emergency%Alert%System%(EAS)%will%be%activated%in%the% event%of%a%major%emergency.%2015%Dispatch*staff* Radio%stations,%PCCR&% Continue%posts%to%social%media%with%each%PitkinAlert%sent.%2015%Dispatch*staff*% Research%the%possibility%of%PitkinAlerts%automatically%scrolling%across%the%screen% of%public%access%television.%2015%Dispatch*staff*% GOAL&4:&Pitkin&County&older&adults&will&have&access&to&a&range&of&medical,&dental,&vision,&and&hearing&services&to&support&their&physical&health.& OBJECTIVE&4.1:&& Develop&a&patientOcentered&community&case&management&model&for&chronic&care&and& successful&transitions&along&the&care&continuum,&including&transitions&to&and&from&hospitals,& other&care&facilities,&and&homes.& COMMUNITY&VALUE:&Improving%transitions%along%the%care% continuum%will%enhance%the%quality%of%medical%care%and% minimize%re8hospitalizations.& ACTION&STEPS&TIMING&RESPONSIBLE*PARTY** POSSIBLE%PARTNERS%NOTES& 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 61 of 219 61 Pitkin&County&Aging&Well&Community&Plan&& PLAN%MASTER%11/4/14%% % 10% Define%and%understand%the%current%care%management%and%care%navigation% landscape.%%2015%PCSS** Adult%and%Family%Services*% Learn%more%about%Mountain%Family%Health%Center,%including%overlap%of%Mountain% Family%population%and%Pitkin%County%population,%identifying%senior%needs%and% gaps%in%meeting%senior%needs,%etc.% 2015%CHS* Mountain%Family%Health%%% Monitor%Mountain%Family%Health%Center%and%similar%developments%to%determine% a%model%for%underserved%areas%in%Pitkin%County.%2016%CHS* Mountain%Family%Health%*% Define%and%understand%transition%models%in%hospitals,%home%care%agencies,% residential%care%facilities%and%medical%offices;%conversations%should%include%those% providers%who%have%direct%care%planning%interactions%with%patients%and%families.%%% 2017% PCSS* Care%Navigation%(HHS),%AVH,% home%care%agencies,% Mountain%Family%Health% % OBJECTIVE&4.2&& Advocate&for&the&expansion&of&a&medical&home&model&in&the&RFV.&(“Medical(home(model”( refers(to(a(team:based(model(of(care(led(by(a(personal(physician(who(provides(continuous(and( coordinated(care(throughout(the(patient’s(lifetime(to(maximize(health(outcomes.)& COMMUNITY&VALUE:&A%model%of%care%coordinated%by% professionals%who%communicate%with%one%another%and%are% thoroughly%aware%of%a%patient’s%history%enhances%patient% care,%safety,%and%efficiency%of%service%delivery.& ACTION&STEPS&TIMING&RESPONSIBLE*PARTY* POSSIBLE%PARTNERS*NOTES% Ask%health%care%providers%to%consider%the%medical%home%model%as%a%possible% model%for%medical%case%management%and%care%navigation,%i.e.,%the%medical% component%of%the%case%management%and%care%navigation%structure%described%in% Objective%4.1% 2015%CHS% Medical%providers%% OBJECTIVE&4.3&& Educate&local&medical&providers&regarding&resources&for&older&adults.& COMMUNITY&VALUE:&All%local%medical%providers,%regardless% of%their%areas%of%expertise,%should%be%aware%of%the%medical% and%non8medical%resources%that%exist%for%older%adults%in%Pitkin% County.%%& ACTION&STEPS&TIMING&RESPONSIBLE*PARTY* POSSIBLE%PARTNERS*NOTES% 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 62 of 219 62 Pitkin&County&Aging&Well&Community&Plan&& PLAN%MASTER%11/4/14%% % 11% Identify%medical%providers%and%institutions%for%the%educational%programs% described%in%this%objective%and%in%Objective%4.4.%2016%AVH% PCSS%%% Develop%educational%tools%about%resources%for%medical%needs;%meet%with%medical% providers%to%share%information%about%PCSS%resources.%2016%PCSS&&% OBJECTIVE&4.4&&& Advocate&for&geriatric&care&education&for&medical&providers&and&for&access&to&a&geriatric& specialist.& COMMUNITY&VALUE:&Many%healthcare%providers%lack%the% specific%knowledge%needed%to%care%for%older%adults%and% geriatric%patients.%Continuing%education%is%necessary%to%assist% providers%with%important%findings%and%changes%in%care% protocol.%& ACTION&STEPS&TIMING*RESPONSIBLE*PARTY* POSSIBLE%PARTNERS&NOTES% Identify%professionals%who%can%educate%medical%providers%regarding%medical% needs%of%seniors%and%geriatric%care.%%2017%AVH%%% Educate%providers%re:%demographic%changes%and%increase%in%Medicare%population.%2016%AVH%% Identified%educators,%PCSS&% Develop%educational%tools%for%sharing%information%about%medical%needs%and% geriatric%care.%2016%Mountain*Family*Health* AVH,%Identified%educators&% Determine%where%healthcare%providers%get%education%and%ensure%that%geriatric% programs%are%included.%2016%AVH% Mountain%Family%Health,%CMC%% OBJECTIVE&4.5&&& Expand&health&care&access&for&people&with&Medicare/Medicaid.& COMMUNITY&VALUE:&Older%adults%would%benefit%from%an% increase%in%the%number%of%local%healthcare%providers%who% agree%to%the%contract%terms%of%Medicare%and/or%Medicaid.%& ACTION&STEPS&TIMING&RESPONSIBLE*PARTY** POSSIBLE%PARTNERS*NOTES% 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 63 of 219 63 Pitkin&County&Aging&Well&Community&Plan&& PLAN%MASTER%11/4/14%% % 12% Assess%the%current%landscape.%Gather%information%regarding%medical%providers% who%do%and%do%not%take%Medicare%or%Medicaid%patients%and%their%existing% parameters%for%new%patients%in%both%categories.%% 2015%PCSS* CHS&• INTERN?% Compile%a%list%of%resources%for%older%adults%looking%for%Medicare/Medicaid% providers;%build%list%into%PCSS%website%and%Information%System.%2016% PCSS* PCHHS,%Eagle%County% Economic%Services& • INTERN?%% • Update%annually% Continue%to%offer%and%promote%the%practice%of%assisting%older%adults%with%their% applications/sign8ups%for%Medicare/Medicaid.%Underway%% PCSS* PCHHS,%Eagle%County% Economic%Services& % OBJECTIVE&4.6& Increase&the&workforce&supply&of&personal&care&providers&and&clinical&rehabilitation& therapists,&i.e.,&CNAs,&PTs,&OTs,&STs.& COMMUNITY&VALUE:&Older%adults%need%options%to%remain%at% home%while%still%getting%necessary%personal%and%medical%care.% The%workforce%supply%of%personal%care%providers%and% professional%therapists%needs%to%be%adequate%for%the% demands%of%the%county’s%population.%& ACTION&STEPS&TIMING&RESPONSIBLE*PARTY* POSSIBLE%PARTNERS*NOTES% Determine%what%nursing%assistant%programs%are%currently%available%through%CMC% and%find%out%if%they%plan%to%increase%enrollment%in%the%programs%they%currently% offer%to%meet%local%market%demand.% 2015% CMC** Healthcare%providers%using% home%health%aides%and%CNAs& • Margaret%Maxwell%(CMC)% • INTERN%for%data8mining?% • Create%spreadsheet% Contact%local%healthcare%providers%to%determine%the%most%effective%way%to%attract% personal%care%providers%and%clinical%rehabilitation%therapists%to%our%area.% Determine%the%most%successful%sources%for%employees%and%implement% recruitment%strategies.% 2015% Healthcare*providers*using* home*health*aides,*CNAs,*and* therapists* AVH/VVH/GRH% • INTERN%for%data8mining?% • Contact%HR%departments% Coordinate%recruitment%of%clinical%rehabilitation%therapists%with%the%local% hospitals;%share%resumes%when%supply%exceeds%demand,%for%those%clinical% rehabilitation%therapists%who%have%given%permission%to%do%so.% 2015% Healthcare*providers*using* clinical*rehab*therapists* AVH/VVH/GRH% • Coordination%of% information% 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 64 of 219 64 Pitkin&County&Aging&Well&Community&Plan&& PLAN%MASTER%11/4/14%% % 13% Connect%with%guidance%counselors%and%college%counselors%at%the%local%high% schools%to%educate%them%on%the%shortage%of%personal%care%providers%and% rehabilitation%therapists%throughout%the%valley;%attend%high%school%career%days%in% the%Roaring%Fork%Valley.% 2015% Human*resource*personnel* from*healthcare*provider* organizations* % Hold%a%regular%professional%caregiver’s%training%program%and%support%group% and/or%investigate%continuing%education%resources%for%professional%caregivers%in% the%valley.%(“Caregiver”%in%this%action%step%refers%to%‘paid’%personal%care%providers% versus%Goal%2%‘unpaid’%caregivers.)% 2015% CMC,%Alzheimer’s%Association,% home%health%care%agencies,% hospice%agencies% • Need%trainers,%materials,% advertising% OBJECTIVE&4.7& Ensure&the&availability&of&hospice&and&palliative&care.& COMMUNITY&VALUE:&Access%to%consistent%hospice%and% palliative%care%services%is%an%essential%part%of%a%community’s% care%continuum.%%& ACTION&STEPS&TIMING&RESPONSIBLE*PARTY* POSSIBLE%PARTNERS*NOTES% Develop%a%strong,%collaborative%relationship%between%hospice%agencies%and%PCSS% through%educational%sessions%re:%options%for%care,%advanced%directives,%creating% stories%of%one’s%life%legacy,%etc.% 2016% PCSS* HCHOTV(( Other%hospice%care%providers% • Ideas:%Annual%calendar%of% events,%printed%materials% Educate%Pitkin%County%residents%on%palliative%care%by%arranging%for%the%palliative% care%specialist%to%conduct%a%series%of%community8wide%educational%programs.%2016%HCHOTV* Other%palliative%care%providers& • Materials,%advertising,% funds%for%professional%fee% Utilize%PCSS%and%the%Senior%Center%as%a%referral%source%for%information%about% hospice%and%palliative%care%services%available%throughout%Pitkin%County.%Underway%% PCSS* Hospice%and%palliative%care% providers%operating%in%Pitkin% County& • Materials,%advertising,% communication%vehicles,% e.g.,%website,%bulletin% board,%HELP%line% Request%that%HomeCare%and%Hospice%of%the%Valley%(HCHOTV)%inform%Pitkin% County%Senior%Services%periodically%regarding%progress%toward%the%inpatient% Hospice%and%Palliative%Care%center%planned%for%development%in%Glenwood% Springs.%% 2015%PCSS* HCHOTV%%% 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 65 of 219 65 Pitkin&County&Aging&Well&Community&Plan&& PLAN%MASTER%11/4/14%% % 14% Explore%ways%to%share%knowledge%between%hospices%and%palliative%care%providers% and%PCSS%through%purposeful%avenues.%2015% Hospice*and*palliative*care* providers*(HCHOTV)* PCSS& % OBJECTIVE&4.8&&& Expand&the&availability&of&affordable,&accessible&dental,&vision,&and&hearing&care&for&older& adults.& COMMUNITY&VALUE:&Older%adults%should%have%easy%access% to%affordable%dental,%vision,%and%hearing%care%within%Pitkin% County.& ACTION&STEPS&TIMING&RESPONSIBLE&PARTY& POSSIBLE%PARTNERS&NOTES% Assess%the%current%landscape%for%dental,%vision,%and%hearing%services.%What% services%are%available?%What%are%Medicare/Medicaid%benefits?%Is%referral% required?% 2016% PCSS* APDHA,%ACDHH,%hearing%and% vision%providers& • INTERN?% Dental:%Promote%and%support%Smiles%for%Seniors,%a%program%of%the%APDHA,%and% other%regional%efforts%for%affordable%direct%dental%services%for%older%adults,% including%the%potential%for%an%affordable%dental%clinic%in%the%Roaring%Fork%Valley.% Underway%APDHA*% Hearing:%Engage%Aspen%Camp%of%the%Deaf%and%Hard%of%Hearing,%the%Center%for% Independence%and%other%hearing%service%providers%to%understand%services% available%for%older%adults%experiencing%hearing%loss.% 2015%PCSS* ACDHH*% Vision:%Identify%vision%service%providers%and%determine%the%availability%of% affordable%services%for%older%adults.%%2016%PCSS* %• INTERN?% Work%to%include%vision,%oral%health,%and%hearing%screenings%and%referrals%into% senior%health%fairs,%and%at%the%Senior%Center.%Underway%%PCSS* AVH&% 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 66 of 219 66 Pitkin&County&Aging&Well&Community&Plan&& PLAN%MASTER%11/4/14%% % 15% GOAL&5:&Pitkin&County&older&adults&will&have&access&to&a&range&of&clinical&services&and&education&to&support&their&mental&health.&&& OBJECTIVE&5.1& Explore&and&implement&best&practices&for&integrated&assessment&and&treatment&of&mental& health,&substance&abuse,&and&cognitive&decline,&including&intensive,&efficient&geriatric& treatment&programs&and&access&to&clinicians&specializing&in&geriatric&care.& COMMUNITY&VALUE:&It%is%important%to%put%into%practice%the% best%assessment%tools%and%treatments%available%for%older% adults%in%the%areas%of%mental%health,%substance%abuse%and% cognitive%decline.%Because%geriatrics%is%a%growing%category%of% patients,%access%to%specialized%clinicians%is%vital.& ACTION&STEPS&TIMING&RESPONSIBLE*PARTY*** POSSIBLE%PARTNERS%NOTES& Develop%specialized%geriatric%assessment%resources%in%the%valley,%recognizing%that% there%are%a%variety%of%causes%for%behavioral%changes,%especially%in%the%older% population:%medical%problems,%substance%abuse,%mental%illness,%and%cognitive% decline.% Consult% MSH%to% determine% timing% Mind*Springs*Health%in% consultation%with%mental% health%professionals% • Medicare8credentialed% clinicians;%funding%for% qualified%non8Medicare% credentialed%psychologists%% Determine%best%practices%for%assessing%behavioral%health%and%competency%for%use% by%mental%health%professionals.% Consult% MSH%to% determine% timing% Mind*Springs*Health%in% consultation%with%mental% health%professionals% % Assess%current%best%practices%in%mental%health%and%substance%abuse%screening%for% older%adults;%select%and%promote%a%screening%tool%(common%instrument)%for%use% by%local%medical%practitioners.%%% Consult% MSH%to% determine% timing% Mind*Springs*Health** Medical%professionals%% Research,%design%and%implement%a%best%practice%brain%health%curriculum.% (Coordinate%with%Objective%6.2.)%2015% Mind*Springs*Health* PCSS,%local%mental%health% professionals,%brain%injury% specialists& • INTERN%for%research?% Create%and%promote%pathways%for%easy%access%to%cognitive/brain%health% programs.%(Coordinate%with%Objective%6.2.)%2016% PCSS* Local%medical%and%mental% health%professionals& • Promotional%materials% 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 67 of 219 67 Pitkin&County&Aging&Well&Community&Plan&& PLAN%MASTER%11/4/14%% % 16% Ensure%the%availability%of%substance%abuse%treatment%options%with%an%emphasis% on%older%adult%care.%2016%Local*mental*health* professionals*% Implement%“Take%5”%campaign.%Encourage%private%practitioners%to%support%limited% pro8bono%work%(5%clients%per%year).%2016% RFV*mental*health* professional*groups** CHS,%Aspen%Community% Foundation%& • Research%how%to% implement,%incentives% (e.g.,%tax%benefits),%referral% process,%flyers%w/info% OBJECTIVE&5.2& Educate&older&adults&and&local&medical&providers&regarding&mental&health&and&substance& abuse&resources.& COMMUNITY&VALUE:&It%is%important%to%know%what%resources% exist%to%assist%older%adults%and%their%loved%ones%with%mental% health%and%substance%abuse%issues.& ACTION&STEPS&TIMING&RESPONSIBLE*PARTY* POSSIBLE%PARTNERS*NOTES% Educate%seniors%on%mental%health%resources%available%to%them.%%2015% Mind*Springs*Health* Hope%Center,%AVH,%primary% care%providers& • Monthly%wellness%groups% at%the%Senior%Center,% printed%materials% Train%local%health%care%professionals%on%the%use%of%a%best%practice,%common% assessment%tool.%(Reference%tool%in%Objective%5.1)%2017% Mind*Springs*Health* RFV%mental%health% professional%groups,%Hope% Center& % Provide%geriatric%clinical%training%to%local%mental%health%providers.%2017%Mind*Springs*Health%% • MSH%will%coordinate%a% training,%perhaps%in% webinar%format% 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 68 of 219 68 Pitkin&County&Aging&Well&Community&Plan&& PLAN%MASTER%11/4/14%% % 17% Promote%public%health%initiatives%that%increase%brain%health%orientation%as%a% critical%piece%to%wellness%maintenance%using,%e.g.,%wellness%script,%PCSS% newsletter%and%community%presentations.%%% 2016% Mind*Springs*Health% CHS,%Hope%Center,%private% mental%health%practitioners% •%Collaborations%w/Senior% Center,%Hope%Center,% MSH,%private%practitioners% Encourage%seniors%to%become%trained%in%QPR%(Question,%Persuade%and%Refer),%and% become%trainers.%2016%PCSS* Hope%Center& • Organize%community% outreach% Educate%local%healthcare%providers%on%the%mental%health%and%substance%abuse% resources%available%to%older%adults.%(Coordinate%with%Objective%4.3.)%2017% PCSS* Hope%Center,%Mind%Springs% Health& • Monthly%wellness%groups% at%the%Senior%Center% GOAL&6:&Pitkin&County&older&adults&will&have&access&to&a&range&of&activities&and&services&to&support&their&wellness.&(Wellness(options(include( nutrition,(physical(fitness(and(recreation,(brain(fitness,(socialization,(and(spirituality.)&&& OBJECTIVE&6.1& Enhance&awareness&of&the&importance&of&nutrition,&exercise,&brain&fitness,&socialization,&and& spirituality&in&the&aging&well&process.& COMMUNITY&VALUE:&Education%regarding%the%importance%of% healthy%activities%and%healthy%choices%will%inform%decision8 making%by%older%adults.& ACTION&STEPS&TIMING&RESPONSIBLE*PARTY* POSSIBLE%PARTNERS%NOTES& Rebrand%“aging”%with%photos,%videos,%and%stories%about%older%adults%engaged%in% activities%that%provide%opportunities%for%wellness%and%connections.%%2015%Wellness*Committee* PCSS&% Develop%and%implement%a%marketing%campaign%emphasizing%the%importance%and% benefits%of%the%wellness%elements%described%in%this%objective;%include%messages%to% address%the%diverse%age%range%of%the%audience%and%the%differences%in%current% inclinations%–%avoiders,%believers,%tech%users,%etc.% 2015% PCSS* PC%Community%Relations,% Senior%Council& % 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 69 of 219 69 Pitkin&County&Aging&Well&Community&Plan&& PLAN%MASTER%11/4/14%% % 18% Conduct%regular%wellness%activities%throughout%Pitkin%County%for%older%adults,% caregivers,%and%providers;%recruit%leaders%to%collaborate%in%rural%programs,%e.g.,% book%club%hosts.%(Coordinate%with%Objective%11.2.)% Ongoing%Wellness*Committee* PCSS&% Determine%creative%ways%to%learn%what%helps%older%adults%remain%active%and% engaged.%%2016%Wellness*Committee* PCSS& • Consider%question%of%the% week%in%newspaper% • include%adults%not%familiar% with%Senior%Services% Encourage%all%organizations%to%communicate%the%senior8friendly%nature%of%their% programs%and%activities.%2017%Wellness*Committee* PCSS&% Consider%“alerts”%regarding%nutrition,%fitness,%etc.%with%voluntary%sign8up,%via%text,% email%or%through%social%media.%2017%PCSS*% OBJECTIVE&6.2& Increase&opportunities&for&brain&fitness&for&older&adults.& COMMUNITY&VALUE:&Older%adults%should%have%multiple% opportunities%to%exercise%their%brains%as%one%of%many%options% to%support%good%health%and%wellness.%%& ACTION&STEPS&TIMING&RESPONSIBLE*PARTY* POSSIBLE%PARTNERS*NOTES% Develop%training%opportunities%for%fitness%professionals%to%learn%about%cognitive% fitness%and%to%integrate%cognitive%fitness%exercises%into%their%existing%physical% activity%programs.%(Coordinate%with%Objective%5.1.)% 2016%Wellness*Committee* PCSS%programming& • This%objective%is%for%fitness% professionals;%Obj%5.1%is% for%health%care%providers.% Investigate%brain%fitness%products%that%can%be%used%at%home,%and%include% information%and%links%on%the%PCSS%website,%in%the%PCSS%newsletter,%and%in%other% avenues%of%communication%with%older%adults.% 2016%Wellness*Committee* PCSS& • Link%to%other%sites%(9News% resource%site)% 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 70 of 219 70 Pitkin&County&Aging&Well&Community&Plan&& PLAN%MASTER%11/4/14%% % 19% Encourage%accessible%group%activities%for%older%adults%that%combine%mental% stimulation%with%social%interaction,%such%as%board%games%(Scrabble,%Pictionary,%or% Monopoly)%or%card%games,%jigsaw%puzzles,%or%book%discussions%with%an%author%or% facilitator%in%attendance.% 2015%Wellness*Committee* PCSS%program%development&% Develop%awareness%of%the%range%of%opportunities%for%cognitive%enhancement,% including%trying%a%new%recipe,%playing%with%grandchildren,%participating%in%your% community,%exploring%passions,%etc.%% 2016%Wellness*Committee* PCSS%program%development&• Wellness%program%series% OBJECTIVE&6.3& Identify&needs&and&fill&voids&for&older&adults&in&the&area&of&nutrition&counseling.& COMMUNITY&VALUE:&Nutritional%information%and%individual% nutrition%counseling%should%be%easy%to%acquire.%%& ACTION&STEPS&TIMING&RESPONSIBLE*PARTY* POSSIBLE%PARTNERS*NOTES% Provide%opportunities%for%nutrition%education%and%counseling.%Underway%% PCSS*nutrition*program* AAAA%nutrition%counselor,% Wellness%Committee,%nutrition% professionals& % Connect%older%adults%with%resources%for%healthy%eating,%cooking%and%access%to% food.%%Underway%% PCSS*nutrition*program* AAAA%nutrition%counselor,% nutrition%professionals& % Educate%providers,%caregivers,%and%older%adults%about%issues%related%to%nutrition,% including%depression,%pain,%and%underlying%factors%like%financial%issues.%2016% PCSS*nutrition*program* AAAA%nutrition%counselor,% Wellness%Committee,%nutrition% professionals& % OBJECTIVE&6.4& Identify&needs&and&fill&voids&for&older&adults&in&the&areas&of&recreation&and&fitness.& COMMUNITY&VALUE:&Older%adults%need%access%to%a%variety%of% recreation%and%fitness%opportunities%that%complement%their% physical%abilities%and/or%limitations.%%& ACTION&STEPS&TIMING&RESPONSIBLE*PARTY** POSSIBLE%PARTNERS&NOTES% 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 71 of 219 71 Pitkin&County&Aging&Well&Community&Plan&& PLAN%MASTER%11/4/14%% % 20% Work%with%ARC%and%TOSV%recreation%departments%to%continue%to%develop%and% promote%recreation%and%fitness%programs%for%older%adults.%Underway%% Recreation*centers’*staff* PCSS%programming,%Wellness% Committee& % Identify%and%publish%a%list%of%senior8friendly%programs%and%classes%at%Pitkin% County’s%public%and%private%recreation%facilities;%utilize%all%mediums.%2015%PCSS* Wellness%Committee&% Identify%and%publish%a%list%of%special%pricing/discounts%for%older%adults%in% fitness/activity%programs;%utilize%all%mediums.%2016%PCSS** Wellness%Committee&% Encourage%local%efforts%in%rural%areas%to%increase%activity%opportunities%for%older% adults%–%such%as%Walk%and%Talk%in%Redstone.%2017%Wellness*Committee* PCSS,%rural%partners&% Continue%to%collaborate%with%ARC%for%access%to%Silver%Sneakers%program.%Underway%PCSS* ARC*staff%% OBJECTIVE&6.5& Enhance&awareness&and&availability&of&the&range&of&programs&that&are&potential&sources&of& inspiration,&satisfaction,&hope,&spirituality,&and&connectedness.& COMMUNITY&VALUE:&Positive%emotions%contribute%to% healthy%living.%Older%adults%deserve%to%know%about%and%have% access%to%a%variety%of%programs%or%opportunities%that%feed%the% soul.& ACTION&STEPS&TIMING&RESPONSIBLE*PARTY* POSSIBLE%PARTNERS*NOTES% Develop%and%publish%a%list%of%activities%that%are%open%to%the%public,%e.g.,% meditation%at%the%Aspen%Chapel.%2016%Wellness*Committee* PCSS,%rural%partners&% Explore%ways%to%promote%values%of%this%objective:%articles%in%the%newspaper%and% newsletter,%radio%stories;%tie%to%cognitive%enhancement%and%wellness%programs.%2016%Wellness*Committee* PCSS,%rural%partners&% GOAL&7:&Pitkin&County&older&adults&will&be&recognized&as&an&essential&and&valued&segment&of&the&population,&and&older&adult&perspectives&will& be&part&of&the&fabric&of&community&conversations.&(Aging(is(“cool.”(Aging(is(for(everyone.)& 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 72 of 219 72 Pitkin&County&Aging&Well&Community&Plan&& PLAN%MASTER%11/4/14%% % 21% OBJECTIVE&7.1& Encourage&an&atmosphere&of&respect&and&appreciation&for&older&adults&and&their& contributions.&&(Objectives&7.2,&7.3&and&7.4&support&7.1,&but&stand&alone&in&importance&to& support&the&goal.)& COMMUNITY&VALUE:&Older%adults%deserve%to%be%treated% with%respect%when%interacting%within%the%county’s% communities.%Our%elected%officials%and%others%who%represent% us%should%model%reverence%for%older%adults%and%appreciation% for%their%contributions%in%the%community.%%& ACTION&STEPS&TIMING&RESPONSIBLE*PARTY** POSSIBLE%PARTNERS%NOTES& Hire%a%professional%to%“change%the%community%conversation”%and%move%the% community%away%from%ageist%attitudes%and%criticisms%that%exist%in%youth% perspectives%of%older%adults%and%vice%versa.%%% 2017%% PCSS*in*concert*with* PR/Marketing*professional** Young%professionals%groups,% AHS%service%club& • Campaign%budget% (development%and% placement),%coordinating% • Begin%after%funding%is% secured%(budget%cycle%or% through%special%request).% OBJECTIVE&7.2& Encourage&an&environment&in&Pitkin&County&in&which&members&of&the&older&adult&community& know&how&to&express&their&concerns&and&feel&that&their&voices&are&being&heard.& & COMMUNITY&VALUE:&A%healthy%community%welcomes% feedback%and%contributions%from%all%its%members%in%a%variety% of%circumstances%and%on%a%variety%of%issues.%%& ACTION&STEPS&TIMING&RESPONSIBLE*PARTY* POSSIBLE%PARTNERS*NOTES% Encourage%seniors%to%attend%a%Community%Governance%Academy%if,%and%when,%it% is%created.%%PCSS** • Unknown%timing% • Keep%in%touch%with%county% administration% Publish%articles,%locally,%by%knowledgeable%people%about%“how%to”%participate%in% the%public%process.%2017%PCSS*% OBJECTIVE&7.3& Encourage&cultural&organizations,&nonprofits,&and&governmental&organizations&to&have&at& least&one&element&in&their&strategic&plans&that&focus&specifically&on&how&they&are&engaging& with&the&older&adult&population.& COMMUNITY&VALUE:&It%is%important%to%the%health%and% happiness%of%older%adults%that%they%are%specifically%included% in%the%planning%processes%of%multiple%entities%within%the% community.%Interaction%with%this%population%segment%is%an% important%way%to%value%their%existence.& 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 73 of 219 73 Pitkin&County&Aging&Well&Community&Plan&& PLAN%MASTER%11/4/14%% % 22% ACTION&STEPS&TIMING&RESPONSIBLE*PARTY* POSSIBLE%PARTNERS*NOTES% Assess%the%current%landscape%of%local%organizations%whose%missions%include% serving%the%older%adult%population.%2016%PCSS**• INTERN?% Host%a%luncheon%at%the%Senior%Center%with%the%partner%organizations;%present% elements%of%Aging%Well%Community%Planning%Initiative%and%request%that%each%of% them%formalize%how%they%plan%to%engage%with%the%growing%population%of%older% adults.%% 2017%PCSS**• Materials%for%distribution% OBJECTIVE&7.4& Ensure&opportunities&for&people&aged&1O59&to&learn&from,&socialize&with,&and&connect&with& older&adults.& COMMUNITY&VALUE:&An%important%part%of%aging%well%is% staying%connected%with%people%of%all%ages.%Older%adults%need% opportunities%to%engage%with%a%variety%of%age%groups%in% planned%or%spontaneous%activities.& ACTION&STEPS&TIMING&RESPONSIBLE*PARTY** POSSIBLE%PARTNERS*NOTES% Assess%the%current%landscape%of%intergenerational%programming%opportunities;% identify%current%opportunities%for%our%older%adult%population%that%meet%the%needs% for%intergenerational%education,%socialization%and%connections.%% 2016% PCSS** County8wide%programming% partners& • INTERN?%% • Use%PCSS%newsletter%space% Increase%intergenerational%programming%opportunities%throughout%Pitkin%County,% including%events%that%promote%interaction,%encourage%conversations,%and%seek% common%ground,%e.g.,%“Climb%to%Glory”%screening%and%an%intergenerational%arts% festival.%% 2016% PCSS* Community%partners,%young% professionals%groups* % GOAL&8:&Pitkin&County&older&adults&will&have&multiple&opportunities&to&volunteer&in&the&community.&& OBJECTIVE&8.1& Ensure&access&to&current&relevant&information&about&volunteer&engagement&opportunities.& COMMUNITY&VALUE:&Older%adults%need%to%have%confidence% that%the%information%they%seek%regarding%volunteer% opportunities%is%current%and%relevant.& 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 74 of 219 74 Pitkin&County&Aging&Well&Community&Plan&& PLAN%MASTER%11/4/14%% % 23% ACTION&STEPS&TIMING&RESPONSIBLE*PARTY** POSSIBLE%PARTNERS%NOTES& Continue%to%provide%volunteer%recruitment%and%placement%services.%Ongoing%PCSS%%% Establish%an%annual%or%biannual%volunteer%fair.%%%2017%PCSS*• Partners%for%a%fair%could%be% AYPA,%Springboard,%etc.% OBJECTIVE&8.2& Assist&rural&communities&in&establishing&volunteer&programs,&if&they&are&interested&and& willing.&& COMMUNITY&VALUE:&Volunteers%in%rural%communities%can% often%determine%the%best%solutions,%neighbor8to8neighbor.%& ACTION&STEPS&TIMING&RESPONSIBLE*PARTY* POSSIBLE%PARTNERS*NOTES% Conduct%meetings%with%rural%associations%to%assess%current%opportunities%for% older%adults%to%volunteer.%(Coordinate%with%Objective%11.2.)%2017% PCSS* RCA,%Frying%Pan%Caucus,%rural% leaders& % Interface%with%the%Mid8Valley%Senior%Program%(Eagle%County/El%Jebel%site)%about% identifying%volunteer%opportunities%for%older%adults.%%2017%PCSS*% GOAL&9:&Pitkin&County&older&adults&will&have&multiple&opportunities&to&be&lifelong&learners.&& OBJECTIVE&9.1& Increase&the&technology&skills&of&older&adults.& COMMUNITY&VALUE:&Older%adults%who%wish%to%improve%their% knowledge%of%technology%should%have%multiple%opportunities% to%participate%in%classes%and%have%access%to%individuals%who% can%help%them%improve%their%personal%skills%and%comfort% level.%%& ACTION&STEPS&TIMING&RESPONSIBLE*PARTY* POSSIBLE%PARTNERS%NOTES& 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 75 of 219 75 Pitkin&County&Aging&Well&Community&Plan&& PLAN%MASTER%11/4/14%% % 24% Assess,%expand%and%promote%the%current%educational%opportunities%for%older% adults%in%the%area%of%technology%skills,%including,%but%not%limited%to:% • Circle%of%Friends%classes% • Aspen%Science%Center% • Pitkin%County%Library% • Basalt%Library% • Carbondale%Library% • CMC%Tech%Classes%% • Non8profits%whose%missions%include%education% Underway%% PCSS** Partnering%agencies,%Senior% Council& % Create%an%inventory%of%skilled%volunteers,%willing%to%work%with%older%adults%one%on% one%for%higher8level%technology%issues%as%part%of%volunteer%outreach%efforts.%2016% PCSS** Partnering%agencies,%Senior% Council& % OBJECTIVE&9.2& Increase&the&social&and&civic&connectedness&of&older&adults&through&the&use&of&technology,& the&internet&and&social&media.&& COMMUNITY&VALUE:&Older%adults%should%be%able%to%use% technology%in%the%same%way%they%would%use%the%newspaper% or%telephone%to%gather%information,%stay%informed%of%current% events,%and%connect%with%others.%%& ACTION&STEPS&TIMING&RESPONSIBLE*PARTY* POSSIBLE%PARTNERS%NOTES& Ask%seniors%at%the%PCSC%technology%events%how%they%are%using%technology,%the% internet,%and%social%media.%What%would%they%like%to%learn?%Would%they%take%a% class%at%CMC%or%the%Pitkin%County%Library?%% 2015%PCSS* CMC,%Pitkin%County%Library&• SENIOR%FOCUS%GROUP% With%the%information%learned%from%the%previous%action%step,%meet%with%CMC%to% construct%classes%that%would%expand%the%knowledge%base%for%seniors%in%the%most% appropriate%areas.%% 2016%PCSS** CMC&% 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 76 of 219 76 Pitkin&County&Aging&Well&Community&Plan&& PLAN%MASTER%11/4/14%% % 25% OBJECTIVE&9.3& Ensure&that&relevant&education&and&cultural&programs&for&older&adults&exist&throughout&the& county.&& COMMUNITY&VALUE:&Education%and%cultural%programs%for% older%adults%should%be%physically%accessible%and%appropriate% for%a%wide%range%of%ages,%learning%styles,%and%abilities.& ACTION&STEPS&TIMING&RESPONSIBLE*PARTY* POSSIBLE%PARTNERS%NOTES& Provide%links%on%website%to%community%calendars%highlighting%cultural%and% educational%events%and%programs.%2016%PCSS* ACRA,%other%agencies&% Highlight%partnerships%with%education%and%cultural%entities%when%programming%is% designed%specifically%for%seniors.%2015%PCSS*% GOAL&10:&Pitkin&County&Senior&Services&will&have&a&facility&(i.e.,*“Senior*Center”)&that&is&known&by&all&and&is&properly&sized,&designed,&and& located&to&serve&the&needs&of&a&growing&and&aging&older&adult&population&through&2024&and&beyond.& OBJECTIVE&10.1& Define&space&and&design&requirements.& COMMUNITY&VALUE:&Any%planned%facility%should%go%through% adequate%planning%and%design%phases%to%properly%reflect%the% needs%of%the%community.& ACTION&STEPS&TIMING&RESPONSIBLE*PARTY* POSSIBLE%PARTNERS%NOTES& Consult%county%administration%regarding%county%facility%plans.%2015%PCSS/HHS*leadership*% Prepare%budget%request%for%2015%county%budget%for%professional%planning%and% assessment%of%space%needs%based%on%function%and%programming.%%Underway%%PCSS*Leadership* County%facility%staff&% 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 77 of 219 77 Pitkin&County&Aging&Well&Community&Plan&& PLAN%MASTER%11/4/14%% % 26% Create%a%committee%of%appropriate%municipality%and%stakeholder%representatives% to%guide%the%process%of%determining%location%and%design.%Underway%% PCSS** Senior%Council,%other% interested%leaders& % Determine%how%to%best%serve%the%recreation%needs%of%older%adults,% complementing,%rather%than%competing%with%other%programs,%i.e.,%recreation% centers.% 2015%Committee&(from%previous% action%step)&% Identify%and%prioritize%space%needs%in%the%facility,%including,%for%example,%a%private% meeting%space%for%external%service%providers%(care%navigators,%audiologist,%home% care%agencies,%counselors,%etc.)%to%meet%with%older%adults%in%a%neutral%setting.%% 2016%PCSS*in*consultation*with* designers*• As%space%is%designed% OBJECTIVE&10.2& Identify&funding&sources&for&the&development&of&a&new&Senior&Services&facility.&& COMMUNITY&VALUE:&&Prior%to%rallying%support%within%the% community%for%a%new%facility,%it%is%important%to%research%the% funding%options%to%get%a%clear%picture%of%available%resources.& ACTION&STEPS&TIMING&RESPONSIBLE*PARTY* POSSIBLE%PARTNERS%NOTES& Once%cost%of%facility%is%determined,%work%with%county%administration%to%plan% funding%strategies%and%define%the%role%of%a%private%campaign.%2016% PCSS/HHS*leadership* BOCC/County%Manager,% project%committee& % GOAL&11:&Pitkin&County&Senior&Services&will&be&known&as&a&hub&for&information,&activities,&programs,&and&services&promoting&health&and& independence&for&older&adults.& OBJECTIVE&11.1& Rebrand&Pitkin&County&Senior&Services&to&add&emphasis&on&intimacy,&friends,&connection,& and&fun,&and&to&encourage&“Knowing&Us&Before&You&Need&Us.”& COMMUNITY&VALUE:&It%is%important%that%all%Pitkin%County% residents%know%Pitkin%County%Senior%Center%is%the%place%to%go% for%older%adults%seeking%social%interaction,%meaningful% interpersonal%relationships,%and%opportunities%to%maximize% health%and%wellness.%& ACTION&STEPS&TIMING&RESPONSIBLE*PARTY* POSSIBLE%PARTNERS%NOTES& 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 78 of 219 78 Pitkin&County&Aging&Well&Community&Plan&& PLAN%MASTER%11/4/14%% % 27% Hire%a%marketing%professional.%Underway%PCSS**% Develop%a%marketing%plan%with%new%logo%and%message.%Underway% PCSS* Public%relations%consultant,% Senior%Council%& % Budget%for%significant%“message%campaign”%to%community.%Underway% PCSS* Public%relations%consultant,% Senior%Council& % Review%existing%printed%materials%for%alignment%with%message%and%revise%as% needed.%2015%PCSS** Senior%Council&% Use%the%Senior%Council%as%a%focus%group.%2015%PCSS** Senior%Council&% Establish%a%consistent%and%familiar%structure%for%communication,%and%use%it%on%the% website,%in%brochures,%and%in%the%PCSS%newsletter.%“Modernize”%the%look%of%the% newsletter.% 2015%PCSS** Public%relations%consultant%%% OBJECTIVE&11.2& Assist&efforts&of&rural&communities&to&determine&what&local&services&they&would&like&to&have& for&older&adults,&e.g.,&a&physical&gathering&space,&information&service,&volunteer&network,& etc.& COMMUNITY&VALUE:&Pitkin%County%should%assist%its%rural% communities%in%developing%services%that%each%community% deems%essential%to%meet%the%needs%of%its%older%adults.& ACTION&STEPS&TIMING&RESPONSIBLE*PARTY* POSSIBLE%PARTNERS*NOTES% Perform%background%research%on%services%in%small%rural%areas%for%possible%models.%2016%%PCSS** Rural%groups&% 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 79 of 219 79 Pitkin&County&Aging&Well&Community&Plan&& PLAN%MASTER%11/4/14%% % 28% Meet%with%Redstone%Community%Association,%Frying%Pan%Caucus,%Midvalley%Senior% Program%(Eagle%County,%El%Jebel),%and%other%focus%groups%to%determine%what%they% have%and%what%they%need/want.% 2016%PCSS* Rural%groups&% Prioritize%initial%service%needs%and%establish%local%partners’%commitments.%%2016%Rural*groups**% GOAL&12:&Pitkin&County&will&have&a&centralized,&commonly&known,&easy&to&use,&upOtoOdate,&sustainable&system&for&accessing&information& important&and&relevant&to&its&older&adult&residents.&(This(information(“system”(includes(human(elements,(reachable(by(phone(or(email,(as(well(as( online(resources.)& OBJECTIVE&12.1& Create&a&standOalone&Pitkin&County&Senior&Services&website.& COMMUNITY&VALUE:&Older%adults%and%those%who%care%for% them%deserve%access%to%accurate%and%timely%information% about%services,%programs,%and%other%resources%available%to% them.%%& ACTION&STEPS&TIMING&RESPONSIBLE*PARTY* POSSIBLE%PARTNERS%NOTES& Meet%with%county%IT%web%specialist%to%clarify%process%and%responsibilities.%Underway%%PCSS* IT%specialist&% Convene%small%group(s)%of%potential%users%and%ask%them%to%show%sites%they%like% and%why.%2015%PCSS**• SENIOR%FOCUS%GROUP% Identify%important%and%relevant%information%and%links%for%content%and%navigation.% Create%new%content,%if%necessary.%2015%PCSS* Senior%Council&% Create%website%design%proposal.%2015%IT*and*PCSS*% Approve%design%proposal%and%set%build8out%deadlines.%2015%PCSS*% 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 80 of 219 80 Pitkin&County&Aging&Well&Community&Plan&& PLAN%MASTER%11/4/14%% % 29% Test%initial%design%product%for%ease%of%use%by%real%users.%2015%PCSS%% Beta%test%volunteer%group%% Train%personnel%who%will%keep%the%site%up8to8date,%and%establish%protocols%for% updates%and%maintenance.%2015%PCSS** • Updating%website%will%be% in%a%PCSS%staff%member’s% job%description% Go%live.%Publicize.%(See%Objective%12.3.)%2015%PCSS** PC%Community%Relations&% Gather%feedback%from%users;%modify%as%needed.%2015%PCSS**• Consider%surveying% periodically%on%the%site% OBJECTIVE&12.2& Develop&the&human&elements&of&the&information&system.& COMMUNITY&VALUE:&Older%adults%and%those%who%care%for% them%deserve%access%to%accurate%and%timely%information% about%available%services,%programs,%and%other%resources.%%& ACTION&STEPS&TIMING&RESPONSIBLE*PARTY* POSSIBLE%PARTNERS*NOTES% Set%guiding%principles%for%phone%and%in8person%interactions.%For%example,%users% feel%they’ve%been%helped%when%they%call,%users%feel%welcome%to%call%again,%and% users%are%empowered%to%find%information%on%their%own.% 2015%PCSS*% Develop%scripts%and%protocol%for%staff%and%volunteers.%%For%example,%answers%to% common%questions,%what%to%say%and%do%if%they%don’t%know%the%answer,%how%to% help%the%caller%find%information%alone,%and%to%get%input%on%the%PCSS%website.% 2015%PCSS((% Establish%training%requirements%for%staff%and%volunteers’%proficiency%with%website,% including%evaluation%and%feedback.%2015%PCSS(• Funds%for%outside%training% may%be%needed%% 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 81 of 219 81 Pitkin&County&Aging&Well&Community&Plan&& PLAN%MASTER%11/4/14%% % 30% OBJECTIVE&12.3& Develop&and&roll&out&a&publicity&campaign&to&promote&the&system.& COMMUNITY&VALUE:&Persons%of%all%ages%need%to%be%aware%of% ways%to%access%information%through%a%variety%of%media.& ACTION&STEPS&TIMING&RESPONSIBLE*PARTY** POSSIBLE%PARTNERS*NOTES% Develop%and%implement%a%public%relations%plan%to%promote%the%information% system%using%all%media%(website,%phone,%email,%printed%collateral).%%2016%PCSS** PC%Community%Relations&% Write%and%distribute%press%releases.%Encourage%links%to/from%PCSS%website,%e.g.,% Network%of%Care%site.%2016%PCSS* PC%Community%Relations&% Develop%and%implement%a%plan%for%ongoing%PR%and%promotion.%2016%PCSS** PC%Community%Relations&% GOAL&13:&Pitkin&County&older&adults&will&have&access&to&experienced,&trustworthy&advocateOmentors.&(Advocate:mentors(may(be(paid( professionals(or(volunteers,(will(have(defined(skill(sets(gained(from(experience(and/or(training,(and(will(serve(as(close(advisors,(guides,(and( champions(to(individual(older(adults(who(desire(such(a(relationship.)& OBJECTIVE&13.1& Investigate&possible&structures&for,&and&elements&of,&an&advocateOmentor&program,&and& create&a&pilot&program.& COMMUNITY&VALUE:&Intergenerational%and%peer8to8peer% connections%will%improve%socialization,%physical%and%mental% health,%personal%organization,%and%a%variety%of%other% elements%for%older%adults.%%%& ACTION&STEPS&TIMING&RESPONSIBLE*PARTY** POSSIBLE%PARTNERS%NOTES& Seek%a%‘champion’%for%the%program,%i.e.,%a%partnership%organization%of% professionals%willing%to%work%with%older%adults.%2017%PCSS**% Construct%a%case%statement%for%an%advocate8mentor%program,%clearly%outlining% the%‘who’,%‘what’,%‘how’,%and%‘why’%of%the%proposed%program.%%%%2017%PCSS* Partner%entity&% Explore%existing%models%that%exist%throughout%the%country%to%determine%best% practices.%2017%Partner*entity*% 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 82 of 219 82 Pitkin&County&Aging&Well&Community&Plan&& PLAN%MASTER%11/4/14%% % 31% Identify%the%professions/experience%needed%to%address%the%various%needs%in%the% local%older%adult%population.%2017%Partner*entity*% Create%and%implement%a%pilot%program.%2017%Partner*entity*% GOAL&14:&&Residents&of&all&ages&will&understand&the&resources&necessary&for&aging&well.&&(“Resources”(encompasses(the(broadest(array(of( services,(including(financial,(legal,(and(practical(considerations.)& OBJECTIVE&14.1& Ensure&the&existence&of&financial&planning&models&and&advisors&to&help&older&adults&manage& expectations&and&assess&current&and&future&abilities&to&age&well&in&Pitkin&County&or& elsewhere.& COMMUNITY&VALUE:&Residents%of%all%ages%should%have% access%to%facts%and%considerations%necessary%to%develop% personal%plans%(financial,%legal,%practical)%for%retirement%and% beyond.%& ACTION&STEPS&TIMING&RESPONSIBLE*PARTY* POSSIBLE%PARTNERS%NOTES& Consult%with%local%financial%planners%and%form%a%committee%to%determine%the%best% financial%planning%models%for%use%in%advising%all%adults,%i.e.,%easy%to%modify%for%a% ‘fill%in%the%blank’%look%at%resources,%needs,%actions,%etc.% 2017%PCSS%% • PCSS%identifies%or% establishes%committee,% including%county%FAB?,% other%financial%advisors%% Establish%a%volunteer%group%of%advisors%to%assist%older%adults%with%assessing% current%and%future%financial%stability;%individuals%need%not%be%professional% financial%planners,%but%should%have%a%strong%grasp%of%financial%planning%concepts.% 2017%Committee%(above)% PCSS,%other%professionals%% Train%the%volunteer%advisor%group%on%how%to%help%older%adults%identify%financial% needs,%define%options,%and%manage%expectations.%2017%Committee*(above)% Volunteer%professionals&% OBJECTIVE&14.2& Educate&all&residents&concerning&financial,&legal&and&practical&considerations&for&aging&well.&& (Examples&include&living&wills,&health&care&directives,&living&trusts,&longOterm&insurance&plans,& and&asset&management.)& COMMUNITY&VALUE:&Residents%of%all%ages%should%have% access%to%facts%and%considerations%necessary%to%develop% personal%plans%(financial,%legal,%practical)%for%retirement%and% beyond.%%& 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 83 of 219 83 Pitkin&County&Aging&Well&Community&Plan&& PLAN%MASTER%11/4/14%% % 32% ACTION&STEPS&TIMING&RESPONSIBLE*PARTY* POSSIBLE%PARTNERS*NOTES% Solicit%presenters%to%conduct%education%seminars%for%all%Pitkin%County%residents% on%living%wills,%living%trusts,%long8term%care,%health%care%directives,%and%asset% management.% 2017%Committee*(above)% PCSS,%volunteer%professionals&% % 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 84 of 219 84 Roaring Fork Valley Continuing Care Retirement Community Greater Aspen Market | Basalt, CO BUILDING AND CENTER FEATURES Aspen Valley Foundation has designed and received full governmental approvals for the development of a 150 unit Continuing Care Retirement Community (CCRC) in Basalt, Colorado. The community will be comprised of housing units ranging from cottages, independent apartments and care units including assisted living and skilled nursing. The focus of the community will be on life enhancement, wellness, recreation and socialization. An 18 acre campus with an exceptional setting in the Roaring Fork Valley 18 cottages, 78 independent living apartments, 30 assisted living units, 24 skilled nursing units Provision for additional accommodations for Rehab and Short Stay Community Commons (lobby/ reception, dining, bistro, coffee shop, recreation and exercise facilities Entertainment and socialization venues Entry fee and non-profit operating model Potential for product and services expansion on 4.12 acre sites The Town of Basalt believes there is between $3-4 million available in local and federal government assistances for this project. PROPERTY DOCUMENTS Basalt Map Basalt/Vail/Denver Map Complete Marketing Package Offered by Exclusive Agent Representing the Seller For More Information Contact: Jeffrey Hyman jeff.hyman@colliers.com Dir +1 847 384 2827 Mark Dolemba mark.dolemba@colliers.com Dir +1 847 571 6014 COLLIERS INTERNATIONAL 6250 N. River Road, Suite 11-100 Rosemont, IL 60018 Scot Huber scot.huber@colliers.com Dir +1 303 283 4585 Michael C Shriver michael.shriver@colliers.com Dir +1 303 283 4591 COLLIERS INTERNATIONAL 4643 South Ulster Street, Suite 1000 Denver, CO 80237 This document has been prepared by Colliers International for advertising and general information only. Colliers International makes no guarantees, representations or warranties of any kind, expressed or implied, regarding the information including, but not limited to, warranties of content, accuracy and reliability. Any interested party should undertake their own inquiries as to the accuracy of the information. Colliers International excludes unequivocally all inferred or implied terms, conditions and warranties arising out of this document and excludes all liability for loss and damages arising there from. This publication is the copyrighted property of Colliers International and/or its licensor(s). ©2015. All rights reserved. 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 85 of 219 85 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 86 of 219 86 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 87 of 219 87 ROARING FORK VALLEY CONTINU ING CAR E RETIREMENT COM MUNITY GREATER ASPEN MARKET | BASALT, COLORADO DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITY 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 88 of 219 88 The site has been slated for annexation for many years, and is one of the only large parcels of land within the existing urban growth boundary that is a prime location for community development, set as it is adjacent to the Southside residential neighborhood, the Basalt high school and the Rio Grande Recreation Trail. Downtown Basalt Outdoor Dining and Shops 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 89 of 219 89 CONTENTS Project Purpose, | 5 | Summary + Land Use Approval Status Program Description | 7 | Development Program | 17 | Key Market Factors | 19 | Financial Projections | 21 | Sources of Revenue | 31 | Operational Plan + Development Team | 33 | Appendices: Appendix A | Ziegler Info | 37 | Appendix B | Market Assessment | 41 | Appendix C | Detailed Pro Forma | 67 | Appendix D | Town of Basalt Ordinance | 71 | 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 90 of 219 90 Through a series of public design charrettes and open houses, the design team gained a sense of what the aging population in the Roaring Fork Valley need and desire in order to continue to be vital members of the Roaring Fork Valley mountain community. They want to be engaged, they want active lifestyles, they want homes that are designed to accommodate their needs, and they want to participate in intergenerational activities without leaving the Valley. 8% of the population in the Roaring Fork Valley is over the age of 65 and no continuing care retirement communities exist within the Roaring Fork Valley. The number of residents over the age of 65 in the primary market area is projected to increase 31% by 2017. Educational and social activity group interventions can lessen social isolation in older adults. 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 91 of 219 91 | Basalt CCRC Package5 There is a growing need in the Roaring Fork Valley to provide housing and a variety of levels of assistance and nursing care for the aging population. This project will address the current void and provide an option for residents to continue to live in the valley with the possibility of appropriate care. The concept of a Roaring Fork Valley CCRC has been created over the past 10 years in conjunction with other non-profits with similar interests in health and human services. As the need has increased and more concrete information has been developed, the leadership of the project has been undertaken by the Aspen Valley Foundation (AVF). AVF has brought together a plan for the 18.01 acre Stott’s Mill site in Basalt. The site is under purchase option by AVF. The CCRC concept is based on an entry fee structure and monthly fees paid as part of a life care contract. The Continuing Care Retirement Community concept is based on the principles that a life care contract is entered into by individuals and that over the course of aging, options for care are available based on needs to include assisted care, and with more medical need, skilled nursing level care. The various housing types include cottage style, independent living apartments, and care units that include assisted living with a common core and skilled nursing. The site selection and community design is based on the philosophy of creating inclusion of residents into the community life of the Roaring Fork Valley. Residents of the valley express a strong sense of connectedness to others and have made great contributions to their community. The CCRC makes inclusivity and integration with other generations possible by the locational advantages of the site in close proximity to downtown Basalt, the high school, walking and biking paths, community gardens, and an established mixed-use neighborhood. The addition of a child care facility on the property not only contributes to meeting the needs of Town of Basalt residents, but also creates synergies for multi-generational experiences. Life enrichment, education, activities, and social events are intended to have broad reach beyond the CCRC residents to welcome the Roaring Fork Community. Pitkin County is one of the Top Ten U.S. Counties for life expectancy. A focus on recreation, wellness, and a connection to nature are valued highly be residents. The development plan takes advantage of the stunning mountain views and surrounding agricultural landscape. A central pond and promenade is designed as a focal point. Direct connection to a regional paved trail and town pathways encourages mobility and engagement in outdoor activities. LAND USE APPROVAL STATUS The Town of Basalt approved the project in its entirety and passed Ordinance No. 15, Series of 2013, which became effective on Thursday, December 5, 2013. The full ordinance is included as Appendix D. 1 | PROJECT PURPOSE, SUMMARY + LAND USE APPROVAL STATUS 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 92 of 219 92 Currently, the 18.01 acre site sits empty. It was an operating lumber mill previously, and before that working agricultural land. It is relatively flat and contains no geologic hazards. There is an historic cabin located onsite. It will be preserved and moved to a 1.8 acre park on site that will be dedicated by the project as parkland. 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 93 of 219 93 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 94 of 219 94 BASALT CONTINUING CARE RETIREMENT COMMUNITY - FINAL PLANAspen Valley FoundationP. O. Box 1639Aspen, CO 81612120 E Main StAspen, CO 81611228 Midland AveBasalt, CO 816215650 DTC Parkway, Suite 200Englewood, Colorado 80111DESIGNWORKSHOPCCY ARCHITECTSLantz-Boggio ArchitectsJune 14, 2013 NL4ILLUSTRATIVE SITE PLANFuture Development Future Development Rio Grande TrailSouthside DriveAllison LaneIllustrative Site Plan 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 95 of 219 95 | Basalt CCRC Package9 PROJECT PHASING The project is organized in two phases to improve the financial feasibility for the project and to provide for a long term need. Phase One is anticipated to include the community common space, 12 cottages, 52 independent living units, 20 assisted living units, 12 skilled nursing units, one employee/community housing unit, maintenance and back of house space, underground and surface parking, parks, child care facility, and site infrastructure. Phase Two will proceed once the project proves financial self-sufficiency. The second phase is anticipated to include 6 cottages, 26 independent living apartments, 10 assisted living units, and 12 skilled nursing units. There is also potential for a future third phase of development on the 4.12 acre eastern portion of the site identified as Lots 3 and 4. This area has been set aside for potential future projects which are currently undefined. When this area is defined for use, an application will be submitted to the Town of Basalt. PARKS AND OPEN SPACE Two acres of improved parkland will be dedicated to the Town of Basalt as per the Town’s requirements for annexation agreements. PARKING Parking is located in close proximity to building entrances and also consolidated or located underground to maximize landscape open space areas. On-street parking will serve the public park as well as additional parking for employees, visitors, and special events. CHILD CARE FACILITY The development will also make possible the accommodation of a child care facility space. Child care is needed within the Roaring Fork Valley and there are few providers in the area. Growing Years child care, a non-profit with over 20 years of successful operation in Basalt, has asked to partner with AVF to make a facility possible on this site. Growing Years has sought a new location for the past 8 years, but finding a site appropriate has been a challenge. The applicant has allowed the building site to accommodate a separate 3,500 gross square foot one-story building and an outdoor play area. AVF will provide a shared parking lot and access to the child care facility. The location creates the opportunity for the outdoor child play area to be located adjacent to the CCRC common area patio, further connecting multiple generations of people. EMPLOYEES Phase One will require 44 full time equivalency employees to support the CCRC operation. When Phase Two is completed, the employees will increase to a total of 76. The employees range from managers, nursing and medical support staff, life enrichment workers to some jobs in the categories of food service, property operation and maintenance. 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 96 of 219 96 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 97 of 219 97 | Basalt CCRC Package11 CCY ARCHITECTS 228 MIDLAND AVENUE POST OFFICE BOX 529 BASALT, COLORADO 81621 970-927-4925 FAX 970-927-8578 CCYOFFICE@CCYARCHITECTS.COM SKETCH PLAN SUBMITTAL 11.06.12 A6 - TYPICAL UNIT PLANS ASPEN VALLEY MEDICAL FOUNDATION BASALT CONTINUING CARE RETIREMENT COMMUNITY (CCRC) "STOTT'S MILL PARCEL" BASALT, COLORADO ASSISTED LIVING TYPICAL 1 BEDROOM (480 SF) 1/8"=1'-0" ASSISTED LIVING TYPICAL 2 BEDROOM (800 SF) 1/8"=1'-0" ASSISTED LIVING TYPICAL STUDIO (350 SF) 1/8"=1'-0" COTTAGE PLAN 1/8"=1'-0" 0' 5'50'25'10' INDEPENDENT LIVING TYPICAL 1 BEDROOM (700 SF) 1/8"=1'-0" INDEPENDENT LIVING TYPICAL 2 BEDROOM (1100 SF) 1/8"=1'-0" INDEPENDENT LIVING 1 BEDROOM PLUS DEN (950 SF) 1/8"=1'-0" INDEPENDENT LIVING 2 BEDROOM PLUS (1300 SF) 1/8"=1'-0" SKILLED NURSING TYPICAL 1 BEDROOM (320 SF) 1/8"=1'-0" 2BR (1450 SF)2BR + DEN (1650 SF) (INCLUDING RENTAL PRODUCTS) Residential Floor Plans07-01-18 TC Packet Page 98 of 219 98 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 99 of 219 99 | Basalt CCRC Package13 A6 Character Elevations07-01-18 TC Packet Page 100 of 219 100 14CCY ARCHITECTS 228 MIDLAND AVENUE POST OFFICE BOX 529 BASALT, COLORADO 81621 970-927-4925 FAX 970-927-8578 CCYOFFICE@CCYARCHITECTS.COM SKETCH PLAN SUBMITTAL 11.06.12 1" = 30'-0" A9 - CHARACTER RENDERINGS ASPEN VALLEY MEDICAL FOUNDATION BASALT CONTINUING CARE RETIREMENT COMMUNITY (CCRC) "STOTT'S MILL PARCEL" BASALT, COLORADO VIEW TO ENTRY COURTYARD FROM SOUTHSIDE DRIVE VIEW TO COMMUNITY CENTER FROM COTTAGES VEIW TO COMMUNITY CENTER FROM RIO GRAND TRAIL Architectural Character Renderings 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 101 of 219 101 | Basalt CCRC Package15 Architectural Model07-01-18 TC Packet Page 102 of 219 102 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 103 of 219 103 | Basalt CCRC Package17 3 | DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM PHASE ONE # OF UNITS BUILT AREA (SF) Independent Living Cottages 12 19,430 Independent Living Apartments 52 77,060 Assisted Living Units 20 15,950 Skilled Nursing 12 12,880 Community Housing 1 950 Child Care Facility 3,500 Community Commons Space 9,920 Maintenance + Back of House 5,130 TOTAL 97 144,820 PHASE TWO # OF UNITS BUILT AREA (SF) Independent Living Cottages 6 9,710 Independent Living Apartments 26 34,441 Assisted Living Units 10 5,950 Skilled Nursing 12 5,950 Community Housing Child Care Facility Community Commons Space Maintenance + Back of House TOTAL 54 56,051 COMPLETION OF BOTH PHASES # OF UNITS BUILT AREA (SF) Independent Living Cottages 18 29,140 Independent Living Apartments 78 111,500 Assisted Living Units 30 21,900 Skilled Nursing 24 18,830 Community Housing 1 950 Child Care Facility 3,500 Community Commons Space 9,920 Maintenance + Back of House 5,130 TOTAL 151 200,870 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 104 of 219 104 Basalt CCRC Presentation: Summer of 2013 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 105 of 219 105 | Basalt CCRC Package19 A Market Assessment was completed by Dixon Hughes Goodman (DHG) in July of 2012 (included as Appendix B), and found the market favorable for this project. Other outside parties (e.g. New Life, ParenteBeard) that have looked at this project have recommended proceeding with a retirement community in this market. The DHG study also supported a community, albeit on a smaller scale than what was recommended by the previous third parties. Based on their study, the project was downsized to better align with the market demand. Penetration rates represent the market percentage a project or market must capture in order to be considered successful. The DHG study shows a penetration rate of 15.2% in 2016, assuming annual income of $75,000 or more. While this percentage is high compared to industry average project penetration rates, it is below the median based on gross market penetration rates. Project penetration rates reflect the project alone, whereas gross market penetration rates reflect this project as well as any other projects existing or proposed in the market. There are few other competitors in this market, and thus the gross market penetration can be weighted more heavily in evaluating overall market demand. While this market has some challenges (e.g. home values varying widely, entry fee life care product new in this market), it can support the project. The local market is well educated about CCRC’s and reflects a particularly affluent household income overall. This assessment is supported by the Rural Resort Region Senior Gap Analysis competed in 2010 for the Northwest Colorado Council of Governments. The report states that “Participants in a 2009 focus group indicated that there were not enough options for them in terms of downsizing to a condominium or retirement community. Cost was less a factor than having the appropriate amenities. Also, this group commented that their income made them ineligible for many of the senior housing opportunities, leaving them with virtually no options”. Regarding assisted living and skilled nursing, the assisted living penetration rates calculated by DHG show the penetration rate for 20 assisted living apartments is a little above the median but within the acceptable penetration rates for this product. Entrance fees have not been tested in the market. The DHG market study does look at the entrance fees as compared to other providers in the Denver metro market and in Steamboat Springs Colorado and also considers median home values. In this case, home values are difficult to analyze due to very high home values in the market and a wide range of values. As part of their recommendation, DHG did support the monthly fees and entry fees that were proposed at that time for this project. Penetration rates typically consider average income, but not home values. Entrance fees are evaluated based on average home values in the primary market area. National benchmarks indicate that entry fees should not exceed 110% of the median home values in any market. While this is a difficult market to analyze, the proposed entry fees are within this benchmark of local home values. The project’s average entry fee is approximately $675,000. 4 | KEY MARKET FACTORS 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 106 of 219 106 View of Independent Living Units from Rio Grande Trail 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 107 of 219 107 | Basalt CCRC Package21 HARD COSTS The CCRC program was initially determined based on local market research. The program was refined based on input from architects experienced with local building practices as well as architects specialized in CCRC developments, Lantz-Boggio Architects, from the front range of Colorado. Christian Living Communities (CLC) also provided input regarding operational and financial aspects of the CCRC program needs. The development schematic design was reviewed by local general contractors for a preliminary budget based on the building program. Hard cost estimates are derived from preliminary budget based on the building program. Phase One is estimated to have Hard Costs totaling $41.6 million. The hard cost estimates include demolition of existing buildings, construction of building and parking, construction surveying, site preparation, earthwork, utility extensions, drainage infrastructure, pavement, site improvements, landscaping and irrigation, direct building costs, 5% construction contingency, 1% general liability insurance, preconstruction services, and G.C. construction fees. SOFT COSTS The project soft costs include design and planning services, geotechnical evaluation, inspections, project management, contractor performance and payment bonds. Also, anticipated development fees that will be incurred from the town of Basalt, special districts, Pitkin County, and utility providers are included in the soft cost. Included are anticipated taxes and insurance, legal costs, marketing expenses, and contingency for soft costs. Taxes are anticipated while the design/construction phase is underway, however, the model assumes tax exemption as a charitable institution will be sought once construction is complete. If tax exemption is not possible, the costs will be passed on to future residents. This potential will be noted in the contract provisions for future residents. 5 | FINANCIAL PROJECTIONS 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 108 of 219 108 22 Basalt CCRC Summary Financial Projections March 13, 2014 Total Project Analysis (Phase 1 and Phase 2) Development Budget, Sources, and Uses  SOURCES OF FUNDS Phase 1 Phase 2 Combined Planned equity 4,581,261$           400,400$             4,981,661$          Fixed debt 44,257,275$         14,869,685$        59,126,960$         Temporary debt (includes $20 million construction loan)27,000,000$         16,000,000$        43,000,000$         Sale of child care center 100,000$              ‐$                      100,000$                  Total 75,938,536$         31,270,085$        107,208,621$      USES OF FUNDS Construction/Hard Costs Construction  41,687,842$         16,492,159$       58,180,001$       Total construction 41,687,842$         16,492,159$       58,180,001$       Land Land purchase 4,150,000$           3,000,000$         7,150,000$         Total Land 4,150,000$           3,000,000$         7,150,000$         Other (see soft costs tab for detail) Soft costs 8,986,028$           2,675,032$         11,661,060$       Taxes and insurance 460,574$              270,000$            730,574$             Legal costs 555,000$              200,000$            755,000$             Marketing 2,030,000$           1,144,000$         3,174,000$         Contingency 630,529$              128,671$            759,200$             Other (to balance)1,311$                   1,311$                 Interest carry on phase 2 land loan (see phase 2 land tab)780,000$              780,000$             Total soft costs 13,443,442$         4,417,703$         17,861,145$       Financing costs Debt service reserve fund (1 year of debt service)3,826,209$           2,152,251$         5,978,460$         Funded interest (27 months) ‐ funds construction of 21 months plus 6  months of fill up 10,084,705$         3,435,388$          13,520,093$        Cost of issuance (bond underwriter, legal)1,583,816$           1,045,054$         2,628,870$         Other (1)$                        233$                    232$                    ‐$                     Total financing costs 15,494,729$         6,632,926$         22,127,655$       Total project cost 74,776,013$         30,542,788$       105,318,801$     07-01-18 TC Packet Page 109 of 219 109 | Basalt CCRC Package23 Basalt CCRC Summary Financial Projections March 13, 2014 Total Project Analysis (Phase 1 and Phase 2) Combined Hard Costs Summary Estimated Estimated Estimated # of units Built Area (SF)Construction Cost # of units Built Area (SF)Construction Cost # of units Built Area (SF)Construction Cost Cottages 12 23,610                   4,958,100$            6 9,249                 1,942,290$            18 32,859              6,900,390$         Independent Living Struture 52 92,952                   19,480,106$          26 42,329               8,772,056$            78 135,281            28,252,162$       Health Care Suites 32 27,466                   6,866,500$            22 11,335               2,833,750$            54 38,801              9,700,250$         Community Space 9,443                     2,341,864$            9,443                2,341,864$         Maintenance and Back of House 4,883                     1,001,015$            4,883                1,001,015$         Employee Housing Unit 950                        197,600$               950                    197,600$            Child Care Facility ‐                         ‐$                        ‐                    ‐$                    Site work ‐                         4,449,604$            678,186$                ‐                    5,127,790$         Gross SF structures 159,304                  62,913              222,217             Total Building Hard Costs 34,845,185$           13,548,096$      48,393,281$       Total Site Work 4,449,604$             678,186$           5,127,790$         Total Hard Costs 39,294,789$          14,226,282$          53,521,071$       Inflation 2,393,053$            2,265,877$            4,658,930$         Total adjust phase 1 hard costs 41,687,842$          16,492,159$          58,180,001$       PHASE 2 COMBINEDPHASE 1 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 110 of 219 110 24 Basalt CCRC Summary Financial Projections March 13, 2014 Total Project Analysis  (phase 1 and phase 2)  Financial Projections 2015‐2020 Stable year 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 *2020 Independent Living Revenue ‐$                    ‐$                  2,033,280$      4,944,675$        5,384,639$         7,558,632$        Assisted Living Revenue ‐                      ‐                   810,650          1,738,480          1,904,738           2,721,568         Nursing Home Revenue ‐                      ‐                   1,059,743       1,711,417          1,993,562           3,601,677         Apartment Rental ‐                      ‐                   20,076             20,678                21,299                21,938               Investment Income ‐                      (3,632)             111,679          285,502              381,684              474,757             TOTAL REVENUE ‐$                    (3,632)$            4,035,427$      8,700,753$        9,685,921$         14,378,572$      Administrative Expenses ‐                      64,487             647,947          701,724              874,514              1,209,492         Management Fees ‐                      (218)                 242,126          522,045              581,155              862,714             Marketing ‐                      27,515             363,740          419,591              487,401              614,063             Life Enrichment / Activities ‐                      3,785               235,978          269,689              321,776              433,567             Resident Services ‐                      598                  93,903             104,883              123,021              167,433             Nursing ‐ Assisted Living ‐                      36,963             297,074          422,219              504,641              723,498             Nursing ‐ Skilled Nursing ‐                      (0)                     617,871          819,773              1,033,685           1,550,385         Ancillary Expenses ‐                      ‐                   38,226             60,995                62,581                107,214             Plant and Ground Maintenance ‐                      15,173             408,826          475,058              584,031              761,467             Housekeeping and Laundry Services ‐                      1,769               232,649          309,539              357,648              471,925             Dining Services ‐                      33,273             827,459          971,123              1,210,157           1,603,813         Health Information ‐                      0                       35,827             46,799                62,053                99,298               Transportation Services ‐                      427                  63,207             78,727                98,917                134,781             Utilities ‐                      ‐                   328,261          338,109              383,871              505,449             Property & Liability Insurance ‐                      ‐                   91,055             93,786                107,677              145,136             Transfer Tax ‐                      ‐                   682,841          171,712              317,084              248,742             TOTAL EXPENSES BEFORE INT/DEPR ‐$                    183,772$         5,206,989$      5,805,773$        7,110,212$         9,638,977$        OPERATING MARGIN ‐$                    (187,404)$        (1,171,562)$    2,894,980$        2,575,709$         4,739,594$        Interest expense 2,899,511          3,604,342       3,395,761       4,679,665          5,068,590           4,415,121         NET EXCESS/DEFICIT (2,899,511)$       (3,791,746)$    (4,567,323)$    (1,784,685)$       (2,492,881)$        324,473$           07-01-18 TC Packet Page 111 of 219 111 | Basalt CCRC Package25 Basalt CCRC Summary Financial Projections March 13, 2014 Phase One Development Program Financial Projections 2015‐2020  Year after stable 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 Independent Living Revenue ‐                   2,033,280        4,944,675         5,153,863           5,308,479         Assisted Living Revenue ‐                   810,650           1,738,480         1,790,635           1,844,354         Nursing Home Revenue ‐                   1,059,743        1,711,417         1,755,521           1,800,839         Apartment Rental ‐                   20,076              20,678               21,299                21,938               Investment Income (3,632)             111,679           285,502             321,005              366,854             TOTAL REVENUE ‐$                    (3,632)$            4,035,427$       8,700,753$        9,042,322$         9,342,463$        Administrative Expenses 64,487             647,947           701,724             722,776              744,459             Management Fees (218)                 242,126           522,045             542,539              560,548             Marketing 27,515             363,740           419,591             432,179              445,144             Life Enrichment / Activities 3,785               235,978           269,689             277,779              286,113             Resident Services 598                  93,903              104,883             108,029              111,270             Nursing ‐ Assisted Living 36,963             297,074           422,219             434,886              447,932             Nursing ‐ Skilled Nursing (0)                     617,871           819,773             844,366              869,697             Ancillary Expenses ‐                   38,226              60,995               57,396                53,607               Plant and Ground Maintenance 15,173             408,826           475,058             489,309              503,989             Housekeeping and Laundry Services 1,769               232,649           309,539             318,826              328,390             Dining Services 33,273             827,459           971,123             1,000,256           1,030,264         Health Information 0                       35,827              46,799               48,203                49,649               Transportation Services 427                  63,207              78,727               81,089                83,522               Utilities ‐                   328,261           338,109             348,253              358,700             Property & Liability Insurance ‐                   91,055              93,786               96,600                99,498               Transfer Tax ‐                   682,841           171,712             73,111                87,855               TOTAL EXPENSES BEFORE INT/DEPR ‐$                    183,772$         5,206,989$       5,805,773$        5,875,597$         6,060,637$        OPERATING MARGIN ‐$                    (187,404)$        (1,171,562)$     2,894,980$        3,166,725$         3,281,826$        Interest expense 2,899,511$        3,604,342$      3,395,761$       3,594,701$        3,208,652$         3,176,752$        07-01-18 TC Packet Page 112 of 219 112 26 Basalt CCRC Summary Financial Projections March 13, 2014 Phase Two Development Program Analysis Financial Projections 2015‐2020 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 Independent Living Revenue ‐                   ‐                    ‐                      230,776                   2,250,153                Assisted Living Revenue ‐                   ‐                    ‐                      114,103                   877,214                   Nursing Home Revenue ‐                   ‐                    ‐                      238,041                   1,800,839                Investment Income ‐                   ‐                    ‐                      60,679                     107,903                   TOTAL REVENUE ‐$                    ‐$                  ‐$                   ‐$                    643,599$                  5,036,109$               Administrative Expenses ‐                   ‐                    ‐                      151,738                   465,034                   Management Fees 38,616                     302,167                   Marketing ‐                   ‐                    ‐                      55,222                     168,919                   Life Enrichment / Activities ‐                   ‐                    ‐                      43,997                     147,454                   Resident Services ‐                   ‐                    ‐                      14,992                     56,163                     Nursing ‐ Assisted Living ‐                   ‐                    ‐                      69,755                     275,566                   Nursing ‐ Skilled Nursing ‐                   ‐                    ‐                      189,319                   680,688                   Ancillary Expenses ‐                   ‐                    ‐                      5,185                        53,607                     Plant and Ground Maintenance ‐                   ‐                    ‐                      94,722                     257,479                   Housekeeping and Laundry Services ‐                   ‐                    ‐                      38,823                     143,534                   Dining Services ‐                   ‐                    ‐                      209,900                   573,549                   Health Information ‐                   ‐                    ‐                      13,850                     49,649                     Transportation Services ‐                   ‐                    ‐                      17,828                     51,259                     Utilities ‐                   ‐                    ‐                      35,619                     146,748                   Property & Liability Insurance ‐                   ‐                    ‐                      11,077                     45,638                     Transfer Tax ‐                      243,973                   160,887                   TOTAL EXPENSES BEFORE INT/DEPR ‐$                    ‐$                  ‐$                   ‐$                    1,234,616$               3,578,340$               OPERATING MARGIN ‐$                    ‐$                  ‐$                   ‐$                    (591,016)$                 1,457,768$               Interest expense ‐$                    ‐$                  ‐$                   1,084,964$        1,859,938$               1,238,369$               NET EXCESS/DEFICIT ‐$                    ‐$                  ‐$                   (1,084,964)$       (2,450,954)$             219,400$                  07-01-18 TC Packet Page 113 of 219 113 | Basalt CCRC Package27 Basalt CCRC Summary Financial Projections March 13, 2014 Total Project Analysis  (phase 1 and phase 2)  Debt Service Coverage Ratio 2019‐2020 Phase 1 only Both phases 2019 2020 Net Excess (Deficit)(41,927)$            324,473$           Add: Interest Exp bonds 3,208,652          4,415,121         Add: Net entry fee turnover 1,297,726          1,568,847         Income Available for debt service 4,464,451$        6,308,441$       Debt Service Requirements 3,208,652          4,694,805         Debt Service Coverage Ratio 139.14% 134.37% Debt Service Coverage Ratio (revenues only)98.69% 100.95% 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 114 of 219 114 28 Basalt CCRC Summary Financial Projections March 13, 2014 Total Project Analysis  (phase 1 and phase 2)  Cash flow Projections 2015‐2020 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 Net Excess/Deficit (2,899,511)$         (3,791,746)$       (4,567,323)$       (1,784,685)$        (2,492,881)$       324,473$          Less: Routine Capital Expenditures ‐                        ‐                     (200,000)           (200,000)            (250,000)           (500,000)          Add: Funded Interest 2015, 2018 bonds *2,899,511            3,604,342         3,580,852         1,084,964           1,859,938         490,487          13,520,093       Add: Initial entry fees received ‐                        ‐                     32,878,624       5,628,047           12,198,644       8,044,328       58,749,643       Less: Entry fees used to pay off short term debt ‐                        ‐                     (27,000,000)      ‐                      (9,698,644)        (6,301,356)      (43,000,000)      Add: Net entry fees received **‐                        ‐                     281,401             881,358              1,297,726         1,568,847        Add: Release of temp DSR fund ***‐                        ‐                     275,000             ‐                      ‐                     825,000           Cash flow ‐$                      (187,404)$          5,248,554$        5,609,684$         2,914,782$        4,451,780$       End of year cash balance (187,404)           5,061,150         10,670,834         13,585,616       18,037,395      * 30 months of funded interest for phase 1 2015 bonds and 22 months of funded interest for phase 2 2018 bonds.  Both equal to construction plus 6 months ** Difference between ongoing new resident entry fee payments less ongoing departing resident refunds *** Temporary debt service reserve fund released after short term debt has been paid off 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 115 of 219 115 | Basalt CCRC Package29 Basalt CCRC Summary Financial Projections March 13, 2014 Total Project Analysis  (phase 1 and phase 2)  Key financial ratios 2015‐2020 2019 2020 Debt Service Coverage 139.14% 134.37% Year end cash/investment 13,585,616$     18,037,395$       Operating Expenses 7,110,212$       9,638,977$         Per day operating expense 19,480$             26,408$              Days Cash on Hand 697                    683                      Permanent Debt 59,126,960$     58,686,960$       Cash to Debt 22.98% 30.73% 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 116 of 219 116 Community Space 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 117 of 219 117 | Basalt CCRC Package31 EQUITY $2.1 million dollars of equity have been used by the Aspen Valley Foundation to pay for the start-up costs of the CCRC project. FEES Entry fees for the independent living units will capitalize 54% of the project. Consistent with Continuing Care Retirement Communities, the monthly fees will cover comprehensive housing and services including: • Care and assistance • Housekeeping • Educational programs • Transportation • Meals • Security • Utilities • Financial consultation • Entertainment, social and cultural programs • Fitness center • Medication assistance • Home and yard maintenance and repair • Furnishings and appliances • Bathing/grooming • Laundry services • Property insurance Consistent with CCRC developments, add-on fees for additional persons and variations in services and meal plans are possible. FINANCE Three financing methods are included in the plan to capitalize this project for the remaining amount required for construction, development, and start-up/ beginning of occupancy of Phase One. The project was conceived with the following general financial methods: 1. $7.1 million of land cost is expected to be financed as part of the long term bond financing in Phase One. 2. A construction loan of $20 million with an estimated 4.25% interest rate is expected to be obtained to fund the construction phase. This would be a draw loan and could be sourced from a single bank or combination of banks. 3. An unrated tax exempt bond would be the source of long term financing. This would be expected to be a private bond issue and sold to a combination of private investors and institutional investors. The bond financing would meet the interest coverage normally expected by the industry (1.35). 6 | SOURCES OF REVENUE 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 118 of 219 118 Interior Courtyard 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 119 of 219 119 | Basalt CCRC Package33 7 | OPERATIONAL PLAN + DEVELOPMENT TEAM DEVELOPMENT TEAM Client Representative, Application Preparation, Site Design, Landscape Architecture Design Workshop, LLC Attorney Holland and Hart, LLC Architects Cottle Carr Yaw (CCY) Architects LTD Lantz-Boggio Architects Civil Engineering, Surveying Sopris Engineering, LLC Geotechnical Evaluation Hepworth | Pawlak, P.C. Water Resources Resource Engineering Inc. Transportation Planners SGM Inc. Operational + Financial Development Advisors Christian Living Communities OPERATIONAL PLAN Medical staff ratios meet the State of Colorado licensing criteria and requirements. Educational and life enrichment positions assume a specific program from Basalt CCRC to match innovation and advanced services beyond basic CCRC operations. The administrative cost, payroll, benefits, and positions included for Basalt CCRC are from operations data and other CCRCs. Actual costs from other similar developments inflated 12% for higher labor costs found locally. 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 120 of 219 120 | Basalt CCRC Package35 BASALT CONTINUING CARE RETIREMENT COMMUNITY - SKETCH PLANAspen Valley Medical Foundation P. O. Box 1639 Aspen, CO 81612 120 E Main St Aspen, CO 81611 228 Midland Ave Basalt, CO 81621 5650 DTC Parkway, Suite 200 Englewood, Colorado 80111 DESIGNWORKSHOP CCY ARCHITECTS Lantz-Boggio Architects November 6, 2012 SHEET LIST MASTER PLAN L1 - Annexation Plan L2 - Existing Conditions L3 - Context Map L4 - Illustrative Plan L5 - Phase I Site Plan L6 - Proposed Site Plan L7 - Proposed Subdivision Plan L8 - Circulation Plan L9 - Grading Plan L10 - Stormwater Drainage Plan L11 - Utilities Concept Plan ARCHITECTURE A1 - Phasing/Roof Plan A2 - Parking Level Plan A3 - Level 1 Plan A4 - Level 2 Plan A5 - Level 3 Plan A6 - Typical Unit Plans A7 - Building Elevations A8 - Character Elevations A9 - Character Renderings APPENDICES 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 122 of 219 121 | Basalt CCRC Package37 B.C. Ziegler and Company 200 South Wacker Drive Suite 2000 Chicago, IL 60606 Phone: 312-263-0110 Toll-free: 800-366-8899 Fax: 312-263-5217 www.ziegler.com William R. Carney Managing Director Senior Living Finance February 10, 2014 Preston Fox, Esq., CPA Law Offices of Preston Fox, PC Geib & Fox CPAs, PC 106 S. Mill Street, Suite 202 Aspen, CO 81611 Dear Preston: Aspen Valley Foundation (“AVF”) is planning to engage Ziegler as underwriter for the planned Continuing Care Retirement Community (“CCRC”) in Basalt, Colorado. Ziegler is the #1 ranked underwriter of not-for-profit senior living communities in the US and we welcome the opportunity to work on this project. Our commitment is based on the proposed CRCC meeting the standard financing metrics and operational benchmarks for a project of this size and scope The market for non-investment-grade senior living bonds continues to be efficient and similar projects have had sufficient access to capital at relatively low interest rates. Ziegler has long facilitated that access for other organizations across the country (as demonstrated in the attached historical statistics and case studies), and appreciate the opportunity to work with the AVF to finance the development of a CCRC in Basalt. Ziegler maintains substantial relationships with high-yield bond institutional and retail investors, and we believe that sufficient appetite exists for a future financing in the near-term, barring any major unforeseen turmoil in the U.S. and global economies. Please feel free to contact me with any questions, or if you should require further information. Sincerely, William R. Carney Managing Director APPENDIX A | ZIEGLER INFORMATION 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 124 of 219 122 38 ZIEGLER - THE LEADER IN SENIOR LIVING FINANCE • Ziegler’s history dates back to 1902 as leader in financing for not-for-profit organizations: healthcare, senior living, church and school • Lead manager on 724 senior living financings since 1990 for $23.0 billion – Lead Managed on $970.7 million in 2013 – Lead Managed on $1,480.3 billion in 2012 – Lead Managed on $518.4 million in 2011 – Lead Managed on $1,545.5 billion in 2010 – Lead Managed on $13,029.2 billion in 2000 to 2009 – Lead Managed on $5,408.7 billion in 1990 to 1999 – Lead Managed on $982.6 million in 1980 to 1989 • Our performance has more than doubled that of our nearest competitor during the last 10 years • Clients include over 191 single-site senior living organizations and 93 multi-site organizations. Financings have ranged from $1.6 million to $229 million • Exceptional relationships with LOC banks, investors, rating agencies, and insurers active in the senior living industry • Full range of financial services: investment banking; FHA mortgage banking; financial risk management; investment management; mergers & acquisitions; seed money and mezzanine financing; capital & strategic planning; and research, education and communication. • Headquartered in Chicago with three other regional offices, with more than 65 investment banking professionals substantially committed to senior living finance. 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 125 of 219 123 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 126 of 219 124 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 127 of 219 125 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 128 of 219 126 42 July 25, 2012 Ms. Kris Marsh, Executive Director Aspen Valley Medical Foundation P.O. Box 1639 Aspen, Colorado 81612 Dear Ms. Marsh, We have prepared the following market assessment for the proposed development of a continuing care retirement community (“CCRC”) in Basalt, Colorado. The proposed CCRC is assumed to consist of consist of 75 market rate independent living units including 65 apartments and 10 cottages; 18 affordable independent living apartments; 20 assisted living units and 20 skilled nursing beds with related common areas (the “Project”). Based on the findings, as well as our experience in the senior living industry, we offer the following observations in relation to the development of the Project: Demographics Management would typically establish certain financial criteria to identify potential residents at the Project based on the income factor of approximately 1.5 to 2.0 times the proposed monthly fee for the smaller independent living units (resulting in a minimum of $50,000 annual income) and the weighted average of all the independent living units (or $75,000 annual income). In addition, for purposes of quantifying the number of income-qualified households in the independent living market areas, households age 75 or older are considered to be the most likely to establish residency in an independent living unit at the Project based the national average age of residents moving into an independent living unit that ranges between between 78 and 84 years. The Project’s primary market area (“PMA”) includes a limited number of age-qualified (75 years or older) and income-qualified households projected in 2017 as follows: 430 with annual incomes above $50,000 283 with annual incomes above $75,000 The percentage of households with annual incomes above $50,000 and $75,000 is considerably higher (20 percent or more) than the percentage in the State of Colorado and in the United States. Basalt CCRC Project Executive Summary 2 Real Estate Market Typically, entrance fees are compared to home values in an area in order to establish a shelter to shelter parity. Due to the high home values in the PMA, this comparison does not apply to the Project as home values for Aspen, Snowmass Village and Basalt average approximately $4 million in 2012. Because of the high home values, the PMA has experienced a limited number of home sales (75 homes sold) and an average days-on-market of approximately 15 months in 2012. Competition There are no senior living communities with independent living units in the PMA. We have profiled three entrance fee retirement communities on the Front Range for comparison purposes to the Project; however, the independent living units associated with these communities are not included in the independent penetration rate analysis due to their location outside the PMA. There are two comparable assisted living facilities, Heritage Park Care Center in Carbondale (48 units) and Whitcomb Terrace (15 units) in Aspen, located within the PMA have a combined total of 63 assisted living and memory care units with a weighted average occupancy of 95 percent. There are 20 memory care units at Heritage Park that are currently 90 percent occupied. According to management of Heritage Park, there is relatively consistent demand for memory care services in the Roaring Fork Valley. Heritage Park Care Center located within the PMA also has 67 nursing care beds that may include up to 19 beds for short-term rehabilitation. According to the Executive Director at Heritage Park, the nursing beds are currently 75 percent occupied due to the economic decline and lower census in the area hospitals. The nursing beds have not experienced occupancy above 80 percent over the last year and short-term rehab patients vary with referrals and census from local hospitals as well as with the seasons due to falls in the snow and ice in the Winter. Basalt CCRC Project Executive Summary 3 Penetration Rate Results In general, penetration rates represent the percentage of the market that the Project or market must capture or “penetrate” in order to be successful. Therefore, the lower the penetration rate, or amount of units the Project must capture or the market has to absorb, is considered favorable. Independent Living Gross Market Penetration Rates or the percentage of age- and income-qualified households that the total market must absorb for the entire market to achieve stabilized occupancy are 12.3 and 15.2 percent in 2012 and 2017 for the $50,000 and the $75,000 income levels in the PMA. These rates assume 60 percent of the residents will originate from the PMA and 40 percent originate from outside the PMA as influenced by adult care givers to move into the market. The results are considered favorable when compared to the Dixon Hughes Goodman database falling below the 50th percentile of 17.1 percent. Project Penetration Rates for independent living in the year of opening (2016) are similar/the same as the Gross Market Penetration Rates due to the lack of competitive independent living units in the PMA. These results fall above industry benchmarks (five percent or less) indicating that it may be difficult for the PMA to absorb the Project’s volume of units. Assisted Living The Gross Market Penetration Rate at 43.1 percent is also considered high but just above the median benchmark (37.5 percent) in the Dixon Hughes Goodman database of similar senior housing projects. The assisted living penetration rates also assume 60 percent of the residents will originate from the PMA and 40 percent originate from outside the PMA as influenced by adult care givers to move into the market. Occupancies of the two assisted living communities are high (weighted average of 95 percent), which is a favorable indicator of demand. Adult children of seniors or households age 45 to 64 earning at least $100,000 annually or Adult Care Givers have the ability to influence a parent to move to closer to them as health care needs arise. Adult Care Giver Market Penetration Rates fall within the industry benchmarks of less than three percent, which is a favorable indicator of demand who may influence a parent to move into a retirement community near the next of kin. Observations and Recommendations Based upon our work in this Market Assessment and reading of previous work efforts including a New Life Market Study performed in June 2008 and focus groups performed by Parente Beard in January 2012, there appears to be a market demand and need for a high-quality alternative for need-based care and services in the Roaring Fork Valley nearing 100 total units. The demographics of the Roaring Fork Valley will dictate a focused set of services due to the nature of a small, isolated, destination market with seasonal fluctuation of its population. 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 129 of 219 127 | Basalt CCRC Package43 Basalt CCRC Project Executive Summary 3 Penetration Rate Results In general, penetration rates represent the percentage of the market that the Project or market must capture or “penetrate” in order to be successful. Therefore, the lower the penetration rate, or amount of units the Project must capture or the market has to absorb, is considered favorable. Independent Living Gross Market Penetration Rates or the percentage of age- and income-qualified households that the total market must absorb for the entire market to achieve stabilized occupancy are 12.3 and 15.2 percent in 2012 and 2017 for the $50,000 and the $75,000 income levels in the PMA. These rates assume 60 percent of the residents will originate from the PMA and 40 percent originate from outside the PMA as influenced by adult care givers to move into the market. The results are considered favorable when compared to the Dixon Hughes Goodman database falling below the 50th percentile of 17.1 percent. Project Penetration Rates for independent living in the year of opening (2016) are similar/the same as the Gross Market Penetration Rates due to the lack of competitive independent living units in the PMA. These results fall above industry benchmarks (five percent or less) indicating that it may be difficult for the PMA to absorb the Project’s volume of units. Assisted Living The Gross Market Penetration Rate at 43.1 percent is also considered high but just above the median benchmark (37.5 percent) in the Dixon Hughes Goodman database of similar senior housing projects. The assisted living penetration rates also assume 60 percent of the residents will originate from the PMA and 40 percent originate from outside the PMA as influenced by adult care givers to move into the market. Occupancies of the two assisted living communities are high (weighted average of 95 percent), which is a favorable indicator of demand. Adult children of seniors or households age 45 to 64 earning at least $100,000 annually or Adult Care Givers have the ability to influence a parent to move to closer to them as health care needs arise. Adult Care Giver Market Penetration Rates fall within the industry benchmarks of less than three percent, which is a favorable indicator of demand who may influence a parent to move into a retirement community near the next of kin. Observations and Recommendations Based upon our work in this Market Assessment and reading of previous work efforts including a New Life Market Study performed in June 2008 and focus groups performed by Parente Beard in January 2012, there appears to be a market demand and need for a high-quality alternative for need-based care and services in the Roaring Fork Valley nearing 100 total units. The demographics of the Roaring Fork Valley will dictate a focused set of services due to the nature of a small, isolated, destination market with seasonal fluctuation of its population. Basalt CCRC Project Executive Summary 4 The real estate market in the PMA provides a conundrum when compared to traditional markets. The high value of homes in the Aspen area that are most likely vacation homes, distorts usual association of the home value and the lifestyle choice of a traditional entrance fee CCRC. The real estate component of the CCRC lifestyle would require unit/apartment sizes well in excess of 1,200 square feet driving entrance fee prices and monthly services fees well in excess of options for in-home care or choosing alternatives elsewhere other than the Roaring Fork Valley. The competition (or alternative) is limited and is primarily represented by Heritage Park Care Center, an assisted living, memory care and nursing home (the majority are semi-private rooms) serving a primarily Medicaid population. There is no “state-of-the-art” private room alternative for skilled nursing, and options for memory care and assisted living appear to be a medical model and considered substandard compared to alternatives outside the Roaring Fork Valley. We believe age- and income-qualified seniors in the PMA, and the adult care givers in the market would consider influencing their senior parent to choose residential and/or assisted living care in the Roaring Fork Valley given an appropriate option. Based upon these observations and others, the optimal position in the market would be biased toward a need-driven model and less of a lifestyle choice model. Given the affluence and high quality of the lifestyle in the Roaring Fork Valley, leaving their million dollar homes is less likely than staying in their own home with supportive services or leaving the valley all together where better support networks may exist. We recommend the following two alternatives for contract type and unit configuration for the proposed CCRC to be located in Basalt. Rental Contract Assuming a predominantly rental contract development plan we recommend considering a continuum of care that started with a central commons building with approximately 80 to 85 apartments ranging between 560 sq ft and 980 sq ft. Healthcare units could be developed in “Small Houses” for between 12 & 15 residents; one small house for Assisted Living, one for Memory Care, and one for Skilled Nursing (~45 units). We would recommend a Catered Living program be considered for a portion of the apartments as a means for residents to age-in-place for an extended period of time. The rental product would be quicker to develop, add more units/density to the Project and attract a broader audience with the seasonal nature of the market and could be considered to have less market risk than an entrance fee alternative. However, rental projects typically require a higher equity contribution to offset the benefits of generating and entrance fee pool ($). In addition to the rental independent living apartments proposed above, an initial phase of 10 Cottages, Cluster Homes, or Duplexes in the 1,100 – 1,400 sq ft range should be considered in the base development plan. These detached housing units in the 1,100 – 1,400 sq ft range should be considered based on demand through an Entrance Fee contract for those residents who will inevitably demand a greater sense of privacy and exclusivity. 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 130 of 219 128 44 Basalt CCRC Project Executive Summary 5 Entrance Fee Contract Assuming a heavier reliance on Entrance Fee units, we recommend the development plan consider 45 to 48 Independent Living apartments and cottages at the current unit size, price and service level as currently proposed for the Project, and an additional 15 to 20 “catered living” rental independent living apartments in a smaller 0ne bedroom configuration than the smallest entrance fee option. Regarding the healthcare component of the Project, we recommend that a Small House concept be consideration for Assisted Living, Memory Care and Skilled Nursing in the 12 to 15 resident design for flexibility in health care (~45 units). The entrance fee model would require more marketing dollars for an appropriate pre-sales process and a perceived need to educate the market on the up-front fee and related health care benefit concept and may assume a slower fill-up period. Report Limitations It is our understanding that Management intends to utilize this market assessment report to assist in evaluating the depth of market and marketing strategies for the Project. It must be noted that any such evaluation must not be based solely on the results of this market assessment, but must also consider other factors, including but not limited to: The continuing plan of development for the Project; The plan of finance for the Project; Financial assumptions for the Project; and Projected operating results of the Project. Although this market assessment evaluates certain market demand opportunities for the Project, the execution by Management of the plans that address the factors noted above is critical to the success of the development. Our report does not evaluate these plans or Management’s capacity to execute them. We have enjoyed the opportunity to work with you on this important engagement. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact me at (404) 575-8992 or Meredith Benedict at (303) 940-3600. Very truly yours, Keith R. Seeloff, CPA Partner Dixon Hughes Goodman LLP Basalt CCRC Project Market Assessment 6 Basis of Presentation This market assessment was designed to present information to assist various stakeholders in making certain decisions and addresses the following questions: What are the characteristics of the geographic market area and what primary market area would the project serve? What are the demographic trends and economic indicators of the geographic market area for the project? How many age- and income-qualified households live in the geographic market area? What is the current regulatory environment governing the Project? What is the current competitive environment in the geographic market area, specifically for independent living, assisted living and skilled nursing care services within a continuing care retirement community setting? What is the estimated market demand for independent living and assisted living services based on the characteristics of the geographic market area and the current competitive environment? Background of the Project The Aspen Valley Medical Foundation (“AVMF”) is pursuing the development of a continuing care retirement community (“CCRC”) consisting of 65 independent living apartments and 10 independent living cottages (collectively referred to as the “Independent Living Units”); 18 affordable independent living apartments (“Affordable Housing”); 20 assisted living units (“Assisted Living Units”) and 20 skilled nursing beds (“Skilled Nursing Beds”) with related programming such as dining, fitness, education as well as amenities including a library, swimming pool, woodshop and beauty salon to be located in Basalt, Colorado (the “Project”). The Project would be located approximately 20 miles northwest of Aspen on an 18-acre site that is under an option for purchase as of May 2012. The Project would be developed on 10 acres of the site and include two acres of public park land, while the remaining six acres would be reserved for future development. In order to support operations of the Project, a second phase of development may include 20 apartments for staff due to the limited affordable housing options. Background of the Engagement AVMF engaged Christian Living Communities (“CLC”) to provide development planning and financial analysis services for the Project. Dixon Hughes Goodman LLP (“DHG”) has been requested to assess and report on the market conditions for the Project and to assist AVMF and CLC (collectively referred to herein as “Management”) in evaluating the estimated market demand for independent living, assisted living and skilled nursing care services in order to determine the Project’s proposed size, pricing and scope of services (“Market Assessment”). The Project is planned to offer a 90 percent refundable entrance fee contract and include a modified life care benefit (“Type B”) and related residency agreement for the 75 market rate independent living units. The 18 affordable independent living apartments would be available for a 50 percent refundable entry fees and also offered under a modified life care (“Type B”) benefit. The anticipated year of opening of the Project is in July 2016. Basalt CCRC Project Market Assessment 7 The following table summarizes the preliminary proposed type, number, approximate square footage, monthly fees (“Monthly Fees”) and entrance fees (“Entrance Fees”) for the Independent Living Units, Assisted Living Units, and Skilled Nursing Beds. Table 1 Proposed Unit Configuration – The Project (1) Type of Unit Number of Units Square Footage Entrance Fees Monthly Fees/ Per Diem Independent Living Units (“ILUs”) (2) Apartments: One Bedroom 10 700 $ 500,000 $ 3,080 One Bedroom with Den 20 850 625,000 3,740 Two Bedroom 20 1,000 700,000 4,400 Two Bedroom with Den 15 1,150 765,000 5,060 Total Apartments 65 942 $ 661,154 $ 4,146 Cottages: Two Bedroom (Floor Plan 1) 5 1,100 $ 850,000 $ 4,840 Two Bedroom (Floor Plan 1) 5 1,300 900,000 5,720 Total Cottages 10 1,200 $ 875,000 $ 5,280 Total/Weighted Avg. ILUs 75 977 $ 689,667 $ 4,297 Weighted Average Second person fees $ 55,000 $ 650 Assisted Living Units (“ALUs”) (2) One Bedroom 15 400 N/A $ 6,000 Two Bedroom 5 550 N/A 7,500 Total/Weighted Avg. ALUs 20 438 $ 6,375 Skilled Nursing Beds Private Rooms 20 350 N/A $ 300 Total/Weighted Avg. Skilled Nursing 20 350 $ 300 Affordable Housing (ILUs) (3) One Bedroom 9 700 $ 220,000 $ 2,400 Two Bedroom 9 850 250,000 2,800 Total/Weighted Avg. Affordable ILUs 18 775 $ 235,000 $ 2,600 Source: Management Notes to Table 1: (1)The Project unit mix, as well as the Entrance Fee and Monthly Fee pricing is effective as of January 1, 2012 and may be packaged differently during marketing of the Project. (2)The Entrance Fees for the Independent Living Units would be offered under a 90 Percent Refundable Plan assuming a Type “B” modified life care contract where residents transferring to the Assisted Living Units or Skilled Nursing Beds would receive a discount of the per diem rates for those services. (3)The Entrance Fees for Affordable Housing would be offered under a 50 percent refundable assuming a modified life care Type “B” plan where residents transferring to the Assisted Living Units or Skilled Nursing Beds would receive a discount of the per diem rates for those services. 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 131 of 219 129 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 132 of 219 130 46 Basalt CCRC Project Market Assessment 9 Public Transportation The Roaring Fork Transportation Authority (“RFTA”) provides bus services between Glenwood Springs and Aspen/Snowmass every 30 minutes daily, seven days a week. The Project site is located near three RFTA bus stops, providing transportation downvalley to El Jebel, Carbondale and Glenwood Springs and upvalley to Aspen Village and Aspen/Snowmass. Airports The Aspen/Pitkin County Airport (“ASE”) provides domestic flights through two commercial airlines, American and United. It is also provides service to numerous private aircraft. Denver International Airport (“DIA”) is located approximately four hours driving time east of the Project Site and provides domestic and international flights to most major airports. Ski/Golf Activities The Aspen/Snowmass area provides skiing and winter activities at four ski resorts located in the area: Aspen Mountain, Aspen Highlands, Buttermilk and Snowmass. Mountain activities in the summer include biking and hiking trails, fly fishing, disc golf, golf as well as gondola rides and alpine slides. Seven golf courses serve Roaring Fork Valley; four public courses and three private clubs. The Roaring Fork Club is an 18-hole private golf course located approximately two miles southeast of the Project Site. Hospital Aspen Valley Hospital is a 25-bed hospital located approximately 18 miles from the Project Site and offers services such as general medicine, orthopedic surgery, pulmonology and cardiology. Aspen Valley Hospital is currently in the process of expanding. Phase I of the expansion is expected to include expanding the number of hospital beds from 25 to 36 and adding space to the intensive care, same-day surgery and the cardiopulmonary areas. Phase II is expected to include a 236-space, three-story parking garage, an 18-unit employee housing building, 17,000 square feet of medical office space and a new loop road to provide access around the property. 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 133 of 219 131 | Basalt CCRC Package47 Basalt CCRC Project Market Assessment 10 US Naval Academy Downtown Annapolis The following map depicts the location of the Project Site and points of interest in the surrounding area. Source: Microsoft Virtual Earth & Microsoft MapPoint 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 134 of 219 132 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 135 of 219 133 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 136 of 219 134 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 137 of 219 135 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 138 of 219 136 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 139 of 219 137 | Basalt CCRC Package53 Basalt CCRC Project Market Assessment 20 Table 9 Number of Single Family Homes Sold by Price Range for Towns in the PMA 2009 2010 2011 2012(1) Aspen Less than $2.5 m $2.5 m - $5.0 m $5.0 m - $7.5 m $7.5 m - $10 m $10 m + Less than $2.5 m $2.5 m - $5.0 m $5.0 m - $7.5 m $7.5 m - $10 m $10 m + Less than $2.5 m $2.5 m - $5.0 m $5.0 m - $7.5 m $7.5 m - $10 m $10 m + Less than $2.5 m $2.5 m - $5.0 m $5.0 m - $7.5 m $7.5 m - $10 m $10 m + Homes Sold 13 24 15 8 9 14 31 21 7 10 22 32 22 5 15 14 18 7 2 5 % of Total 19% 35% 22% 11% 13% 17% 37% 25% 9% 12% 23% 33% 23% 5% 16% 30% 39% 15% 5% 11% Snowmass Village Less than $2.0 m $2.0 m - $4.0 m $4.0 m - $6.0 m $6.0 m - $8.0 m $8 m + Less than $2.0 m $2.0 m - $4.0 m $4.0 m - $6.0 m $6.0 m - $8.0 m $8 m + Less than $2.0 m $2.0 m - $4.0 m $4.0 m - $6.0 m $6.0 m - $8.0 m $8 m + Less than $2.0 m $2.0 m - $4.0 m $4.0 m - $6.0 m $6.0 m - $8.0 m $8 m + Homes Sold 7 4 0 2 3 5 10 7 1 4 7 10 3 1 2 2 5 2 0 1 % of Total 44% 25% 0% 12% 19% 18% 37% 26% 4% 15% 30% 44% 13% 4% 9% 20% 50% 20% 0% 10% Basalt(2)Less than $0.75m $0.75 m - $1.0 m $1.0 m - $1.25m $1.25 m - $1.5 m $1.5 m + Less than $0.75m $0.75 m - $1.0 m $1.0 m - $1.25m $1.25 m - $1.5 m $1.5 m + Less than $0.75m $0.75 m - $1.0 m $1.0 m - $1.25m $1.25 m - $1.5 m $1.5 m + Less than $0.75m $0.75 m - $1.0 m $1.0 m - $1.25m $1.25 m - $1.5 m $1.5 m + Homes Sold 2 8 8 1 6 10 9 5 3 3 22 22 5 1 9 4 8 1 4 2 % of Total 8% 32% 32% 4% 24% 33% 30% 17% 10% 10% 37% 37% 9% 2% 15% 21% 42% 5% 21% 11% Source: BJ Adams and Company, July 2012 (1)Reflects data through June 30, 2012. (2)The Project is to be located in Basalt. 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 140 of 219 138 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 141 of 219 139 | Basalt CCRC Package55 Basalt CCRC Project Market Assessment 23 Continuing Care Regulatory Requirements Life care facilities are licensed and regulated by the Colorado Division of Financial Services (the “Division”) under the Rules and Regulations pertaining to Life Care Institutions, Colorado Revised Statutes (“CRS”) 12-13-101 – Colorado Code Regulations 4.1 to 14.1 (the “Life Care Rules and Regulations”). Any person or entity that intends to accept life care contracts must notify the Division in writing 90 days prior to the acceptance of the initial life care contract. The definitions associated with life care for the State of Colorado can be found in the CRS title 12, article 13. Life care is defined as “care provided, pursuant to a life care contract, for the life of an aged person, including but not limited to services such as health care, medical services, board, lodging, or other necessities.” Under the terms of a life care contract, life care facilities agree to “provide life care to a person for the duration of such person’s life conditioned upon the transfer of an entrance fee to the provider of such services in addition to or in lieu of the payment of regular periodic charges for the care and services involved.” Life care contracts must be written in a clear and coherent manner, show the value of all property that is transferred, detail all services that will be provided by the life care provider, be accompanied by the financial statements of the life care provider, specify the monthly fee required for this care and explicitly state what rights the resident will have to participate in management and financial decisions affecting the life care facility. In order to operate in the State of Colorado, a life care facility must do the following: File an annual report of the life care facility to the Division and make the annual report available to prospective and current resident upon request; Maintain an appropriate level of reserves and invest these reserves in stocks and bonds approved by the Division; The life care facility shall establish an escrow account for all entrance fees received by the provider; and Comply with the Division in regard to the required semi-annual assessment of the life care facility’s operations in order to protect the interest of the residents and the State of Colorado. Comparable Retirement Communities Comparable retirement communities include those offering independent living units and at least one level of health care services, such as assisted living and/or nursing care for seniors. Independent living units may be apartments, cottages, and/or free-standing homes where residents have access to on-site amenities, which typically include a choice of dining venues, library, lounge areas, fitness facilities, banking, game room, multi-purpose room, arts and crafts area, hair salon, a chapel and more. Services typically include 30 meals per resident per month, weekly housekeeping, all utilities except telephone, scheduled transportation, activities program, emergency call system in each residence, 24-hour security, interior and exterior maintenance, maintenance of grounds, and discounted health care services in on-site assisted living and nursing care facilities. Basalt CCRC Project Market Assessment 24 Comparable facilities are defined as those facilities that: (i) include independent living services; (ii) provide one or more other levels of care such as assisted living, dementia care and/or nursing care services; (iii) offer similar services and amenities within the PMA of the Community; and (iv) compete for similar age- and income-qualified residents. CCRCs may provide a variety of contracts to residents. Generally, the major distinction in contract types relates to the health care benefit. The most common contract types are as follows: Extensive or Life Care Contract (“Type A”) - Under a Type A contract, a resident typically pays an upfront entrance fee and an ongoing monthly service fee in exchange for the right to lifetime occupancy of an independent living unit with certain services and amenities. Residents of independent living who require assisted living or nursing care may transfer to the appropriate level of care and continue to pay essentially the same monthly fee they had been paying for their residence, or upon permanent transfer, the fee may be adjusted to the weighted average of the independent living units all monthly fees or some similar methodology to a standard healthcare transfer rate. Modified Contract (“Type B”) - Under a Type B contract, the resident also pays an upfront entrance fee and an ongoing monthly service fee for the right to lifetime occupancy of an independent living unit with certain services and amenities. However, under a Type B contract, the CCRC typically provides assisted living or skilled nursing care to residents either (a) at a modest discounted rate on the per diem, e.g., 20 percent (20%) discount; (b) a certain number of days per year or per lifetime, e.g., 60-90 days; or, (c) some combination of the two. Fee-for-Service Contract (“Type C”) - A Type C contract also requires an upfront entrance fee and an ongoing monthly service fee for the right to lifetime occupancy of an independent living unit with certain services and amenities. However, under the Type C contract, residents who require assisted living or nursing care do not receive any discount on assisted living or skilled nursing services. In addition to the three contract types described above, comparable retirement communities may also include equity or co-op ownership or rental communities that offer independent living housing and health care services, such as assisted living or nursing care. Under an equity ownership model, the resident purchases the independent living unit and retains full ownership of the home. Under the rental option, the resident is not required to pay an entrance fee, but rather signs a lease for the independent living unit selected and pays for various additional services utilized on a monthly or per diem basis at prevailing market rates. Independent Living Competitive Analysis Since there are no comparable retirement communities in the PMA that offer independent living, the following tables profile the Project and three comparable entrance fee retirement communities located on the Front Range or west of Denver. The independent living units associated with the following entrance fee communities are not included in the independent living penetration rate analysis following due to their location outside the PMA. 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 142 of 219 140 56 Basalt CCRC Project Market Assessment 25 Source: Management, interviews and site visits through July 2012. Table 12 Comparable Retirement Communities – Entrance Fee Communities The Project Vi at Highlands Ranch (“Vi”) Holly Creek Wind Crest Location Basalt Highlands Ranch Centennial Highlands Ranch Sponsor/Developer Aspen Valley Medical Foundation CC-Denver, Inc. Christian Living Communities Erickson Retirement Communities Year Opened – July 2008 2005/2008 June 2007 Type of Contact Type A/Type B Type A Type B Type C For-Profit/Not-for-Profit Not-for-Profit For-Profit Not-for-Profit Not-for-Profit Unit Configuration Independent Living Units (ILUs) Studios – – – One-bedroom apartments 39 94 48 230 Two-bedroom apartments 44 118 150 345 Three-bedroom apartments – – – Homes/Cottages 10 40 14 – Total ILUs 93 252 212 575 Assisted Living Units 20 28 40 7 Nursing Care Beds 20 24 24 – Independent Living Square Footage Studios – – – One-bedroom apartments 700 – 850 923 – 1,146 665 – 765 700 – 994 Two-bedroom apartments 1,000 – 1,150 1,310 – 2,086 920 – 1,615 995 – 2,023 Three-bedroom apartments – – – Homes/Cottages 1,100 – 1,300 1,664 – 1,893 1,483 – 1,511 – Entrance Fees Studios – – – One-bedroom apartments $500,000 – 625,000 $302,500 – 389,100 $199,310 – 243,885 $183,000 – 260,000 Two-bedroom apartments $700,000 – 765,000 $445,900 – 884,900 $294,375 – 508,365 $288,000 – 547,000 Three-bedroom apartments –– – Homes/Cottages $850,000 – 900,000 $681,900 – 850,200 $390,000 – 410,000 – 2nd Person Entrance Fee $21,500 – Monthly Fees Studios – – – One-bedroom apartments $2,810 – 2,920 $3,140 – 3,500 $2,705 – 2,945 $1,681 – 1,944 Two-bedroom apartments $3,790 – 4,000 $4,110 – 4,970 $3,320 – 5,125 $1,944 – 2,391 Three-bedroom apartments – – – Homes/Cottages $4,760 – 6,820 $4,780 – 5,160 $4,430 – 2nd Person Monthly Fee $650 $860 $590 $642 Refund Options 90% Refund 0%, 50% Refund and 90% Refund (shown)90% Refund 100% Refund Assisted Living Monthly Fee $6,000 – 7,500 – $4,990 – 7,095 – Nursing Care Daily Rate $279 – $330 - 364 – Occupancy Rate Independent Living – 77%91% 86% Assisted Living – 96%100% 100% Nursing Care – 100%100% – Basalt CCRC Project Market Assessment 26 Notes to Table 13: The Project a.The one and two-bedroom apartments at the Project each include nine Affordable Housing apartments for Entrance Fees ranging between $220,000 and $250,000 under a 50 percent refundable plan and a Type B contract. Monthly fees for the Affordable Housing apartments range between $2,400 and $2,800 with a $500 second person monthly fee. b.Entrance Fees shown in the table for the Independent Living Units reflect the 90 percent refundable plan under a Type A contract. Monthly Fees reflect market rates for the Independent Living Units. Vi at Highlands Ranch (“Vi”) a.Health care at Vi was constructed as a second phase of development of the community and opened in phases. Assisted living opened in Summer 2009, nursing care opened in December 2009 and memory care opened in Spring 2010. Vi initially allowed direct admissions from outside the Vi community into health care but currently only allows internal residents transferring through the continuum of care according to the life care contract at no additional cost except for the cost of additional meals added to their original independent living monthly fee. b.Entrance fees shown reflect the 90 percent refundable plan (Vi previously offered a 100 percent refund plan). Management of Vi indicated that the majority of residents are evenly split in selection preference for the 0 percent and 90 percent refund plans since inception of the options, The 50 percent refund plan has been the least popular plan. Compared to the 90 percent refund plan entrance fees shown, the 50 percent refund plan and 0 percent plans are approximately 27 percent and 42 percent lower, respectively, than the 90 percent refund plan fees shown. c.According to management of Vi, although the community opened in 2008, the community’s independent living units are still considered to be in “fill-up” due to the slower sales as a result of the difficult housing market and economic downturn over the last four years. Holly Creek a.Holly Creek Phase I opened in 2005 with 114 independent living apartments. An additional 84 independent living apartments included in Phase II opened in August 2008 for a total of 198 independent living units. The assisted living units, assisted-living memory care units and nursing care beds at Holly Creek became available for occupancy in November 2008. In addition, there are 51 Cottages of which 14 are owned by the Company and 38 are privately owned and managed by the Holly Creek Homeowners Association (“HOA”). b.Holly Creek offers a 10 percent discount on the then monthly/daily service fee for independent living residents permanently transferring into assisted living and skilled nursing care. c.Of the 40 assisted living units, 12 units are designated for memory care in studio units offered for a monthly fee of $6,990. Holly Creek offers three higher levels of care in addition to the base rates shown for assisted living offered for monthly fees of $450, $750 and $1,25, respectively. There is a one-time, non-refundable community fee of $2,000 in assisted living. The second person assisted living fee is $943 per month. d.Occupancies as of July 17, 2012. Wind Crest a.Four residential buildings of independent living apartments at Wind Crest became available in June 2007. A second phase of development that includes a health care center to be called “Renaissance Gardens” is planned to consist of 250 units including assisted living, memory care and nursing care and is anticipated to begin construction in Spring of 2012 and would be available in Summer 2013. Pricing of the health care components have not been determined. b.Wind Crest currently includes four residential buildings consisting of 579 independent living apartments; however, four apartments are currently being used for residents requiring assisted living services in a seven-bed configuration. These residents are receiving assistance through hired nurses; however, additional monthly fees for these services has yet to be determined. The configuration of the number of one- and two-bedroom units of the total 575 apartments was not available but assumed to approximate 60 percent two-bedroom units and 40 percent one-bedroom units. Timing for the third phase of development would consist of a second neighborhood with two additional residential buildings (approximately 200 units) and a clubhouse; timing has yet to be determined and is dependent upon market conditions. c.Management of Wind Crest indicated occupancy is currently 86 percent but they are 95 percent reserved with deposits by prospective residents who are awaiting the sale of their homes. 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 143 of 219 141 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 144 of 219 142 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 145 of 219 143 | Basalt CCRC Package59 Basalt CCRC Project Market Assessment 31 The following graph illustrates the Gross Market Penetration Rate results for the PMA for the Project’s proposed units at both income levels for 2012 and 2017 compared to the Dixon Hughes Goodman database of similar projects in other markets. The Gross Market Penetration Rates in 2012 and 2017 for the $50,000 and the $75,000 income levels in the PMA fall near the 25th percentile in comparison to other senior housing projects in the Dixon Hughes Goodman database. This implies that the percentage of age- and income- qualified households the total market must absorb for the entire market to achieve stabilized occupancy is lower than 75 percent of the senior housing projects included in the Dixon Hughes Goodman database. Basalt CCRC Project Market Assessment 32 Description and Utilization of Assisted Living Colorado licenses assisted living under the Personal Care Boarding Homes (“PCBH”) rules as regulated by the Department of Public Health and Environment, Health Facilities Division. Colorado defines PCBH as residential facilities providing assistance with activities of daily living (“ADLs”) to three or more adults through room and board and personal services, protective oversight, and social care due to impaired capacity to live independently, but not to the extent that regular 24-hour medical or nursing care is required. Personal services include social supervision, transportation assistance, assistance with activities of daily living such as bathing, dressing, eating, laundry, and recreational activities. Protective oversight includes monitoring activities and medications, while social care includes organizing, planning, coordinating and conducting activity programs. Currently, there is no separate licensure required for assisted living facilities providing dementia care services. Assisted living in the State of Colorado has two additional levels of licensing; Alternative Care Facilities and Residential Treatment Facilities. Alternative Care Facilities accept Medicaid clients and are licensed and certified. Residential Treatment Facilities are mental health facilities that are licensed and operated by local mental health centers. Management does not generally consider Alternative Care Facilities and Residential Treatment Facilities to be comparable to the assisted living services at the Communities. There is no Certificate of Need (“CON”) requirement for licensure of PCBH in Colorado. For the purposes of this study, PCBH are referred to as the general industry term “assisted living facilities.” Assisted living facilities with less than 20 units (“Group Homes”) are not considered comparable to the Assisted Living Units at the Project due to the limited services offered, rate structure (lower income qualification) and size of these facilities. 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 146 of 219 144 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 147 of 219 145 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 148 of 219 146 62 Basalt CCRC Project Market Assessment 37 The following table estimates the number of age- and income-qualified individuals living alone and requiring assistance with activities of daily living in the PMA. Estimates of the percentage of households requiring assistance and the percentage living alone are based on the 2000 Census. Table 19 Estimated Number of Age 75+ Assisted Living Qualified Individuals in the PMA Estimated Age Qualified Households(1)(2) Estimated Age- and Income- Qualified Households(1)(3) Percentage Requiring Assistance(4) Percentage Living Alone(5) Estimated Number of Age- Qualified Individuals Estimated Number of Age- and Income-Qualified Individuals 2012 646 –24.4% 47.8% 75 – –483 24.4% 47.8% –56 2016 802 –24.4% 47.8% 94 – –597 24.4% 47.8% –70 2017 841 –24.4% 47.8% 98 – –627 24.4% 47.8% –73 Source: Nielsen Claritas (1)Based on 2012 estimated and 2017 projected population statistics as provided by Nielsen Claritas. (2)Age-qualified households are those households age 75 and over. (3)Age- and income-qualified households include households (age 75 and over) with income over $35,000 and homeowners (age 75 and over) with income between $25,000 and $34,999. (4)Percentage requiring assistance is a weighted average of the qualified households and the percentage of the population requiring assistance with activities of daily living for the respective age groups. (5)Based on Nielsen Claritas demographic estimates. The following graph presents age- and income-qualified individuals in the PMA with income levels above $35,000 and homeowners earning between $25,000 and $34,999 estimated for 2012 and projected for 2017. The number of age and income qualified individuals for both areas are benchmarked against the age- and income-qualified individuals for assisted living services in the Dixon Hughes Goodman database. The Dixon Hughes Goodman database includes over 50 assisted living projects in markets throughout the U.S. that have been financed between 2000 and 2012. The numbers of qualified individuals from these assisted living projects are representative of the same age and income qualifications as the Project (age 75+ with an annual income of $35,000 and over or homeowners with an annual income between $25,000 and $34,999). Basalt CCRC Project Market Assessment 38 The graph above shows that the number of assisted living age- and income-qualified individuals within the PMA falls below the minimum value when compared to assisted living projects in the Dixon Hughes Goodman database. 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 149 of 219 147 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 150 of 219 148 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 151 of 219 149 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 152 of 219 150 | Basalt CCRC Package67 APPENDIX C | DETAILED PRO FORMA Basalt CCRC Financial Projections March 13, 2014 Soft Cost Phase I Estimate Total Hard Costs for Phase 1 (See Hard Costs Tab)41,687,842$               Land Purchase 7,150,000$                Per land option contract 500,000$ 7% Item Total Task Comments Pre Construction  Costs Pre  Construction  Cost Precent Geotechnical Soils Report 11,190$                      Review of Building Excavation Plans, Sketch Plan Comments response,  Foundation Design Study 11,190$ 100% Geotechnical Construction/Materials Inspections 5,000$                        TBD 0% Site Survey 13,000$                      Completed work 13,000$ 100% Master Planning 120,000$                    DW: Includes concept through final master plan 120,000$ 100% Transportation Engineer‐ Initial Trip Generation Study 2,400$                        Associated traffic analysis with PUD plan. Completed October 2012 with review  comment follow up 2,400$ 100% Transportation Engineer‐ Permit Application Level III  Traffic Analysis none Determined unnecessary due to not deemed necessary by the Town or 20%  threshold is not met 100% Fire Protection Plan 4,000$                        Report prepared by BCER. Proposal for $2,400 but additional meetings will  require add services 4,000$ Town Plan Submissions 240,000$                    Preliminary Plan, Final Plan, Rezoning, Annexation, Subdivision 240,000$ 100% Architectural Design for Sketch and Schematic Design 450,000$                    Currently Contracted.450,000$ 100% Architectural Design‐ DDPhase 550,000$                    Based on Preliminary Fee Estimate from CCY dated July 11, 2012. To be  negotiated 550,000$ 100% Architectural Design‐ CDPhase 675,000$                    Based on Preliminary Fee Estimate from CCY dated July 11, 2012 ‐ To be  negotiated 675,000$ 100% Architectural Design‐ Construction Observation 400,000$                    Based on Preliminary Fee Estimate from CCY dated July 11, 2012 ‐ To be  negotiated 400,000$ 100% Renewable Energy Management Plan ‐$                            Included in the Architectural Fee -$ 100% Structural Engineers 250,000$                    KL&A July11, 2012 Estimate Mechanical/Electrical/Plumbing Engineers 550,000$                    Beaudin Ganze July 11, 2012 Estimate. Includes Communication and AV Roofing/Waterproofing Consultant ‐$                            Included with architectural team Civil Engineer ‐ sketch plan and response to comments 12,500$                      Completed work Civil Engineer ‐ final plan submission 51,000$                      Completed work and review comment responses Civil Engineer ‐ Priminary, Construction Documents,  Observation 179,732$                     Based on 9% of local contractor Sitework estimate. ($1,997,019) sitework ‐  Roads, Utilities, Storm Drainage, Earthwork ($300,000)and Site Preparation  Based on local contractor Estimates.134,799$ 75% Interior Design 180,000$                    LBA Interiors ‐ Proposal 135,000$ 75% Landscape Architect 210,553$                    Based on 10% of $2.1 million  of landscape construction. Estimates by local  contractor 157,915$ 75% Signage Design 20,000$                      Estimate 17,000.00$ 85% Acoustical Engineer 41,000$                      David Adams and Assoc.  July 11, 2012 Estimate 41,000$ 100% Lighting Designer 30,000$                      Estimate for task lighting and public space including exterior street lighting 30,000$ 100% Kitchen Design 16,000$                      Tundra Design Group July 11, 2012 Estimate 13,600.00$ 85% Code Compliance Consultant ‐$                            Included in Architectural Design Fee -$ 100% Fixtures/Furniture/Equipment 1,738,000$                 Kitchen $400,000/ $15,000 per independent living/$8000 for skilled &  assisted/public space $200,000. Estimate confirmed by Jeff Trout comparable  examples Blueprint Costs 65,000$                      Lump sum estimate 55,250.00$ 85% General Contractor Preconstruction Services 50,000$                      Includes Participation with design team, creation of preliminary budgets, value  engineering recommendations, presume at risk preconstruction services by GC. 50,000$ 100% Sustainable Building Practices ‐$                            Estimate for energy audit, special design considerations, and material  specifications, building modeling, included in architectural fee -$ 85% Steel Inspections 8,000$                        Structural steel requires a special inspector, hired by the owner. Estimate Health & Hospitals Inspections 7,500$                        Estimate from Jeff Trout based on recent similar project costs (email dated  1/14/2013) Public Utility Work Inspections 25,000$                      Regulated by the utility. leach test, video test, ground water test Sanitation and  Water District. Estimate Owner's Representative for Construction Period 240,000$                    Estimate 20 months at 12,000 per month. AVF Project Management Overhead/Staff 825,000$                    2.5% of hard costs  ($33M for 3 years)330,000$ 40% Contractor Performance and Payment Bond 215,824$                    Contractor Bond of $215,824.  local contractor email dated 1/14/2013. (Adjusted  for $33m hard costs) Subcontractor Performance and Payment Bond 409,767$                    2% of the direct building costs less the const of general conditions. local  contractor email dated 1/15/2013 ‐ adjusted for $33.0M hard costs Phase One Development Program Hard Cost Summary Soft Costs 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 154 of 219 151 68 Basalt CCRC Financial Projections March 13, 2014 Soft Cost Phase I Estimate Phase One Development Program Development Fees Item Total Task Comments Pre Construction  Costs Pre  Construction  Cost Precent Building Permit Fees  178,244$                     Total building Direct Costs per local contractor.  $7,415.75 for the first  $1,000,000 plus $9.00 for each additional $1,000 or fraction thereof. Based on  Construction Valuation. Basalt Table 1A. See Building Permit tab for calculation.  Calculated based on $33M. 178,244$ 100% Town of Basalt‐Building Department Plan Review Fee  115,858$                     Municipal Code Section 18‐14. When construction documents are submitted for  a building permit, a plan review fee shall be paid. Said plan review fee shall be  sixty‐five percent (65%) of the building permit fee determined by the Building  Official. 115,858$ 100% Economic  and Impact Analysis Reports 12,500$                      Ehlers 3rd party economic analysis report $7,500. EPS report estimate $5,000 12,500$ Town of Basalt Application Review 10,000$                      Town Planning Review Fees for Annexation, Sketch Plan, Final Plan Review 10,000$ Special/Town Inspections 6,300$                        Estimate ($42.00 per hour at 150 hours) 6,300$ 100% Energy Code Review Fee 400$                           10% of Building Permit Fee. Not to exceed $400. Municipal Code Sec. 18‐14 400$ 100% REMP (Renewable Energy Mitigation Program) Fee 35,824$                       Municipal Code 18‐14.  snowmelt, pools, spas, or garages included in the project.  Project = 2,375 sq ft of snowmelt. Per code: "free allowed square footage is 200"   BTUs per sq ft per year = 34,425. $14 Fee per sq ft for 20 years boiler efficincy of  Affordable Housing Payment in Lieu none Final Town Resolution 12/05/2013. Impact fee assessed by real estate transfer  tax.  School Impact Fee none Exempt based on school district email received 2013 and 4/23/2013 Sketch Plan  Approval Transportation/Pedestrian Improvement Fee 57,072$                       Final Approval 12/5/2013 decision to discount to $.5 per total square foot to be  built free‐market entry fee units. $0 community housing, Other space  0.75 per  total square foot built excluding back of house,  mechanical, and parking. Phase I  sq ft Final Plan Submission = 67452 entry fee units. other space = 31128 Carshare Program Implementation Fee none Exempt per Final Plan Approval 12/05/2013 due to shuttle bus provided Home Supply Ditch Company Agreement 2,711$                        Invoices received to date for legal and technical review of agreement Sanitation District Review 2,000$                        Estimated Sketch Plan and Final Plan Review Costs charged by the Sanitation  District Fire District Review/Inclusion 19,000$                      Application Fees established by the District.  Fire District Impact Fee 77,970$                       Residential is $979 per unit and Commerical is Square Footage/2000x$979. Per  Town of Basalt Letter 12‐13‐2012. Phase I = 65 residential units and 29,286  commercial square feet. Sewer Tap Fee 308,700$                    Based on tap fee schedule (63 EQR at $4900/EQR). Town of Basalt gallons per  day estimate Phase I Sewer Connection Inspection 8,300$                        ($100/EQR 83) Town of Basalt gallons per day estimate Water Tap Fee  241,646$                     Town EQR schedule amended 3/11/2014 for senior housing lower water use  rate.  EQR rate of .3 for senior housing unit of 2 bedrooms/baths or less (roughtly  equal to 100 gallons of water use per day).  Each additional bedroom over 2 is  0.5 EQR. See water rate tab for calculation method of 46.319 EQRs in Phase I.  EQR base rate of $5217. 24,165$ 10% Water Meter Charge 1,200$                        $150/Meter with 8 Water Meters (1 per building)120$ 10% Water Tank Surcharge  96,005$                       (46.319 EQRS at $2,072.70 per EQR). EQR rate established by Basalt Letter 12‐13‐ 2012. Number of EQRs based on 3/11/2014 Town of Basalt amended EQR rate  for senior housing. Real Estate Transfer Assessment (RETA)  n/a 1%. Dwelling units that sell for more than $1Milllion would have an addditional  1% RETA (Required by the Town's Annexation Policy. Per Town of Basalt Letter  12‐13‐2012 Pitkin County Construction Use Tax n/a Pitkin County Exemptions for Non‐profits Completion Bonds for Public Improvements 58,263$                      5% of Roads and Utilities ($880,920 local contractor Estimate) ‐ Subdivision  Improvement Agreement 58,263$ 100% Park Land Dedication Fee (accounted for in the Hard  Costs) Annexation Poliucy requires double the parkland dedication. 2.0 acres of  developed park @ $250,000/AC Development Mitigation Fee ‐$                            No fee assessed per 12/5/2013 Final Plan Approval Special Improvement Fee 142,445$                    $1.00 per (gross) square foot (per Town of Basalt memo 12/14/2012 and Sec 18‐ 4). Square Feet Calc includes Phase I only 142,445$ 100% Electrical Provider Fees 90,000$                      Estimate from Sopris Engineers 2/11/2013 27,000$ 30% Telephone Company Fees 30,000$                      Estimate from Sopris Engineers 2/11/2013 3000 10% Cable Co. Fees ‐$                            Estimate from Sopris Engineers 2/11/2013 Gas Co. Fees 18,000$                      Estimate from Sopris Engineers 2/11/2013 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 155 of 219 152 | Basalt CCRC Package69 Basalt CCRC Financial Projections March 13, 2014 Soft Cost Phase I Estimate Phase One Development Program Soft Costs Subtotal 9,107,904$                 Item Total Task Comments Pre Construction  Costs Pre  Construction  Cost Precent Taxes and Insurance Property Taxes Future residents pay through fee structure if tax exempt status cannot be  qualified through the state Property Insurance for Occupied Units During  Construction 50,000$                      Estimate by Jeff Trout. Applies with construction is underway but the first phase  of people are moving in. Builder's Risk Insurance 260,574$                    local contractor Estimate per email dated 1/14/2013 Taxes While Under Design/Construction 150,000$                    Estimate for unimproved land Legal Costs Total Legal costs estimated at 1.25% of Hard Costs Land Purchase Contracts, Easements, etc.75,000$                      75,000$ 100% Easements and Agreements 25,000$                      25,000$ 100% Reimbursement Agreement 5,000$                        5,000$ 100% Creation of Development Entity 65,000$                      65,000$ 100% Management Contract 35,000$                      35,000$ 100% Compliance with State of Colorado Regulations(CCRC)45,000$                       Construction Contracts 30,000$                      30,000$ 100% Land Use Approval and Subdivision 50,000$                      50,000$ 100% Water Rights 25,000$                      25,000$ 100% Pre‐Sales Contracts 35,000$                      35,000$ 100% Sales Contracts for Care Services 55,000$                      55,000$ 100% Sub‐use Lease 10,000$                       Misc 100,000$                     Marketing Marketing Costs 2,030,000$                58 units @ $35,000 per independent living unit 1,218,000$ 60% Contingency Soft Cost Contingency 637,841$                    3% of Soft Costs excluding Land 510,273$ 80% Finance Bond and Construction Loan Financing Costs See Jeff Trout Economic Model Total 12,791,320$              6,636,721$         Inflation 2014  (3%) $                   383,740  Inflation 2015 (3%) $                   395,252  Total 13,570,311$               Pitkin County Use Tax ‐ No Use Tax due to tax exempt  Bond Underwriting debt service reserve and capital  Explanations, Sources, and Footnotes:  07-01-18 TC Packet Page 156 of 219 153 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 158 of 219 154 7207-01-18 TC Packet Page 159 of 219 155 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 160 of 219 156 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 161 of 219 157 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 162 of 219 158 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 163 of 219 159 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 164 of 219 160 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 165 of 219 161 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 166 of 219 162 8007-01-18 TC Packet Page 167 of 219 163 Town of Snowmass Village Agenda Item Summary DATE OF MEETING: July 1, 2019 AGENDA ITEM: Recommendation on a Public Art piece to be located near Town Park Station. PRESENTED BY: Julie Ann Woods, FAICP/MLA, Community Development Director and SAAB members BACKGROUND: At the February 4, 2019 Town Council meeting with SAAB members, Town Council agreed to allocate “up to $100,000” for a public art piece to be located at Town Park Station. In addition, Town Council indicated that installation of the selected piece could be further absorbed by the Town (likely that subs would be hired for the installation work). The SAAB then began an RFQ/RFP solicitation and received over 79 entries from artists around the world. In April, SAAB selected three artists to proceed and propose a specific piece for the selected site. The three artists selected were: 1) Joe McDonnell from New York City; 2) John Fleming from Seattle, WA; and Solomon Bassoff-Faducci from the Sierra Nevada’s in California. After submitting their proposals for the site, the three artists were interviewed by the entire SAAB on Thursday, June 13th. Afterward, the SAAB members discussed the pros and cons of each proposal and came up with their preferences in the following order: 1) Ice Cubes by Joe McDonnell; 2) Fifty Years of Lightness by John Fleming; and 3) Sleigh Ride by Solomon Bassoff-Faducci The SAAB is prepared to present their preferences/recommendation to Town Council at their July 1st meeting which will include a PowerPoint of each artist’s submittal. It is also included here as Exhibit B. As part of their evaluation, SAAB put forth that all three pieces could be good options for this particular site. In their deliberation, they offered the following Pros and Cons for each proposed piece: 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 168 of 219 164 ARTIST/PIECE PROS CONS Ice Cubes by Joe McDonnell— Will take 2-3 months to produce and 4-5 days to install • Has implemented several similar pieces throughout the nation • Has worked with Chihuly, glass artist, and studied glass in Venice • Piece is beautiful, looks like real ice cubes • Made of polyurethane for long lasting wear • Scale is right • Ice Cubes in summer will be “unexpected” and “appropriate” in winter • Sets the tone for welcoming guests to the Village • Includes basic LED lights • Annual Maintenance primarily washing with soap and water • Oldest piece is 8-9 years old installed at University of Seattle • Low installation cost. Estimated at $800. • Additional lighting is separate cost and should be subtle in design • The piece is not original to Snowmass • May be too sophisticated for average person to appreciate • UV Coating lasts 3-4 years and will require re-application to keep shine Fifty years of Lightness by John Fleming— will complete fabrication in fall and deliver in spring for installation • Most unique of all pieces, specifically designed for Snowmass Village • Intellectual • Little maintenance required, except occasional pressure- washing • Would like to work with community to fully develop concept such as significant events in Snowmass history reflected in piece • Some felt it looked too much like a cell tower, was too utilitarian- looking compared with nearby light poles and cell towers • Lifespan of PVC and ABS is about 25 years 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 169 of 219 165 Sleigh Ride by Solomon Bassoff-Faducci • Pieces are found at children’s hospitals and zoos • You will smile when you see the piece • Piece is very emotive and interactive—expect people to sit in sleigh and take selfies • Fibrous cement over lath frame and steel (same material used to fill potholes in CA) • Artist is willing to work with SAAB on color and details • Key to longevity is a coating over the structural steel and reinforcement in places of heavy use; entire piece sealed to stop Spaulding and create longevity; piece is welded in place after one single concrete pour • Height is 9’ at top pf trunk • Played off the Rodeo theme by providing cowboy hat and boots on Jefferson Sloth • Could begin installation in Fall with Final piece finalized in Spring 2020 • Colors are pigmented in the white concrete and are not vivid • Maybe better for marketing but not necessarily a statement piece for the entrance to Town • Most expensive installation cost estimate at $16,700 The Arts Acquisition Policy adopted by Town Council on October 16, 2017 by Resolution No. 35, Series 2017 (Attachment A) specifically states “. . .Objects will be installed and displayed in accessible, visible locations in Town buildings, parks, gardens, on trails and walkways, near amenities and/or on public property. This Policy recognizes art in the public domain as an essential component of creating a vibrant community, stimulating economic viability and fostering connectivity and civic pride.” [emphasis added] It was made clear to each of the selected artists that if a piece is selected by Town Council that a contract would need to be signed before production could begin. Further, the artists were informed that the Town Council is not obligated to accept solicited 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 170 of 219 166 artwork. Per the solicitation, the artists who are not selected will be given a $500 stipend to help offset the costs incurred to travel and develop a design. FINANCIAL IMPACT: The contribution by the Town of Snowmass Village toward the production of the piece is expected to be approximately $100,000 plus installation costs (depending on the selected piece) being approximately $800 to $16,700. Currently there is $60,000 for Arts Projects in the 2019 budget so that SAAB may begin fulfilling their goal of more public art throughout the community. At the February 4, 2019 Town Council meeting, Town Council expressed a desire to solicit for a piece up to $100,000 with the additional funding for the piece and installation to be determined at a later date. APPLICABILITY TO COUNCIL GOALS & OBJECTIVES: Community Building A major component of community building is creating more community oriented spaces and gathering places. In addition, the Town needs to increase utilization of existing community spaces by programing them with community focused activities and exploring partnerships with organizations, such as Pitkin County Library, that create vitality. These community places need to be conveniently connected such that “a flow” between them is evident and high levels of vitality can be enjoyed throughout the Village. This community building initiative should further include cultural activities including performing and visual arts. Finally, the Town needs to clearly define the Town Park project and complete a master plan design so that improvements can be set into motion for this community-oriented space. COUNCIL OPTIONS: 1. Listen to the SAAB presentation and approve their top choice, “Ice Cubes” by Joe McDonnell and direct staff to draft a contract to begin the execution of the piece; 2. Approve a different piece among the other two artists that were solicited and direct staff to draft a contract to begin the execution of the piece; or 3. Turn down all three of the artists’ proposals and provide direction to the SAAB and Staff what type of art Town Council prefers. STAFF RECOMMENDATION: Staff is not making a recommendation on the proposed art, but the SAAB recommends that Town Council select Joe McDonnell for his “Ice Cubes” work for fabrication and installation at Town Park Station. Town Staff will come back to the Town Council for review and approval of a contract and request for fund allocation for the preferred art piece at a later date. 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 171 of 219 167 ATTACHMENTS: EXHIBIT A Art Acquisition Policy EXHIBIT B PowerPoint Presentation of the three selected artists with cost estimates for a Public Art installation near Town Park Station 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 172 of 219 168 1 Attachment A: Art Acquisition Policy with Appendices ART ACQUISITION POLICY Adopted by Town Council October 16, 2017 Explore + Connect + Be Inspired 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 173 of 219 169 2 TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. PURPOSE 2. VISION 3. POLICY GUIDELINES 4. PROCESS OF ART SOLICITATION 5. PUBLIC ART ACQUISITIONS a. Permanent Art Acquisitions b. Donations and Bequests c. Loans 6. ART ACQUISITION & SELECTION CRITERIA 1. Artistic Merit 2. Site 3. Installation 4. Financial Obligations 5. Time Allowances 6. Special Conditions 7. EXCEPTIONS TO THIS POLICY 8. REVISIONS TO THIS POLICY Appendix A Methods of Solicitation Appendix B Sample Call to Artists Appendix C Sample Artist Release Form Appendix D Sample Art Acquisition Application 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 174 of 219 170 3 1. PURPOSE To provide leadership in the support and development of arts and culture in the Town of Snowmass Village. To develop a body of art of cultural value that will enhance the community’s unique identity and result in the beautification of public spaces. This Policy provides guidelines for the acquisition, solicitation, commission, display and management of temporary and permanent artworks in the Town’s collection. It will be the duty of Snowmass Arts Advisory Board (SAAB) to advise the Town Council in connection with matters relating to public art development and to implement the Policy within the scope of the Arts Strategic Plan which provides a framework and working vision for the acquisition and exhibition of site specific objects of art and art happenings in specific Town locations. 2. VISION The Town of Snowmass Village is committed to achieving a dynamic collection of artworks of outstanding caliber and artistic merit that is recognized as an asset to the Town. Objects will be installed and displayed in accessible, visible locations in Town buildings, parks, gardens, on trails and walkways, near amenities and/or on public property. This Policy recognizes art in the public domain as an essential component of creating a vibrant community, stimulating economic viability and fostering connectivity and civic pride. The contemplation of temporary and permanent art installations throughout the Town will provide opportunites for art experience and give residents and visitors new ways to connect with one another and the environment. 3. POLICY GUIDELINES Artworks considered for acquisition and commission as well as art projects and programs initiated by SAAB will be evaluated according to the following guiding principles: • Acquisitions and programs must enhance the identity of a world-class resort destination and reflect and uphold values befitting a welcoming mountain community • Artwork must be deemed suitable for exhibition in public space • The collection will be without gender or ethnic bias and will strive to reflect the diversity of the local population and surrounding area • Preference may be given towards artists and/or artwork demonstrating a relevant connection to the Town and local area • Acquisitions and commissions will be considered in an ethical, accountable and transparent manner • The collection will illustrate a wide variety of media, philosophies and techniques • Programs and artwork will enhance the experience of public spaces and engage all ages and abilities 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 175 of 219 171 4 • Projects and programs will ideally foster connectivity between existing and proposed amenities • Should be appropriately placed in specific locations for largest visual and experiential impact 4. PROCESS OF ART SOLICITATION SAAB shall assume authority for decisions concerning the acquisition of public art as guided by the Policy guidelines and will make recommendations to Town Council on such acquisitions, whether the objects are donated/bequests, loans, rotational exhibits or commissions (through open competition, invitational competition or direct selection). The Board may determine and adopt a method of art solicitation best-suited for a project to create the desired outcome. See Appendix A Sample Call to Artists. Any form of art solicitation adopted by SAAB will be guided by review criteria for art acquisition as stated in this Policy, unless otherwise determined by SAAB or as directed by the Town Council. 5. PUBLIC ART ACQUISITIONS All Art Acquisitions In order for an artwork to be considered for acquisition as part of the Town’s collection, the potential artist, donor or representative is required to submit an application to SAAB addressing the Art Acquisition and Selection Criteria (see #6 below and Appendix D Art Acquisition Application). In making a determination on acquiring a piece of permanent artwork, SAAB may solicit public input from Snowmass Village residents and visitors. To this end, public education regarding the object under consideration should be promoted. This may include prominent online postings which provide an opportunity for public comment and community attendance at SAAB meetings no less than 14 days prior to the date of SAAB’s decision, photos or renderings of the proposed object, along with any available artist commentary and materials, at www.tosv.com. Additionally, relevant information may be distributed for publication in the local newspaper. Related SAAB meeting notices should also be published online and advertised to allow for public discussion and community feedback regarding the piece. SAAB may elect - but is under no obligation - to hear comments from “industry experts” in appropriate art and trade fields (such as architecture), experienced professionals from art entities, collection curators or artists or individuals who are not participating in the project under consideration. After reviewing the artist’s submissions, available public opinion and possibly expert commentary, as well as other related materials, SAAB will vote to make a recommendation to Town Council to: 1) request more information or, 2) accept the object for acquisition, or 3) decline the object for acquisition. 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 176 of 219 172 5 a. Donations and Bequests Artwork may be offered to the Town as a donation or bequest. At certain times, SAAB may also solicit donated art. Prior to being acquired by the Town, SAAB will evaluate the potential gift according to the review criteria set forth in this Policy and subject to the following: • The Town Council and SAAB are not obligated to accept gifts • Where artwork is offered to the Town as a gift, the object will be considered for the collection by SAAB under the guidelines and criteria set out in this Art Acquisition Policy as well as the framework of the Arts Strategic Plan with a recommendation to the Town Council • The display location may be recommended by SAAB to Town Council • A contract between the Town and the donor is required where both the donor’s and the Town’s responsibilities regarding the piece are stipulated • Conditions regarding site location, installation, public exhibition, ongoing conservation and maintenance requirements, valuation, responsibility for repairs of damage, as well as other matters may be deemed necessary and require approval by the Town Attorney b. Calls to Artists • The Town Council and SAAB are not obligated to accept solicited artwork through a Call to Artists • Where artwork is solicited by the Town, the object will be considered for the collection by SAAB under the guidelines and criteria set out in this Art Acquisition Policy as well as the framework of the Arts Strategic Plan with a recommendation to the Town Council • The display location may be recommended by SAAB to Town Council • A contract between the Town and the artist is required where both the artist’s and the Town’s responsibilities regarding the piece are stipulated • Conditions regarding site location, installation, public exhibition, ongoing conservation and maintenance requirements, valuation, responsibility for repairs of damage, as well as other matters may be deemed necessary and require approval by the Town Attorney 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 177 of 219 173 6 c. Loans SAAB may solicit and accept artwork and installations for temporary display as agreed with the donor, artist or representative. In many instances, site location will be pre-selected. With Town Council approval, the Board shall have discretion to accept art work on loan for a limited period of time, with the understanding that the object may be sold by the artist and/or relocated elsewhere in Town. 1. Short-Term Short-term artwork display and its installation is intended to be non-permanent, visually stimulating and create minimal financial impact. The object may be exhibited for a fixed duration, a season and/or a special event or competition. 2. Long-Term Long term loans include any artwork officially loaned to the Town for exhibition as stated and specified in an Agreement for Placement of Artwork. Details of payment, maintenance costs, liability, etc., must be described in a contract between the donor and Town. Long term loan art is generally considered to be on display for a minimum of twelve months. d. Rotational Exhibits Rotational art displays may be long or short-term, purchased or on loan. For example, sculptures may be displayed for a specific amount of time and then rotated to different locations and/or new objects may be introduced. 6. ART ACQUISITION & SELECTION CRITERIA Whether the Town acquires a gift or commissions an art object will be guided by the Policy acquisition criteria and SAAB’s professional expertise. Consideration of artwork submissions will be subject to the following review criteria: 1. Artistic Merit a. Artistic merit and technical competence of the artwork, including consideration of its artistic, social, geographical and/or historical significance (which may include a written description, drawings and/or maquette of the proposed artwork) b. Qualifications of the artist (which may include image of past work, resume, references, and published reviews) • Artists must have a sustained visual arts practice as well as demonstrated exhibition and/or collection history • Emerging artists will be considered where a strong professional potential is demonstrated c. Artworks will be intrinsically sound in condition as well as reasonably immune to deterioration in routine operations, display, packing and transporting d. Artists must demonstrate compatibility and relevance of the work of art within the context of Snowmass Village e. Artist must warrant originality and authenticity of the work of art (only original works or limited editions shall be considered) f. Artist/donor should articulate provenance (origin) of artwork 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 178 of 219 174 7 2. Site a. The object’s physical condition is excellent and is suitable to the proposed site with respect to its general social audience and physical environment b. Scale, form, content, color and design of the artwork in relation to the site (NOTE: Some neighborhoods/villages, such as Base Village, West Village and Snowmass Center may have specific design criteria or special conditions) c. Provide information on any ecological impact (e.g., percentage of Impervious cover) d. Address accessibility to the public, including persons with disabilities e. Provide details on any text components (i.e., signage and/or plaques) 3. Installation a. Consideration of site-specific requirements for installation (e.g., electricity, lighting, water and sewer easements, or other services) b. Desired method/process/system of installation c. Storage requirements, if any d. Maintenance requirements, both immediate and long term e. Safety standards related to installation f. Proposed timeline for the project 4. Financial Obligations a. All costs associated with fabrication and installation (including site preparation, name plaque design and unveiling/dedication event, if any) b. Source of funding and date funds are available. (Monies must be raised through private fundraising or town funding before the artwork may be fabricated) c. Estimated ongoing maintenance and conservation costs d. Statement of value of artwork for insurance purposes (i.e., artist's commission contract amount or professional written appraisal of existing artwork) e. Council must have sufficient resources to care for and safeguard the object to industry standards 5. Liability a. Susceptibility of the artwork(s) to normal wear and to vandalism b. Potential risk to the public c. Public access, if necessary, as well as compliance with ADA requirements d. Special insurance requirements 6. Timeliness a. Allowance of sufficient time for a complete review process to be conducted by SAAB, the Town and any other boards or neighborhood associations involved b. Timely and appropriate response from the artist, donor or representative to SAAB and staff requests for additional materials or information is required 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 179 of 219 175 8 7. Special Conditions a. Any conditions of the artwork imposed by the applicant b. Artwork that contains advertising or corporate logos will not be considered 7. EXCEPTIONS TO THIS POLICY Due to the unique nature of and methods for acquiring art, the Town Council, Town Manager and/or SAAB may, in certain cases, favor exceptions to this policy. Any exceptions should consider the guidelines and intent of this Policy and the Arts Strategic Plan framework. 8. REVISIONS TO THIS POLICY The Snowmass Arts Advisory Board shall regularly review this Policy and make recommendations for revision as needed to the Town Council for adoption. 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 180 of 219 176 9 Appendix A Methods of Solicitation 1. Open Competition An Open Competition is an art selection process based on criteria identified in a specific Call to Artists. Artists would submit their qualifications and credentials, along with other required materials, to SAAB in order to become eligible for the project. The Call to Artists or competition description provides detailed information about the project, including the type of installation expected, location for the artwork, technical requirements, audience for the project, budget, timing of submissions, prize (if any) for the winning submissions, etc. A sample Call to Artists is provided in Appendix B 2. Invitational Competition An Invitational Competition approaches a select group of artists to submit their qualifications and credentials to SAAB, along with other required materials as outlined in an invitation, to become eligible for a project. The invitation is constructed similarly to the Call to Artists, described above. 3. Direct Selection Direct Selection is when a specific artist is selected for a project. This process can be used when circumstances such as poor response to open competition, project timeline, community considerations and/or client demand occur. It will be up to the discretion of the SAAB to decide if Direct Selection is appropriate. If Direct Selection is chosen, the SAAB will be responsible for guiding the artist or piece selection based on the Review Criteria herein. 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 181 of 219 177 Joe McDonnell, Sculptor Artist #1 2 PM –2:45 PM New York City ICE CUBES 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 182 of 219 178 Work Description 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 183 of 219 179 Similar Work 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 184 of 219 180 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 185 of 219 181 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 186 of 219 182 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 187 of 219 183 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 188 of 219 184 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 189 of 219 185 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 190 of 219 186 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 191 of 219 187 Installation 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 192 of 219 188 Video of Maquette https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=493f9_VCDWQ&feature=youtu.be 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 193 of 219 189 Anticipated Name of Piece Cost Breakdown for Art Creation Design Materials Fabrication Lighting Engineering costs for the piece Fee to artist (separate from expenses) Travel expenses Transportation of Sculpture to site Signage, if any Other Expenses Anticipated (Please itemize) ** Materials Breakdown: Mold for 48'' x 48'' x 48'' Cubes - $6,750.00 Cubes 48'' x 48'' x 48'' $3,850 each. X 8pcs. = $30,800.00 Stainless Steel Bolts x 8 = $500.00 Subtotal Cost to Create Piece: Cost Breakdown for Art Installation Additional site engineering design for support structure Anticipated installation costs: Crane, lift, tractor, other Earth Work Electrical Flatwork/Concrete Other Utilities Traffic Control Sign installation Site Restoration (landscaping, irrigation, etc.) Other Total Anticipated Cost: $2,000 TOTAL COSTS FOR ART CREATION AND INSTALLATION SNOWMASS TOWN PARK STATION $800 (1 Day) Cost of Labor: $2,000 Estimated Total Costs of installation of Art Piece By: _Joseph A. McDonnell_Artist's Name__Joseph A. McDonnell $29,050 $35,150.00** $2,000 $2,000 for inground lighting $1,000 $20,000.00 $5,000 $1,000 $100,000 $99,200.00 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 194 of 219 190 JOHN FLEMING, Artist Artist #2 3 PM –3:45 PM Seattle, WA Fifty Years of Lightness 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 195 of 219 191 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 196 of 219 192 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 197 of 219 193 As Viewed on Site 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 198 of 219 194 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 199 of 219 195 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 200 of 219 196 As Viewed from Brush Creek Road upon entering the Village 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 201 of 219 197 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 202 of 219 198 Details 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 203 of 219 199 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 204 of 219 200 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 205 of 219 201 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 206 of 219 202 TOTAL COSTS FOR ART CREATION AND INSTALLATION SNOWMASS TOWN PARK STATION Estimated Total Costs of installation of Art Piece By: John Fleming Anticipated Name of Piece Fifty Years of Lightness Cost Breakdown for Art Creation Design 20,000 Materials— Steel rods, support branches, central column and steel base 20,000 PVC & ABS pipe sleeves, end cap labels, and milestone discs 2,000 Fabrication— Steel rods, support branches, central column and steel base 30,000 PVC & ABS pipe sleeves, end cap labels, and milestone discs 15,000 Lighting 0 Engineering costs for the piece 5,000 Fee to artist (separate from expenses)(See Design above) Travel expenses 3,000 Transportation of Sculpture to site 4,500 Signage, if any 0 Other Expenses Anticipated (Please itemize) Liability Insurance 500 Subtotal Cost to Create Piece:100,000 0 0 0 0 0 Cost Breakdown for Art Installation Additional site engineering design for support structure 1,000 Anticipated installation costs: Crane, lift, tractor, other 2,000 Earth Work 3,000 Electrical Flatwork/Concrete 3,000 Other Utilities Traffic Control Sign installation Site Restoration (landscaping, irrigation, etc.)1,000 Other Total Anticipated Cost:10,000 0 0 0 0 0 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 207 of 219 203 Solomon Bassoff-Faducci, Artist #3 4 PM –4:45 PM North San Juan, CA SLEIGH RIDE 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 208 of 219 204 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 209 of 219 205 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 210 of 219 206 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 211 of 219 207 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 212 of 219 208 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 213 of 219 209 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 214 of 219 210 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 215 of 219 211 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 216 of 219 212 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 217 of 219 213 Anticipated Name of Piece Cost Breakdown for Art Creation Design Materials Fabrication Lighting Engineering costs for the piece Fee to artist (separate from expenses) Travel expenses Transportation of Sculpture to site Signage, if any Other Expenses Anticipated (Please itemize) Insurance Subtotal Cost to Create Piece: Cost Breakdown for Art Installation Additional site engineering design for support structure Anticipated installation costs: Crane, lift, tractor, other Earth Work Electrical Flatwork/Concrete Other Utilities Traffic Control Sign installation Site Restoration (landscaping, irrigation, etc.) Welding Total Anticipated Cost: 200 16700 3000 100000 500 1000 0 10000 0 400 100 4000 TOTAL COSTS FOR ART CREATION AND INSTALLATION SNOWMASS TOWN PARK STATION 500 Estimated Total Costs of installation of Art Piece By: Faducci LLC Artist's Name: Solomon Bassoff 15000 12000 22000 0 5000 35000 3000 0 5000 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 218 of 219 214 Town of Snowmass Village Agenda Item Summary DATE OF MEETING: July 1, 2019 AGENDA ITEM: Consideration to Draft a Letter of Support for the Woody Creek Solar Project PRESENTED BY: Travis Elliott, Assistant Town Manager BACKGROUND: The Community Office of Resource Efficiency (CORE) has requested the Town Council draft a letter of support for the proposed 5MW solar farm near Woody Creek. This is a Holy Cross Energy project that is being developed by a third party, and it is currently under review as a Land Use Application with the Pitkin County Planning and Zoning Commission. They will review the application at their meeting on July 16th. Details about this project are available online at www.pitkincountysolar.com. The Town of Snowmass Village, through the Renewable Energy Purchase Program (REPP), has already agreed to purchase power from the project – if and when it becomes available. The project will continue to improve the renewable energy portfolio of our electric grid, and it will assist the community meet our goals. FINANCIAL IMPACT: There are no direct financial impacts associated with sending a letter of support. APPLICABILITY TO COUNCIL GOALS & OBJECTIVES: This topic is related to the Town Council’s strategic goal of a continued commitment to resiliency. COUNCIL OPTIONS: 1. Direct staff to draft a letter of support to send to the Pitkin County P&Z 2. Decline to send a letter of support for the project at this time STAFF RECOMMENDATION: Provide direction to staff. 07-01-18 TC Packet Page 219 of 219 215