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12-02-19 Town Council PacketTown Council Monday, December 02, 2019 3:00 PM 130 Kearns Road Council Chambers Agenda 1.CALL TO ORDER - Mayor Butler called to order the Regular Meeting of the Snowmass Village Town Council 2.ROLL CALL 3.PUBLIC HEARINGS - QUASI-JUDICIAL HEARINGS - Public Hearings are the formal opportunity for the Town Council to LISTEN to the public regarding the issue at hand. For land use hearings the Council is required to act in a quasi-judicial capacity. When acting as a quasi-judicial body, the Council is acting in much the same capacity as a judge would act in a court of law. Under these circumstances, the judicial or quasi-judicial must limit its consideration to matters which are placed into evidence and are part of the public record. The Council must base their decision on the law and the evidence presented at the hearing. 3.A.PUBLIC HEARING - SNOWMASS CENTER PUD - PRELIMINARY PLAN REVIEW Agenda Summary Snowmass Center PUD Page 4 Attachment A Site Plan Page 7 Attachment B PC Reso No 5 Page 8 Attachment C Staff Report Page 21 TOWN COUNCIL AND INTERESTED MEMBERS OF THE PUBLIC WILL NOW PROCEED TO THE SNOWMASS CENTER FOR A SITE VISIT 1 Town Council Page - 2 4.PUBLIC COMMENT - This section is set aside for the Town Council to LISTEN to comments by the public regarding items that do not otherwise appear on this agenda. Generally, the Town Council will not discuss the issue and will not take an official action under this section of the agenda. (Five Minute Time Limit) 5.CONSENT AGENDA - These are items where all conditions or requirements have been agreed to or met prior to the time they come before the Council for final action. A Single Public Hearing will be opened for all items on the Consent Agenda. These items will be approved by a single motion of the Council. The Mayor will ask if there is anyone present who has objection to such procedure as to certain items. Members of the Council may also ask that an item be removed from the consent section and fully discussed. All items not removed from the consent section will then be approved. A member of the Council may vote no on specific items without asking that they be removed from the consent section for full discussion. Any item that is removed from the consent agenda will be placed on the regular agenda. 5.A.DRAFT AGENDAS Draft Agendas Page 33 5.B.SECOND READING - ORDINANCE NO. 14, SERIES OF 2019 – SECOND READING OF AN ORDINANCE AMENDING THE 2019 BUDGET FOR THE POST GRANT FUND FOR THE TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE Agenda Summary Ord 14 POST Grant Page 37 POST Ord 19-14 Page 39 5.C.RESOLUTION NO. 40, SERIES OF 2019 - A RESOLUTION ESTABLISHING DATES FOR REGULAR MEETINGS OF THE SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL FOR 2020 Agenda Summary Setting 2020 TC Meeting Dates Page 41 Reso 40 Setting 2020 TC Meeting Dates Page 43 19 -40 Attachment - Holidays Page 45 5.D.RESOLUTION NO. 39, SERIES OF 2019 - A RESOLUTION OF THE TOWN COUNCIL OF THE TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO, APPROVING THE INITIAL 2020 BUDGET FOR THE PITKIN COUNTY 1/2 CENT TRANSIT SALES AND USE TAX Agenda Summary EOTC Budget Page 47 Reso 39 EOTC Budget Page 49 2020 EOTC Budget Page 51 5.E.RESOLUTION NO. 47 SERIES OF 2019 – A RESOLUTION APPROVING THE TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE INTERIM SMALL CELL INFRASTRUCTURE DESIGN GUIDELINES, AS DEFINED BY FCC SMALL CELL ORDER 18-133. Agenda Summary Small Cell Design Guidelines Page 53 2 Town Council Page - 3 Reso 47 Small Cell Design Guidlines Page 55 Exhibit A Interim Design Guidelines Page 57 6.POLICY/LEGISLATIVE PUBLIC HEARINGS 6.A.PUBLIC HEARING AND FIRST READING OF ORDINANCE NO. 13, SERIES OF 2019 - AN ORDINANCE REGARDING AMENDMENTS TO CHAPTER 1, GENERAL PROVISIONS, CHAPTER 16A, LAND USE AND DEVELOPMENT CODE, SECTION 16A-4-240 "FIRE PROTECTION" AND CHAPTER 18 OF THE BUILDING CODE’S “FIRE DEPARTMENT ADMINISTRATION” OF THE SNOWMASS VILLAGE MUNICIPAL CODE TO ADDRESS UPDATES TO THE WILDFIRE HAZARD PROVISIONS. Agenda Summary Wildfire Hazard Provision Page 59 Attachment 1 Public Hearing Notice Page 62 Attachment 2 Ord 13 Page 63 Attachment 3 PC Reso 5 Page 78 Attachment 4 Staff Analysis Page 82 Attachment A Referral Comments Black Hills Energy Page 85 Attachment B 191031 Mitigation Lake Christine Fire Page 87 7.ADMINISTRATIVE REPORTS 7.A.OWL/BRUSH CREEK INTERSECTION DISCUSSION Agenda Summary Continued Discussion Brush Creek Owl Creek Page 92 Attachment A Community Survey Charts Page 95. Attachment B Roundabout Images and Drawings Page 98 Attachment C Operational Summary Slide Page 101 8.TOWN COUNCIL REPORTS AND ACTIONS - Reports and Updates 9.EXECUTIVE SESSION 9.A.Executive Session Executive Session Page 102 10.ADJOURNMENT 3 Town of Snowmass Village Agenda Item Summary DATE OF MEETING: December 2, 2019 AGENDA ITEM: PUBLIC HEARING - Snowmass Center Major Planned Unit Development (PUD) Preliminary Plan Review PRESENTED BY: Brian McNellis- Senior Planner Clint Kinney – Town Manager BACKGROUND: MEET AT COUNCIL CHAMBERS AT 3:00 TO BEGIN TOUR To assist the Council in understanding the Snowmass Center Redevelopment Proposal, the applicant has proposed a site visit at the December 2nd meeting. Participants will walk to the site. The site visit is scheduled for approximately one hour, depending on weather, at which time the conversation will continue in Town Council Chambers. The applicant will give a presentation once back at Town Hall illustrating additional photo simulations with views of the project. At the site visit, the applicant will guide Town Council on a tour of the site, showing property corners and story poles for the proposal. The applicant will provide a walking map, as well as a listing of the heights for each story pole as part of the site visit. Given the potential for weather and wind, the applicant will have a drone as part of the site visit to assist with the clear view of the story pole heights. A few key items to keep in mind about the story poles: • There are certain buildings where the finished first floor level is higher than current grade. In these instances, the story pole illustrates the full height as measured from current grade to the top of the roof and will also show the height of the grade change through a color-coded pole. This is the case for Buildings 5A, 5B, and 2A and 2B. • Where poles are located on existing building roofs, the height of the pole represents to the top of the proposed building roof. This is the case for Building 1A. 12-02-19 TC Packet Page 4 of 103 4 NOTE: Although the site visit will be part of the public record, the Town Council is encouraged to ask questions but not offer opinions about aspects of the project until returning to Town Hall. A digital version of the application can be found at: https://docs.tosv.com/WebLink/Browse.aspx?id=128293&dbid=0&repo=TOSV FINANCIAL IMPACT: This project will have a financial impact on the Town. It may rejuvenate the primary, locally-serving commercial center of the community thereby boosting commerce and sales tax collected. The proposal has the potential to enhance the overall character, services, and retail amenities of the Town which may leverage Snowmass Village as a tourist destination and Snowmass Center as a locally serving community center. That said, the proposal entails a substantial influx in the local housing inventory (and commercial space) obligating the Town and special districts for additional services, including fire protection, shuttle service, trash removal, snow plowing, police protection, etc. The Town Council should also consider cost/benefits associated with the proposed pedestrian bridge (or aerial conveyance) that would connect Snowmass Center and Base Village. Considering the amount of capital that would be required to design/build the bridge (approx. $4 million), minus the applicant’s suggested monetary contribution ($750,000), the Town may be left to fund a bridge or conveyance project that has not yet been designed. APPLICABILITY TO COUNCIL GOALS & OBJECTIVES: This project facilitates most of the Town Council goals established in 2019 including Affordable Workforce Housing, Community Building, Safety, and (financial) Resiliency. • Although the project is not obligated to provide affordable Housing for commercial square footage totaling less than 77,000 square feet, the project is required to mitigate for the additional free-market residential proposed (roughly 100,322 square feet for 68 free-market units). The Applicant’s proposal exceeds the mitigation requirement by slightly over 2,000 square feet. • The project will enhance Community Building and vitality through the creation of community gathering spaces. • The Applicant proposes modal connectivity with their suggested monetary contribution to a bridge across Brush Creek for an elevated pedestrian route between Base Village and Snowmass Center. • The project may foster fiscal resiliency through an increased commercial tax base. COUNCIL OPTIONS: The Town Council shall consider all relevant materials and testimony, shall consider the 12-02-19 TC Packet Page 5 of 103 5 standards of Section 16A-5-310 and Section 16A-5-340 and shall, by resolution, approve, approve with conditions or deny the application. An approval would allow the application to proceed to Final Plan submission which can be reviewed by the Planning Commission at the discretion of Town Council. STAFF RECOMMENDATION: Staff recommends that Town Council open the public hearing and attend the site visit as scheduled. Upon returning to Town Hall, the Town Council may hear further presentation of the project by the Applicant, ask questions and accept public input. It is recommended that at the December 9, 2019 Town Council meeting, the Town Council begin to discuss the issues outlined below in addition to any other issues identified by the Council; • Review of Requested Variances – Height, Parking, Residential Unit Count • Snowmass Center and Base Village Connectivity • Community Purpose (Benefit) – Monetary Contribution vs. “Brick & Mortar” Assets • Street Level Services and Retail • Conditions of Approval (as identified by Staff and Town Council) The Public hearing should be continued to December 9, 2019. ATTACHMENTS: A. Revised Site Plan, June 2019 B. Planning Commission Resolution 5, Series 2019 C. November 4th Staff Report 12-02-19 TC Packet Page 6 of 103 6 TOWN HALL LOWER KEARNS ROADUPPER KEARNS ROADBRUSH CREE K R O A D ALPINE BANK WOODBRIDGE CONDOS CONOCO 0 50 100 BUILDING 4A BUILDING 4B BUILDING 3A BUILDING 3B BUILDING 2A BUILDING 5A BUILDING 6A BUILDING 6B BUILDING 5B BUILDING 1A BUS TRANSIT BRIDGE TO BASE VILLAGETO ASSAY H ILL UNDERGROUND PARKING FOOTPRINT (DASHED) SURFACE PARKING - 51 STRUCTURED PARKING - 138 BUILDING 2B 1 1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 2 3 4 5 6 7 10 11 12 13 14 1516 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 17 18 21 22 19 20 14 15 16 252423 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 38 36 37 39 40 41 43 42 44 45 46 47 4849 5051 9 HC VAN8HC 9 10 11 12 13 14 SNOWMASS CENTER SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO ILLUSTRATIVE SITE PLAN SHOPPINGCARTS 12-02-19 TC Packet Page 7 of 103 7 TOWNOFSNOWMASSVILLAGEPLANNINGCOMMISSIONRESOLUTIONNO.5SERIESOF2019ARESOLUTIONRECOMMENDINGAPPROVALOFAPLANNEDUNITDEVELOPMENT(PUD) PRELIMINARYPLANAPPLICATIONFORTHESNOWMASSCENTERREDEVELOPMENTANDEXPANSIONWHEREAS,theEastwoodSnowmassInvestors,LP(“Applicant”)submittedaPUDPreliminaryPlanonDecember21,2018asanamendmenttothe currentSPAapprovedpursuanttoOrdinanceNo.22,Seriesof1984;andWHEREAS,saidapplicationproposesredevelopmentandexpansionoftheSnowmass Center(hereafterCenter)toincludenewcommercial,andRestrictedHousingadjacenttomixedusedevelopmentandfree-market,multifamilyresidentialonpropertyknownasParcelsAandreplatofParcelA(theSnowmassCenter),B,F,G,andI,FarawayNorthRanch;andWHEREAS,theinformationpresentedwiththePreliminaryPlanPUDgenerallyproposes:a)anincreaseinthecommercialandofficesquarefootageoftheCenterfrom53,997to58,433squarefeet;b)adding10RestrictedHousingunitsabovethemainleveloftheCenter;c)adding9freemarketunitsabovethemainleveloftheCenter;d)adding6multi-familyunitsimmediatelynorthoftheCenter(Parcel2);e)adding9multi-familyunitsnorthofParcel2(Parcel3);f)adding30multi-familyunitsnorthofParcel3(Parcel4);g)7townhomeunitsimmediatelyeastoftheCenter(Parcel5);h)constructingtwonewmixed-usebuildingssouthofthe Center (Parcel6)thatincludes10,331squarefeetofcommercial/officeusesand7units(5,735squarefeet)offreemarketresidentialabove;i)alongwithapproximately370parkingspacesincluding122subgradeparkingspaces;andWHEREAS,toaccommodatesaiddevelopment,anAmendmenttotheOfficialZoneDistrictMapissoughttorezonethe propertyfromSPAtoMixedUse-2(MU-2)withaPUDoverlay;andWHEREAS,theApplicantisseekingaheightvarianceincreasing themaximumbuildingheighttoapproximately55feetfrom38feetandasharedparkingreductionofabout50parkingspacesfromtheLandUse Coderequirementofapproximately370spaces;andWHEREAS,ajointmeetingbetweentheTownCouncilandthePlanningCommissionwasheldonFebruary19,2019,tohearanoverviewoftheprojectbytheApplicant;and12-02-19 TC PacketPage 8 of 1038 PCReso.5of2019Page2of12WHEREAS,aninitialpublichearingwasheldbeforethePlanningCommissiononMarch6,2019toreviewtheapplication;andWHEREAS,the PlanningCommissioncontinuedhearingstoMarch20,April3, April17,June5,June19,July17,August7,August21andSeptember4of2019tofurtherconsidertheapplicationanddraftresolution.NOW,THEREFORE,BEITRESOLVEDbythePlanningCommissionoftheTownofSnowmassVillage,Colorado:SectionOne:GeneralFindings.ThePlanningCommissionherebygenerallyfindsthat:1)TheApplicantreceivedSketchPlanapprovaltoproceedwithPreliminaryPlanpursuanttoTownCouncilResolution18of2018onApril16,2018.2)TheApplicantsubmittedtheapplicationforPreliminaryPlan ReviewoftheProjectinaccordancewiththe provisionsoftheMunicipalCode.ThePreliminaryPlanPUDapplicationprovidedtheMinimumContentsrequiredpursuanttoSection16A-5-340andincludedwrittenandgraphicmaterialsinsufficientdetailtodeemtheapplicationcompleteforreview.3)ThePreliminary PlangenerallyidentifieslandusesproposedattheCentersitewhichareconsistentwiththeTownofSnowmassVillage2018ComprehensivePlan (the“ComprehensivePlan”)FutureLandUseMapwhichspecifiesMixed-useandMulti-familyResidentialusesforthesubjectparcel.4)Atotalof45 unitsper theComprehensivePlan’sBuildoutAnalysisChartisspecifiedfortheSnowmassCenterandFarawayNorth(Center)developmentareas.TheApplicanthasestimatedthetotalbuildoutforthesubject parcelswithintheCenterandFarawayRanchNorthsubdivisiontobe approximately31.5units,acalculationdeemedacceptablebythePlanningCommission.ThePreliminaryPlanapplicationproposes68residentialunits,exceedingthebuildoutmaximumby36.5units,whichthePlanningCommissionjustifiesasappropriateduetotheproject’sproximitytopublictransportation,localservicesandretail.5)PursuanttoSection16A-5-310(c)(4)(b)asupermajorityvote(%)byTownCouncilisrequiredtoexceed100percentofthemaximumbuildoutdescribedherein.Tothe extentnecessaryforand pertinenttoaPreliminaryPlanlevelofevaluationandreview,theapplicationmaycomplywiththereviewcriteriaforexceedingthemaximumbuildoutasspecifiedinSection16A-5-300(c)(4),subjecttosatisfyingtheapplicableconditionscontainedwithinSectionThreeofthisresolution.12-02-19 TC PacketPage 9 of 1039 PCReso.5of2019Page3of126)TheApplicantisrequestingavariancefromtheheightrestrictionsassociatedwiththeproposedunderlyingMU-2zonefrom38feettoamaximumof55feet pursuanttoPursuanttoSection16A-5-310(c)(7)(a)whichrequiresasupermajorityvote(34)byTownCouncil.Specifically,theApplicantisrequestingamaximumof49feetforbuilding1A,38.4feetforbuilding2A,45.9feetforbuilding2B,49feetforbuilding3A,45.1feetforbuilding3B,50feetforbuildings4N4B,52feetforbuilding5A,55feetforbuildingSB,and51.5feetforbuilding6B.7)Forconsiderationofthe saidvariationrequests(buildoutandheight)theApplicantsuggestsacontributionof$750,000towardsthefuturedesignandinstallationofapedestrianbridgeconnectingtheCenterandBaseVillagewhichmaybeevaluatedpursuanttheCommunityPurposecriteriainMunicipalCodeSection16A-5-300(c)(6).8)Theamountofopenspaceprovidedinandaroundtheaffectedsitesproposedfordevelopmentorredevelopmentexceeding25%areacceptable.9)ThesubjectareaisidentifiedontheComprehensivePlan’sEnvironmentalSensitivityMapasbeingwithintheBrushCreekImpactArea.Thedevelopmentproposalwillbe locatedoutsidetheBrushCreekfloodplainandwetlandsareasandwillimprovestormwaterqualityenteringBrushCreek.10)ThePreliminaryPlan identifieslandproposedfordevelopmentorredevelopmentthatarenotlocatedwithintheWildlifeSensitiveAreasidentifiedintheComprehensivePlan.11)TotheextentnecessaryforandpertinenttoaPreliminaryPlanlevelofevaluationandreview,theapplicationisgenerallyconsistentwiththeprovisionsofSection16A-5-300(c),GeneralRestrictions,oftheDevelopmentCode,subjecttosatisfyingtheapplicableconditionscontainedwithinSectionThreeofthisresolution.12)TotheextentnecessaryforandpertinenttoaPreliminaryPlanlevelofevaluationandreview,theapplicationisgenerallyconsistentwiththeprovisionsofSection16A-5-310,ReviewStandards,oftheDevelopmentCode,subjecttosatisfyingtheapplicableconditionscontainedwithinSectionThreeofthisresolution.13)WhilethisapplicationshouldproceedtotheFinalPlanreviewphase,theApplicantshouldbeawarethatthedeterminationsbythePlanningCommission,baseduponnewinformationrequiredandprovidedattheFinalDevelopmentPlanreviewandasratifiedbyTownCouncil,mayrequireminorchangestotheoveralldevelopmentplan.12-02-19 TC PacketPage 10 of 10310 PCReso.5of2019Page4of12SectionTwo:Action.The PlanningCommissionherebyrecommendstoTownCouncilthattheyacceptthePreliminaryPlanPUDproposingtheSnowmassCenterRedevelopmentandExpansion.TownCouncil shalldetermine whethertoauthorizetheApplicanttoproceedtoaFinalPlanPUDapplication,subjecttothesuggestedconditionsstatedinSectionThreebelow.SaidPreliminaryPlanPUDgenerallyproposestheimprovementsasillustratedinattachedExhibitA.SectionThree:Conditions.TheapprovalgrantedinSectionTwoaboveshallbesubjecttosatisfyingthefollowingconditions:Residences(FreeMarketandRestricted):1)Nolessthan100s.f. ofstorage(connectedorseparate)shallbeprovidedforeachresidentialunit(RestrictedorFree-Market)inBuilding1A.2)Theapplicantshallprovideassurancethat theexteriorcommonspaceassociatedwithbuilding1Awillnotbecomederelictbylooselyregulatedstorageofbicycles,skis,kayaks,grills,etc.Ifnecessary,additionalstoragespaceforboththefreemarketandrestrictedhousingof Building1Amaybeconsideredinthiscommonareaorelsewhereintheproject.3)Applicantshallprovidebetterqualityoutdoorspaceforeachofthe free-marketunitsinBuilding1Abyprovidingseparationbetween decks,eliminatingJuliet-stylebalconies,andsteppingbacktheunitstoprovidefulloutdoorlivingspaces.4)Theapplicantshallensurethereisadequatedepthoftheoutdoor decksfortheemployeeunitsforcomfortableoutdoorlivingspace.5)TheCondominiumdeclarationsshallspecifynooutdoorstorageondecksofseasonalequipment.6)Finishes,storage,appliancesandamenitiesfortherestrictedunitsshallbeofcomparablequalitytothoseinBuilding1Afreemarketunits.7)RestrictedunitsshallbecompletedandissuedCertificatesofOccupancypriortoissuanceofCertificatesofOccupancyforthe freemarketunitsinBuilding1A.8)RestrictedunitsshallbeofferedtoeligibleemployeesundertermsestablishedinaccordancewiththeTownofSnowmassVillagePermanentModerateHousingRegulationsforapriceconsistentwithcurrentsalepricesofcomparablerestrictedunitswithintheTown.ARestrictedHousingAgreementshallbesubmittedwithFinalPlansubmittal.9)Two-bedroom Restrictedunitsshallmeetthesink/toiletseparationrequirementssetforthbytheTown’sHousingprogram.10)Restrictedunitsshallbesubjecttoarecordeddeedrestrictiontoensurethispurposeinperpetuity.Landscaping, PavementandStreetFurnishings:11)FurtherdetailsshouldbeprovidedaspartoftheFinalPlan submittalpertainingtosurfacetreatmentsanddimensionsofallpedestrianaccess12-02-19 TC PacketPage 11 of 10311 PCReso.5of2019Page5of12routes, crosswalks,andsidewalkstoassurethatpedestrianareasaregenerouswithoutdissipatingthevitalityofthestreetscape.12)TheApplicant shalldemonstrateacontrastingsurfacetreatmentforMainStreettoindicatewhendriversaretransitioningintoaquasi-pedestrian,urban environment.Thetreatmentshouldbeabletowithstandstandardsnowremovaltechniques.13)Landscapelightingmayneedtobeincreased(especiallyassociatedwithstairways)and further detailedaspartofFinalPlanSubmissioninaccordancewiththestandardsofthelightingcode.14)Wheneverpossible, theamountofimperviousareashallbereduced,andthehardscapedareasminimizedwithincreasedbioswalesandlandscapedareas.15)TobetteraccommodatesafedeliveriestoBuilding1A,Staffrecommendsthatapedestrian crossingbedemarkedacross“MainStreet”fromthewestservicebayinBuilding6A.Thiswillaccommodatehand carteddeliveriestothewestsideof Building1A.16)Theapplicantshall providemoredesignandlandscapedetailfortheresidential/office“courtyard”onthe2ndfloorofBuilding1A.17)Wheneverpossible,excesswidthalongtheMainStreetcorridorshallbededicatedtothepedestriansidewalksoneachsideofthestreet.18)AspartoftheFinalPlansubmission,moredetailshallbeprovidedforthelandscapedesignofthesecond-floorcommonareaofBuilding1A.19)Moreevergreentreeplantingsshouldbeprovidedonthe backsideofbuildingsSAandSB(east),6B(south),and2A/2B(south)tobetterscreenthesebuildingsasseenfromadjacentproperties.20)Aspecificseedmixneedstobeidentifiedandapprovedfortherevegetationofdisturbedopenspaceareas—especiallynorthofbuildings4Aand4B.21) AspartoftheFinal PUDsubmission,theapplicantshallprovideanoxiousweedmanagementplan.22)Anyexistingbarbed-wirefencingonthepropertyshallberemoved and,ifnecessary,replacedwithwildlifefriendlyfencingpursuanttoPitkinCountystandards.23)ThelandscapingplanshallemphasizemakingimprovementstowildlifelinkagesbetweenBrushCreekandnativehabitatstothenorthofSnowmassCenter.24)AspartoftheFinalPlan submittal,theapplicantshallprovideadetailedtreemitigationplanfortheremovalofanytreespeciesof4”caliperormoreata1:1replacementratio.Architecture:25)EachbuildingintheSnowmass Centershall matchaLEEDstandardofnolessthanSilverasapprovedbytheTown’sBuilding Official.26)Theprojectshall bedesignedwithnon-reflectiveglass,especiallyontheeastsideofBuildings5Aand58soasnottocauseanuisanceforneighboringproperties.12-02-19 TC PacketPage 12 of 10312 PCReso.5of2019Page6of1227)Building6Ashouldraise thestreetlevelstorefrontroofheighttoatleast12feetand articulatetherooflinewithdormersandotherdesignfeatures.Alternatively,the applicantmayexplorerotatingtheroofline90degreestoopenviewsfromthecommercialcentertowardstheskimountain.28)Lightercoloredmaterialsshallbeminimizedonbuildings4Aand4Bsothatthearchitectureblendswiththedark,naturaltonesofthehillsidebeyond.29) AspartoftheFinalPUDReviewsubmission,theapplicantshallcontinuetodiversifythearchitecturalcharacterofeachbuildingwithinthedevelopment.30)AttheTown’sdiscretion,the applicantmayberequiredtoprovideadditionalventilationemissioncontrolsforrestaurantusesshouldcomplaintsarise.31)The commonbalconiesassociatedwiththeFreeMarketunitsaboveClark’sMarketshouldberedesignedtobeindividuallyprivatevs.sharedspace.32)Theapplicantshallexploresteppingbackthethird flooroftheMainStreetfacadestoprovide visualreliefforthestreetscapeandaccommodatemoreresidentialbalconies.33)TheapplicantshallconsiderexpandingtheatriumspaceassociatedwithBuilding1Atoaccommodateaverticalarchitecturalcomponentthatexceedsthe38-footheightlimit.PlanningCommissionrecommendsthatarenderingbesubmittedtoTownCouncilforconsideration.34)TheapplicantshalladheretospecificationsoutlinedintheBGBuildingWorks,LLCletterdatedDecember14,2018(submittedwiththePreliminaryPlan)regardingmechanical,electric, andplumbinginstallations.35) AspartoftheFinalPUDsubmission,theapplicantshallprovidesoundmitigationdetailsfortheairhandlingchillerlocatedinthemechanicalbunkeronthe2’levelof buildingIA.LoadingDocks,SolidWasteandSnowStorage:36) TothesatisfactionofthePublicWorksDepartment,theApplicantshallfurtherdemonstratethattheproposedloadingdocksandotherunloading/loadingareas,canadequatelyaccommodatetheturningmovementsandstackingofsemi-trailer vehicleswithafocusonthewestendservicesofbuilding1A-withoutcompromisingtrafficflowandlandscapedareas.37)ArevisedSolidWasteManagementPlanshallbeprovidedforthecommercialcore andshallbeincludedaspartoftheFinalPlansubmission.38) Tothe extent possible, trashenclosuresshallbeadequatelyscreenedand/orrelocatedtobe outofimmediateviewofroadwaysandmainpedestriancorridors.39)Theapplicantshall provide anupdatedSnowStoragePlanthat showsadequatestorestoragelocationsfornoless thana25-yearsnowstormeventand submitasnowmanagementplanbeforeFinalPlanreview.12-02-19 TC PacketPage 13 of 10313 PCReso.Sot2019Page7of1240)PriortoadoptionoftheFinalPUDafinalverificationfortheturningmovementsshallbesubmittedbyalicensedengineerforreviewandapprovalbythePublicWorksDepartment.Easements:41)TheTownofSnowmassVillageshall notacceptownershipofeasementsconveyingthemaintenanceofinternalroads,driveways,orparkingareasassociatedwiththeSnowmassCenterwiththeexceptionofUpperKearns(betweenBrushCreek Roadtotheshuttleroundaboutandtheinclusionthereofl.42)Theapplicantshall provideageneralaccesseasementonParcelAforthebenefitoftheTownofSnowmassVillagethatwillprovidedirectpedestrianaccesstoandfrom“MeltonRanch’Trailand/orvehicularaccesstoParcelsHandHishouldthoselotsbeacquiredbytheTown.43)AspartoftheconveyanceofParcelItotheTown,theapplicantshalldraftanaccesseasementtothe benefitoftheSnowmassCenterHOAforregularmaintenanceofstormwaterinfrastructureonthatparcel.Parking:44)AdetailedandthoroughlycraftedParkingManagementPlanshall beincludedaspartofFinalPlansubmissionandmustaddressmethodstopreventskierandspecialeventparking.45)EachbedroomintheRestrictedHousingunitsshall beprovidedasingleparkingspacelocatedbetweenbuilding1Aandbuildings2N2B.46)Theapplicantshallprovideadequateparkingspaces/chargingstations(surfaceand/or sub-grade)fortheexclusiveuseofelectricvehicles.Uses47)AspartoftheFinalPlansubmission,theApplicantshallprovideaplantoassurethatretailintheCommercialCorewillremain“communityserving”.TheCommercialCoreneedstoaccommodateamixtureofretailtypes.49)Community-basedcommercialshallbespecifiedinaPUDGuidesubmittedwiththeFinalPlanapplication,whichprovidesassurancethatsuchbusinesseswillbemaintainedandprovidedinthelongterm.Examplesof“community-based”commercialincludebutarenotlimitedto:a)Medicalanddentaloffices;b)Professionaloffices;c)Realestateoffices;d)Grocerystores;e)PostOffice;flDrugstoresandpharmacies;g)Cleaners;Ii)Liquorstores;i)Hardwarestoresj)Restaurants,cafes,coffeeshops;k)Financialinstitutions;12-02-19 TC PacketPage 14 of 10314 PCReso.5of2019Page8of12I)Otherprofessionalandservice-basedretail,servicesandoffices;m)Othersimilartypesofcommunity-baseduses.51)ApplicantshouldprovideclarificationaboutthecontinuedoperationofSundance,Tasters,theHardwareStore,andDryCleaners.52)Notwithstanding thelistabove,noofficeusesshallbe allowedatthestreetlevel(retailandrestaurantsonly)unlessconsentedtobyTownCouncil.Currentoffice-basedservicesandentitiesatthestreetlevelshallbe“grandfathered”andallowedtooccupystreetlevelspacewithintheredevelopedSnowmassCenterat theirdiscretion.RoadImprovements:53)TheApplicant’sTransportationImpactStudysupports theLevelofServiceCestimatedfortheLowerKearnsRoad intersectionifthereisanadditionofarightturnlaneonLowerKearnsRoadtomaintainthelevelofserviceduringthe peakhourtraffic.ThePlanning Commissionrecommendssaidintersection improvementbeimplemented.54)Forroadwaysthatrequireretainingwallfeatures,theApplicantshallprovideaspartoftheFinalPlanReview,design and/orveneerofthewallsforreviewandapprovalbytheTown.55)Theapplicantshall providedetailedinformationaboutthesurfacetreatmentofeachaccessroad,driveway,andparkingarea aspartoftheFinalPlansubmittal.56)TheapplicantshallprovidedetailsregardingthematerialityandtreatmentofpedestriancrossingstoassuretheMainStreetareaperformsasaquasi-pedestrianspace.57)The roadwaynetwork,bothprivateandpublic,shallmeetTownEngineeringstandards.58)MainStreetanditsassociatedon-streetparkingshall complywiththedimensionalstandardsoftheLandUseCodeSection 16-4-310,OffStreetParkingStandards.59)AspartoftheFinalPlansubmittal,theapplicantshallprovidemethodologyforminimizingpotentialvehicularconflictsbetweencarsexitingtheeastsideoftheparkinggarageandcarsroundingthebendfromMainStreetontolowerKearns Road.60)AspartoftheFinalPlansubmission, theapplicantshallprovidedetailedsectionsofroadwayintersectionsectionsthatspecify thewidth ofpedestrian,parkingandroadways.61)TheapplicantshallprovideadetaileddraftDevelopmentAgreementforpublicinfrastructureaspartofFinalPlansubmittal.62)ThetransitcenterloopshallberestrictedtopublicRFTAbusesandTOSVshuttlesonlyandshallbesignedaccordingly.12-02-19 TC PacketPage 15 of 10315 PCReso.5of2019Page9of12Trails,Sidewalks andConnectivity:63)Aspartof FinalPlansubmission, theapplicantshallre-evaluatetheproposedtrailconnectionontheeastsideofbuilding3Aand3Bandofferothertrailalignmentoptionsthatdonotexceed6%grade.64)Theapplicant mustprovidesidewalkaccessalongtheeastsideofbuilding1A(fromthemainloadingdockdowntoMainStreet).65)AsidewalkimprovementontheeastsideofUpperKearnsRoad(betweentheround-a-boutandthe transitcircle)shall beconstructedintheavailableTownofSnowmassVillageright-of-wayatawidththatshallbecoordinatedwiththePublicWorksDepartment.MaintenanceAccess:66) AspartoftheFinalPlansubmission,theapplicantshall providemoredetailaboutmaintenanceaccessforvehiclestothedetentionpondslocatednorthofBuildings4N4B.Fire:67) AspartoftheFinalPlansubmission,theapplicantshallcontinuetocooperatewiththeFireProtectionDistricttoprovide“hardened”buildingmaterialsforeachoftheproposedbuildingtothesatisfactionoftheDistrict.ConstructionManagement:68)Duringconstruction,anydisruptiontoexistingcommercialservicesshallnotexceed2daysormoreandshallrequirenotificationof30daysinadvanceofthescheduleddisruptiontotenants.EmergencysituationsasdeemedassuchbythePoliceDepartmentorPublicWorksshallbeexemptfromthisnotificationrequirement.69) AspartoftheFinalPUDsubmittal,theapplicantshall provideamoredetailedconstructionmanagementplanasreferencedinTOSVOrdinance12,series2007withspecificattentiontodustsuppressionmethods.70)Phasingshallallowthegrocerystoreandpostofficetoremainopenduringconstructionwithminimalprolongeddisruptiontodailyoperations.Anymandatoryclosureofthe grocery storeorpostofficeof2daysormoreshallrequireapublicnotice30priortosaidscheduledclosure.CommunityPurpose:71)Although notofficiallyrecommendedforapproval,themonetarycontributionof$750,000fortheconstructionofapedestrianbridgefromthePointSitetoBaseVillageshall remainasaconsiderationbytheTown.72) AspartoftheFinalPlan Review,theapplicantshallconsidersubsidizedrentforlocallyowned,essentialcommunityservices.73) AspartoftheFinalPlanReviewandtotheextentpossible,theapplicantshallcontinuetoworkwiththeExecutive BranchoftheFederalGovernmenttoimproveandactivatethestreetscapefaçadeofthePostOffice.12-02-19 TC PacketPage 16 of 10316 PCReso.5of2019Page10of1274)TheapplicantshallreserveatenantspaceforthePostOfficeexpansionofupto4,000squarefeettotal,toimprovetheoperationsandefficienciesofthespace.ThereservationshallbeconsideredaCommunityPurposecontributionasrequiredbytheLandUseCode.Thecommitmentforthereservationshallexpireuponthe5thanniversaryofthedateoffinalapprovalofthePUDplan.Water andSanitationRequirements:75) Priortobuildingpermitsubmission,detailedreviewahdapprovalofthewaterandsewersystembySnowmassWater&SanitationDistrict’s(SWSD)engineershallbe required.76)Priortobuildingpermitsubmission,theapplicantshallprovideprovisionsofadetailedWaterandSanitarySewerBasisofDesignReporttoSWSDthatincludesaverageandpeakwaterandwastewaterflowsandanestimateoftotalEQR’sbrokendownbyindividuallivingspaceand commercialclassification.77)Theapplicantshallprovide SWDSwithanirrevocableletterofcreditinanamountacceptabletoSWDSasaguaranteetosecurecompletionoftherequiredpublicimprovements.78)Installationofwaterand sanitation infrastructureshallbeinstalledinaccordancewithSWDSrulesandregulations.79)Theapplicantshallprovideas-builtsurveysandacceptanceofpublicinfrastructurebySWSDtogetherwithatwo-yearwarrantycoveringalldesign and/orconstructiondefectsandaletterofcredittoSWSDintheamountof10%oftotalwaterandsewerconstructioncosts.80)TheapplicantshallprovideadedicationofpublicutilityeasementtoSWDSforallpublicinfrastructuretobeownedbySWSD,inaformandwith titleassurancesasrequiredbySWSD,freeandclearofanyfinancialencumbrances.81)The applicantshallprovidepaymentofsystemdevelopment fees,totheTownand/orSWSD,asapplicableforeachproperty/building.82)ReimbursementofSWSD’scostsincurredinnegotiationandadministrationoftheLineExtensionAgreement(LEA)includingperiodicreplenishmentofa$25,000ProjectFundinadditiontorequiredsecurity.CivilEngineering:83) AspartoftheFinalPUDsubmission,theapplicantshallprovideupdatedcivilengineeringplansoftheentireprojectforreviewandapprovaloftheTown,includingadditionalhydrodynamicseparatorCDSwatertreatmentvaultsatallloadingdocksandparkinggarageforthepurposeofseparatingsandandoilfromparkinglotrun-off84)Theapplicantshalladheretopreviousgeotechnicalreportsprovidedintheapplication,specificallythosefromSeptember24,2008 andOctober26,2007.85)AspartoftheFinal PUDsubmission, theapplicantshallprovideagreementsbetweenAlpineBankandtheapplicantthatitisacceptableto12-02-19 TC PacketPage 17 of 10317 PCReso.5of2019Page11o112improveandutilizeportionsofAlpineBank’spropertyatLowerKearnsandBrushCreekRoadfor trail,snowstorageandstormwaterimprovements.86)AspartoftheFinal PUDsubmission,theapplicantshallprovidemoredetailedinformationaboutthehydrodynamicseparator(CDS)stormwatervaultsandtheremovalofhydrocarbons,organicmaterial,andotherdissolvedelementsfromstormwater.87)AspartoftheFinalPUDsubmission,theapplicantshall providespecificationsonthesizeandsedimentremovalefficienciesoftheproposedconcretesedimentationbasin.88)AspartoftheFinalPUDsubmission,the applicantshallprovidedetailsandmanagementplanwithschedulethataddressesaccesstostormdrainsystemsforregularmaintenanceandcleaning.89)AdetailedmaintenancescheduleforstormwaterinfrastructureshallbeprovidedaspartoftheFinalPlansubmission.Other90)Theplanshall beconsideredforreturntoPlanningCommissionforFinalReviewrecommendation.91)TheapplicantshallprovideaproposedconfigurationofHOAsfortheresidential and commercialcomponentsofthedevelopmentaspartoftheFinalPlansubmission.Acondominiumplatshallberecordedpriortocompletionofconstruction.92)Exceptasmayneedtobeamended,theFinalPlanapplicationshallbeconsistentwiththe provisionsofthisresolution, andwiththedesign,policyorotherrepresentationsmadebytheApplicantduringthePreliminaryPlanPUDreview.12-02-19 TC PacketPage 18 of 10318 PCReso5of2019Page12of12INTRODUCED,READ,ANDADOPTEDbythePlanningCommissionoftheTownofSnowmassVillage,Coloradoonthis4thdayofSeptember2019,withamotionmadebyCommissionmemberFaurerandasecondbyCommissionmemberMarshack,byavoleof5infavor and1opposed.CommissionmemberFridsteinwasrecusedfromreviewingandvotingontheproject.TOWNOFSNOWMASSVILLAGEPLANNINGCOMMISSIONPatrickJ.KeIty,Cha*ersonATTEST:CindyFord’SecretaryAttachments:1.ApprovedSitePlan12-02-19 TC PacketPage 19 of 10319 p - I.. -t .t.—— —. chA DESIGN\WIIKSI lOP ILLUSTRATIVE SITE PLANSNOWMASSCENTER12-02-19 TC PacketPage 20 of 10320 MEMORANDUM TO: Snowmass Village Town Council FROM: Planning Department – Brian McNellis, Planner AICP, MLA SUBJECT: Snowmass Center – Faraway Ranch North SPA, Parcels A, B, F, G, and I MAJOR PLANNED UNIT DEVELOPMENT (PUD) and REZONING PRELIMINARY PLAN REVIEW DATE: November 4, 2019 ______________________________________________________________________ I. General Information:  Owner/Applicant: Eastwood Snowmass Investors, LP  Property: Parcels A, B, F, G, and I, Faraway Ranch North Subdivision:  Representative: Design Workshop, Inc. II. Project Summary:  New Commercial/Office uses within existing Snowmass Center – 58,433 s.f. total (current SPA allows up to 77,450 s.f. of commercial with no additional employee housing mitigation) • 6,279 s.f. – new expansion of existing Snowmass Center (Clark’s Market) • 3,305 s.f. – new building 6A • 7,026 s.f. – new building 6B  Commercial Parking – 122 subgrade and 52 surface spaces (174 total)  Residential Parking – 146 spaces (subgrade and surface)  Restricted (For Sale) Housing - New 2nd and 3rd floor above Clark’s Market – 11,346 s.f. (10 units) total  New Free-Market Residential units – 100,322 s.f. (68 units) total • 9 multi-family units on Parcel 1 (above Clark’s Market) • 7 multi-family units on Parcel 1 (across Main Street from Clark’s Market) • 6 townhouse units on Parcel 2 (north of Clark’s Market) • 9 townhouse units on Parcel 3 (north of Clark’s Market) • 30 multi-family units on Parcel 4 (north of Clark’s Market) • 7 townhouse units on Parcel 5 (east of Clark’s Market)  New Public Transit Facility – 2 TOSV shuttle staging capacity III. Applicant’s Request: Approval of the PUD Preliminary Plan pursuant to Code Sections 16A-5-340 of the Land Use Code including:  Rezoning to Mixed-Use 2 with a PUD overlay Staff Response: This zone overlay coupled with a Planned Unit Development request is appropriate for the type of mixed-use development being proposed.  Height Variance (38 feet allowed) 55 feet max requested on Parcel 5 Townhomes and slightly less variance on Building 3A, 3B, 4A, 4B, and 6B). Height variances may be permitted pursuant to Section 16A-5-300(c)(7)(a): a. Height. Variations to increase the maximum allowable height of structures may be obtained pursuant to the following provisions: 12-02-19 TC Packet Page 21 of 103 21 1. A request to grant a variation to increase the maximum allowable height for any individual structure may be granted by the Town Council, provided that at least fifty percent (50%) of the structure for which the variation is sought, as measured utilizing the structure's footprint, conforms to the height limits of the underlying zone district, provided further that no portion of the structure exceeds the height limit of the underlying zone district by more than seventy- five percent (75%). 2. In exceptional and special circumstances, a request to grant a variation to increase the maximum allowable height for individual structures may be permitted to exceed the fifty-percent or seventy-five-percent limitation described in the preceding paragraph, if the applicant is able to sufficiently demonstrate to the satisfaction of the Town Council that: a) Views from surrounding properties, as determined through the use of detailed view plane analysis, which may include computer-generated visualizations, story poles and other methods acceptable to the Planning Director, will not be substantially adversely affected. The surrounding properties to be considered will include those immediately adjacent to the PUD and those that are identified by the Planning Commission and the Town Council during their respective review and public comment periods. b) The proposed structure will be compatible, in terms of height, mass, scale, orientation and configuration, with other structures in the PUD and with adjacent structures. If the variation exceeds the fifty-percent or seventy-five-percent limitations described in the preceding paragraph, the variation and the Preliminary PUD Plan resolution must be approved by at least three-quarters (¾) of the Town Council members present and voting, for good cause shown and by identifying the reasons why the height variation is warranted. 3. For the purposes of administering paragraph (7)a, the Town Council may grant by simple majority vote, a height variation for certain structures, such as flagpoles, antennas and other similar structures which have only a nominal footprint. Staff Response: The applicant is requesting a number of variances beyond the 38-foot height restriction on several building including building 5A, 5B, 4A, 4B, 3A, 3B, and 6B (see attachment K).  Encroachment into 30% Slopes. For the Town to allow development under any of the above circumstances, the applicant shall provide an opinion from a professional geotechnical engineer licensed in the State stating that: a) The slope is not prone to instability or failure; or b). The proposed development will not cause greater slope instability or increase the potential for slope failure, and that therefore, there will be no significant risk that damage to adjacent property will result from the proposed construction. Staff Response: The applicant has provided a geotechnical report from a certified engineer that analyses the soil conditions and required foundation specifications to assure sound development within defined 30% slope areas.  Shared Parking Reduction. A reduction in off street parking standards may be granted pursuant to Section 16A-4-310(c) Shared Parking: Off-street parking facilities for separate uses may be provided collectively, if the total number of 12-02-19 TC Packet Page 22 of 103 22 spaces provided is not less than the sum of the separate requirements of each such use. However, no parking space or portion thereof shall serve as the required space for more than a single use, unless the Town specifically authorizes a shared parking arrangement. In order to obtain approval of a shared parking arrangement, the applicant shall be required to show that the peak use period for the uses will not overlap with one another, that the uses are located on the same or adjoining sites, and that the total number of spaces that would be required for all uses has not been reduced by more than twenty percent (20%). Staff Response: the applicant is proposing a reduction of approximately 50 spaces from nearly 370 required to 320 spaces provided (roughly a 14% reduction but may vary depending upon specific commercial uses).  Brush Creek Impact Review pursuant to Section 16A-4-30(e) Setback: Development shall not take place within the stream channel and shall not alter the channel of Brush Creek or its capacity, except as expressly permitted herein. Development shall be set back a minimum of twenty-five (25) feet, measured horizontally from the outer edge of any riparian or wetland areas that are subject to the provisions of this Section 16A-4-30, Brush Creek Impact Area. Staff Response: A portion of the subject property is located within the Brush Creek Impact Area. The applicant has addressed all applicable standards in the Impact Report that was submitted with the application. No development will occur inside of the 25-foot setback area (Parcel I). There are no known nesting and breeding areas in the Impact Area. The relocated Melton Trail may require tree removal and replacement in accordance with these standards. No changes to the creek are proposed on Parcel I, although a new clean-out/maintenance structure will be added to the area above the creek which will remain out of the revised floodplain. It is expected that storm water quality will be improved as the result of new utilities and infrastructure proposed at the Snowmass Center.  Development Exceeding the Future Buildout Potential of the Site by More Than 65%. Note: In accordance with the buildout matrix adopted as part of the 2018 Comprehensive Plan and methodology offered by the applicant (as approved by Staff) the site is limited to 31.5 residential units. The proposed 68 units exceeds this buildout by more than 100% which triggers Community Purpose (community benefit) standards pursuant to Code Section 16A-5-300(c)6, which includes; a) Provision of restricted housing. A parcel's maximum buildout may be achieved, and its dimensional limitations may be varied to offer an incentive to applicants to provide more restricted housing within the PUD than would otherwise be required by this Development Code, particularly in those priority locations for such housing is identified within the Comprehensive Plan. Staff Response: The applicant proposes to provide approximately 2,207 square feet more of restricted housing than is required. b) Encourage sustainable development. A parcel's maximum buildout may be achieved, and its dimensional limitations may be varied to encourage sustainable development within the Town that diversifies the mix of lodging, retail and dining uses and that is consistent with the intent of the Comprehensive Plan. Sustainable development may be of the type that creates a sense of place where one can live and work within a small defined service area as well as where recreation, public transportation, 12-02-19 TC Packet Page 23 of 103 23 open space, personal services and shopping are within reasonable walking distance. It may also be where the development includes positive social, environmental or economic benefits that significantly contribute to, greatly enhance or are determined necessary for the sustainability of the community as a whole. Staff Response: In accordance with the Comprehensive Plan, the Faraway Ranch North CPA is recognized as an appropriate location for mixed used development where residents can live, work, and spend their leisure time. c) Provide open space and/or avoid wildlife habitat. A parcel's maximum buildout may be achieved, and its dimensional limitations may be varied to provide necessary site planning flexibility to enable the development to provide more and higher quality open space or to conserve critical wildlife habitat lands. This shall be accomplished in such a way as to maintain these lands as large, contiguous areas. Such lands shall not be fragmented into small, unconnected areas by development, unless the applicant demonstrates that this arrangement will result in the most suitable development pattern for the property, and that the lands providing valued open space or critical wildlife habitat have been protected. Where applicable, connections of such lands on the site to such lands on adjacent properties shall be accomplished. Staff Response: The applicant proposes to dedicate Parcel I along Brush Creek Road as well as 23.6 acres of dedicated open space that is contiguous with existing open space and will not fragment wildlife habitat. d) Encourage better design. A parcel's dimensional limitations may be varied (but its maximum buildout may not be achieved) to allow for greater variety in the type, design and layout of buildings. Structures shall be designed to be compatible, in terms of height, mass, scale, orientation and configuration, with other buildings in the PUD and with surrounding uses yet shall avoid uniformity of design. Various types of residential uses may be combined within the PUD (when allowed by the underlying zone district), to promote more efficient land use patterns and increased open space. Staff Response: The proposed PUD provides a variety of residential designs that will be established surrounding the commercial and office core. Townhomes and flats are proposed as well as restricted units on the upper floors of the center. This variety of architecture ensures that the type, design and layout of the buildings are harmonious and will not be “cookie cutter” in their configuration. e) Develop necessary public facilities. A parcel's maximum buildout may be achieved, and its dimensional limitations may be varied to provide an incentive for an applicant to develop, or contribute to the development of, necessary public facilities, such as public parking and transportation facilities, public recreation facilities and other public facilities consistent with the intent of the Comprehensive Plan and the Town's goals and objectives. The facilities may be located within or outside of the PUD but shall be facilities beyond the required mitigation for the project that meet the needs not only of project residents, but also of other residents of and visitors to the Town and shall promote, generally, the public health, safety and welfare. Staff Response: The applicant has provided a proposed list of community purpose benefits that they feel meets the intent of this section of the code. These are included 12-02-19 TC Packet Page 24 of 103 24 (see attachment M). The most significant of the proposed “community benefits” is a $750,000 cash contribution toward a pedestrian bridge or other conveyance to help promote pedestrian connectivity and reduce vehicular traffic to the center. IV. Sec. 16A-5-310. – General Review Standards. In addition to demonstrating compliance with the provisions of Section 16A-5-300(c), General Restrictions, and with all other applicable provisions of this Code, a proposed PUD shall also comply with the following review standards. 1) Consistency with Comprehensive Plan. The PUD shall be consistent with the intent of the Town's Comprehensive Plan. Staff Response: The applicant has worked with Planning Staff throughout Sketch and Preliminary Plan to assure compliance with the intent of the Comprehensive Plan as identified below. The proposed redevelopment and expansion proposal are part of the Faraway North and Snowmass Center Comprehensively Planned Area (CPA) which identify components that should be considered as part of a redevelopment proposal for the subdivision:  Encourage mixed-use redevelopment of the Snowmass Center that incorporates a pedestrian friendly space that fosters year-round activity. Thoughtfully-designed streetscapes will provide an opportunity for locals and visitors to gather, dine and interact with one another daily and throughout the year.  Retain essential services such as the Post Office and grocery store while including other related uses that can be accessed collectively during a single visit to the Snowmass Center.  Promote residential development within walking/biking distance to the Snowmass Center that will generate a steady flow of activity and commerce.  Reinforce a well-designed and interconnected system of narrow streets that accommodate slow vehicular traffic for ease of access to services for locals and visitors.  Ensure that redevelopment incorporates seamless transit with safe and pleasant pedestrian connections. A bridge or aerial conveyance between Base Village and Snowmass Center will allow locals and visitors to easily access services, restaurants, and entertainment throughout the Village Core.  Higher density residential development could be accommodated on publicly owned parcels west of Town Hall and northeast of the existing Snowmass Center, providing needed housing for local employee and elderly populations. Housing should maintain a balance of free market and “restricted” employee units with a variety of housing types and sizes.  Any redevelopment should be “authentic” to Snowmass Village and capture important views of Mt. Daly and Snowmass Mountain.  Architecture should be human-scaled and interconnected with pedestrian plazas and outdoor seating areas that offer good solar exposure, lighting, plantings and quality of design. Where possible, upper building floors should be stepped back to create outdoor spaces and roof decks to capture views while activating the streetscape. Staff Response: The proposed design of the Center is consistent with the Comprehensive Plan. 2) Preservation of Community Character. The development proposed for the PUD shall be consistent with the standards of Section 16A-4-340, Building Design Guidelines to Preserve Community Character, shall be compatible with, or an enhancement of, the character of existing land uses in the area and shall not adversely affect the future development of the surrounding area. 12-02-19 TC Packet Page 25 of 103 25 Staff Response: The proposal arguably enhances the character of the current antiquated Snowmass Center with updated/expanded grocery store as well as more commercial services, restaurant spaces, and multi-family residential that will offer vibrancy to the area. The design offers commercial center or “Main Street” component that fosters community gathering, interaction, and vitality. 3) Creative Approach. The development proposed for the PUD represents a creative approach to the development and use of land and related physical facilities to produce better developments and to provide amenities for residents of the PUD and the public in general. Staff Response: The development utilizes the existing configuration of the Snowmass Center while providing sub-grade parking, thereby allowing for the creation of a double-sided “Main Street” corridor. 4) Landscaping. Proposed landscaping for the PUD shall provide sufficient buffering of uses from one another (both within the PUD and between the PUD and surrounding lands) to minimize noise, glare and other adverse impacts, shall create attractive streetscapes and parking areas and shall be consistent with the character of the Town. Staff Response: The applicant has provided a Landscape Plan. The Planning Commission has requested more screening between buildings within/surrounding the development. More detail should be provided for plantings along the streetscapes as part of Final Plan review. 5) Comply with development evaluation standards. The PUD shall comply with all applicable provisions of Article IV of this Development Code, Development Evaluation Standards. Staff Response: The applicant has met these standards. 6) Suitability for Development. The property proposed for the PUD shall be suitable for development, considering its topography, environmental features and any natural or man-made hazards that affect its development potential. Staff Response: The development will encroach slightly into 30% slope areas, an issue that has been addressed in the geotechnical report submitted with the application. Other potential hazards including rockfall and debris/mud flows will be mitigated by the incorporation of retention basins as recommended. Spatial Pattern Shall be Efficient. The PUD shall be located to avoid creating spatial patterns that cause inefficiencies in the delivery of public services, or that require duplication or premature extension of public facilities. Staff Response: The revised Preliminary site plan doubles the amount of delivery bays currently offered at the Snowmass Center. The design also accommodates a shuttle transit station and provides a hotel shuttle pick-up/drop-off area. 7) Roads. Any new road developed to serve the PUD shall be continuous and in alignment with existing platted streets to which the street is to be connected. Where appropriate, new streets shall be planned so that they can create an interconnected Town road network, with provision for adequate road and utility easements. Where cul-de-sacs are used in the development, the applicant is encouraged to provide a trail or similar pedestrian link between them. 12-02-19 TC Packet Page 26 of 103 26 Staff Response: The proposal suggests a two-way Main Street that allow for access to the Snowmass Center via Lower and Upper Kearns Road. Some roadways will terminate on the upper portions of the development but will incorporate emergency turnaround standards. Pedestrian access from these areas will be adjacent or provided within a reasonable walking distance. 8) Water and Sewer Lines. Any water or sewer line extension necessary to serve the PUD shall be consistent with the Snowmass Water and Sanitation District's service plan and the Town's Comprehensive Plan. Staff Response: The applicant has provided detailed civil engineering reports and drawings that connect proposed utilities to existing infrastructure. The applicant has addressed a majority of Staff’s concerns as it pertains to stormwater management (but is still a work in progress – see attachment D). Easements for associated water and stormwater utilities will be dedicated to the benefit of the Snowmass Water & Sanitation District. 9) Phasing. If the PUD is to be developed in phases, then each phase shall contain the required streets, utilities, landscaping and other public facilities or improvements that are necessary and desirable for residents of the project. If the PUD incorporates any amenities for the benefit of the Town, such as trail connections, these shall be constructed within the first phase of the project, or, if this is not possible, then as early in the project as is reasonable. The pace and phasing shall be evaluated with regard to construction impacts along with possible interruption of construction as it would affect the community as a whole. Staff Response: The draft construction management plan assures minimal interruption to existing community services including the Post Office and the grocery store. 10) Construction Interruptions. The development application shall provide a reasonable restoration and/or remediation contingency plan to mitigate impacts resulting from any potential extended interruption of construction affecting the community as a whole. Surety or security may be necessary to ensure implementation of the plan. Staff Response: The Planning Commission recommended that the applicant be required to provide adequate notification to the Town/community prior to any prolonged interruption of operation and/or services V. 16A-5-340. - Preliminary Plan. a) Purpose. The purpose of preliminary plan review is for the applicant to formulate detailed, properly designed/engineered solutions to the issues and concerns identified during sketch plan review, and to address, in a detailed manner, all other issues that are relevant to the preliminary plan. For minor PUD applications, where no sketch plan was submitted, the purpose of the preliminary plan is to present detailed, properly designed/engineered plans for consideration by the Town and the public. The burden at the preliminary plan stage is on the applicant to provide detailed information and mitigation proposals to be evaluated by the Town and the public. For any PUD application that also involves subdivision or that requires approval of an amendment of the Official Zone District Map, the application for subdivision or rezoning shall be submitted with, and considered at the same time as, the preliminary PUD plan review. (b) Preliminary Plan Review Intent and Issues. The questions the Planning Commission and Town Council should consider in a detailed manner during review of the 12-02-19 TC Packet Page 27 of 103 27 preliminary plan (depending upon the size and complexity of the proposal) include the following: 1) Response to Sketch Plan Issues and Concerns. Has the applicant provided detailed, sufficient and appropriate responses to each of the issues and concerns identified during the sketch plan review? Staff Response: The applicant has modified the site plan based upon the concerns raised by Planning Commission and Town Council during Sketch Plan review including the configuration of the shuttle transit station. An updated parking management plan has been submitted and is currently under review by Staff for the requested shared parking arrangement which reduces the parking requirement by approximately 14%. As proposed in Sketch Plan, variances for height are requested in the current proposal. 2) Zone District Limitations. Does the proposed development comply with all of the limitations of the underlying zone district? If the applicant proposes to vary any of the property's dimensional limitations, then does the application comply with all of the applicable standards for granting of the variation? Staff Response: As previously mentioned, the applicant is requesting a variance from the 38-foot height limit to a maximum of 55 feet (see attachment K). 3) Comprehensive Plan. Is the proposed development consistent with all relevant policies and recommendations of the Town's Comprehensive Plan? If the applicant proposes a buildout in excess of sixty-five percent (65%) of that identified in the Comprehensive Plan, then will the community purposes that are most appropriate to be accomplished by the proposed development be achieved? Staff Response: The applicant proposes to (more than) double the residential allotment prescribed for the Faraway North Ranch Subdivision in the 2018 Comprehensive Plan. Such a request triggers Community Purpose for which the applicant has suggested a $750K contribution towards the construction of a pedestrian bridge. Staff feels this is substantially lacking as a community benefit when considering the long-term impact of this project and questions the effectiveness of a bridge that will connect Town Hall and Base Village. Staff encourages that the applicant explore other Community Benefit proposals that are “brick & mortar” solutions which can be funded and built by the applicant, including the possibility of offering more restricted housing within the proposal. 4) Architectural Plans. Are the proposed mass, scale, height, density, volume, materials, colors and detailed design elements of the buildings compatible with, appropriate for or an enhancement of the character of the community and with surrounding buildings? Staff Response: As previously mentioned, the applicant is requesting to exceed the 38- foot height limit for the proposed MU-2 zone district which will inherently increase the perceived mass of some of the buildings. The applicant should continue to articulate the architecture so that all buildings are complimentary of one another but appear as a collection of individual developments. 5) Landscaping and Open Space. Is the type, amount, size, species and location of proposed landscaping adequate and suitable for the development? Has adequate landscaping been provided as a buffer between uses and around the 12-02-19 TC Packet Page 28 of 103 28 perimeter of the development? Has the applicant demonstrated that existing vegetation and trees on the site that should be protected will be so protected? Which specific areas of the site will be designated as open space; what is the proposed size, use and landscaping of each area? What are the preliminary plans for the homeowner's association or condominium association to maintain said open space? Staff Response: A majority of the natural open space in the subdivision will be dedicated and maintained by the Town. Although a Landscape Plan has been submitted, more detail needs to be provided regarding species planning varieties and seeding types. Staff feels that more articulation of the landscaping in the common areas and streetscapes need to be offered for reviewed. The applicant should provide more evergreen screening for building facades that potentially exceed the 38-foot height limit (i.e. between Woodbridge condominiums and buildings 5A/5B). As it relates to HOA maintenance of open space, this issue will be further addressed at time of Final PUD submission. 6) Natural Hazard Areas. What is the site-specific location and characteristics of any geologic hazards, steep slopes, flood plains and similar hazards on the property? Will any of these natural areas pose a potential threat to life or property? If so, what specific measures will be employed to avoid, minimize or mitigate these dangers? Staff Response: The property is rated for severe wildfire danger. The applicant is in on- going discussion with the Roaring Fork Fire Authority regarding the extent of “hardened materials” required for each of the buildings. There are no other significant natural hazards associated with the property. Potential rockfall, mud/debris flows are mitigated by detention basins on the upper portions of the site. The property contains floodplain hazard within Parcel I where no development is proposed. 7) Natural Resource Areas. What is the site-specific location and characteristics of any wildlife habitat areas, riparian areas, wetlands and other valued natural features on the property? What are the anticipated impacts of the proposed development on these features? Has the proposed development been designed so it will comply with the standards of this Development Code that apply to these natural resource areas? Staff Response: The only areas of ecological value include the open space on the uppermost portions of the subdivision and Parcel I along Brush Creek (both of which will be dedicated to the Town). Storm water run-off originating from the upper open space areas and the impervious areas within the development will benefit from new infrastructure that will improve the overall water quality discharged into Brush Creek. 8) Grading and Drainage. What is the extent of soil and vegetation disturbance planned for the site? How will disturbed areas be stabilized both during construction and following completion of the project? Where will excavated materials be stockpiled? Will any retaining structures be employed and, if so, what will be their design specifications and materials? How will storm water be handled both during construction and following completion of the project? Staff Response: The proposed development will, at specific locations, result in significant retainage and therefore substantial soil excavation. The revised construction management plan states that excavated material will be immediately removed from the 12-02-19 TC Packet Page 29 of 103 29 site. Infrastructure for stormwater management will be constructed as part of Phase 1 and shall be finalized prior to commencement of all other construction on-site. 9) Transportation Impact. How many vehicle trips will be generated, and what is the anticipated public transportation ridership from the proposed development? What is the capacity of the intersections that the proposed development will impact? What will be the impacts of the proposed development on the Town's public transportation system, road capacities and parking facilities and how will these impacts be mitigated? What measures will the project employ to ensure that following development roadways within the Town will continue to function at the adopted level of service standard? Have roads on- and off-site been designed in a safe and efficient manner, to connect the site to other activity areas and destination points? Staff Response: Upon the request of Staff, the applicant provided a revised Traffic Report that incorporates traffic counts for the recently completed Limelight Hotel. The results indicate that the current roadways and intersections will adequately accommodate the influx of traffic generated from the redeveloped Snowmass Center - with exception of a Level of Service (LOS) rating of D for vehicles turning left from Lower Kearns onto Brush Creek Road. It was suggested that this intersection could benefit from separate turning lanes (right vs. left turning vehicles). 10) Necessary Facilities. Has the applicant provided detailed engineering plans and reports demonstrating the type, location and capacity of the water supply, sewage disposal, solid waste disposal, fire protection and other necessary facilities that will be constructed to serve the project? Will needed public facilities and services be made available concurrently to offset the potential impacts of such development? Staff Response: The applicant has adequately addressed these issues and has provided Will Serve letters from all of the major utility providers. More detail and alternate solutions regarding sedimentation and hydrocarbon removal from stormwater is recommended. The installation of utilities is listed as the first item (Phase I) in the revised Construction Management Plan. 11) Pace and Phasing. Has the applicant provided a sufficiently detailed phasing proposal to ensure that the development phasing will occur in an efficient and orderly manner with consideration given to construction and other impacts to the community? Have all phases, including the initial phase, been designed to sustain itself and function as a complete development not reliant on subsequent phases to operate in an efficient and orderly manner? Has the applicant provided a reasonable contingency plan to mitigate impacts resulting from any possible interruption of construction as it would affect the community as a whole? Staff Response: The applicant has adequately addressed construction phasing in the revised Construction Management Plan. The proposed phasing accommodates the continued operation of the Post Office and grocery store with the possibility of occasional disruption (as required with 30-day prior notice to the Town and public). 12) Restricted Housing. What is the specific mix and configuration of housing that will be provided to meet the Town's restricted housing requirements? What guarantees has the applicant agreed to provide to ensure that such housing will be available at the time it has been required by the Town? 12-02-19 TC Packet Page 30 of 103 30 Staff Response: The proposal includes a total of 78 units (of which 10 are Restricted Housing units). As background, Ordinance No. 22, Series of 1984, previously required the Snowmass Center to provide a minimum of 51 mixed employee units on parcel C (now occupied by TOSV Town Hall). Upon conveyance of Parcel C to the Town, this requirement was rescinded by Resolution No. 34, Series of 1988 stating that the Snowmass Center is, “automatically, fully, and forever relieved of any obligation to build 51 mixed employee units”. In accordance with the 1988 Resolution, the Town has conceded that Restricted Housing for any new commercial development (not exceeding the original 77,450 s.f. allowed) is not required. Therefore, and as it pertains to this proposal, the applicant is only required to provide additional mitigation housing to offset the proposed residential development at the Snowmass Center. The proposed units vary from 1-bedroom units to 4 bedrooms total. Pursuant to Planning Commission Resolution No. 5 of 2019, the applicant is obligated to be issued Certificates of Occupancy (COs) for all the restricted housing units prior to issuance of CO’s for the free market units in Building 1A. 13) Fiscal Impact. Will the proposed development have a positive or negative fiscal impact upon the Town and other taxing districts that provide services to it? If the proposal is shown to have a negative fiscal impact, then what measures will the applicant employ to mitigate those costs? Staff Response: Overall, the proposed development is expected to have a positive fiscal impact on the Town. A peer review of the applicant’s Fiscal Impact Report suggests that the project would generate approximately $288,197 in annual General Fund revenues in sales tax vs. $204,148 in additional municipal expenditures required to service the new project. 14) Energy Conservation. What will be the energy utilization of the significant energy-consuming elements of the project (such as heating systems, swimming pools, saunas, Jacuzzis, etc.). What specific active and passive techniques will the development employ to promote energy conservation and take advantage of solar and alternative energy source opportunities? Staff Response: Pursuant to Planning Commission Resolution No. 5 of 2019, the applicant is committed to achieving no less than a LEED standard of Silver, which will include solar on rooftops. 15) Air Quality. What will be the primary sources of air pollution from the project? What will be the quantity and composition of pollutants that will be discharged on a daily and seasonal basis and what are the dispersal qualities of the site that will affect the pollutants that are generated? What geographic area will be impacted by these pollutants? What techniques will the development employ to reduce the impacts of these pollutants? Staff Response: The Planning Commission has recommended more detail in the Construction Management Plan as it pertains to dust suppression. The Town reserves the right to administer additional air quality measures if restaurant uses become a nuisance or compromise air quality. 12-02-19 TC Packet Page 31 of 103 31 16) Construction Management Plan. What is the proposed plan for phasing of the project? What is its construction schedule? What measures will be employed to mitigate construction impacts? Staff Response: The applicant has provided a 4-tiered phasing schedule as part of their Construction Management Plan. The Chief Building Official for TOSV has deemed it adequate for Preliminary Review and the scale of construction proposed for the Snowmass Center. It is designed to assure the continued operation of the Post Office and grocery store. 17) Community Welfare. Does the proposed development in its totality promote the public health, safety and welfare? Staff Response: The community will benefit from a renewed Snowmass Center that will include an expanded grocery store and Post Office in additional to local serving retail. The redevelopment will provide the community with a Town Center which has long been desired by many residents of Snowmass Village. VI. Sec 16A-4-40. - Floodplain and wetland areas. Staff Response: Parcel I of the project contains the Brush Creek Floodplain in its entirety. No development is proposed in the floodplain or wetland areas as part of this development. ATTACHMENTS: A. Housing Office referral B. Transportation Department referral C. Public Works referral D. SGM referral (civil) E. SGM referral (SMW&S) F. Roaring Fork Fire Authority referral G. Dunlop Environmental referral H. LSC Traffic Engineering referral I. Supplemental Parking Plan J. Public Comment K. Height Analysis L. DWI Application Amendments M. DWI Community Purpose 12-02-19 TC Packet Page 32 of 103 32 DRAFT 2019 -2020 Agenda Items • Regular Meetings begin at 4:00 p.m. unless otherwise noted • Work Sessions begin at 4:00 p.m. and aim to end at 6:00 p.m. • The dates on which agenda items are listed are only a best approximation. Agenda items are added to this list as they arise. Agenda items may well be moved to different meeting dates. Agendas are generally not finalized until the Thursday prior to the meeting. • In addition to agenda items, this document also lists expected absences of Town Council members. In compliance with section 2-49 of the municipal code, once the consent agenda is approved, the absences noted will be considered to have received the prior approval necessary of the majority of the Council for members to be absent from meetings. 2019 Meetings Mon. Dec. 2nd - Regular Meeting (3:00 p.m. Site Visit – Snowmass Center) • Continued P.H. Snowmass Center? • Owl/Brush Creek Intersection Discussion • 1st reading Ord Wildfire mitigation ordinance proposal • Reso for new interim small cell design guidelines • Reso setting TC 2020 Meeting dates • Coffey Place Financing resolution? • EOTC Budget approval • Executive Session Mon. Dec. 9th – Regular GID Meeting • GID – Reso Setting Mill Levy Mon. Dec. 9th - Special Meeting • TC – Reso Setting Mill Levy • Initial discussion regarding Fanny Hill Stage location • Continued public hearing on Snowmass Center • Discussion with JAS regarding potential new venues • Request to extend Enclave Final Plat requirement deadline Mon. Dec. 16th - Regular Meeting (Madsen, Sirkus out) • Reso -Timberline AT&T cell project • SAAB- consideration accepting new art and installing one permanent and one temporary piece • 2nd Reading Ord Wildfire mitigation ordinance proposal • Coffey Place Financing Reso— 2020 Draft Agenda’s - Not yet approved by the Town Council Mon. Jan 6th – Regular Meeting • Wildcat Ranch vesting extension • Snowmass Center Public Hearing Mon. Jan 13th – Work Session • Tue. Jan 21st – Regular Meeting 12-02-19 TC Packet Page 33 of 103 33 DRAFT 2019 -2020 Agenda Items • Snowmass Center Public Hearing • Mon. Feb 3rd – Regular Meeting • Snowmass Center Public Hearing • Mon. Feb 10th – Work Session • Tue. Feb 18th - Regular Meeting • Snowmass Center Public Hearing • Mon. Mar 2nd – Regular Meeting • Mon. Mar 9th – Work Session • Mon. Mar 16th – Regular Meeting • Mon. Feb 10th – Work Session • Mon. Apr 6th – Regular Meeting • Mon. Apr 13th – Work Session • Mon. Apr 20th – Regular Meeting • Mon. May 4th – Regular Meeting • Mon. May 11th – Work Session • Mon. May 18th – Regular Meeting • Mon. Jun 1st – Regular Meeting • Mon. Jun 8th – Work Session • Mon. Jun 15th – Regular Meeting • Mon. Jul 6th – Regular Meeting • Mon. Jul 13th – Work Session • Mon. Jul 20th – Regular Meeting • Mon. Aug 3rd – Regular Meeting • Mon. Aug 10th – Work Session • Mon. Aug 17th – Regular Meeting • Tue. Sep. 8th – Regular Meeting • 12-02-19 TC Packet Page 34 of 103 34 DRAFT 2019 -2020 Agenda Items Mon. Sep.14th – Work Session • Mon. Sep. 21st – Regular Meeting • Mon. Oct. 5th – Regular Meeting • Mon. Oct. 12th – Work Session • Mon. Oct. 19th – Regular Meeting • Mon. Oct. 19th – Regular Meeting • Mon. Nov. 2nd – Regular Meeting • Mon. Nov. 9th – Work Session • Mon. Nov. 16th - Regular Meeting • Mon. Dec. 7th – Regular Meeting • Mon. Dec. 14th – Special Meeting • Mon. Dec 21st – Regular Meeting • 12-02-19 TC Packet Page 35 of 103 35 DRAFT 2019 -2020 Agenda Items Topics for Work Sessions or Other Meetings Requested by Town Council Members • Explore the potential of having or creating a not-for-profit to support the arts community in addition the SAAB • Senior Housing Discussion • Broad discussion regarding dogs on trails and leash law enforcement • Review the outdoor smoking ordinance to consider modifications • Update on Daly Town Home regarding retaining wall • How did they do that? • Environmental Discussions/ Approaches: 1) Meet with EAB and prioritize Sustainability goals 2) update on Solar and Renewable Energy for the Town of Snowmass Village 3) Discuss the Climate Reality Project 4) overview of the Re-Op Fund, its uses and successes. 5) a presentation of the Energy Navigator from the EAB/PW 6) discussion regarding how to move energy conservation efforts beyond town government to a community wide effort enabling individuals to help make progress 7) Update Council on solar project that was included in 2019 budget with findings from FAB, etc • Housing strategy: 1) discuss a potential regional approach to aging in place/ work with Pitkin county and county senior services- 2) find ways to encourage/ allow individuals to move from larger homes to smaller homes 3) meeting other needs- such as specific housing for town employees 4) update on current housing construction project 5) update on meeting the overall housing strategy • Action on Necessary IGA’s or other documents regarding “school property tax” distribution • A discussion on potentially allowing camping (RV or other) within the Village • Schedule Updates will all of the Town Boards to review priorities and current initiatives o EAB o FAB o PTRAB o POSTR o Marketing o Grants – Recent Awards; Review of Criteria; Purpose, etc. o SAAB o Planning • RFTA Strategic Priorities Update w. New Mill Levy 12-02-19 TC Packet Page 36 of 103 36 Town of Snowmass Village Agenda Item Summary DATE OF MEETING: December 2, 2019 AGENDA ITEM: ORDINANCE NO. 14, SERIES OF 2019 – SECOND READING OF AN ORDINANCE AMENDING THE 2019 BUDGET FOR THE POST GRANT FUND FOR THE TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE PRESENTED BY: Clint Kinney, Town Manager Marianne Rakowski, Finance Director BACKGROUND: The POST (Peace Officer Standards & Training) Grant Fund is proposed to be amended due to an increase in the POST grant funding to pay for additional training in the amount of $45,000. FINANCIAL IMPACT: The POST Grant funds of $45,000 will be both a revenue (for the approved grant funding) and an expenditure (for the training). APPLICABILITY TO COUNCIL GOALS & OBJECTIVES: COUNCIL OPTIONS: 1. Approve the Second Reading of Ordinance No. 14, Series of 2019 funding the amended budget items. 2. Deny the Second Reading of Ordinance No. 14 Series of 2019 declining funding the amended budget items. STAFF RECOMMENDATION: It is recommended to amend the budget by approving Ordinance No. 14, Series of 2019 . 12-02-19 TC Packet Page 37 of 103 37 ATTACHMENTS: Ordinance No. 14, Series of 2019 12-02-19 TC Packet Page 38 of 103 38 SNOWMASS VILLAGE 1 TOWN COUNCIL 2 3 ORDINANCE NO. 14 4 SERIES OF 2019 5 6 7 8 AN ORDINANCE AMENDING THE 2019 BUDGET FOR THE POST GRANT FUND 9 FOR THE TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE. 10 11 12 WHEREAS, Clint Kinney, Town Manager, has submitted changes to the 2019 13 Adopted Budget; and 14 15 WHEREAS, the 2019 amendments include changes to the POST Grant Fund; 16 and 17 18 WHEREAS, the POST Grant Fund is revised to include additional revenues and 19 expenditures of the I-70 West POST Grant; and 20 21 WHEREAS, the Town of Snowmass Village Home Rule Charter requires 22 adjustments to the budget when circumstances change relating to the budget. 23 24 NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED by the Town Council of the Town of 25 Snowmass Village, Colorado: 26 27 28 Section One: Revised Budget 29 That the Town of Snowmass Village 2019 budget for the POST Grant 30 Fund be adjusted to include the below amendments. 31 32 Section Two: Appropriation 33 That the below 2019 revised revenues and expenditures are hereby 34 appropriated for expenditure during the 2019 budget year. 35 36 Town of Snowmass Village Budget Changes - 2019 Revised Budget 2019 Revenues 2019 Expenditures POST Grant Fund $ 45,000 $ 45,000 12-02-19 TC Packet Page 39 of 103 39 19-14 TC Ord Page 2 of 2 37 Section Three: Effective Date 38 This Ordinance shall become effective upon adoption in accordance with 39 Article X, Section 9.11 (e) of the Home Rule Charter. 40 41 42 INTRODUCED, READ AND ADOPTED on first reading by the Town Council of 43 Snowmass Village, Colorado on the 18th day of November, 2019 with a motion made 44 by Council Member Madsen and seconded by Council Member Sirkus and by a vote of 45 4 in favor to 0 opposed. Council Member Goode was absent. 46 47 INTRODUCED, READ AND ADOPTED on second reading by the Town Council of 48 Snowmass Village, Colorado on the 2nd day of December, 2019 with a motion made by 49 __________ and seconded by ______________, and by a vote of __ in favor to __ 50 opposed. A roll call was taken, those in favor were_________________________, 51 those opposed were _____________________. 52 53 54 55 TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE 56 ____________________________ 57 Markey Butler, Mayor 58 59 ATTEST: 60 61 ____________________________ 62 Rhonda Coxon, Town Clerk 63 12-02-19 TC Packet Page 40 of 103 40 Town of Snowmass Village Agenda Item Summary DATE OF MEETING: December 02, 2019 AGENDA ITEM: RESOLUTION NO. 40, SERIES OF 2019 - A RESOLUTION ESTABLISHING DATES FOR REGULAR MEETINGS OF THE SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL FOR THE MONTHS OF JANUARY 2020 THROUGH DECEMBER 2020 PRESENTED BY: Rhonda B. Coxon, CMC, Town Clerk BACKGROUND: Each year the Town Clerk provides meeting dates for the next full calendar year to help Town Council Members with scheduling of vacations and time off for the next calendar year. The attached resolution proposes that each meeting begin at 4:00 p.m., as normal, and moves Council Meeting to Tuesdays due to any conflicting Holidays on Mondays. A full holiday calendar is also attached for your review. In addition to the regularly scheduled meetings, it is anticipated that Work Sessions will continue on the second Monday of each month with those meetings beginning at 4:00 p.m. FINANCIAL IMPACT: N/A APPLICABILITY TO COUNCIL GOALS & OBJECTIVES: N/A COUNCIL OPTIONS: 1. Approve 2. Modify 3. Deny STAFF RECOMMENDATION: Approve or Modify the Resolution 12-02-19 TC Packet Page 41 of 103 41 ATTACHMENTS: A. Resolution No. 40, Series of 2019 B. Holiday’s 2020 12-02-19 TC Packet Page 42 of 103 42 TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE 1 TOWN COUNCIL 2 3 RESOLUTION NO. 40 4 SERIES OF 2019 5 6 A RESOLUTION ESTABLISHING DATES FOR REGULAR MEETINGS OF THE 7 SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL FOR 2020 8 9 WHEREAS, Section 2-46 of the Municipal Code provides that Regular Meetings 10 of the Town Council will occur the first, second and third Monday of each month; and 11 12 WHEREAS, Section 2-46 provides in the event that the date of a regular meeting 13 occurs on a legal holiday as defined in Section 1-21, then the meeting shall occur on the 14 Tuesday immediately following the Monday that is the legal holiday; and 15 16 WHEREAS, The Town Council may by resolution change the date for a regular 17 meeting or designate additional meetings; and 18 19 WHEREAS, the Snowmass Village Town Council has determined two Regular 20 Meeting dates for each month of 2020 is appropriate; and 21 22 NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED by the Town Council of the Town of 23 Snowmass Village, Colorado: 24 25 Section One: Snowmass Village Town Council regular meeting dates for 26 the year of 2020 are set as follows: 27 28 January 6, 2020 - Monday 29 January 21, 2020 - Tuesday 30 31 February 3, 2020 - Monday 32 February 18, 2020 - Tuesday 33 34 March 2, 2020 - Monday 35 March 16, 2020 - Monday 36 37 April 6, 2020 - Monday 38 April 20, 2020 - Monday 39 40 May 4, 2020 - Monday 41 May 18, 2020 - Monday 42 43 June 1, 2020 - Monday 44 June 15, 2020 - Monday 45 46 12-02-19 TC Packet Page 43 of 103 43 19-40 TC Reso Page 2 of 2 July 6, 2020 - Monday 47 July 20, 2020 - Monday 48 49 August 3, 2020 - Monday 50 August 17, 2020 - Monday 51 52 September 8, 2020 - Tuesday 53 September 21, 2020 - Monday 54 55 October 5, 2020 - Monday 56 October 19, 2020 - Monday 57 58 November 2, 2020 - Monday 59 November 16, 2020 - Monday 60 61 December 7, 2020 - Monday 62 December 21, 2020 - Monday 63 64 65 INTRODUCED, READ AND ADOPTED, by the Town Council of the Town of 66 Snowmass Village, Colorado on the 2nd day of December 2019 upon a motion made by 67 Council Member ______ seconded by Council Member _____, and by a vote of __ in 68 favor and __ opposed 69 70 TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE 71 72 73 _______________________________ 74 Markey Butler, Mayor 75 76 ATTEST: 77 78 79 __________________________________ 80 Rhonda B. Coxon, Town Clerk 81 82 83 APPROVED AS TO FORM: 84 85 86 _______________________________ 87 John C. Dresser Jr., Town Attorney 88 12-02-19 TC Packet Page 44 of 103 44 SMTWTFS March WT Calendar for Year 2020 (United FebruaryanuaryJ SMT s 7 28 14 21 5 12 13 F 6 20 27 F 18 19 25@ une WT 6 13 @ 27 5 12 @ 2624 25 4 @ 24 @ J T 16 23 @ s 1 I 15 22 29 2 9 16 23 30 15 22 29 7 14 21 28 5 @ 19 26 @ 18 @ 12 89 15 16 22 23 29 30 TFS 1 34 Septemberuly 4 1 1 8 15 22 29 56 23 9 10 67 13 14 20 21 27 28 3 4 5 10 rr 6D)6)ra)dY@za 2 9 16 23 23 e 6a) @@23 24 30 31 @ 31 M 2 9 16 23 30 1 I 15 22 29 15 ''6 @22 23 24 29 30 31 12 36 7 8 9@ 13 14 rs 6dlz @@ zzY@ g9 28 2e 30 7 2 9 16 23 30 12 89 15 16 22 23 2e@E 26 12 13 7 14 @@,,26 27 28 MayApril SMTWTFS sSMTWTFS 10 17 67 13 14 20 21 27 28 12 9 16 22 23 29 30 3 @ 17 4 11 18 25 5 12 19 26 567 12 13 14 19 20 21 26 27 28 SM 24 31 AugustJ SMTWTFSSMTWTFSSMTWT ffi 26 1 8 15 22 29 S 7 14 21 28 4 11 18 25 5 124 11 18 25 5 12 19 26 21 3 10 17 24 December MTWT €e S 67 13 14 69 18 25 S 1 8 15 22 29 October TWT FS November w 4 1 17 24 25 @@ FF 4 11 18 5 12 19 6 13 20 @ 1 3 10 17 24 31 67 13 14 20 21 27 28 54 11 19 @ 11 11 Janl . Jan6 . JanT . Jan 13 o Jan 14 . Jan 17 | Jan 19 . Jan 19 o Jan 20 o Jan 20 r Jan 20 , Jan 20 . New Year's Day Epiphany Orthodox Christmas Day Stephen Foster Memorial Day Orthodox New Year Lee-Jackson Day (Virginia) Conlederate Heroes' Day (Texas) Robert E. Lee's Birthday (Florida) Martin Luther King Jr. Day Civil Rights Day (Arizona, New Hampshire) ldaho Human Rights Day (ldaho) Robert E. Lee's Birthday (Alabama, Mississippi) Chinese New Year Kansas Day National Freedom Day Groundhog Day Super Bowl Rosa Parks Day (California, Missouri) National Wear Red Day Tu BishvaVTu B'Shevat Lincoln's Birthday (CT, lL, MO, NY) Lincoln's Birthday (Florida) Statehood Day (Arizona) Valentine's Day Susan B. Anthony's Birthday (CA, FL, NY, Wr) Elizabeth Peratrovich Day (Alaska) Presidents' Day (Most regions) Daisy Gatson Bates Day (Arkansas) Maha Shivaratri Shrove Tuesday/Mardi Gras (Alabama, Louisiana) Shrove Tuesday/Mardi Gras (Florida) Shrove Tuesday/Mardi Gras Ash Wednesday Linus Pauling Day (Oregon) St. David's Day Texas lndependence Day (Texas) Casimir Pulaski Day (lllinois) Read Across America Day Town Meeting Day (Vermont) Employee Appreciation Day Daylight Saving Time starts Holi Purim Evacuation Day (Massachusetts) St. Patrick's Day March Equinox lsra and Mi'ral Maryland Day (Maryland) Prince Jonah Kuhio Kalanianaole Day (Hawaii) National Vietnam War Veterans Day Seward's Day (Alaska) C6sar Ch6vez Day (Many regions) Pascua Florida Day (Florida) Palm Sunday National Tartan Day Maundy Thursday Passover (first day) Good Friday (Many regions) Holy Saturday Easter Sunday Easter Monday Feb 12 r a a a a a o a a a a a a a a a a Mar 29 o Mar 6 Mar 8 Mar 9 Mar 10 Mar 17 Mar 17 Mar 19 Mar22 Mar 25 Mar 26 Mar 30 Mar 31 Apr 2 Apr 5 Apr 6 Apr 9 Apr 9 Apr 10 Apr 11 Apt 12 Apr 13 Feb 12 Feb 14 Feb 14 Feb 15 Feb 16 Feb 17 Feb 17 Feb 21 o Feb 25 o Feb 25 .Jan 25 Jan 29 Feb 1 Feb 2 Feb 2 Feb 4 a a o a a a Feb 25 o Feb 26 r Feb 28 o Marl . Mar2 . Mar2 . Mar2. Mar3 . o t o a a o a a a a a FebT . Feb 10 o S .\', timeonddote.com 6 13 20 27 12 3 6 7 8 I 10 13 14 15 16 17 20 21 22 zsa| 27282s30@ 4 11 18 25 S 12-02-19 TC Packet Page 45 of 103 45 Calendar for Year 2020 (United d'. timeonddote.com Apr 13 Apr 15 Apr 15 Apr 16 Apr 16 Apt 17 Apr 18 Apr 19 Apr 20 Apr 20 Apr 20 Apt 21 Apr 21 Apr 21 Apt 22 Apr 22 Apr23 Apr 24 Apt 24 Apr 26 Apr 27 Apt 27 Apt 27 Apt 27 Apr 29 May I May 1 llay 1 May I tlay 2 May2 May 4 May 4 May 5 May 6 MayT May 8 May 8 llay I May 10 May 10 May 10 May 11 May 12 May 12 May 15 May 15 May 16 May 16 May 19 May 20 llay 21 May22 May 22 May 24 May 25 May 25 . Thomas Jefferson's Birthday. Father Damien Day (Hawaii) o Tax Dayr Emancipation Day (District ol Columbia). Last Day of Passover o Orthodox Good Friday o Orthodox Holy Saturday o Orthodox Easterr Patriot's Day (Maine, Massachusetts) o Orthodox Easter Monday. Boston Marathonr San Jacinto Day (Texas)r National Library Workers' Day o Yom HaShoah. Administrative Professionals Day o Oklahoma Day (Oklahoma) o Take our Daughters and Sons to Work Dayr Arbor Day (Nebraska) o First Day of Ramadan o Confederate Heroes' Day (Florida)r Confederate Memorial Day (Alabama) o Conlederale Memorial Day (Mississippi)r State Holiday (Georgia) r'ConfederateHeroes' Day' observed (Florida). Yom Ha'atzmaut. LawDayr Lei Day (Hawaii). Loyalty Dayr Kentucky Oaks. National Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Dayr Kentucky Derby. Kent State Shootings Remembrance (Ohio)r Rhode lsland lndependence Day (Rhode lsland) o Cinco de Mayo o National Nurses Day. National Dayof Prayerr Truman Day (Missouri) o Military Spouse Appreciation Day o Victory in Europe Dayr Conlederate Memorial Day (South Carolina) o Confederate Memorial Day (North Carolina) o Mother's Dayr 'Conlederate Memorial Day' observed (South Carolina) o Primary Election Day (West Virginia) o Lag BaOmer o National Defense Transportation Day o Peace Oficers Memorial Day o Armed Forces Day o Preakness Stakes. Lailat al-Oadr o Emergency Medlcal Services for Children Dayr Ascension Day o Harvey Milk Day (California) o National Maritime Day o Eid al-Fitr o Memorial Day o JelfersonDavis' Birthday (Mississippi) o National Missing Children's Day o Shavuol o Pentecost o JelfersonDavis' Birthday (Alabama) o Statehood Day (Kentucky, Tennessee). Whit Monday o Jeflerson Davis' Birthday (Florida) D-Day Belmont Stakes Trinity Sunday Kamehameha Day (Hawaii) Corpus Christi Army Birthday Bunker Hill Day (Massachusetts) Flag Day Emancipation Day (Texas) Juneteenth (All except Hl, MT, ND, sD, rx) West Virginia Day (West Virginia) American Eagle Day June Solstice Father's Day 'lndependence Day' observed lndependence Day Nathan Bedlord Forrest Day (Tennessee) Bastille Day Pioneer Day (Utah) Parents'Day National Korean War Veterans Armistice Day o Tisha B'Av o Eid al-Adha o Colorado Day (Colorado)r Raksha Bandhanr Coast Guard Birthday o Purple Heart Day. Victory Day (Rhode lsland) o Janmashtami o Assumption of Mary. Bennington Battle Day (Vermont) o 'Bennington Battle Day'observed (Vermont) o National Aviation Dayr Muharram o Slatehood Day (Hawaii) o Ganesh Chaturthi o Senior Citizens Day o Women's Equality Day. Lyndon Baines Johnson Day (Texas) o Labor Dayr California Admission Day (California). Patriot Day o Carl Garner Federal Lands Cleanup Day o National Grandparents Dayr Constitution Day and Citizenshlp Day o Air Force Birthday. National POWMIA Recognition Day o Rosh Hashana (Texas) o National CleanUp Day o Rosh Hashana o Emancipation Day (Ohio) o September Equinox o Native American Day (California) o Gold Star Mother's Dayr Yom Kippur (Texas) o Yom Kippur o First Day of Sukkot. Feast of St Francis of Assisi o Child Health Day o Last Day of Sukkot. Leif Erikson Day o Shmini Atzeret o Simchat Torah o Columbus Day (Most regions) o Columbus Day (Florida) o lndigenous People's Day (Many regions) o Native Americans'Day (South Dakota) o Navy Birthday o White Cane Safety Dayr Boss's Day o Navralri o Sweetest Day (Many regions) o Alaska Day (Alaska) o 'Alaska Day'observed (Alaska) o Dussehra o The Prophet's Birthdayr Nevada Day (Nevada) o Halloween. All Saints'Day o New York City Marathon o Daylight Saving Time ends o All Souls' Day. Election Day (Many regions). Election Day. Return Day (Delaware) o Marine Corps Birthday. Veterans Day o Diwali/Deepavali o Thanksgiving Dayr Acadian Day (Louisiana)r American lndian Heritage Day (Maryland) Day After Thanksgiving (Many regions) Family Day (Nevada) Lincoln's Birthday/Lincoln's Day (lndiana) Presidenls' Day (New Mexico) State Holiday (Georgia) Black Friday First Sunday of Advent Cyber Monday Rosa Parks Day (Ohio, Oregon) St Nicholas Day Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day Feast of the lmmaculate Conception Chanukah/Hanukkah (fi rst day) Feast of Our Lady ol Guadalupe Nalional Guard Birthday Bill of Rights Day Pan American Aviation Day Wright Brothers Day Last Day of Chanukah December Solstice Christmas Eve (Many regions) Christmas Eve Christmas Day Day After Christmas Day (KS, NC, SC, TX) Kwanzaa (frst day) New Year's Eve (LA, Ml, Wl) New Year's Eve 25 29 31 1 May May May Jun Sep 28 Oct 3 Ocl 4 Ocl 5 Oct I Oct 9 Oct 10 Oct 11 Oct 12 Oct 12 Oct 12 Jun 1 Jun 1 Jun 3 Jun 6 Jun 6 Jun 7 Jun 11 Jun 11 Jun 14 Jun 14 Jun 14 Jun 19 Jun 19 Jun 20 Jun 20 Jun 20 Jun 21 Jul 3 Jul 4 Jul 13 Jul 14 Jul 24 Jul 26 Jul27 Sep 11 Sep 12 Sep 13 Sep 17 a a a a a a a Oct 13 Ocl 15 Oct 16 Oct 17 Oct 17 Oct 18 Oct 19 Ocl 25 Oct 29 Oct 30 Oct 31 Nov 1 Nov 1 Nov 1 Nov 2 Nov 3 Nov 3 Nov 5 Nov 10 Nov 11 Nov 14 Nov 26 Nov 27 Nov 27 Nov 27 . Nov27 r Nov27 o Nov29 o Nov30 o Decl . Dec6 . DecT . DecS . Dec 11 . Dec 12 . Dec 13 o Dec 15 o Dec 17 o Dec 17 o Dec 18 . Dec 21 o Dec24 c Dec24 c Dec 25 o Dec 26 r Nov 27 . Nov 27 . Nov 27 r Oct 12 Dec 26 Dec 31 Dec 31 a a a a Jul 30 Jul 31 Aug 1 Aug 3 Aug 4 Aug 7 Aug 10 Aug 10 Aug 15 Aug 16 Aug 17 19 20 21 21 21 26 27 7 I Aug Aug Aug Aug Aug Aug Aug sep sep Sep sep 18 18 Sep 19 Sep 19 Sep 19 Sep 22 Sep 22 Sep 25 Sep 27 Sep 28 o a a 12-02-19 TC Packet Page 46 of 103 46 Town of Snowmass Village Agenda Item Summary DATE OF MEETING: December 2, 2019 AGENDA ITEM: Resolution No. 39, Series of 2019 - Initial 2020 Budget for the Pitkin County 1/2 Cent Transit Sales and Use Tax. PRESENTED BY: David Pesnichak, Pitkin County Regional Transportation Administrator David Peckler, Transportation Director BACKGROUND: Staff requests Council’s approval of Resolution #39, Series of 2019 to approve the initial 2020 Elected Officials Transportation Committee budget for the Pitkin County ½ Cent Sales and Use Tax. The Aspen City Council, Pitkin County Commissioners and Snowmass Village Town Council met together as the Elected Officials Transportation Committee (“EOTC”) on October 17, 2019. The proposed 2019 budget for the ½-cent transit sales and use tax was approved by the EOTC at that meeting; see the Resolution’s attachment. FINANCIAL IMPACT: Proposed 2020 budget summary: Total 2020 Net Revenues (after RFTA contribution) $ 2,013,746 Total 2020 Expenditures 4,443,547 Annual Surplus (Deficit) $(2,429,801) EOTC Savings $ 8,207,028 Unobligated EOTC Savings $ 2,638,241 APPLICABILITY TO COUNCIL GOALS & OBJECTIVES: Approval by resolution of all three jurisdictions that comprise the EOTC is necessary for appropriation of the Pitkin County ½ Cent Sales and Use Tax. 12-02-19 TC Packet Page 47 of 103 47 COUNCIL OPTIONS: 1. Approve the resolution 2. Amend the Resolution 3. Deny the resolution STAFF RECOMMENDATION: Approve the resolution. At the October 17, 2019 EOTC meeting all the parties approved the initial budget for 2020. ATTACHMENTS: 1. Resolution #39, Series of 2019 Approving the Initial 2019 Budget for the Pitkin County 1/2 Cent Transit Sales And Use Tax 2. 2019 EOTC Budget Approved October 2019 12-02-19 TC Packet Page 48 of 103 48 TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE RESOLUTION NO. 39 SERIES OF 2019 A RESOLUTION OF THE TOWN COUNCIL OF THE TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO, APPROVING THE INITIAL 2020 BUDGET FOR THE PITKIN COUNTY 1/2 CENT TRANSIT SALES AND USE TAX WHEREAS, the Town Council of Snowmass Village, the Aspen City Council and the Pitkin County Board of County Commissioners (the "Parties") have previously identified general elements of their Comprehensive Valley Transportation Plan (the "Plan") which are eligible for funding from the Pitkin County one-half cent transit sales and use tax; and WHEREAS, by intergovernmental agreement dated September 14, 1993, the Parties agreed: a. To conduct regular public meetings as the Elected Officials Transit Committee (“EOTC”) to continue to refine and agree upon proposed projects and transportation elements consistent with or complimentary to the Plan; and b. That all expenditures and projects to be funded from the County-wide one-half cent transit sales and use tax shall be agreed upon by the Parties and evidenced by a resolution adopted by the governing body of each party; and WHEREAS, at the EOTC meeting held on October 17, 2019, the Parties considered and approved the attached initial 2020 budget for the Pitkin County one-half cent transit sales and use tax; and WHEREAS, the Town of Snowmass Village Council now desires to ratify the budget approval given at the EOTC meeting by adoption of this resolution. NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED by the Town Council of the Town of Snowmass Village, Colorado, that the attached initial 2020 budget for the one-half cent transit sales and use tax is hereby approved as summarized below: Total 2020 Net Revenues (after RFTA contribution) $ 2,013,746 Total 2020 Expenditures $ 4,443,547 READ, APPROVED, AND ADOPTED by the Town Council of the Town of Snowmass Village, Colorado on the _____ of November, 2019, upon a motion made by Council Member _____________________________, the second of Council Member ____________________, and upon a vote of ______ in favor and ______ opposed. 12-02-19 TC Packet Page 49 of 103 49 TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE _________________________ Markey Butler, Mayor APPROVED AS TO FORM ________________________ John Dresser, Town Attorney ATTEST: _________________________ Rhonda Coxon, Town Clerk 12-02-19 TC Packet Page 50 of 103 50 2020 EOTC BUDGET - APPROVED OCTOBER 2019 EOTC Transit Project Funding Projection or Actual Budget Budget Plan Plan Plan Plan 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 FUNDING SOURCES: Pitkin County 1/2% sales tax 5,669,869 6,520,350 6,389,943 6,597,616 6,812,039 7,033,430 7,262,016 less RFTA contribution (81.04% of 1/2% sales tax)4,594,862 5,284,092 5,178,410 5,346,708 5,520,476 5,699,892 5,885,138 net 1/2% sales tax funding to EOTC 1,075,007 1,236,258 1,211,533 1,250,908 1,291,563 1,333,538 1,376,878 Pitkin County 1/2% use tax 1,484,002 1,000,000 550,000 567,875 586,331 605,387 625,062 Investment income & misc.166,211 187,000 252,213 261,020 287,404 138,943 159,877 Total Funding Sources 2,725,220 2,423,258 2,013,746 2,079,803 2,165,298 2,077,868 2,161,817 FUNDING USES: Ongoing / Operational Use tax collection costs & overhead 67,213 113,090 148,299 151,413 154,593 157,839 161,154 Administrative costs & meeting costs 4,781 11,700 12,400 12,660 12,926 13,197 13,474 Country Inn taxi program in-lieu of bus stop safety improvements 2,108 4,000 4,000 4,000 4,000 4,000 4,000 X-Games transit subsidy 115,000 115,000 115,000 - - - - Brush Creek Park and Ride operating costs 30,252 32,000 42,000 95,000 96,995 99,032 101,112 No-fare Aspen-Snowmass-Woody Creek bus service - year-round 650,556 662,158 690,075 838,888 872,444 907,342 943,636 WE-cycle operational support 100,000 100,000 100,000 Brush Creek BRT connecting service - spring, summer, fall (50% from Snowmass Sav 294,400 Regional Transportation Administrator 34,492 134,376 140,881 148,177 155,856 163,937 172,442 sub-total Ongoing / Operational 1,298,801 1,172,324 1,252,655 1,250,138 1,296,814 1,345,347 1,395,818 net funding available for projects 1,426,419 1,250,934 761,091 829,665 868,484 732,521 765,999 Projects Buttermilk/SH82 Pedestrian Crossing Analysis 22,753 Battery Electric Bus Program 500,000 Variable message sign on Hwy 82 - 564,019 Snowmass Mall transit station (funded from Snowmass Village Savings Fund) 50,000 - 650,000 5,578,787 EOTC Retreat, Professional Services, Regional Transportation Participation 10,000 8,000 Brush Creek Park and Ride FLAP grant match (EOTC approved 10/20/16)41,127 1,958,873 Community Task Force - Integrated Mobility System Feasability 10,000 Total Uses 1,371,554 1,723,451 4,443,547 1,250,138 6,875,601 1,345,347 1,395,818 EOTC ANNUAL SURPLUS/(DEFICIT)1,353,666 699,807 (2,429,801) 829,665 (4,710,303) 732,521 765,999 EOTC CUMULATIVE SURPLUS FUND BALANCE 9,937,022 10,636,829 8,207,028 9,036,693 4,326,390 5,058,911 5,824,910 12-02-19 TC Packet Page 51 of 103 51 2020 EOTC BUDGET - APPROVED OCTOBER 2019 a)sales tax 5.8%15.00%-2.00%3.25%3.25%3.25%3.25% b)use tax -8.6%-32.6%-45.0%3.25%3.25%3.25%3.25% c)investment earnings rate 1.64%1.5%1.5%1.75%1.75%1.75%1.75% Projection or Actual Budget Budget Plan Plan Plan Plan 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 DISTRIBUTION OF ANNUAL SURPLUS (excludes projects funded from savings funds)1,550,866 699,807 (1,779,801) 829,665 868,484.00 732,521 765,999 25% to Snowmass Village Savings until restored to maximum 274,222 - (355,960) 207,416 148,544 - - remainder to Aspen Savings 1,276,645 699,807 (1,423,841) 622,249 719,940 732,521 765,999 Savings Fund for greater Snowmass Village Area Savings Fund maximum 6,228,787 6,228,787 5,578,787 5,578,787 - - - share of annual surplus/deficit 274,222 - (355,960) 207,416 148,544 - - less 50% of Brush Creek BRT connecting service (147,200) - less Snowmass mall transit station - reduces savings fund maximum (50,000) - (650,000) - (5,578,787) - - Savings Fund for greater Snowmass Village Area 6,228,787 6,228,787 5,222,827 5,430,243 - - - Savings Fund for greater Aspen Area share of annual surplus/deficit 1,276,645 699,807 (1,423,841) 622,249 719,940 732,521 765,999 Savings Fund for greater Aspen Area 3,708,235 4,408,042 2,984,201 3,606,450 4,326,390 5,058,911 5,824,910 Revenue projections: 12-02-19 TC Packet Page 52 of 103 52 Town of Snowmass Village Agenda Item Summary DATE OF MEETING: December 2, 2019 AGENDA ITEM: Resolution No. 47 Series of 2019 - A Resolution Approving the Town of Snowmass Village Interim Small Cell Infrastructure Design Guidelines, as Defined by FCC Declaratory Ruling and Order 18-133. PRESENTED BY: Travis Elliott, Assistant Town Manager BACKGROUND: This is a continuation of our ongoing efforts to address the evolving landscape of small cell wireless infrastructure and broadband technology. Following our previous discussion and informative presentation from HR Green on November 11th, Town Staff has developed a set of interim design guidelines for any proposed small cell infrastructure in Snowmass Village. These design guidelines are now published on our website and serve as a stopgap for any new applications for small cell wireless infrastructure. Town Staff will be working to develop a more comprehensive set of guidelines and standards for this type of equipment, which will amend the Snowmass Village Municipal Code. This will require involvement from the Planning Commission, and the approval of an ordinance by the Town Council. In the meantime, the attached design guidelines will allow the Town of Snowmass Village to have some control over the design of any proposed infrastructure while these more robust standards are being developed. FINANCIAL IMPACT: There are no immediate financial impacts associated with the adoption of these design guidelines. 12-02-19 TC Packet Page 53 of 103 53 APPLICABILITY TO COUNCIL GOALS & OBJECTIVES: NA COUNCIL OPTIONS: 1. Adopt Resolution No. 47 Series of 2019 2. Adopt Resolution No. 47 Series of 2019 with modifications 3. Decline to adopt the interim design guidelines at this time STAFF RECOMMENDATION: Adopt Resolution No. 47 Series of 2019. ATTACHMENTS: ATTACHMENT A - Resolution No. 47 Series of 2019 - A Resolution Approving the Town of Snowmass Village Interim Small Cell Infrastructure Design Guidelines, as Defined by FCC Declaratory Ruling and Order 18-133. ATTACHMENT B – Town of Snowmass Village Interim Small Cell Infrastructure Design Guidelines 12-02-19 TC Packet Page 54 of 103 54 SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL RESOLUTION NO. 47 SERIES OF 2019 A RESOLUTION APPROVING THE TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE INTERIM SMALL CELL INFRASTRUCTURE DESIGN GUIDELINES, AS DEFINED BY FCC DECLARATORY RULING AND ORDER 18-133. WHEREAS, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) issued Declaratory Ruling and Order 18-133 to accelerate wireless broadband deployment by removing barriers to infrastructure investment across the country; and WHEREAS, the FCC Order 18-133 places strict parameters and timeframes on the review and approval of small cell wireless infrastructure by local jurisdictions; and WHEREAS, the FCC Order 18-133 has also given local jurisdictions the authority to restrict small cell infrastructure so long as such requirements are “(1) reasonable, (2) no more burdensome than those applied to other types of infrastructure deployments, and (3) objective and published in advance”; and WHEREAS, the Town of Snowmass Village intends to adopt permanent regulations for the deployment of this technology in the Snowmass Village and amend the Land Use Code, by ordinance, in the near future; and WHEREAS, the Town of Snowmass Village has drafted interim design guidelines that are “reasonable and reasonably directed” to clearly define the standards of Snowmass Village in the interim; and WHEREAS, the Town of Snowmass Village has published these interim design guidelines on the Town website to provide cell phone providers advance notice of the “aesthetic requirements they will be obligated to satisfy to obtain permission to deploy a facility at any given site” in Snowmass Village; and WHEREAS, the Town Council has determined that it is necessary for the preservation of health, safety, and welfare of the Town of Snowmass Village to adopt and publish Interim Small Cell Design Guidelines to govern the deployment of small cell infrastructure until permanent land use code revisions can be made to Chapter 16A of the Snowmass Village Municipal Code. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED by the Town Council of the Town of Snowmass Village, Colorado: 1. That the Interim Small Cell Design Guidelines attached hereto as Exhibit A be adopted in accordance with FCC Declaratory Ruling and Order 18-133 to govern the deployment of small cell infrastructure in the Town of Snowmass Village. 12-02-19 TC Packet Page 55 of 103 55 INTRODUCED, READ AND ADOPTED by the Town Council of the Town of Snowmass Village, Colorado on the 2nd day of December 2019 with a motion made by Council Member , seconded by Council Member . The motion was approved by a vote of in favor to opposed. TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE ______________________________ Markey Butler, Mayor ATTEST: _______________________________ Rhonda Coxon, Town Clerk 12-02-19 TC Packet Page 56 of 103 56 SNOWMASS?eINTERIMSMALLCELLINFRASTRUCTUREDESIGNGUIDELINESEffectiveimmediately,thefollowingdesignguidelinesshallapplytoanynewlanduseapplicationsfortheconstruction,reconfiguration,oradditiontocellphonetowerinfrastructure,antennae,andtransmissiondeviceswithintheTownofSnowmassVillage,asdefinedbyFCCSmallCellOrder18-133.•Notowersorantennaewillbepermittedwithin600’ofanyexistingorproposedsmallcelltowerorantennaeequipment.•Allsmallcellequipmentandappurtenancesshallbehousedinternallywithregardtothepoleoralternativetowerstructurewhichhoststhesmallcellantennas.•Electricmeteringstructuresand/ormetersshallnotbevisiblefromtheexteriorofthepoleoralternativetowerstructurewhichhoststhesmallcellantennaswherethepoleoralternativetowerstructureislocatedinTownright-of-way.ThisrequirementmaybewhollyorpartiallywaivedbythePublicWorksDirectorwhereitistechnicallyinfeasibletoplaceallorpartofameterinternally.•Theheightofthetower,antennae,and/oranysupportingequipmentshallnotexceedthedimensionallimitationsoftheunderlyingzonedistrictasoutlinedinChapter16AoftheSnowrnassVillageMunicipalCode.Ifnotspecifiedfortheproposedsite,noinfrastructureshallexceedamaximumheightof26’tall,asmeasuredfromtheexistinggradeatgroundleveldirectlybelowtheproposedinfrastructure.•Conceahnentofallsmallcellequipmentandappurtenancesshallberequired.•Anystand-alonesmallcellfacilityshallnotblockwindowsoranybuildingentrances.Totheextentpossible,polesshallbelocatedatmid-blocks,awayfromintersections.Allpolesshallbelocatedsoastoensurepropersight-triangles.•ThepoledesignintheTownright-of-wayshallmatchthecolor,aesthetics,spacing,andarchitecturalcharacteristicsofexistingstreetlightsinstalledadjacenttothepole,orinthevicinity.•Polesandtowersshallincorporatebannerarmsandluminariestoblendwiththeexistingstreetscape.AwaiverofthisrequirementmaybegrantedbythePublicWorksDirectorwhereitisdeemedinthebestinterestinthepublictodoso.•Wirelesscommunicationsfacilitiesandequipmentshouldnotbeinstalledwithinthedriplineofanytree.Page1of212-02-19 TC PacketPage 57 of 10357 •Polecaissonsshouldbecircularinnatureanddesignedtominimizeimpactofadjacentandfutureutilities.ConcretemustfollowthelatestColoradoDepartmentof Transportation(CDOT)Road&BridgeSpecificationforapplicabledesign.AlldesignsmustbestampedandsignedbyaregisteredProfessionalEngineerintheStateofColorado.•TheTownofSnowmassVillageencouragesco-locationoffacilitiesandthelocationoffacilitiesonexistinginfrastructure,suchasTown-ownedlightpoles,withthewrittenapprovalofthePublicWorksDirector.•TheTownofSnowmassVillagereservestherighttoremoveandrelocateinfrastructureifnecessary,orifalternativemethodsbecomeavailable.Approved:,,7/2ClintonM.KinneyTownManager11/25/20193:43:00PMDatePage2of212-02-19 TC PacketPage 58 of 10358 Page 1 of 3 MEMORANDUM TO: Snowmass Village Town Council THROUGH: Julie Ann Woods, Director Community Development Department FROM: Jim Wahlstrom, Senior Planner Community Development Department DATE: December 2, 2019 meeting SUBJECT: Public Hearing and First Reading of Ordinance No. 13, Series of 2019. An ordinance regarding amendments to Chapter 1, ‘Definitions,’ Chapter 16A, Land Use and Development Code, Section 16A-2-20, “Definitions,” Section 16A-4-240 "Fire Protection" and Chapter 18 of the building code’s “Fire Department Administration” of the Snowmass Village Municipal Code to address updates to the wildfire hazard provisions. I. PURPOSE According to Section 16A-5-210(a), ‘Purpose,’ of the municipal land use and development code it states: “The purpose of this Section is to provide the means by which the Town Council may, from time to time, amend, supplement or repeal the text of this Land Use and Development Code.” The Town Council is being asked to consider final language amendments to Chapter 1, ‘Definitions’: Chapter 16A of the Land Use and Development Code Section 16A-4-240 "Fire Protection"; and Chapter 18 of the Building Code’s “Fire Department Administration” as set forth in the attached Ordinance No. 13, Series of 2019. The proposed amendments are being presented by both Roaring Fork Fire Rescue and the Town’s Community Development Department Staff. Attachment 2 of this staff report includes Ordinance No. 13, Series of 2019, and its Exhibit ‘A’ which shows both the proposed edited and final version of the affected code sections. II. SUMMARY DESCRIPTION AND BACKGROUND According to Section 16A-5-210(b), ‘Initiation,’ it states as follows: “An amendment to the text of this Development Code may be initiated by resolution of the Town Council, by the Planning Commission, by the Planning Director, by any person who holds a recognized interest in land within the Town or by any citizen or business owner within the Town.” On March 4, 2019, officials from the Roaring Fork Fire Rescue (RFFR) Authority attended the Town Council meeting to present an overview of past and future wildfire mitigation projects, and to make a series of recommendations to “harden” our community 12-02-19 TC Packet Page 59 of 103 59 Page 2 of 3 from the threat of wildfire. The Town Council directed that the RFFR could proceed in coordination with the Community Development Department in preparing legislative updates. Roaring Fork Fire Rescue also delivered a similar presentation to the Environmental Advisory Board at their regular meeting on February 5, 2019. Overall, the Board was very supportive of the planned wildfire mitigation projects and recommended code revisions. The EAB passed the following motion unanimously, 4-0: “The EAB supports the Fire Authority’s recommendations to Town Council to adopt similar wildfire codes as Pitkin County.” Similar Pitkin County wildfire hazard provisions were earlier submitted by the RFFR and initially contemplated between the RFFR and the Community Development Department staff in the spring of 2019. It was found that the Pitkin County’s prescriptive nature of their wildfire hazard codes, such as the meaning of an activity envelope, measuring minimum distances on ‘flat’ ground, the 30-foot perimeter spacing for vegetation from a structure, the reduction of the density of fuels measured up to a 100 foot perimeter from a structure, or the requirement for in-house sprinkler systems for homes greater than 5,000 square feet (depending on how it is measured), did not entirely fit with circumstances in Snowmass Village. There were inconsistencies with some of the existing and varying site conditions, lot sizes, provisions of platted building envelopes or not, the floor area maximums or measurement standards, the established zone districts, PUDs and other development parameters or standards approved or adopted in Snowmass Village. As a result, it was later determined, as recommended by the RFFR and the Chief Building Official this past summer, to develop a more simplified or generalized update of the Town’s current wildfire hazard provisions. This was in lieu of re-establishing an entirely new and customized set of standards for each land use, subdivision, lot, building envelope, zone district, or applying different wildfire zone categories. Instead, an approach that would be applied broadly throughout the Village together with additional building / fire code standards seemed to be the best course to take. The revised provisions include one wildfire hazard zone for the entirety of Snowmass Village to address “defensible space” standards in the Land Use and Development Code. Hazard classifications and recommendations (including maintenance provisions) are proposed to be made by the Roaring Fork Fire Rescue rather than by the Colorado State Forest Service (who no longer reviews these applications). In addition, new building components and building code requirements are proposed for the Wildland/Urban Interface in efforts to “harden” the structures at the time of building permit applications. These land use and building code standards are proposed as set forth in Exhibit ‘A’ of the attached draft Town Council Ordinance No. 13, Series of 2019 (Attachment 2). III. PLANNING COMMISSION RECOMMENDATIONS The Planning Commission recommends approval with one condition in regard to the Amendments to the text of the Development Code relative to Chapter 1, ‘Definitions’; Chapter 16A of the Land Use and Development Code 16A-4-240 "Fire Protection"; and Chapter 18 of the Building / Fire code’s “Fire Department Administration” as set forth in 12-02-19 TC Packet Page 60 of 103 60 Page 3 of 3 the attached signed Planning Commission Resolution No. 5, Series of 2019 (reference Attachment 3). Pursuant to the Planning Commission’s recommended condition in Resolution No. 5, Series of 2019, the Town’s Board of Appeals and Examiner’s met on November 19, 2019 to discuss the effects of the proposed wildfire hazard provision updates and the Planning Commission’s recommended condition to consider a minimum percentage threshold for size of proposed additions prior to implementing the proposed building components and code requirements found in new Sub-section 18-125.3.4, ‘Exterior Walls and Siding.’ It was recommended by the Board of Appeals and Examiners that when implementing the proposed building components and code requirements found in new Sub-section 18- 125.3.4, ‘Exterior Walls and Siding,’ the standards should apply to new construction. A minimum percentage threshold for size of proposed addition in implementing the new standards was not recommended. Instead, proposed additions to existing structures should be able to propose matching the existing siding provided that the addition’s exterior is constructed with assemblies that meet a one-hour exterior fire rating, which is one of the options “that meet the established performance criteria,” and is already stated as such in the proposed regulations. IV. STAFF RECOMMENDATIONS Staff recommends approval of the amendments to the text of the development code relative to Chapter 1, ‘Definitions’; Chapter 16A of the Land Use and Development Code 16A-4-240 "Fire Protection"; and Chapter 18 of the Building / Fire code’s “Fire Department Administration” as set forth in the attached draft of Town Council Ordinance No. 13, Series of 2019, and its Exhibit ‘A’ (with both the edited and final versions – in Attachment 2), which is a duplicate from Exhibit ‘A’ in Planning Commission Resolution No. 5, Series of 2019 (Attachment 3). V. ATTACHMENTS Attachment 1: Public hearing publication notice; Attachment 2: Ordinance No. 13, Series of 2019, with its referenced Exhibit ‘A’ for the proposed edited and final version of the Amendment to the text of the Development Code for the wildfire hazard provision updates; Attachment 3: Signed Planning Commission Resolution No. 5, Series of 2019. (Note: it’s Exhibit ‘A’ matches that shown in Ordinance No. 13, Series of 2019); Attachment 4: Staff Report Analysis with its referenced Attachments A and B, that include referral comments and an article. 12-02-19 TC Packet Page 61 of 103 61 SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT A PUBLIC HEARING WILL BE HELD BEFORE THE SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL. THE PUBLIC IS INVITED TO ATTEND AND COMMENT. DATE: December 2, 2019 TIME: During a regular meeting that begins at 4:00 P.M. WHERE: Town Council Chambers Town Hall, 130 Kearns Road Snowmass Village, CO WHY: To hear public comments regarding the consideration of Ordinance No. 13, Series of 2019, to amend Chapter 16A, Land Use and Development Code, Section 16A-2-20, “Definitions,” Section 16A-4-240 "Fire Protection" and Chapter 18 of the building / fire code’s “Fire Department Administration” of the Snowmass Village Municipal Code to incorporate updates to the wildfire hazard provisions. CODE: The application will be processed pursuant to Section 16A-5-210, ‘Amendments to text of Development Code,’ of the Municipal Code. INFO: Additional information regarding the proposal is available for inspection at the Snowmass Village Community Development Department, by telephone at (970) 923-5524 during normal business hours, or via the Town’s web page at: https://docs.tosv.com/WebLink/Browse.aspx?id=135447&dbid=0&repo=TOSV Written comments are encouraged and will be accepted until the close of the public hearing. For inclusion of written comments in the staff report, submissions must be received a minimum of 10 days prior to the public hearing to the following address: Snowmass Village Community Development Department P.O. Box 5010 Snowmass Village, CO 81615 Attention: Jim Wahlstrom, Senior Planner; Email: jimwahlstrom@tosv.com Additional public hearings may be held for which only this published notice may occur. Telephone: (970) 923-3777 Internet Access to Council email: http://www.tosv.com Citizen Feedback Hotline: (970) 922-6727 or clerk@tosv.com Rhonda B. Coxon, Town Clerk Posted and Published in the Snowmass Sun on November 13, 2019. 12-02-19 TC Packet Page 62 of 103 62 ATTACHMENT 2 TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE 1 TOWN COUNCIL 2 ORDINANCE NO. 13, 3 SERIES OF 2019 4 5 AN ORDINANCE APPROVING AMENDMENTS TO CHAPTER 1, ’GENERAL PROVISIONS,’ 6 CHAPTER 16A, LAND USE AND DEVELOPMENT CODE, SECTION 16A-2-20, “DEFINITIONS,” 7 SECTION 16A-4-240 "FIRE PROTECTION" AND CHAPTER 18 OF THE BUILDING CODE’S “FIRE 8 DEPARTMENT ADMINISTRATION” OF THE SNOWMASS VILLAGE MUNICIPAL CODE TO 9 ADDRESS UPDATES TO THE WILDFIRE HAZARD PROVISIONS. 10 11 WHEREAS, Town Council Ordinance No. 4; Series of 1998 and Ordinance No. 7, Series of 12 2000 were adopted to establish the current ‘Fire Protection’ provisions in Chapter 16A of the 13 Land Use and Development Code; and 14 15 WHEREAS, Town Council Ordinance No. 4, Series of 1994 and Ordinance No. 16, Series of 16 2003 were adopted to establish the current ‘Fire Department Administration’ provisions in 17 Chapter 18 of the Building Code; and 18 19 WHEREAS, the Town Council approved Ordinance No. 9, Series of 2018 on December 17, 20 2018, thereby adopting the 2018 Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan (the 21 "Comprehensive Plan"); and 22 23 WHEREAS, Table 1 on Page 50 of the updated Comprehensive Plan summarized the goals, 24 policies and next steps; and 25 26 WHEREAS, under the policy of A.3 ‘Protect Wildlife Habitat and Other Environmentally 27 Sensitive Areas,’ one of the next steps identified in the Comprehensive Plan was to: ‘Work with 28 the Snowmass-Wildcat (now the Roaring Fork Fire Rescue or RFFR) on wildfire mitigation to 29 minimize threats from wildfire within the Village’; and 30 31 WHEREAS, On March 4, 2019, officials from the Roaring Fork Fire Rescue (RFFR) Authority 32 attended the Town Council meeting to present an overview of past and future wildfire mitigation 33 projects, and to make a series of recommendations to “harden” our community from the threat 34 of wildfire. The Town Council directed that the RFFR could proceed in coordination with the 35 Community Development Department in preparing legislative updates; and 36 37 WHEREAS, amendments to Chapter 1, 16A and 18 of the Snowmass Village Municipal Code 38 ("Municipal Code") are necessary to implement certain action steps identified within the 39 Comprehensive Plan; and 40 41 WHEREAS, in coordination with the Roaring Fork Fire Rescue and the Community 42 Development Department, amendments to Chapter 1, Chapter 16A and Chapter 18 the Municipal 43 12-02-19 TC Packet Page 63 of 103 63 19-13 TC Ord Page 2 of 3 Code are submitted for consideration at this time; and 44 45 WHEREAS, on November 6, 2019, the Town of Snowmass Village Planning Commission 46 recommended to the Town Council via Resolution No. 5, Series of 2019, including one condition, 47 the proposed amendments to the text of the development code regarding the updates to the 48 wildfire hazard provisions; and 49 50 WHEREAS, pursuant to the Planning Commission’s recommended condition in Resolution 51 No. 5, Series of 2019, the Town’s Board of Appeals and Examiner’s met on November 19, 2019 to 52 discuss the effects of the proposed wildfire hazard provision updates and the Planning 53 Commission’s recommended condition to consider a minimum percentage threshold for size of 54 proposed additions prior to implementing the proposed building components and code 55 requirements found in new Sub-section 18-125.3.4, ‘Exterior Walls and Siding’; and 56 57 WHEREAS, the amendments contained in this Resolution are being processed under the 58 provisions of Section 16A-5-210, ‘Amendments to text of the Development Code’ of the Municipal 59 Code; and 60 61 WHEREAS, this ordinance permits Town Council updates to Chapter 1, ‘General Provisions,’ 62 Chapter 16A in Section 16A-4-420, ‘Fire Protection’ of the Land Use and Development Code and 63 Chapter 18, ‘Fire Department Administration’ provisions of the Building / Fire Code as further 64 described in Exhibit ‘A’ attached hereto and incorporated herein; and 65 66 WHEREAS, the Town Council has determined that the revisions to the Municipal Code as 67 hereinafter set forth are necessary for the public health, safety and welfare. 68 69 NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED, by the Town Council of the Town of Snowmass 70 Village: 71 72 Section One: Findings. Based upon the information provided and the staff report, analyses and 73 testimony given during the meetings, the Town Council finds: 74 75 1. The procedural requirements set forth in Section 16A-5-210, ‘Amendments to the Text of 76 the of the Development Code’ of the Municipal Code have been satisfied. 77 78 2. The proposed amendments comply with the applicable review standards specified within 79 Section 16A-5-210(e) of the Municipal Code. 80 81 Section Two: Action. The Town Council hereby adopts the amendments to Chapters 1, 16A and 82 18 of the Municipal Code, described in Exhibit ‘A,’ with the following condition: 83 84 1. Pursuant to the Board of Appeals and Examiners recommendations in response to the 85 Planning Commission’s recommended condition of approval, in implementing the 86 12-02-19 TC Packet Page 64 of 103 64 19-13 TC Ord Page 3 of 3 proposed building components and code requirements found in new Sub-section 18-87 125.3.4, ‘Exterior Walls and Siding,’ the standards shall apply to new construction. 88 Proposed additions to existing structure may propose matching the existing siding 89 provided that the addition’s exterior is constructed with assemblies that meet a one-hour 90 exterior fire rating, which is one of the options “that meet the established performance 91 criteria,” and is already stated as such in the proposed regulations. 92 93 INTRODUCED, READ AND APPROVED on First Reading by the Town Council of the Town of 94 Snowmass Village on December 2, 2019 upon a motion by Town Council Member ___________, 95 the second of Town Council Member __________, and upon a vote of ___ in favor and ___ 96 against. 97 98 READ, APPROVED AND ADOPTED on Second Reading by the Town Council of the Town of 99 Snowmass Village on December 16, 2019 upon a motion by Town Council Member __________, 100 the second of Town Council Member __________, and upon a vote of ___ in favor and ___ 101 against. 102 103 TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE 104 105 106 ____________________________ 107 Markey Butler, Mayor 108 ATTEST: 109 110 111 __________________________ 112 Rhonda B. Coxon, Town Clerk 113 114 APPROVED AS TO FORM: 115 116 117 ________________________________ 118 John C. Dresser, Jr., Town Attorney 119 120 Attachments: 121 Exhibit "A" – Edited and Final Versions of Section 1-21, ‘Definitions,’ Section 16A-2-20, 122 ‘Definitions,’ Section 16A-4-240, ‘Fire Protection,’ Section 18-124, ‘Fire Department 123 Administration,’ and Section 18-125, ‘Wildfire Hazard Areas.’ 124 12-02-19 TC Packet Page 65 of 103 65 Page 1 of 3 Certain definition in Section 16A-2-20, ‘Definitions,’ in Article II of the TOSV municipal code shall be revised, deleted or added to and shall be amended and restated as follows: •Sec. 16A-2-20. – ‘Definitions,’ shall be amended and restated as follows: Fire Department means the Roaring Fork Fire Rescue (RFFR). •Sec. 16A-4-240. – ‘Fire protection,’ in Article IV of the Land Use and Development Code shall be amended and restated as follows: (a)Service by Fire Protection District. Fire Authority. Developments and new construction on existing lots shall be located and designed in a manner that enables them to be served by the Snowmass- Wildcat Fire Protection District Roaring Fork Fire Rescue Authority and that complies with the adopted standards of said district Fire Authority. (1)Unusual fire hazards. No future development and construction on existing lots shall be approved that, due to design, size (including height) or building materials, could present unusual fire hazards that are beyond the fire-fighting capability of the Snowmass-Wildcat Fire Protection District. Roaring Fork Fire Rescue Authority. (2)Location. Development and new construction on existing lots shall not be located in such a way as to adversely affect the capability of the protection district fire authority or other public service entities to respond to fires or other non-fire emergencies in any other structure or area of the Town. (3) Fire access. Fire lanes, emergency access and fire apparatus access roads shall conform to the provisions of the Fire Code, as set forth in Chapter 18, Article VII of the Municipal Code. (b)Development and New Construction on existing lots in Areas Subject to Wildfire Hazards. (1)Purpose. There are certain types of All lands within the Town that have the potential to pose hazards to human life and safety and to property due to wildfire. The purpose of this Section is to ensure that development and new construction on existing lots avoids these wildfire hazard areas whenever possible. Where it is not possible for development or new construction to avoid these areas, standards are provided to reduce or minimize the potential impacts of these hazards on the occupants of the property and, as applicable, the occupants of adjacent properties. (2)Applicability. When the Planning Director shall The Planning Director and the Roaring Fork Fire Authority have determined that due to the vegetation, slopes and other factors present on a property lands within the Town, there is a potential for development within the Town to be threatened by moderate or severe wildfire hazards, then as such, the Planning Director shall refer EXHIBIT 'A' Ordinance No. 13, 2019 Page 1 of 12 12-02-19 TC Packet Page 66 of 103 66 Page 2 of 3 the all applications for new development and new construction on existing lots to the Colorado State Forest Service (CSFS) Roaring Fork Fire Rescue Authority ( RFFR) for review and comment. (3)Classification of hazard by CSFS. CSFS RFFR shall review the application and determine whether there is a low, moderate or high the degree of wildfire hazard posed to persons and property. CSFS RFFR shall consider the proposed design of the development or new construction on existing lots (including the planned or existing roads and water supply facilities and the configuration and location of lots), the topography of the site, the types and density of vegetation present, the fire protection measures proposed by the applicant and other related factors in making its determination. (4)Recommendations by CSFS RFFR. If CSFS RFFR finds that moderate or severe any degree of severity of wildfire hazard may be posed to persons and property, CSFS RFFR shall make recommendations as to the mitigation techniques that should be incorporated in the development or construction on existing lots. These recommendations shall be based on guidelines promulgated by CSFS the Colorado State Forest Service (CSFS) (see, for example, CSFS publications entitled "Wildlife Protection in the Wildland Urban Interface" and "Wildfire Safety Guidelines for Rural Homeowners") and may include, but are not limited to, the following mitigation techniques: a.Locations. Recommendations to locate structures outside of severe hazard areas, off of steep slopes and outside of draws and canyons. b.Manipulate vegetation. Recommendations to manipulate the density and form of vegetation, so as to create defensible space buffers around proposed building envelopes, to remove hanging tree limbs near chimneys and to establish fuelbreaks or reduce the severity of the hazard. The form and the extent of the recommended vegetation manipulation shall be based on the severity of the hazard that is found to be present. c.Structural design. Recommendations to use noncombustible materials, to require pitched roofs and to sheath, enclose or screen projections and openings above and below the roof line, as applicable. d.Water supply. If access to a pressurized water system with fire hydrants is not provided, recommendations may be made to ensure the availability of a water supply for individual structures, in the form of access to a pond, installation of an underground water storage tank, provision of dry hydrants or similar methods. e.Access. Recommendations to provide for separate routes of entrance and exit into a subdivision, existing lot or PUD, to lay out roads so as to create fuel breaks and to ensure the adequacy of access by emergency vehicles, including the provision of regularly spaced turnouts along roadways, the establishment of adequate grades and sight distances and the prohibition of dead-end streets (but not cul-de-sacs) in the project. f.Utility approaches. Access to all building exterior electrical and/or gas utilities, meters, regulators, and piping shall remain free and clear of all obstructions including fencing, or vegetation. Enclosures are permitted provided proper ventilation is installed. EXHIBIT 'A' Ordinance No. 13, 2019 Page 2 of 12 12-02-19 TC Packet Page 67 of 103 67 Page 3 of 3 (g)Maintenance. o keep roofs cleared of debris and to store flammable materials and firewood away from structures. Maintenance and Miscellaneous Requirements Recommendations: (i) Roofs and gutters shall be kept clear of debris. (ii) Roof vents shall be screened with corrosive-resistant wire mesh, with mesh one- fourth (¼) inch maximum. (iii) Yards shall be kept clear of all litter, slash and flammable debris. (iv) All flammable materials shall be stored on a parallel contour a minimum of fifteen (15) feet away from any structure. (v) Weeds and grasses within the ten (10) foot perimeter shall be maintained to a height not more than six (6) inches. (vi) Firewood/wood piles shall be stacked on a parallel contour a minimum of fifteen (15) feet away from the structure. (vii) Swimming pools and ponds shall be accessible by the local fire district authority. (viii) Fences shall be kept clear of brush and debris. (ix) Wood fences shall not connect to other structures. (x) Fuel tanks shall be installed underground with an approved container. (xi) Propane tanks shall be buried, if possible, or installed according to NFPA 58 standards and on a contour away from the structure with standard defensible space vegetation mitigation around any aboveground tank. Any wood enclosure around the tank shall be constructed with materials approved for two (2) hour fire-resistive construction on the exterior side of the walls. (xii) Each structure shall have a minimum of one ten (10) pound ABC fire extinguisher. (xiii) Addresses shall be clearly marked with two (2) inch non-combustible letters and shall be visible at the primary point of access from the public or common access road and installed on a non-combustible post. (5)Compliance. The Town Council shall consider the recommendations of CSFS RFFR, and shall apply those recommendations they deem to be appropriate as conditions of new development. Proposed construction on existing lots will be reviewed as part of a building permit submission that will be referred to the RFFR for their approval. (Ord. 4-1998 §1; Ord. 7-2000 §1) (Ord. 4-1998 §1; Ord. 7-2000 §1; new Ord. number §1) EXHIBIT 'A' Ordinance No. 13, 2019 Page 3 of 12 12-02-19 TC Packet Page 68 of 103 68 Page 1 of 3 1 Town of Snowmass Village Municipal Code 2 3 Chapter 1, Article II REVISIONS 4 5 Sec. 1-21. – Definitions. 6 7 Fire Department is the Roaring Fork Fire Rescue Authority. 8 9 Chapter 18 REVISIONS AND ADDITIONS 10 11 Sec. 18-124. Fire Department Administration 12 13 The provisions of this Article are administered by the Fire Chief of the Fire Department 14 pursuant to an intergovernmental agreement between the Town and the Roaring Fork Fire Rescue 15 Authority. 16 17 Sec. 18-124.1 Applicability 18 The provisions of this article shall apply to all property located within the municipal 19 limits of the Town of Snowmass Village. Further, these regulations shall apply to all new 20 construction, additions and remodels that affect exterior elevations. 21 22 Sec. 18-125 Wildfire Hazard Areas 23 24 18-125.1 Scope. The provisions of this Section shall govern the materials, systems and25 assemblies used for structural fire-resistance-rated construction separation of adjacent exterior areas to 26 safeguard against the spread of fire in case of a local wildfire event. 27 28 18-125.2 Definitions.29 30 EXTERIOR WALL. A wall, bearing or non-bearing, that is used as an enclosing wall for a building that has 31 a slope of 60 degrees or greater with the horizontal plane. 32 33 EXTERIOR WALL ENVELOPE. A system or assembly of exterior wall components, including exterior wall 34 finish materials, that provides protection of the building structural members, including framing and 35 sheathing materials, and conditioned interior space, from the detrimental effects of the exterior 36 environment. 37 38 FENESTRATION. Skylights, roof windows, vertical windows (fixed or moveable), opaque doors, glazed 39 doors, glazed block and combination opaque/glazed doors. Fenestration includes products with glass 40 and non-glass glazing materials. 41 42 EXHIBIT 'A' Ordinance No. 13, 2019 Page 4 of 12 12-02-19 TC Packet Page 69 of 103 69 Page 2 of 3 FIRE PROTECTION RATING. The period of time that an opening protective will maintain the ability to 43 confine a fire as determined by tests specified in Chapter 7 of the International Building Code. Ratings 44 are stated in hours or minutes. 45 46 FIRE-RATED GLAZING. Glazing with either a fire protection rating or a fire-resistance rating. 47 48 FIRE RESISTANCE. The property of materials or their assemblies that prevents or retards the passage of 49 excessive heat, hot gases or flames under conditions of use. 50 51 FIRE WINDOW ASSEMBLY. A window constructed and glazed to give protection against the passage of 52 fire. 53 54 FLAME SPREAD. The propagation of flame over a surface. 55 56 MASTIC FIRE-RESISTANT COATINGS. Liquid mixture applied to a substrate by brush, roller, spray or 57 trowel that provides fire-resistant protection of a substrate when exposed to flame or intense heat. 58 59 ROOF COVERING. The covering applied to the roof deck for weather resistance, fire classification or 60 appearance. 61 62 SKYLIGHTS AND SLOPED GLAZING. Glass or other transparent or translucent glazing material installed 63 at a slope of 15 degrees or more from vertical. Glazing material in skylights, including unit skylights, 64 tubular daylighting devices, solariums, sunrooms, roofs and sloped walls, are included in this definition. 65 66 WILDLAND-URBAN INTERFACE AREA. That geographical area where structures and other human 67 development meets or intermingles with wildland or vegetative fuels. 68 69 18-125.3 Building Components and Code Requirements for the Wildland/Urban Interface.70 71 18-125.3.1 Roofs. Class A fire-rated roof coverings on all structures.72 73 18-125.3.2 Eaves, Overhangs, Soffits. Eaves, overhangs and soffits shall be of non-combustible74 materials, ignition resistant materials, application of gypsum sheathing, or one-hour fire-resistance 75 rating on exterior wall assembly applied to the underside of rafter tails, soffit or roof deck in areas 76 exposed to radiant or convective heat. 77 78 18-125.3.3 Gutters and Downspouts. Gutters and downspouts shall be non-combustible or fire-79 resistant. Leaf/debris guards or other protective means shall be provided in all gutters to prevent the 80 accumulation of leaves, needles and debris. 81 82 18-125.3.4 Exterior Walls and Siding. Wall coverings or wall assemblies shall be non-83 combustible, ignition-resistant materials or heavy timber exterior wall assembly, log wall construction 84 assembly or other assemblies that meet established performance criteria. 85 86 EXHIBIT 'A' Ordinance No. 13, 2019 Page 5 of 12 12-02-19 TC Packet Page 70 of 103 70 Page 3 of 3 18-125.3.5 Vents. Vents shall be non-combustible and properly covered with screens that have 87 a minimum opening dimension of 1/16-inch and a maximum of 1/8-inch or rated vents shall be installed. 88 89 18-125.3.6 Windows and Skylights. Exterior windows and exterior glazed door assemblies shall90 be constructed of multi-pane glazing or tempered glass meeting established safety glazing 91 requirements, glass block units, or materials with established fire-resistance ratings or other 92 performance requirements. 93 94 18-125.3.7 Exterior Doors. Exterior doors installed, where radiant or convective heat exposure95 is likely, shall be of non-combustible or ignition resistant material, be constructed of solid core wood 96 that complies with thickness requirements, or meet established fire-resistance rating or performance 97 requirements. 98 99 18-125.3.8 Decks and Attachments. Deck surfaces shall be constructed with noncombustible,100 exterior fire-retardant-treated wood, approved wood thermoplastic composite lumber, ignition-101 resistant materials, or other material that complies with established performance requirements. Deck 102 framing shall be one-hour fire-resistant construction, use noncombustible materials or be constructed 103 with other approved materials. 104 105 18-125.3.9 Detached Accessory Structures. Accessory structures within 50 feet of primary106 structures are subject to the same minimum requirements as the primary structure. 107 108 18-125.3.10 Weeds and Grasses. All weeds and grasses within the ten (10) foot perimeter of109 the primary structure shall be maintained to a height of not more than six (6) inches. 110 111 18-125.3.11 Firewood. All firewood/wood piles shall be stacked on a parallel contour a112 minimum of fifteen (15) feet away from any structure. 113 114 18-125.3.12 Fences. Fences shall be kept clear of brush and debris. Wood fences shall not115 connect to other structures. 116 117 18-125.3.13 Fuel Tanks. Fuel tanks shall be installed underground with an approved container.118 Propane tanks shall be buried if possible or installed according to NFPA 58 Standards and on a contour 119 away from the structure with standard defensible space vegetation mitigation around any above ground 120 tank. Enclosures around the tank shall be constructed with materials approved for two (2) hour fire-121 resistive construction on the exterior side of the walls. 122 123 18-125.3.14 Address. Each lot or parcel shall be clearly marked with three (3) inch minimum124 non-combustible numbers and shall be visible at the primary point of access from the public or common 125 access road and installed on a non-combustible post or monument. 126 127 18-125.3.15 Flammable Materials. All flammable materials shall be stored on a parallel contour128 a minimum of fifteen (15) feet from any structure. 129 130 EXHIBIT 'A' Ordinance No. 13, 2019 Page 6 of 12 12-02-19 TC Packet Page 71 of 103 71 Page 1 of 3 Certain definition in Section 16A-2-20, ‘Definitions,’ in Article II of the TOSV municipal code shall be revised, deleted or added to and shall be amended and restated as follows: •Sec. 16A-2-20. – ‘Definitions,’ shall be amended and restated as follows: Fire Department means the Roaring Fork Fire Rescue (RFFR). •Sec. 16A-4-240. – ‘Fire protection,’ in Article IV of the Land Use and Development Code shall be amended and restated as follows: (a)Service by Fire Authority. Developments and new construction on existing lots shall be located and designed in a manner that enables them to be served by the Roaring Fork Fire Rescue Authority and that complies with the adopted standards of said Fire Authority. (1)Unusual fire hazards. No future development and construction on existing lots shall be approved that, due to design, size (including height) or building materials, could present unusual fire hazards that are beyond the fire-fighting capability of the Roaring Fork Fire Rescue Authority. (2)Location. Development and new construction on existing lots shall not be located in such a way as to adversely affect the capability of the fire authority or other public service entities to respond to fires or other non-fire emergencies in any other structure or area of the Town. (3)Fire access. Fire lanes, emergency access and fire apparatus access roads shall conform to the provisions of the Fire Code, as set forth in Chapter 18, Article VII of the Municipal Code. (b)Development and New Construction on existing lots in Areas Subject to Wildfire Hazards. (1)Purpose. All lands within the Town have the potential to pose hazards to human life and safety and to property due to wildfire. The purpose of this Section is to ensure that development and new construction on existing lots avoids these wildfire hazard areas whenever possible. Where it is not possible for development or new construction to avoid these areas, standards are provided to reduce or minimize the potential impacts of these hazards on the occupants of the property and, as applicable, the occupants of adjacent properties. (2)Applicability. The Planning Director and the Roaring Fork Fire Authority have determined that due to the vegetation, slopes and other factors present on lands within the Town, there is a potential for development within the Town to be threatened by wildfire hazards, as such, the Planning Director shall refer all applications for new development and new construction on existing lots to the Roaring Fork Fire Rescue Authority ( RFFR) for review and comment. (3)Classification of hazard by RFFR. RFFR shall review the application and determine the degree of wildfire hazard posed to persons and property. RFFR shall consider the proposed design EXHIBIT 'A' Ordinance No. 13, 2019 Page 7 of 12 12-02-19 TC Packet Page 72 of 103 72 Page 2 of 3 of the development or new construction on existing lots (including the planned or existing roads and water supply facilities and the configuration and location of lots), the topography of the site, the types and density of vegetation present, the fire protection measures proposed by the applicant and other related factors in making its determination. (4)Recommendations by RFFR. If RFFR finds that any degree of severity of wildfire hazard may be posed to persons and property, RFFR shall make recommendations as to the mitigation techniques that should be incorporated in the development or construction on existing lots. These recommendations shall be based on guidelines promulgated by the Colorado State Forest Service (CSFS) (see, for example, CSFS publications entitled "Wildlife Protection in the Wildland Urban Interface" and "Wildfire Safety Guidelines for Rural Homeowners") and may include, but are not limited to, the following mitigation techniques: a.Locations. Recommendations to locate structures outside of severe hazard areas, off of steep slopes and outside of draws and canyons. b.Manipulate vegetation. Recommendations to manipulate the density and form of vegetation, so as to create defensible space buffers around proposed building envelopes, to remove hanging tree limbs near chimneys and to establish fuelbreaks or reduce the severity of the hazard. The form and the extent of the recommended vegetation manipulation shall be based on the severity of the hazard that is found to be present. c.Structural design. Recommendations to use noncombustible materials, to require pitched roofs and to sheath, enclose or screen projections and openings above and below the roof line, as applicable. d.Water supply. If access to a pressurized water system with fire hydrants is not provided, recommendations may be made to ensure the availability of a water supply for individual structures, in the form of access to a pond, installation of an underground water storage tank, provision of dry hydrants or similar methods. e.Access. Recommendations to provide for separate routes of entrance and exit into a subdivision, existing lot or PUD, to lay out roads so as to create fuel breaks and to ensure the adequacy of access by emergency vehicles, including the provision of regularly spaced turnouts along roadways, the establishment of adequate grades and sight distances and the prohibition of dead-end streets (but not cul-de-sacs) in the project. f. Utility approaches. Access to all building exterior electrical and/or gas utilities, meters, regulators, and piping shall remain free and clear of all obstructions including fencing, or vegetation. Enclosures are permitted provided proper ventilation is installed. g.Maintenance. Maintenance and Miscellaneous Recommendations: (i) Roofs and gutters shall be kept clear of debris. (ii) Roof vents shall be screened with corrosive-resistant wire mesh, with mesh one- fourth (¼) inch maximum. EXHIBIT 'A' Ordinance No. 13, 2019 Page 8 of 12 12-02-19 TC Packet Page 73 of 103 73 Page 3 of 3 (iii) Yards shall be kept clear of all litter, slash and flammable debris. (iv) All flammable materials shall be stored on a parallel contour a minimum of fifteen (15) feet away from any structure. (v) Weeds and grasses within the ten (10) foot perimeter shall be maintained to a height not more than six (6) inches. (vi) Firewood/wood piles shall be stacked on a parallel contour a minimum of fifteen (15) feet away from the structure. (vii) Swimming pools and ponds shall be accessible by the local fire authority. (viii) Fences shall be kept clear of brush and debris. (ix) Wood fences shall not connect to other structures. (x) Fuel tanks shall be installed underground with an approved container. (xi) Propane tanks shall be buried, if possible, or installed according to NFPA 58 standards and on a contour away from the structure with standard defensible space vegetation mitigation around any aboveground tank. Any wood enclosure around the tank shall be constructed with materials approved for two (2) hour fire-resistive construction on the exterior side of the walls. (xii) Each structure shall have a minimum of one ten (10) pound ABC fire extinguisher. (xiii) Addresses shall be clearly marked with two (2) inch non-combustible letters and shall be visible at the primary point of access from the public or common access road and installed on a non-combustible post. (5)Compliance. The Town Council shall consider the recommendations of RFFR, and shall apply those recommendations they deem to be appropriate as conditions of new development. Proposed construction on existing lots will be reviewed as part of a building permit submission that will be referred to the RFFR for their approval. (Ord. 4-1998 §1; Ord. 7-2000 §1; new Ord. number §1) EXHIBIT 'A' Ordinance No. 13, 2019 Page 9 of 12 12-02-19 TC Packet Page 74 of 103 74 TOWNOFSNOWMASSVILLAGEPLANNINGCOMMISSIONRESOLUTIONNO. 5,SERIESOF2019ARESOLUTIONRECOMMENDINGAMENDMENTSTOCHAPTER1,GENERALPROVISIONS,CHAPTER1GA,LANDUSEANDDEVELOPMENTCODE,SEcTION1GA-2-20,“DEFINITIONS,”SECTION16A-4-240“FIREPROTECTION”ANDCHAPTER1:8OFTHEBUILDING CODE’S“FIREDEPARTMENTADMINISTRATION”OFTHESNOWMASSVILLAGEMUNICIPALCODETOADDRESSUPDATESTOTHEWILDFIREHAZARDPROVISIONS.WHEREAS,TownCouncilOrdinanceNo.4;Seriesof1998andOrdinanceNo.7,Seriesof2000wereadoptedtoestablishthecurrent‘FireProtection’provisionsinChapter16AoftheLandUseandDevelopmentCode;andWHEREAS,TownCouncilOrdinanceNo.4,Seriesof1994andOrdinanceNo.16,Seriesof2003wereadoptedtoestablishthecurrent‘FireDepartmentAdministration’provisionsinChapter18oftheBuildingCode;andWHEREAS,theTownCouncilapprovedOrdinanceNo.9,Seriesof2018onDecember17,2018,therebyadoptingthe2018TownofSnowmassVillageComprehensivePlan(theComprehensivePlan’);andWHEREAS,Table1onPage50oftheupdatedComprehensivePlansummarizedthegoals,policiesandnextsteps;andWHEREAS,underthepolicyofA.3‘ProtectWildlifeHabitatandOtherEnvironmentallySensitiveAreas,’oneofthenextstepsidentifiedintheComprehensivePlanwasto:‘WorkwiththeSnowmass-WÜdcat(nowtheRoaringForkFireRescue orRFFR)onwildfiremitigationtominimi2ethreatsfromwildfirewithintheVillage’;andWHEREAS,OnMarch4,2019,officialsfromtheRoaringForkFireRescue(RFFR)AuthorityattendedtheTownCouncilmeetingtopresentanoverviewofpastandfuturewildfiremitigationprojects,andtomakeaseriesofrecommendationsto“harden”ourcommunityfromthethreatofwildfire.The TownCouncildirectedthattheRFFRcouldproceedincoordinationwiththeCommunityDevelopmentDepartmentinpreparinglegislativeupdates;andWHEREAS,amendmentsto Chapter1,16Aand18oftheSnowmassVillageMunicipalCode(‘MunicipalCode”)arenecessarytoimplementcertainactionstepsidentifiedwithintheComprehensivePlan;andWHEREAS,incoordinationwiththeRoaringFork FireRescueandtheCommunityDevelopmentDepartment,amendmentstoChapter1,ChapterlEAandChapter18theMunicipalATTACHMENT 312-02-19 TC PacketPage 78 of 10375 PlanningCommission Resolution19-5WildfireHazardProvisionCodeRevisionsPage2of3Codearesubmittedforconsiderationat thistime;andWHEREAS,theamendmentscontainedinthisResolutionarebeingprocessedundertheprovisionsofSection16A-5-210,‘AmendmentstotextofDevelopmentCode’oftheMunicipalCode;andWHEREAS,thisresolutionrecommendsthatTownCouncilupdateSection16A-4-420,‘FireProtection’oftheLandUseandDevelopmentCodeandChapter18,‘FireDepartmentAdministration’provisionsoftheBuilding/FireCodeasfurtherdescribedinExhibit‘A’attachedheretoandincorporatedherein;andWHEREAS,thePlanningCommissionhasdeterminedthattherevisionstotheMunicipalCodeashereinaftersetfortharenecessaryforthepublichealth,safetyandwelfare.NOW,THEREFORE,BEITRESOLVED,bythePlanningCommissionoftheTownofSnowmassVillage:SectionOne:Findings.Basedupontheinformationprovidedandthestaffreport,analysesandtestimonygivenduringthemeetings,thePlanningCommissionfindsasfollows:1.TheproceduralrequirementssetforthinSection16A-5-210,‘AmendmentstotheTextoftheoftheDevelopmentCode’oftheMunicipalCode havebeen satisfied.2.TheproposedamendmentscomplywiththeapplicablereviewstandardsspecifiedwithinSection16A-5-210(e)oftheMunicipalCode.SectionTwo:RecommendationstotheTownCouncil.ThePlanningCommissionrecommendsthattheTownCounciladopttheamendmentstoChapters1,16Aand18oftheMunicipalCode,describedinExhibit‘A,’withthefollowingcondition:1.Aminimumpercentagethresholdforsizeofproposedadditionsought tobeprovidedandconsideredbetweentheCommunityDevelopmentDirector,theChiefBuildingOfficialandtheBoardofAppealsandExaminerspriortoimplementingtheproposedbuildingcomponentsandcoderequirementsfoundinnewSub-section18-125.3.4,‘ExteriorWallsandSiding.’INTRODUCED,READ,ANDAPPROVED,asamended,bythePlanningCommissionoftheTownofSnowmassVillageonNovember6,2019,uponamotionbyCommissionMemberFridstein,thesecondofCommissionMemberGustafson,anduponavoteof6infavorandOagainst.(PlanningCommissionMemberRiceabsent)12-02-19 TC PacketPage 79 of 10376 PlanningCommissionResolution19-SWildfireHazardProvision CodeRevisionspage3of3TOWNOFSNOWMASSVILLAGEPLANNINGCOMMISSIONt1JIPatricki.Yelty,Chai\manATtEST:tjCindyFart’,PlanningCommissionSecretaryAttachments:Exhibit“A”—EditedandFinalVersionsofSection1-21,‘Definitions,’Section16A-2-20,‘Definitions,’Section1GA-4-240,‘FireProtection,’Section18-124,‘FireDepartmentAdministration,’andSection18-125,‘WildfireHazardAreas.’12-02-19 TC PacketPage 80 of 10377 ATTACHMENT 4 Page 1 of 3 STAFF REPORT ANALYSIS APPLICABLE REGULATIONS Municipal Code review criteria that regulates proposed amendments to text of land use and development code include Section 16A-5-210, ‘Amendments to text of Development Code.’ Article V, Division 2, Procedures for Review of Particular Application, and Section 16A-5-210. ‘Amendments to text of Development Code.’ Section 16A-5-210(c). Procedure. The following procedures shall apply to an application for an amendment to the text of the Development Code. These procedures are illustrated in Figure 5-2, Text or Map Amendment Procedures (as shown or illustrated in the municipal code). (1) Pre-application conference. Attendance at a pre-application conference is optional, but recommended, prior to submission of an application for an amendment to the text of the Development Code. Pre-application meetings were held between the Roaring Fork Fire Rescue and the Town’s Community Development Department staff, including the Chief Building Official and the Community Development Director, in April and May of 2019, to initially overview proposed code changes similar to the Pitkin County code involving multiple wildfire hazard zones, each with different restrictions and standards. At the beginning of the summer season, it was determined that a more simplified or generalized land use code update with one wildfire hazard zone and accompanying “defensible space” standards should suffice for Snowmass Village’s size. The “hardening” standards in the building / fire code are also proposed for implementation with building permit applications. These proposed changes are being presented in Ordinance No. 13, Series of 2019, and its Exhibit ‘A’ (with both edited and final versions). See Attachment 2 of this packet. (2) Submission of application. The applicant shall submit an application to the Planning Director that contains those materials specified in Section 16A-5-210 (d), Submission Contents. In conjunction with the RFFR, the Community Development Department prepared the application materials and referred the proposed legislative municipal code changes to various Town Departments, districts and other agencies on August 22, 2019. The application materials may be found on the Town web page via this link: https://docs.tosv.com/WebLink/Browse.aspx?id=135447&dbid=0&repo=TOSV Otherwise, Staff finds the application to be complete. (3) Staff review. Staff review of the application shall be accomplished, as specified in Section 16A-5-210, Staff Review of Application. 12-02-19 TC Packet Page 82 of 103 78 ATTACHMENT 4 Page 2 of 3 This report serves as a description and analysis of the application for the amendments to code text and includes precise wording of the proposed amendments as shown in Exhibit ‘A’ (in edited and final versions) of the attached draft Ordinance No. 13, Series of 2019 (Attachment 2 of this packet). Reference the referral comments received from Black Hills Energy Corp dated August 20, 2019 with follow up comments from the Roaring Fork Fire Rescue dated September 5, 2019 in Attachment A. Their recommendations were incorporated into the draft code text amendments. The specific proposed language is: “Utility approaches. Access to all building exterior electrical and/or gas utilities, meters, regulators, and piping shall remain free and clear of all obstructions including fencing, or vegetation. Enclosures are permitted provided proper ventilation is installed.” (4) Planning Commission review. “A complete copy of the application shall be forwarded to the Planning Commission, together with a copy of the staff review. The Planning Commission shall review the application, considering the standards of Section 16A-5-210 (e), Review Standards, and shall make its recommendations to the Town Council.” Reference the staff analysis further below regarding the compliance with the Town code’s review standards under Section 16A-5-210(e), ‘Review Standards,’ in this report. This is similar to the report presented to the Planning Commissioners. The Planning Commission acted favorably upon Resolution No. 5, Series of 2019, with a recommended condition (see Attachment 3 of this packet). (5) Public hearing. Prior to second reading of such ordinance, the Town Council shall hold a public hearing. Public notice of the hearing shall be given by publication of notice, pursuant to Section 16A-5-60 (b), Manner and Timing of Notice. The Town Council shall consider the application, any relevant support materials, the staff report, the Planning Commission's recommendation and the public testimony given at the public hearing. Following closure of the public hearing, the Town Council shall adopt the ordinance, adopt the ordinance with modifications or deny the ordinance, considering the standards in Section 16A-5- 210 (e), Review Standards. If the Council shall make modifications to the ordinance prior to adoption it may, but need not, remand the application to the Planning Commission for further recommendations. A public hearing notice for the proposed Amendments to the text of the Development Code is required for the Town Council meetings and prior to the second reading of an ordinance. The notice for the public hearing scheduled for the December 2, 2019 meeting was printed in the Snowmass Sun on November 13, 2019. 12-02-19 TC Packet Page 83 of 103 79 ATTACHMENT 4 Page 3 of 3 Section 16A-5-210(e). Review Standards. An application for an amendment to the text of the Development Code shall comply with the following standards: (1) Consistent with purposes. The proposed amendment shall be consistent with the purposes of this Development Code. This Development Code has been promulgated by the Town of Snowmass Village, Colorado, as a codification of all the ordinances of the Town of Snowmass Village of a general and permanent nature through Ordinance No. 4, Series of 1994 (as has been amended from time to time) for the purpose of providing an up-to-date code of ordinances, properly organized and indexed, in published form for the use of the citizens and officials of the Town. The purpose of the proposed Ordinance No. 13, Series of 2019, is to further update and properly organize and index the code of ordinances and is consistent with the purpose of this Development Code. (2) Not conflict with other provisions. The proposed amendment shall not conflict with any other applicable provisions of this Development Code. The proposed Ordinance No. 13, Series of 2019, does not conflict with any other applicable provisions of the Development Code and specifically serves to enhance the wildfire hazard provisions that the municipal code already has adopted. (3) Consistent with Comprehensive Plan. The proposed amendment shall be consistent with the Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan. The proposed amendments are consistent with the Comprehensive Plan. Town Council passed Ordinance No. 9, Series of 2018 on December 17, 2018, which adopted the 2018 Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan (the "Comprehensive Plan"). On page 50, under the policy of A.3 ‘Protect Wildlife Habitat and Other Environmentally Sensitive Areas,’ one of the next steps identified in the Comprehensive Plan was to: ‘Work with the Snowmass-Wildcat (now the Roaring Fork Fire Rescue or RFFR) on wildfire mitigation to minimize threats from wildfire within the Village.’ (4) Public health, safety and welfare. The proposed amendment shall preserve the public health, safety, general welfare and environment and contribute to the orderly development of the Town. The goal of the proposed amendments would contribute to a safer and orderly development of the Town for the benefit of the community as a whole. ATTACHMENTS Attachment A: Referral comments from Black Hills Energy Corp dated August 30, 2019 and follow up comments from RFFR dated September 5, 2019; and Attachment B: Article dated October 31, 2019 of new report explaining how mitigation played an important role in saving homes during the Lake Christine Fire of 2018. 12-02-19 TC Packet Page 84 of 103 80 From: Ellsworth, Todd <Todd.Ellsworth@blackhillscorp.com> - BLACK HILLS ENERGY CORP Sent: Friday, August 30, 2019 1:32 PM To: Jim Wahlstrom <JWahlstrom@tosv.com> Cc: Cox, Jason <Jason.Cox@blackhillscorp.com> Subject: RE: Proposed updated Wildfire Hazard Provisions Jim, First, I would like to thank you for reaching out to Black Hills Energy for input on this code update. After reviewing the documents, the one suggestion on our behalf would be to maybe add something that the gas meter at all structures must be free of obstructions, such as fencing, shrubbery, etc. This would assist not only gas personnel with access in the event of an emergency, but other first responders, who may be on scene prior to the gas company during an emergency. In doing this, the location of the gas meter is more evident and allows personnel to get a potential fuel source for a fire isolated and shut off. I welcome your thoughts on this potential addition. Thanks, Todd Ellsworth Supervisor Black Hills Energy ATTACHMENT A 12-02-19 TC Packet Page 85 of 103 81 From: Ellsworth, Todd <Todd.Ellsworth@blackhillscorp.com> - BLACK HILLS ENERGY CORP Sent: Friday, August 30, 2019 1:32 PM To: Jim Wahlstrom <JWahlstrom@tosv.com> Cc: Cox, Jason <Jason.Cox@blackhillscorp.com> Subject: RE: Proposed updated Wildfire Hazard Provisions Jim, First, I would like to thank you for reaching out to Black Hills Energy for input on this code update. After reviewing the documents, the one suggestion on our behalf would be to maybe add something that the gas meter at all structures must be free of obstructions, such as fencing, shrubbery, etc. This would assist not only gas personnel with access in the event of an emergency, but other first responders, who may be on scene prior to the gas company during an emergency. In doing this, the location of the gas meter is more evident and allows personnel to get a potential fuel source for a fire isolated and shut off. I welcome your thoughts on this potential addition. Thanks, Todd Ellsworth Supervisor Black Hills Energy ATTACHMENT A 12-02-19 TC Packet Page 85 of 103 82 From: John Mele <JMele@roaringforkfire.org> - ROARING FORK FIRE RESCUE (RFFR) Sent: Thursday, September 5, 2019 8:10 AM To: Jim Wahlstrom <JWahlstrom@tosv.com>; Ellsworth, Todd <Todd.Ellsworth@blackhillscorp.com> Cc: Cox, Jason <Jason.Cox@blackhillscorp.com>; Julie Ann Woods <JWoods@tosv.com>; Mark Kittle <MKittle@tosv.com> Subject: RE: Proposed updated Wildfire Hazard Provisions Jim, The Roaring Fork Fire Rescue Authority fully supports the addition that natural gas meters at all structures must to be free of obstructions, such as fencing, shrubbery, etc. Our currently adopted International Fire Codes only address the protection of gas regulators and meters subject to damage by protected barriers or other approved manners. We believe the objective to keep gas meters free of obstructions for access is a very attainable and worthwhile addition to our Municipal Code revision. I would like to suggest we place the following wording in Sec. 16A-4-240 under item number (4), “(f) Access to all building exterior electrical and/or gas utilities, meters, regulators, and piping shall remain free and clear of all obstructions including fencing, enclosures or vegetation.” I am open for further advisement or additions on the matter. John 12-02-19 TC Packet Page 86 of 103 83 Mitigation Played Important Role In Saving Homes During Lake Christine, New Report Says | Aspen Public Radio 191031 Mitigation Played Important Role In Saving Homes During Lake Christine, New Report Says _ Aspen Public Radio.pdf[11/19/2019 2:59:26 PM] 1A KAJX Problems with audio on several different frequencies have been resolved. Click here for details. Thanks for your patience! Mitigation Played Important Role In Saving Homes During Lake Chrisine, New Report Says By CHRISTIN KAY • OCT 31, 2019 ShareTweetEmail Listen CREDIT ERIC LOVGREN, EAGLE COUNTY WILDFIRE MITIGATION COORDINATOR  Site MenuDonate 12-02-19 TC Packet Page 87 of 103 84 Mitigation Played Important Role In Saving Homes During Lake Christine, New Report Says | Aspen Public Radio 191031 Mitigation Played Important Role In Saving Homes During Lake Christine, New Report Says _ Aspen Public Radio.pdf[11/19/2019 2:59:26 PM] TAGS: LAKE CHRISTINE FIRE A new sudy on the Lake Chrisine fre fnds that wildfre mitigation, like using fame- resisant consruction materials and clearing vegetation around homes, played a signifcant role in saving property. The sudy, by the Community Wildfre Planning Center, was presented to the Eagle County board of commissioners by wildfre mitigation coordinator Eric Lovgren on Tuesday. "The report was fabulous in highlighting what a diference mitigation does both for the work the frefghters need to do but also in terms of saving property," commissioner Jeanne McQueeney said. It found that homes threatened by the fre survived due to both mitigation and actions taken by frefghters. The report says that residential areas that hadn’t mitigated were fortunate that adequate frefghter resources were available. But it cautions that may not always be the case. Commissioner McQueeney says Eagle County will look to build its mitigation program, called REALFire, by working with homeowner associations and fre disricts. It may also consider adding saf and equipment, such as a woodchipper to help residents dispose of wood and brush piles, to help with mitigation eforts, 1:01 Firefighter taking suppression actions on Lava 12-02-19 TC Packet Page 88 of 103 85 Mitigation Played Important Role In Saving Homes During Lake Christine, New Report Says | Aspen Public Radio 191031 Mitigation Played Important Role In Saving Homes During Lake Christine, New Report Says _ Aspen Public Radio.pdf[11/19/2019 2:59:26 PM] WILDFIRE MITIGATION ShareTweetEmail RELATED CONTENT The Lake Chrisine wildfre las summer not only desroyed three homes and torched thousands of acres of fores, it also came dangerously close to taking down poles holding the full loop of power lines in Basalt. After this close call, Holy Cross Energy partnered with Rocky Mountain Insitute (RMI) to fnd ways to keep the lights on if there’s another disaser. Holy Cross Looks To Build Energy Resilience Pos-Lake Chrisine Fire By ELIZABETH STEWART-SEVERY & ASPEN JOURNALISM • SEP 22, 2019 5:01 Listen One year ago, on June 3, 2018, the Lake Chrisine fre sarted at the Basalt shooting range. It eventually burned over 12,000 acres, forced thousands of residents to evacuate and desroyed three homes. Fire ofcials say, now, it’s time for homeowners to take action before another fre. The Community Came Together After Lake Chrisine. Can It Unite To Prepare For The Next Fire, Too? By CHRISTIN KAY • JUL 2, 2019 4:05 Listen Connect with us Drive during the Lake Christine Fire CREDIT DOUG CUPP ELIZABETH STEWART- SEVERY/ASPEN JOURNALISM CHRISTIN KAY / ASPEN PUBLIC RADIO 12-02-19 TC Packet Page 89 of 103 86 Mitigation Played Important Role In Saving Homes During Lake Christine, New Report Says | Aspen Public Radio 191031 Mitigation Played Important Role In Saving Homes During Lake Christine, New Report Says _ Aspen Public Radio.pdf[11/19/2019 2:59:26 PM] © 2019 Aspen Public Radio 110 E Hallam Street Suite 134 Aspen, CO 81611 970-920-9000 Support About 12-02-19 TC Packet Page 90 of 103 87 Mitigation Played Important Role In Saving Homes During Lake Christine, New Report Says | Aspen Public Radio 191031 Mitigation Played Important Role In Saving Homes During Lake Christine, New Report Says _ Aspen Public Radio.pdf[11/19/2019 2:59:26 PM] 12-02-19 TC Packet Page 91 of 103 88 Town of Snowmass Village Agenda Item Summary DATE OF MEETING: December 2, 2019 AGENDA ITEM: A Continued Discussion regarding the Brush Creek/Owl Creek Roundabout Design PRESENTED BY: Anne Martens, Public Works Director BACKGROUND: The Town Council approved $330,000 in the 2019 Budget to continue the design of the roundabout at the intersection of Owl Creek Road and Brush Creek Road to about a 60% level. At the May 20, 2019 Council meeting, staff presented the most recent design drawings for the Owl Creek Road and Brush Creek Road roundabout. The goal of that presentation was to receive direction on the actual size of roundabout. Staff recommended that design continue with the larger roundabout configuration and was asking for Council concurrence so that design efforts could continue. The Council asked that a broader review of Brush Creek intersections be undertaken between Faraway Road and Sinclair Road so that the road could be looked at comprehensively. This discussion was scheduled for July. At the July 15, 2019 Council meeting, pedestrian crossing improvements along Brush Creek Road at Sinclair and Faraway in conjunction with Owl Creek Road intersection were reviewed and approved. Council requested to defer the discussion on the size of the roundabout until after the Community Survey results have been submitted. At the September 16, 2019 Council meeting, the Council very briefly reviewed the topic. The Community Survey results were reviewed. Following a brief dialogue, the Town Council directed that the discussion be rescheduled for the December 2 Council meeting. 12-02-19 TC Packet Page 92 of 103 89 To date, the engineering firm SGM has completed a significant portion of the design, but is on hold until a decision on the size of the roundabout has been determined by the Town Council. The larger roundabout and slip lane is designed to handle the expected level of traffic in the Village and keep the intersection operating at a level A at all times. The larger design would be similar to Wood Road and Brush Creek, thus allowing for raised curbs and island refuges. This design is expected to have the greatest (positive) impact to reduce speeds. The smaller roundabout and slip lane size would also accommodate the expected increase in traffic keeping the expected level of service at A. Because of the decreased space, this roundabout design would have rollover curbs, thus the it is expected to be less effective at reducing speeds on Brush Creek. Attached are the Community Survey Charts pertaining to intersections (Attachment A). Attached are the Owl Creek Road and Brush Creek Road roundabout comparison drawings (Attachment B - exhibit A, B & C). The operational summary comparing the intersection improvement developed in 2014 is attached in Attachment C. FINANCIAL IMPACT: This design project was originally budgeted for $330,000. To date, approximately $150,000 has been expended. Approximately $180,000 remains. Once expended, the design is expected to be approximately 60% complete. APPLICABILITY TO COUNCIL GOALS & OBJECTIVES: The improvement projects along Brush Creek Road are part of the council goal to improve safety within the community. The improvements connect the community by improving access for pedestrians, transit, bike users, and mobility. COUNCIL OPTIONS: 1. Direct staff to move forward with design of the larger roundabout at Owl Creek Road and Brush Creek Road. 2. Direct staff to move forward with design of the smaller roundabout at Owl Creek Road and Brush Creek Road. 3. Direct staff to not move forward with implementation of the proposed improvements. STAFF RECOMMENDATION: Staff recommends that: The design efforts at Owl Creek and Brush Creek continue forward with the larger roundabout design 12-02-19 TC Packet Page 93 of 103 90 ATTACHMENTS: A. Community Survey Results for Intersection Satisfaction Questions B. Roundabout Images and Drawings C. Operational Summary Slide 12-02-19 TC Packet Page 94 of 103 91 by percentage of respondents (Excluding "Don’t Know”)Q20. When driving or riding in an automobile, please rate your satisfaction with the following intersectionsSource: ETC Institute (2019)37%25%14%14%13%11%44%56%55%54%36%29%12%17%24%21%20%22%7%3%7%11%31%38%Brush Creek & Wood Rd. (new roundabout)Brush Creek Rd. at Town Park Station/RodeoBrush Creek & Sinclair Rd.Brush Creek & Faraway Rd.Brush Creek Rd. & Owl Creek Rd. (single stop sign)Wood Rd. & Carriage Way (mini roundabout)0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100%Very Satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied/Very DissatisfiedPage 2012-02-19 TC PacketPage 95 of 10392 by percentage of respondents (Excluding "Don’t Know”)Q21. When walking or biking, please rate your satisfaction with the following intersectionsSource: ETC Institute (2019)20%26%11%10%12%10%55%45%44%42%36%30%20%18%31%30%25%24%5%11%14%18%27%36%Brush Creek Rd. at Town Park Station/RodeoBrush Creek & Wood Rd. (new roundabout)Brush Creek & Sinclair Rd.Brush Creek & Faraway Rd.Wood Rd. & Carriage Way (mini roundabout)Brush Creek Rd. & Owl Creek Rd. (single stop sign)0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100%Very Satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied/Very DissatisfiedPage 2112-02-19 TC PacketPage 96 of 10393 87%81%80%78%75%75%67%63%3%9%9%7%9%9%15%12%10%10%11%15%15%16%18%25%CrosswalksRoundabout(s)Stop sign(s)Pedestrian islands/landscaped mediansYield sign(s)Reduced speed limitsAcceleration/de-acceleration lanes0%20%40%60%80%100%Acceptable Don't know Not acceptableQ22. Which traffic calming measures currently used in Snowmass Village do you find acceptable for improving overall traffic flow and safety?by percentage of respondentsSource: ETC Institute (2019)Pedestrian activated rapid flashing beacons at crosswalksPage 2212-02-19 TC PacketPage 97 of 10394 Title:RoundaboutComparison ExhibitRevision#Dwg No.Brush Creek Roundabout Snowmass Village, COJob No.Drawn by:Date:File:PE:QC:91004DAMC1.8.19RGNBrushCreekRB-ComparisonExhibitRG118 West Sixth Street, Suite 200 Glenwood Springs, CO 81601 970.945.1004 www.sgm-inc.com Date By: Preliminary Not For ConstructionProject Milestone:13Of :Graphic ScaleIn Feet: 1" = 60'0 30 6012012-02-19 TC PacketPage 98 of 10395 Title: 115' RoundaboutRevision#Dwg No.Brush CreekRoundaboutSnowmass Village, COJob No. Drawn by: Date: File: PE:QC: 91004D AMC 1.8.19 RGN BrushCreekRB-ComparisonExhibit RG 118 West Sixth Street, Suite 200Glenwood Springs, CO 81601970.945.1004 www.sgm-inc.comDate By:Preliminary Not For ConstructionProject Milestone:2 3Of : Graphic Scale In Feet: 1" = 60' 0 30 60 120 12-02-19 TC Packet Page 99 of 103 96 Title:87' RoundaboutRevision#Dwg No.Brush Creek Roundabout Snowmass Village, COJob No.Drawn by:Date:File:PE:QC:91004DAMC1.8.19RGNBrushCreekRB-ComparisonExhibitRG118 West Sixth Street, Suite 200 Glenwood Springs, CO 81601 970.945.1004 www.sgm-inc.com Date By: Preliminary Not For ConstructionProject Milestone:33Of :Graphic ScaleIn Feet: 1" = 60'0 30 6012012-02-19 TC PacketPage 100 of 10397 Operational Summary “Roundabouts operate with the least delay, fewest stops, and shortest overall queues.” 12-02-19 TC Packet Page 101 of 103 98 Town of Snowmass Village Agenda Item Summary DATE OF MEETING: December 02, 2019 AGENDA ITEM: Executive Session PRESENTED BY: Clint Kinney, Town Manager BACKGROUND: The Town Council has reason to convene in executive Session. To convene in executive session, state law requires that the specific motion written in staff recommendations section requesting the executive session be passed with 2/3 of the governing body voting in the affirmative for said motion. FINANCIAL IMPACT: N/A APPLICABILITY TO COUNCIL GOALS & OBJECTIVES: N/A COUNCIL OPTIONS: Convene in Executive Session Choose not to convene in Executive Session STAFF RECOMMENDATION: It is the recommendation of the Snowmass Village Town Staff that the Council make and approve the following motion 1. Town Council will now meet in Executive Session pursuant to C.R.S. 24-6-402(4) and Snowmass Village Municipal Code Section 2-45(c), to specifically discuss one item: 12-02-19 TC Packet Page 102 of 103 99 a) Personnel matters, except if the employee who is the subject of the session has requested an open meeting, pursuant to C.R.S. 24-6-402(4)(f)(I) and Snowmass Village Municipal Code Section 2-45(c)(6); Provided, there is an affirmative vote of two-thirds of the quorum present at this meeting to hold an Executive Session and for the sole purpose of considering item (a) above. Provided further, that no adoption of any proposed policy, position, resolution, regulation, or formal action shall occur at this Executive Session. ATTACHMENTS: A. N/A 12-02-19 TC Packet Page 103 of 103 100