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07-05-11 Town Council Packets SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL REGULAR MEETING AGENDA JULY 5, 2011 PLEASE NOTE THAT ALL TIMES ARE APPROXIMATE ITEMS COULD START EARLIER OR LATER THAN THE STATED TIME CALL TO ORDER AT 4:00 P.M. Item No. 1: ROLL CALL Item No. 2: PUBLIC NON-AGENDA ITEMS (5-minute time limit) Item No. 3: COUNCIL UPDATES Item No. 4: CONSIDERATION OF A REQUEST BY ASPEN COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL TO THE TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE SEEKING TOWN CONSENT, AS LANDOWNER OF THE REAL PROPERTY KNOWN AS PARCEL F, HORSE RANCH PUD, TO INCLUDE THE PROPERTY IN A LAND USE APPLICATION (Time: 30 Minutes) ACTION REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: Approval or deny request --Russ Forrest/John Dresser Pagel (TAB A) Item No. 5: FINANCIAL UPDATE (Time: 45 Minutes) ACTION REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: Listen to presentation by staff and provide feedback --Marianne Rakowski ...........................Page 6 (TAB B) Item No, 6: RODEO PLACE FINAL PHASE CONSTRUCTION DISCUSSION (Time: 60 Minutes) ACTION REQUESTED BY COUNCIL: Discussion of market demand and approval denial to proceed with construction --Joe Coffey ...........................Page 18 (TAB C) Item No. 7: SUPPORT FOR C.O.R.E.'S REPORT PRIORITIZING CLEAN ENERGY AND ENERGY CONSERVATION IN COLORADO'S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY (Time: 30 Minutes) ACTION REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: Approve or deny support for the above mentioned CORE report. --Lesley Compagnone/Katherine Dart .............Page 30 (TAB D) 07-05-11 TC Page 2 of 2 Item No. 8: MANAGER'S REPORT (Time: 10 minutes) --Russell Forrest ...........................Page 45 (TAB E) Item No. 9: AGENDA FOR NEXT TOWN COUNCIL MEETING July 18, 2011 Page 47 (TAB F) Item No. 10: APPROVAL OF MEETING MINUTES FOR: May 16, 2011 Regular Meeting I Page 49 (TAB G) Item No. 11 COUNCIL COMMENTS/COMMITTEE REPORTS /CALENDARS .....I Page 56 (TAB H) Item No. 12: ADJOURNMENT NOTE: Total time estimated for meeting: Approx 3 hours (excluding items 1-3 and 8 —12) ALL ITEMS AND TIMES ARE TENTATIVE AND SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT FURTHER NOTICE. PLEASE CALL THE OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK AT 923-3777 ON THE DAY OF THE MEETING FOR ANY AGENDA CHANGES. MEMORANDUM TO: Snowmass Village Town Council FROM: John Dresser DATE: July 5, 2011 SUBJECT: Request for Landowner Consent by Aspen Country Day School I. PURPOSE AND ACTIONS REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: Approve or Deny a request by Aspen Country Day School "ACDS to consent to the inclusion of Parcel F, Horse Ranch PUD in a land use application pursuant to SVMC Chapter 16A to construct a school. II. SUMMARY OF PROJECT ACDS is contemplating re- locating the current campus from the Castle Creek valley and would like to explore the concept of using Parcel F for the new campus. In reviewing their programmatic needs for a previously considered campus site, ACDS identified a range of floor area required as approximately 50,000 to 70,000 square feet. Parcel F is approximately 14 acres. III. BACKGROUND Parcel F was dedicated to TOSV as part of the development of Horse Ranch. It is zoned "PUB" Public and pursuant to the Horse Ranch PUD Land Use Plan has permitted use by right "Public facilities to be defined by special review use approval" The site has been informally referred to as the "school site" since the review of the Horse Ranch PUD proposal. IV. APPLICABLE REGULATIONS SVMC Section 16A- 5- 40(a)(1) requires that "if the applicant is not the owner of the land,... the applicant shall submit a letter signed by the owner consenting to the submission of the application." V. DISCUSSION ITEMS: ALTERNATIVES AND IMPLICATIONS Council as the landowner can consent to the submission of an application and this is all ACDS is requesting at this point. Such consent is not an agreement to convey the land to ACDS and does not bind TOSV. Consent would allow ACDS to envision and plan a school project in order to submit a land use application for review by TOSV. Such consent does not compromise TOSV's ability to act quasi- judicially in reviewing any application. Such consent would allow ACDS to expend funds to thoroughly examine and creatively plan a campus, whereas a denial informs ACDS that such funds could be utilized elsewhere more effectively. VI. STAFF RECOMMENDATIONS AND FINDINGS Staff recommends that Town Council discuss and consider the request for consent. Davis Horn PLANNING REAL ESTATE CONSULTING June 27, 2011 Mayor and Council Members Town of Snowmass Village Post Office Box 5010 Snowmass Village, Colorado 81615 Re: Request For Town Council Consent To Submit a .Land Use Appliction for a New Aspen Country Day School Campus on Horse Ranch Parcel F Dear Mayor and Council Members: Aspen Country Day School (ACDS or the School) is represented by Tom Newland, Project Manager and Glenn Horn, Land Use Planner in this request. As you know, ACDS is seeking to develop a new campus in Snowmass Village. We have been analyzing various options for the School which will be consistent and compatible with land uses in the Town. This letter requests consent permission from the Town Council to submit a land use application to develop a new campus on Horse Ranch Planned Unit Development (PUD) Parcel F, a 14.2 acre lot, owned by the Town of Snowmass Village. Plans approved by the Town identify Horse: Ranch Parcel F as a parcel which may be an appropriate location for a school. Parcel F was dedicated to the Town as part of the Horse Ranch Subdivision/Planned Unit Development approval process. The Parcel is commonly referred to as "the School Site." The attached Site Vicinity Map, depicts Horse Ranch PUD Parcel F and land located in the site vicinity. Parcel F is bordered by Wildridge Unit 1 and Wild Oak Unit 1 to the south, west and. north. Horse Ranch PUD Parcel D borders the parcel to the east. The attached Vicinity Map depicts the platted access right of way which links Parcel F to Brush Creek Road across Parcel D. Parcel F is well located for a school. The Parcel is east facing and receives lots of sunlight. It is located near the Rodeo Grounds/Entryway including all the town facilities in this area. The proximity of the Parcel to the Rodeo Grounds /Entryway creates opportunities for shared used of ACDS and Town facilities which could be mutually beneficial. Similarly, the proximity of the Parcel to the golf course and nordic tracks would be an asset to ACDS. The 2010 Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan "Rodeo Entry CPA" designates Parcel F for Public land uses. Additionally, the Horse Ranch PUD Land Use Plan Map indicates Public Facilities to be defined by special review use approval are permitted on Parcel F. ALICE DAVIS AICPf GLENN HORN AICP 215 SOUTH MONARCH ST. SUITE 104 ASPEN, COLORADO 81611 970/925 -6587 FAX: 970/925 -5180 adavi5 @rof.ne ghorn @rof.net Since the school was founded in 1969, ACDS has leased classroom space at the Music Associates of Aspen's 23 -acre campus on Castle Creek. The School's lease with the Music Associates is set to expire in 2022. Securing a permanent campus is the top priority of the Aspen Country Day School Board of Trustees. Over the past four decades, the school has explored a variety of alternative locations, ranging from the Red Brick building in Aspen to Cozy Point South at the intersection of Brush Creek and Stare Highway 82, to the Moore property on Maroon Creek Road. While searching elsewhere, ACDS has simultaneously sought to secure a more permanent home on the Castle Creek campus. The School has retained CCY Architects and Design Workshop to design a new campus plan. The design team will be testing various conceptual plans to determine if a school is feasible Parcel F. We anticipate presenting our preliminary findings to you at a future public meeting as part of a Pre sketch Plan in accordance with Section 16A -1 -55 of the Land Use and Development Code. The School looks forward to receiving your consent to submit a Pre sketch Plan in compliance with Section 16A -1 -55 (2) d. of the Code. Thank you for considering this request. Sincerely, DAVI HOR N N INCORPORATED GL HORN AICP 2 I r �ƒ i !E 2 o c k 3 O U U) o 2 0 4-J n V ton m 3 MEMORANDUM TO: Snowmass Village Town Council FROM: Russ Forrest, Town Manager Marianne Rakowski, Finance Director DATE: June 6, 2011, Continued to July 5, 2011 SUBJECT: Financial Update I. PURPOSE AND ACTIONS REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: Review updated 2011 revised budget numbers and provide direction to staff on the following items (these items are further described in the attached spreadsheets: General Fund Volunteer Program Ice Age Consultant Extension Police Officer expense equipment Merit Pool RETT Fund RETT Revenues Summer Mountain Maintenance Open Space- Trail/Wildlife Study II. BACKGROUND Attached are the updated 2011 revised numbers for the General Fund, RETT Fund and Excise Tax Fund. The Budget Summaries for the above funds show a box containing: the 2011 adopted budget; the changes that were reviewed with you on 3/ 21/11; and an additional column labeled 6/6/11. Behind each Budget Summary, there is a sheet containing the backup detail for both the 3/21/11 and the 6/6/11 changes. SUMMARY General Fund (Attachments A B) At the 3/21/11 meeting, the General Fund showed an additional $668,423 in revenues... mostly from the property tax increase for Droste and Transportation services. The increase in expenditures from March showed an increase of $894,233, most of this is adding the expenditures for Droste and Transportation OP Summer service as well as some expenditures that were budgeted for in 2010, but were carried over to 2011. The 6 /6 /1 lcolumn includes additional revenues of $115,050, mostly due to increases in the Transfers in from the RETT and Road Fund to account for the increase in vehicle gas oil costs. There is an additional $232,745 in expenditures, which is detailed in the attachment and includes both increases and decreases in budgeted expenditures. The expenditures also includes a merit pool of $153,000, which is a 3% increase over the annual budgeted payroll amount. Since potential raises would not be effective until July l the range of raises (based on performance) would be from 0% to 6 which is similar to how it was managed prior to the economic downturn. There are a couple of requested positions that have been discussed at staff level that may be brought forward to Council during the normal budget process. We have not made any adjustments to the sales tax projections at this time, although we are anticipating being up from budget for 2011. The current projected ending fund balance for 2011 revised is $6.4M. RETT Fund (Attachments C D) There are three changes to the RETT Fund since the 3/21/11 meeting. The first one proposes to increase the RETT revenues by $185,000 based on Y -T -D RETT collections, thereby increasing the budget from $1,250,000 to $1,435,000. Through 5111/11, the Town has collected $740K. In 2010, the Town collected $1,624,000 in RETT. On the expenditure side, we increased the Transfer out General Fund for Transportation Vehicle Gas Oil increases and for the Transportation rolling stock costs associated with the addition of the summer bus service. We also added $15K for Summer Mountain Trail Maintenance. The current projected ending fund balance for 2011 revised is $23M. Excise Tax Fund (Attachments E F) There are no changes to the revenues of this fund at this time although we have not received any excise taxes y -t -d as of 5111/11. The only change to expenditures in this fund is the additions of the Fire Alarm System and the Foundation Repairs that Council approved on 5/2/11. III. STAFF RECOMMENDATION Review and discuss the attached financial information and provide direction to staff on the below items: General Fund Volunteer Program Ice Age Consultant Extension Police Officer expense equipment Merit Pool RETT Fund RETT Revenues Summer Mountain Maintenance Open Space- Trail/Wildlife Study 000* !to O O C7 z s Z Z v m o G1 O a a Z m m I c�, Z O O J O m Z O O p 3 m Z a O Z i 3 2 a, a Z i m p v p Z N v H J m r� a 3 s g z Z Z p Z o N O z W Gl z i 0 H z 0 m p m p F rt dl dl D a Z S O m p 2 r m 0 '"I Z w p m p a a a a p m O a m Z T Q C p 1 m Z 4 v H a F o pm �Xo �m °m m m F o m T c a c d Z Z O O m m a a m n n m N fT� 7C -�i m Z i Z K Oo U m N C A rHil a �O Z m p -�I u p N N C1 3p'.� A N p 0 0 A Z N a H 3 Z 2 Z 'fit z ICma <m o mo7s° m N N C D wm p Z m z v 3 4 H Z m Z C 0 O p M r O JO N Z N U1P r n C D m o c Z +n NO a (NII �D Oo p W P W �D p "y O k 1 0 A O a N n A N P C>f UI V O y Wy �yyD b lT C -91 m P N UI F P A v S A A P �D O O W O O i' g S O p O p W I� O m O p O VA ((P�� A O W W S` ;rr; 5 :V W O N O N A O V O O W O V N V V ;'ay� O O O V O N 4 W W 4 t�w'i8�s4 v0 V Hr {R H iA fih fA H! 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M 4i4 iR i/R H to S iR H .y� ifl iA f/R o P V `n V N P O O VJ 2tUg.'x A A p S :5 N A V D N 'rgln, i i p V p V �D W to k V a A rt b* iA bt +R iA M 1 W iA 1A 1 A H M to i!' +A 1 w iN H H +A 4h iN H fh V A O P AA t N N P N W �D A Ul m O W 0 0 N �D N P N l0 O O O p O T �D O O•*:'Y o'_`I 0 W W _N N N p p O (11 S O w A W W T w W ,p r V o O p O W o S o y P )D W o o c N of O O S S S S N O S O Y S S S O S S S O N d4 iq yw fR iA H H tw +A {p M U iR H (A +w r M +A ih iN iA tw {p tR P p V V O W W O O O p5'zO U 0 W V pPp N S T O O O O T O� O O p O .A u 'r s t"C" N W (Vit A O ,QV N W O V Oo O� i O O O S O O O p p ,0 0 `tp3':fp b 0p0 0 O to +w u fn to to fw to <w v+ ur sw to v+ ur ab to iw 'A a a tw to 0 A (11 �D y y �t TWx A V O� W (T N O P b W O O y W O O N A O O O p O ybb 0i W� V O P O V V W W V W m b S A S 0 10 V O oo S W O p ao p. A O po OP W 00 111 0 0 S O O S Vi P O 0. N O O N O N A W O W O O O O N o H {/t to M M fR Vf H H H M M M M {A iIR iR iA iA H iA M +A {p W A w N O O w V VI w Q b i! r N 8 V 0O pp UI V I A p p O O W S O O F a; P O r. O N O N (n 1 V O S O O O O N S S O S t S S S S S O O O N :;vfn'uU Town of Snowmass Village Budget Analysis for 2011 revised. ATTACHMENT (minus figures are unfavorable) ��ho�uncrl ,iter�s�342�1�1�1`���r� E Revenues Operating 2011 Revisions Solid Waste Revenues (Charges for recycling) TIGGER II Grant 39,776 Offsets majority of costs for Parcel C garage Imp) Property Tax (Transportation Services) 73,936 Property Tax 357,000 (Droste Property contribution) 5311 FTA Grant (Reduction in Federal grant revenues) 200,000 (2,289) Total 2011 Revenue Revisions 668,423 Expenditures- Operating Capital Ice Age funding (Consultant) Energy Efficiency Exp (Holy Cross funds expenditures reserved) (5,750) (Use remaining 2010 (185,040) Road Vehicle Replacement (Sweeper from 2010 amount reserved for this) Town Hall Roof (195,461) (Replace membrane where leaks are occurring) Transp Tigger Grant Expenses (Fast- closing Parcel C Doors LED Lighting) (16,720) Transp -Bus Service (82,152) (Add back Summer Bus Service) (174,290) Droste Property Contribution (Budget expend to PITCO Open Space) Leadership Training (P (200,000) art of Strategic Goals for the Town) Other Town Departments (S.W. P/R Benefts, Clerk Trvl /Training) (12,000) (22,820) Total 2011 Expenditure Variance (894,233) G h s UhC� ItI011c1(�ZD Re�(I5 0115 01 'a i fi 4 {2ii !NZ 3 Revenues Operating from 3/21/11 2011 Add'I Revisions 668,423 Transportation Parking Revenues (Revised based on winter revenues) Transferin -RETT (8,950) (Vehicle Gas &Oil $52K/Transportation Summer Svc $30K) 82,000 Transfer In -Road (Vehicle Gas Oil) 42,000 Total 2011 Revenue Revisions 115,050 Tota12011 Revenue Variance 3 -21 -11 6- .06-11 783,473 Expenditures- Operating Capital from 3 -21 -11 (894,233) Solid Waste Division (Recycle Dump Fees) Town Clerk (15,000) (G.A. Telephone Lines savings based on 2010 actual) 40,000 Finance (Property Tax collection Fees to Pitco) All Departments (11,140) (Health Insurance renewal savings from budget) 100,000 All Departments (Vehicle Gas Oil Increase) Transportation (121,000) (Reclass 2 existing employees to FTYR based on hours) (12,000) Shop Division (Equipment to dispense diesel engine emissions) Town Mgr /Community Relations (3,000) (Volunteer Program) Ice Age Funding (Consultant extension) (5,000) Public Safety (3,000) (Officer /Equipment) (49,605) All Departments (Merit Pool) (153,000) Total 6/06/11 Expenditure Revisions (232,745) Total 2011 Expenditure Variance 3 -21 =11 6 -06-11 !(1;126,978) goo 0 c a v m 0 a X n m z CL A a 0 A a A A p m 3 m a c 7v 'n o 7 a y Z o o c A c c� O tc e O m 0 n 3 7 n 0 f C L a 3 C X N n Z n ry v A -3 3 p R v v A m m 0 M C a ro O N 7 N 2 T O O N f rt l y O C O 0 Q O. m iik Lf ifl iii ei+ Lit L 0 co a Ul IC W W b _^a,, o o rn A O O O� 00 W N IO O 8 A O co w w (31 O O cn O 0 0 S$$ 0 8 OD Ul to to D r Z N -W _bR w o OD cn o w w w 0 C m p 00 0 0 o W N 00 v o Z w N o 0 v co w o m T w o o e o w 0 0 0 w C O w p 7 U1 Vk N P m N `G m N C O Cn H O N W W W H p H (n N N OD N OD (A F• m cn o rn m r LM m w �o D y O O O O w O v X 0 0 0 0 0 o o 0 0 0 to t» Vp J.% 1 W MA m N �{h m N N N f•, m N W uD O N O W W W N m w o rn m cn OD OD \o rn V O o o N) `u -b", 4` O cn O O O 0 0 0 O O O O O w O O N O O> j o a w DD N Q AA' �p C O S V w O V 70 9x m CA) O w w 0 O O O V O C W O 0 0 0 0 o rn m a w v 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 w 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 00 a JU% -W JW% A +A J o r -W V Q N r N N Q N .gyp 0 Ol N CT w O O !Al N O Q (n N W co OD W (A N 14 pp m o w Q o o o O rn 0 0 0 8 8 8 0 0 8 0 0 A -W AW 70 jw -W 4A Q N N N Q N cm N W 00 O Q CT N f+ O. 0 0 o m w 4 N O0D m w w O 8 p +n N w iw V OODD O� V N O O O �O O w V V 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 0 8 0 VV 40 AW O 0 W Q N N N n+ 0 O ODD Ul A 0 w w tn O N �O �O T ,OOD V a w 0 0 jw io N 0 o v o 0 0 p w w m y V N 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1W +ft -W A 0 ih fR �A M N {j� N N Q N VV O N 0 OD CA) O �a v C71 CO En Ul (71 A (71 f�i/ b Q L pp N Lin CO V O jw iA N m !O O O O O �O p r A Ow, 0 0 8 0 8 0 0 8 0 0 3 3 i ATTACHMENT 0 (minus figures are unfavorable) Revenues 2011 Revisions FTA Grant (For Bus Purchases originally budgeted in '09,'10 448,338 pushed to 2011 due to production timing) Total 2011 Revenue Revisions 448,338 Expenditures- Operating Capital Buses and Equipment (For Bus Purchases originally budgeted in '09,'10 (1,550,821) pushed to 2011 due to production timing) Total 2011 Expenditure Variance (1,550,821) Revenues from 3/21/11 2011 Add'I Revisions 448,338 RETT Revenues (Based on Y -T -D revenues) 185,000 Total 2011 Revenue Revisions 185,000 Total 2011 Revenue Variance 3- 21 -11+ 6 -06 -11 1633,338 Expenditures- Operating Capital from 3/21/11 (1,550,821) Transfer Out General Fund (Vehicle Gas Oil $52K /Transp Summer Svc $30K) 82 000 Summer Mountain Maintenance (to Aspen Skiing Company) (15,000) Total 2011 Expenditure Variance (97,000) Total 2011 Revenue Variance 3 -21 -11 6 -06 -11 (1,647,821) O,ther�Co`t%s�d „eret�ons Open Space Trails Study 28,000.00 sJ3 ZM z X m v v' H e n m o o EA n o A m o p o m ry 70, a 3 4Zl 7 0 0 o H O A A p N Z A 0 O o 0 0 0 m C O m A o 0 a c o s c c o c1 N m H n n 0 n n 3 p p O a -n a n n 3 0 m 0 A I m l a C v v 0 0 N o o= c Z 0 A 3 m v o N N 0 N N r 0 13 0 a I i m r o' m E o T S H 0 D -t p N 0 0 3 s s EA 7 T O m m m m 3 N N H H N H v O O 3 {H tit C71 (71 +F� N {f{' OD 00 n N Ul N i-+ N N W D N n O %O OD O O O� n W w C p W N 0 W w P O p p. -4 c O� 00 OD OD tit tit Q` tit V O N 000 {it O O tir V p. O_ O �O �O �o 0 0 0 �O 0 :1 V O o 0 N N 0 0 0 0 OO 0 0 0 0 0? rn N O O ul O V o .A o 0 0 0 W? tit .y .y{. tit tft V V N N OO N N tfl' N to Ul OD a to -N 0 0 0 a o O Ln 2a i, Ln o 0 0 Ln M 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 U in o 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 in Z cn o 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Ul tit C X 70 O to T 0o au w W m N w fR N tit 00 m (v H W W H O W 00 01 O O 0 0 W H O m m 0 Ul Ul (A C71 N 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ,0 0 0 0 0 0 o 0 v 0 0 X N N 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 O o 0 0 o 0 3: n N 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 N {it to yr n C Ul 00 Oo N N m N N tir N tp (M 7D T7 O� O, M 0 Q• O O Cn V OD m N 0 H of A N r+ 01 O OD O O w H O 4 .-fa V r tit tit tR tir tit N A p ti+ .yt 0 iR iit 0 J m oD OO OD O o 0 0 O O 0 0 0 0 0 0 00 v N N O O o 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 m N 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 N tit {p 7O O O y �O A H O) OV V O 0D �O D o O� rn n V tit tit .6% {i+ {it 0 tit t!t 4ft {i+ t/t tit N n Oj�1 m a, 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 v in 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 cn m 0 0 0 0 0 v 0 0 o 0 0 V o 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 V ift 70 p 00 oD OD O o p a P tit oD p N N N m m A v 41 tit tit trt tit tit tit tit rn m PO OO co O O O o 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 A v O OD N N 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 O m N 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 O N O� p N 1 -ft A 0 t O O N OD N O 0 to tit OD O\ m w om 00 14 w O 0 C7 rn o cn tia tit tit tit tit yr L tir N N m W am Ol rn rn rn 0 O o o 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 w 4 v iv N N 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 N 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 O N 'O tit N tit A O co (A Oo 0 -4 o 0 •P ,WN., v N)N.. 0 0 ti+ .yt Ht to tit tit tst bt tit lh a rn O 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Ul rn N N O O O o O O O O O O O O N 00 00 000 0 0 0 0 O N A tiR m m 0 0 p Ln Ln 0 0 En o N 00 pEm 0o N ao OD v OD {ir tit tit yr tit {p tit {p. {iR tit W m o O o 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 v N N N o 0 O O O O O O o 0 0 O N e ATTACHME F 2011 Revisions Revenues- Total 2011 Revenue Revisions Expenditures- Operating Capital Deck Remodel (Completion of 2010 budgeted work) (60,240) Total 2011 Expenditure Variance (60,240) 2011 Revisions Revenues- Total 2011 Revenue Revisions Total 2011 Revenue Variance 3 -21 -11 6 -06 -11 [Expenditures- Operating Capital (60,240) Brush Creek 300 Building (Foundation Repairs) (66,381) Creekside 100 Building (Foundation Repairs) (26,510) Fire Alarm System (Palisades) (26,010) Total 2011 Expenditure Variance (118,901) Total 2011 Expenditure Variance 3 -21 -11 6 -06 -11 (179,141) Attachment G STAFF LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT A. Issues /Goal: In the Town Council's 2011 work plan, an action included developing a staff leadership program. It was discussed in the 2011 Council retreat, that the Town wants the very best staff members who are well trained and highly motivated to serve the community. Our staff has stated that they want to be the best service organization among mountain resorts but many ingredients are needed to achieve this goal: alignment, competitive pay, benefits, along with training and personnel development. In addition, some of our senior staff members have expressed their desire to retire soon. Succession planning is now a topic of conversation. As the Town Manager, I would like to invest in both succession planning and leadership development for existing managers and potential future leaders. This type of leadership training can: a) increase efficiency b) tear down silos /improve team work and c) enhance customer service. A sub committee including 5 Directors and the Town Manager developed a set of goals and reviewed multiple approaches for a leadership program. The goals for a leadership program include: Creating a common paradigm for leadership and management within the Town of Snowmass Village organization, More effective /creative problem solving throughout the organization, Improved communication and team work, and Growing leaders within the ranks of the organization (succession planning). B. Options and Considerations Staff evaluated options available for leadership development. There are several leadership programs in the Valley and in the State. Costs for sending people to leadership development that meet the goals mentioned above can vary from $2,000- $3,000 (or more). We have found a number of outstanding local leadership resources that could create a training program that could be cost effective in providing leadership development for the organization. The other value of this type of program is for different departments to go through a learning process together and create improved multi -leve� working relationships. The subcommittee reviewed multiple approaches and interviewed two organizations to provide this type of training. After reviewing several approaches we would like to engage Brad Stevenson, who is a resident of Snowmass Village, to provide an initial training OV 1 program for the senior staff of the Town. He has significant national experience in providing this type of training and he has excellent references. If this program is successful we would propose to budget for this training for other managers in 2012. C. Request of Council The total cost for this initial phase of training in 2011 would be $17,000 ($1,400 per person assuming 12 people). We have $5,000 that is budgeted that could be applied to this type of training. At the March 21, 2011 Financial Update staff added $12,000 to support this training, we are seeking confirmation to proceed with this training. 2 MEMORANDUM TO: Snowmass Village Town Council FROM: Joe Coffey, Housing Department DATE: July 5, 2011 SUBJECT: Rodeo Place Final Construction Phase, Owner's Options I. PURPOSE AND ACTIONS REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: Staff is requesting Council direction on the construction of the last three homes and four duplex units at the Rodeo Place Affordable Housing Project. II. BACKGROUND The Town has three remaining homes; two two bedrooms and one three bedroom home, and four duplex units remaining to build and sell in the Rodeo Place affordable housing development. The Housing Department began advertising to solicit applicants for these units on April 27, 2011. The application deadline was June 15, 2011 and nine applications were received for seven units. After reviewing and qualifying the applicants four applicants have qualified for the three homes and three applicants have qualified for the four duplex units. Two of the applicants were not full time Snowmass Village employees. The Housing Department has only offered the Rodeo Place homes to full time Snowmass Village employees. All of these applicants have submitted a pre- qualification letter from a lending institution to finance these homes. Financially these applicants appear to be qualified buyers. Several of the applicants have agreed to sign a pre construction contract and pay a deposit to purchase a home or a duplex unit after a lottery is held. Even though the economic conditions are not the best at this time construction costs will most likely increase as the economy improves and this may be the most affordable time for the Town to build these homes. If Council were to decide to move ahead with the construction of these homes and some of the current applicants drop out the Housing Department will continue to advertise these units or homes in an effort to sell to a full time Snowmass Village employee. The Town has subsidized the Rodeo Place Affordable Housing Project from the beginning with a reduced land cost, infrastructure ,soft costs and a portion of the hard costs(construction) in an effort to sell these homes at an affordable price to Snowmass Village employees. 6012 0 07 -05 -11 Housing Memo Page 2 of 3 The final phase of Rodeo Place consists of three homes and four duplex units will require an estimated subsidy of $1,059.000 which is a conservative estimate and saving are anticipated. This number assumes that all of the contingencies and warranty item budgets will be used and in the last phase only approximately 25% of these funds were used. We also have some additional value engineering to consider. The modular pricing is the largest construction expense for this project and the construction team is evaluating modular pricing and the quality of another modular home manufacturer. The main concern of the construction team is the quality of the modular product and a new manufacturer must meet our current product specifications so all the homes are similar in quality and finishes. Robert Kaufmann of Resort Opportunities and Investments, LLC is here today to discuss the preliminary construction schedule and the construction budgets. Attached to this memo you will find pricing information, the preliminary construction schedule and, the estimated construction budgets for the final homes and duplex units submitted from Robert. III. OPTIONS: Council has several options to consider: 1. Council can direct staff to begin construction on the final phase of the Rodeo Place Housing project. 2. If the Council decides to build these homes the Housing Department could then hold these homes for a period of time in an effort to sell the units to Snowmass Village employees. Please note there will approximately one year to find qualified Snowmass Village buyers for some of the units based on our construction schedule. 3. Another option would be to allow Pitkin County employees to purchase the Rodeo Place homes and they would most likely sell relatively quickly because the Housing Department has had numerous calls from Pitkin County employees about these homes. Pitkin County would be the next priority if we did not have a Snowmass Village employee to purchase the homes. This is the sales process used to sell all the other deed restricted sales properties at this time. 4. The Town may postpone the construction of the final homes and duplex units until the market demand is greater and there are more applicants to insure these units and homes are sold to Snowmass Village employees. 090P 07 -05 -11 Housing Memo Page 3 of 3 IV. STAFF RECOMMENDATIONS Staff recommends option #1 and option #2 for the following reasons. If Council selects option #1 the Rodeo Place project construction will be finished and this will make the entire neighborhood happy. On going Construction is a big disruption to the neighborhood and this work needs to be finished. The duplex units are located at the entrance to Rodeo Place and the three homes are located right in the middle of this complex. Delaying this work and re- grouping to begin construction later will add expenses to the construction costs in the future. If the Town has not sold all of the homes or units when they are finished the carrying costs to hold these units is not a significant expense. Insurance, utilities and advertising are the main expenses. The Town could hold these homes or units until they sell to a Snowmass Village employee. Therefore option #3 is not recommended at this time. Delaying this construction will likely increase the subsidy required from the Excise Tax Fund to build these homes. The Rodeo Place construction team is still in place and Wardcraft the modular manufacturer is available now too. The continuing goal is to price these homes as close to the previously sold homes as possible. V. ATTACHMENTS Attachment A: Letter from Robert Kaufman discussing Rodeo Place final home construction costs. Attachment B: Rodeo Place Phase III Preliminary Construction Schedule Attachment C: Sales Price vs. Hard Cost Subsidy Draft Final Homes Attachment D: Rodeo Place Lot 1 2 Duplex Budget Attachment E: Rodeo Place Lot 20 Single Family Home Budget Attachment F: Rodeo Place Lot 22 24 Single Family Home Budget Attachment G: Rodeo Place Newspaper Ad for Final Phase Attachment H: Excise Tax Budget ATTACHMENT «A„ Resort opportunities Investments, LEO June 24, 2011 Mr. Joe Coffey, Director of Housing Town ofSnowmass Village Snowmass Village, CO 81615 Re: Rodeo Place Affordable Housing Lots 1, 20, 22, 24 Budgets There are three single family homes (Lots 20, 22, 24) and four duplex units (Lot 1) left to build at Rodeo Place. Lots 22 24 are at 100% CDs and in for permit. The Building Department has finished its review, and in to Planning. The CDs need to be updated to reflect Building Code changes (fire sprinklers, new energy code,...). Rudd Construction received final pricing from Wardcraft Homes (modular manufacturer) and major subs, and are willing to hold for 90 days. Lot 20 is a reuse of Lot 16 and at 100% DDs site /grading issues need to be finalized. Preliminary pricing from Rudd, based on Lots 16 18. Lot 1 is at 100% SDs. A new design and pricing from Rudd is preliminary, but similarto Lots 2 3 duplexes. Budget Construction Cost The latest Pricing Exercise included two new modular manufacturers. Wardcraft, the manufacturer of the last two phases, cost per sq. ft. is in -line with previous phases. Another manufacture has come -in considerably less. ROI, the design team and Rudd will review if they can meet the level of quality specs. The Budget reflects pricing from Wardcraft. Since the last phase was bid -out (18 months ago) commodity prices have increased anything with resins (sheathings, insulation, foams,...) are up considerably. Steel is through the roof. Lumber has remained fairly flat up some down some. Since the last phase, Rudd has agreed to lower their Profit and Overheat fees from 5% to 4% if they build all (7) units at once. This is reflected in the Budgets. Additional sub discounts may also be available. Also, they would drop their equipment costs another 401 so S% they have already dropped 7% in current pricing from the last phase. On Phase 2B Rudd, and the rest of the consultant team, based their fees on building (4) homes, but agreed to hold their fees when the Town Decided to build just two homes. There are additional costs to these last (7) homes due to building code changes; fire sprinkler systems and HERS modeling and testing. Also, since this would be the final phase, additional costs for export will be incurred. Lot 1 has a slightly larger retaining wall than on Lots 2 3, and the Plat needs to be amended. These costs are reflected in the Budget. A 7.5% Contingency is currently being carried in the Lot 1 and Lot 20 Budgets to reflect the status of the CDs, and will be reduced to 5% after 100% CDs are priced. Overall the cost of construction, per square foot, has continued to decline with each phase. If the Town decides to build just one home, or one duplex, the efficiencies are reduced and the cost will increase. Sales Prices Lots 20, 22, 24 The low range of the Sales Price for each home is based on /SF Gross Liv. for a similar unit /home (in the most recent phase) plus the cost of the fire sprinkler system. Adjustments upward from there could be made for the walk -out basement on Lots 22 24. Lot 1— Is anew design /smaller units. Low range of the Sales Price for each unit is based on /SF Gross Liv. for Lot 2 ($218.43) plus the cost of the fire sprinkler system. The units on Lot 1 are 1,125 SF, vs. 1,211 SF on Lots 2 3. Same /SF $218.43. im 60 ATTACHMENT "B„ (n A w}N W'C7 t0 W V6t Cn� A�Wi N� W� C7�ta �I�O� CJ'f Ai W NrF-+ i -guA y o- �a l� ttai ttt5 tnG O 'D `O y tO i t o o m r I- t- r- r- r t- r- r r r r- O C N m N O O O w O O O w O O O p, O O O O 0 0 0 w O Z w (c+ r+ r+ 1+ r+ r+ rt r+ r+ r+ 1+ r+ G+ e+ rt 5 0J C 3 i N N f-z N N W N N 3 1--* N N 0'p I- A N c O G Ot f O N O N o N O N O N A aj 0)� 4 O) Kj O A N O A m CFa O m -Di m OY1 O 4 O C7�1 i f2� O m Sp Qo Qo c v 90 cm O S11 N t 3 f! 00 CL a m 0 00 00 00 0 0 m O N N 1 w w A N w I.- I- Ln A N A A O A O N W d V t. aNj CL B. o_ O O Ln to n Ln to N ti M M he Q Ln O_ w W w v w CL CL Q. Q. 0. t2 4_ O., G. 0., t1 nt 0. a) 0. w a. 1Z m CL Q. C2 CZ C6 "C w O ty N w N ty O) w w w `G w w •C w LY/ i d w w w cn w w .,C K< `C vC K -C K `C w w i CD {.0 .0 w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w r w 0 w w a -p m m m ro c c ro m c c m ro c c m m m m m m m m m c m co cD 00 to tD 00 00 tO 0� V V ifl CO V W C CL Q CL V A A w O 'i Oq N Ol lD w N W N N CD V N v. f N N N N N e V Ol C'1 CIl Qti tD V W I-, 1.4 F-� r I�"t• fa 1 W F W W 1m�p m c O m 0 0 0 o m m o m m o m m m O m m 0 m o m tD CL m 0- CL �'.CLCLc Ca.O.a:3 CL A c ai a m w m u u oa to w o0 0o w to w w to o0 oa V oa rn A w CL j\ 00 \r.� r- N U7 fy N V9 00 N N w F-c N N w N w F-s $.A w Ol ID A w O N N W f N I'S ro i W O tD w N W GO 00 V tO 00 V Ln Ln U7 A N '�v avmm m Q lo_ 0 v ;OO 000 Qa V ��Q13 i CL 0. CL O O C G C Iz CL 0- a N n I W f (D o o (a 0 c im o rn I c f (D N H I _i N fD oI c i cn M2 W j `p fb N E05 W 05 1 1v ATTACHMENT °C' N A n w CN7�c PIm A a oo a V-a an am aa.cm ffi rn m a e ncnn m m x m 'D m ,D a?� m wWwmw wtawW f�. iA o v Q n o q fi n -n Z ^°r C1 a Z L� m 2 m a o rn, n G G m 3 N Aw:A jAA A NNNNN,N N ;tJ O O W 3 0 3 N n1 rn N ro.N w i rn rn cn�c71ro1,cn C W m N r;,� -1 A C CD �tD W mO�N_N AN N UI j[n W tJ tJ Cb CL T ro O cn d O (D W ib1co m pp O C r y .0 REM _0 C C N O S V'.O W'. W 1 W W (.11 q1 Uf O ro N m 'O 1 3 W 1i T; C D7 O Ci fD C O 10 W V�4 -4I�1 C7 f y w r0 c� O �o +SSru_S�DOmo�nocvm0,:, o T rro r r- O O N m 7 0 W� t a ;a .T1 O m C m n .m 77 n 17 C7 C1 C7 TI 'n,'t'f G1 7 a CD S1 Y Z 3 Q Q 1n N m a m co io av ono ymm vv�v��mp 9 Ra °i m T- m 3 Z' S Syr r a N N fn ,.pp m In cf) n�a ONW f. W N�N`lIN O .0 7 S O In a p70 SOT Qi N.P. QJ 07101 cp Gpj 14 CD =L 1 t U10oU1 WO)CnS7Lno00001� a1_a 3 o Non 2�2 a �3 3 g xc ar rn a m 1� 1 1 zF` p1 �Ti Nw c` D 70 S n d w W i 1 w ro v ma N o oic o c♦ c m m ro N rr ro b O N Sf� fb 7 C4 ppNpWpp7 pN to V N O V S'OO�iS j� W N O j N C L "C 1 Qo cn (D �!'1 1/0 CL S p O A �CS�A a a7 tD O CD A A OP Cf1 Z,' 3 0 CL CD 111 W A W OD W OO�1�I�k1(y(VS1� a O (n: tJ1SS fS f]1`�O T W N W W C�i7 Nj C n W N Cn 071 ,2 -n E bGl 47 w w' �ic 0 Ay tD W, top NN 000000clo! t i r -+N� =ti Ni- iNNNNNN,hi� {13j u 'mot 1e�w m co eo v u oo m [Oefl7•.W and w o i��a>!b7 h iD --4 v o 0 1o,KD 0, vcn >,v oo wwcncn ii N d w to 'v1 u rn u u m�mNm So. N to CD to CD co CID o r if p wcn 061 8 u'1cnucnuvrnuu� V C.0 10 1D' O'd Ul �P W Om co a 4 C CNotJ;CT ?Op1 tD O-4NN, R F C 1 u'A:; 07 W N W A q 01! C C/ S 1 07. .a o s cD -0 r Y.< 7 C N N NNN S o io N +�S W -4 r o d°3 3 3 3 d�3° C C7 1 Rodeo Place -Phase 2G ATTACHMENT "D" Lot 1 2 duplexes Cost to Cost to CONSULTANTS Estimated Budget Date Complete 1 m 5,000 0 5,000 2 Architectural Building Design CDl 52,734 0 52,734 3 Structural Engineer Maggert 8,029 0 8,029 4 Soil Geotechnical Engineer HP Geotech 2,625 0 2,625 5 Civil Engineer- SGM 2,500 0 2,500 6 Snow Shed Consultant 4,025 0 4,025 7 ►g@r9 5,000 0 5,000 8 Legal HOA Documents TBD 5,000 0 5,000 9 Condo Map Lot 1 SGM 10,500 0 10,500 Subtotals r 4 413 DEVELOPMENT CHARGES 10 Building Permits 0 0 0 11 Water and Sewer Tap Fees 29,290 0 29,290 12 Water and Sewer Relocates 0 0 0 13 Electric Holy Cross 1=nergy 0 0 0 14 Telephone Qwest 0 0 0 15 Gas -Source Gas 0 0 0 16 Cable Comcast 0 0 0 17 0 0 0 w y Tr Subtotals 2 0+ $'O 29 O SITE AND CONSTRUCTION 18 Sum Pum 0 0 18 M Q'i 0 0 20 fill Import 0 0 0 21 P 18,638 0 18,638 22 Radon Allowance(included In 23) 0 0 0 23 Home Construction (Based on Schematic Design) 1,355,688 0 1,355,688 24 Storm Drain 20,000 0 20,000 25 Retaina a Wall Foam Blocks included in 23 0 0 0 OTHER 26 Builder's Risk Insurance 2,000 0 2,000 27 Warranty 4 6,000 0 6,000 28 0 9 0 0 SObWtalsAL NIN" "$1$'' Q !t $,.0.. $1$' °000 29 Owner's Representative 41,888 0 41,888 CONTINGENCY 30 Contingency Consultants Dev. Charges 5.0% 8,330 0 8,330 31 Contingency Site Construction 7.5% 104,574 0 104,574 32 0 0 0 tSibtoa 'o $x $�Q a 33 Miscellaneous Town Costs 4 4,000.00 0 4,000 MAM Gross Sales Revenue $1,011,563 Subsidy per Phase 674,268 Subsidy per Home Avg. Soft Costs 29145 72,874 Hard Costs 95,691 Allocations Land 194,078 48,520 Overall Soft Costs 56,809 14,202 006)0:� Infrastructure 403,818 100,954 Total Subsidy $1,328,964 332,241 gym• r" 1�" �:1 1tMoMt�, c 28,638 7 RIA9(t 0pportuniBes Investments, LLC Rodeo Place Phase 2C ATTACHMENT "E" Lot 20 Single Family Home Preliminary Budget CONSULTANTS Estimated Budget Cost to Costto Date Complete 1 Planning 0 0 0 2 Architectural Building Design CDI 7,454 0 7,454 3 Structural Engineer- Maggert 4,733 0 4,733 4 Soil Geo Eng. HP Geotech (Allowance) 1,250 0 1,250 5 Civil Engineer- SGM 3,500 0 3,500 6 Snow Shed Consultant (Allowance) 1,250 0 1,250 7 Specifications Consultant (Included in 2) 0 0 0 8 Legal d> 0 0 0 9 �ru� Tlti At1oaace 1 z5o 0 1 Y# ffi ;19;437 DEVELOPMENT CHARGES 10 Building Permits 0 0 0 11 Water and Sewer Tap Pees 12,878 0 12,878 12 Water and Sewer Relocates 0 0 0 13 Electric Holy Cross Energy 0 0 0 14 Telephone Qwest 0 0 0 15 Gas Source Gas 0 0 0 16 Cable Comcast 0 0 0 17 r CJUbtQtalS s a$'027_ $;12'878 SITE AND CONSTRUCTION 18 Sump Pump 0 0 0 19 10,650 0 10,650 20 Fill Import 0 0 0 21 e 8,800 0 8,800 22 Re- vegetation 0 0 0 23 Home Construction (Based on Lot 16, 50% CDs) 511,104 0 511,104 24 Radon Allowance (If req'd. Includ. In 23) 0 0 0 25 O SUbt6tcllS` OTHER 26 Builder's Risk Insurance 750 0 750 27 Warranty 1 1,500 0 1,500 28 0 29 Owner's Representative $13,665 0 $13,665 CONTINGENCY 30 Contingency Consultants Dev. Charges 5.0% 2,299 0 2,299 31 Contingency Site Construction 7.5% 39,792 0 39,792 32q 0 33 Miscellaneous Town Costs 1 $1,300.00 0 $1,300 i Gross Sales Revenue 454,887 Subsidy per Phase $167,286 Subsid -per Home -Avg. Soft Costs 91 1 91,621 Hard Costs 75,667 Allocations �I Land 48,520 48,520 Overall Soft Costs 14,202 14,202 Infrastructure 100,954 100,954 Total Subsidy 330,965 330,965 aa mqw4r a ,w File: P r ,cde� pdaf ,p 20,700 20 ,700 Resort Opportunities Investments Rodeo Place Phase 213 ATTACHMENT F Lots 22 2412 Single Family Homes Preliminary Budget Cost to Cost to CONSULTANTS Estimated Budget Date Complete 1 Architect Planning 0 0 0 2 Architectural Building Design CDI 20,322 11,649 8,673 3 Structural Engineer Maggert 7,992 5,692 2,300 4 Soil Geotechnical Engineer HP Geotech 2,875 0 2,875 5 Civil Engineer SGM 230 0 230 6 Snow Shed Consultant 2,013 2,013 0 7 Specifications Consultant (included in 2) 0 0 0 8 Legal 0 0 0 9 f 2,500 0 2,500 Sufitbtals DEVELOPMENT CHARGES 10 Building Permits 0 0 0 11 Water and Sewer Tap Fees 20,272 0 20,272 12 Water and Sewer 0 0 0 13 Electric Holy Cross Energy 0 0 0 14 Telephone Qwest 0 0 0 15 Gas -Source Gas 0 0 0 16 Cable Comcast 0 0 0 17 0 0 0 SITE AND CONSTRUCTION 18 Sump Pump /Lot 22 (included in 23) 0 0 0 19�< 9,550 0 9,550 20 Filllmport 0 0 0 21 17,956 0 17,956 22 Re- vegetation 0 0 0 23 Home Construction (Based on 100% CD) 921,536 0 921,536 24 Radon Allowance (If req d. lnclud. In 23) 0 0 0 25 0 0 0 ti Sutitcitais $,Ot. 042 OTHER 26 Builder's Risk Insurance $1,000 0 $1,000 27 Warranty 2 3,000 0 3,000 28 0 0 0 Subtatais. 0001 n SUI?t0,ta 00 X24 w$?�g� 9$9;89 29 Owner's Representative 27,330 0 27,330 CONTINGENCY 30 Contingency Consultants Dev. Charges 5.0% 4,177 0 4,177 31 Contingency Site Construction 5.0% 47,452 0 47,452 32 Q Q{ Q X 0 Q �»p G7, i 33 Miscellaneous Town Costs 2 2,600.00 0 2,600 Gross Sates Revenue 873,349 Subsidy for Phase 217,454 Subsidy per Home Avg. Soft Costs a xi n X49;7„ 70,880 Hard Costs 37,847 Allocations Land 97,039 48,520 Overall Soft Costs 28,405 14,202 Infrastructure 201,909 100,954 Total Subsidy 644,807 272,403 l�cirdttic� t�s t e o Crdr t pd es; e pc is 30,006 Resort 0l*tfrtWties Investments, LLC WE NEED QUALIFIED APPLICANTS BEFORE WE BUILD THE FINAL PHASE! ATTACHMENT "G" ,�I k LAST HOMES AT RODEO PLACEI SNOWMASS VILLAGE EMPLOYEES DO YOU QUALIFY? The Town is trying to determine the market demand for new homes in Snowmass Village. Listed below are the final homes and duplex units that still need to be built at Rodeo Place; we can only build if there are interested and qualified Snowmass Village applicants. If you are interested in buying one of these homes, please complete an application and provide a lender's pre qualification letter confirming you are financially qualified to purchase the home you want. Applications are due June 15, 2011. At that time, the Town will determine if there is sufficient and legitimate demand to build these homes. Pricing is approximate as stated below and will be confirmed through a general construction contract if the Town Council authorizes moving forward with this final phase of Rodeo Place. If there is sufficient market demand, a lottery will be held to pre -sell these homes before construction begins. Address /Information: Rodeo Place Duplex 1A, 1B, 1C 1D 102, 112, 122, 132 Stallion Circle 1,117 S.F. 2 bedroom /2 bathroom 1 car garage 287 S.F. Estimated Price Range: From $250,393 to $260,393 Association Dues: g To be determined Occupancy: Minimum occupancy of 1 persons Maximum Net Worth: $188,909 to $196,465 Maximum Annual Income: $138,434 to $141,956 Address /information: Rodeo Place Lot 20,151 Stallion Circle, 1,816 S.F. 3 bedrooms /2.5 bathrooms /2 car garage 844S.F. Unfinished Basement t Estimated Price Range: From $443,000 to $458,000 Association Dues: To be determined 2jj[ Occupanc y: Minimum occupancy of 3 persons Maximum Net Worth: $332,479to$347,592 r'I Maximum Annual Income: $205,359 to $212,403 Address /Information Rodeo Place Lot 22,171 Stallion Circle 1,314 S.F. 2 Bedrooms /2 bathrooms /2 car garage 1,314 S.F. Unfinished Basement Estimated Price Range: $391,000 to $406,000 Association Dues: To be determined Occupancy: Minimum occupancy of 2 persons Maximum Net Worth: $294,697 to $309,810 Maximum Annual Income: $187,658 to $194,791 Address /Information: Rodeo Place Lot 24,191 Stallion Circle 1,486 S.F. 2 bedrooms /2 bathrooms/ 2 car garage 1,381 S.F. Unfinished Basement Estimated Price Range: $433,916 to $448,916 Association Dues: To be determined Occupancy: Minimum occupancy of 2 persons Maximum Net Worth: $324,923 to $340,036 El l Maximum Annual Income: $201,836 to $208,881 The Tojnrn of Snowrgass Village Fcusing Department [e requesting a preiqualtfiaatlon letterfrom a lender "Ari a.completed epPl[oatlon by 5.p t» ,an June 15"',..,2,01.,1.. Please check tosv.com for the site and home floor plans. Click on Town Departments, Housing Department, to find the Rodeo Place Phase information. Applioatlons are available at tosv.com or at the Housing Department, 555 Deerfield Drive, Snowmass Village. Or oall Terri Everest at 923 -2360 ext. 512 or teverestfdrtosv.com Per Chapter 17 of the Town of Snowmass Village Municipal Code, all Snowmass Village Employees with 1(one) year of more employment time are encouraged to apply for these homes. 0% to ATTACHMENT "H n m z m v M a H o o n R� T o o a h 10 tmtnn y p p O 7 0 z o 0 0 0 0 o m 3 C O v o o j 0 c oc P O s m N m N m 0 o mv R R nn A O t� ty 3 m D m jo C v v o o x m o o v n A a A m 0 En p m O S S y I I s s to o 0 p y am S H N A N N m v 3 m A A A N N N N H v p a iY} UI UI a Uf y iA iq N b+ W C. W W N D O w O W P O p. 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D t o o .i` .br .A .R iPr v..11 df d+ .A i!+ Ir `iWW m 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 N N N 0 0 00 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 N MEMO OF INTEREST DATE: July 5 2011 TOPIC: Support for CORE's Report Prioritizing Clean Energy and Energy Conservation in Colorado's Economic Development Strategy STAFF RESPONSIBLE: Katherine Dart, CORE ISSUE STATEMENT: As a result of Governor Hickenlooper's Bottom -Up Economic Development Initiative, CORE has prepared a report, "Prioritizing Clean Energy Conservation in Colorado's Economic Development Strategy. This report, already submitted to the Governor's office, will be submitted to delegates at the State House of Representatives and Senate in early June, and will include a list of signatories who support the report. CORE wishes to include the Pitkin County Board of County Commissioners in this list and is seeking approval to proceed as such. BACKGROUND: As the Council is undoubtedly aware, Governor Hickenlooper launched his Bottom -Up Economic Development Initiative earlier this year. The goal of the initiative is to create an economic development plan for the state through strategies suggested via county governments and the 14 regional Colorado Council of Governments. After attending several meetings and in discussing this process with our partners, CORE felt there was a need to specifically address Colorado's clean tech and efficiency markets in the State's strategy. As a result, CORE (along with local partners) quickly moved to create the report, :Prioritizing Clean Energy and Energy Conservation in Colorado's Economic Development Strategy which was then submitted to the Governor's office on Monday, May 16th. The report provides a general overview of five areas for economic growth: Energy Efficiency and Conservation, Renewable Energy, Transportation, Fossil Fuels and Market Synergy. CORE trusts that Council will find that the report advocates for a number of initiatives that have been or are currently being enacted in our region. Major topics include: energy based building codes, financing for EE and RE projects, increased public transportation, and incentives for efficiency or renewable upgrades. Please keep in mind that this report it is in no way meant to be comprehensive. Rather, it was drafted in an effort to put forward a diverse set of options for Colorado lawmakers to consider. The primary goal was to illustrate the myriad financial opportunities available to homeowners, business owners and investors in Colorado and also to support our regions progressive efforts. 1 The next step in this process is to secure supporting signatures (from local, regional and national partners) before submitting the report to the State House and Senate representatives in early -mid June. CORE hopes to obtain the support of the Snowmass Village Town Council for inclusion in the final list. LINK TO STRATEGIC PLAN: This item directly supports the County's Strategic Issues in Environmental Protection (most notably, Promotion of Energy Efficiencies, and Regional Activism on Environmental Issues), and Regionalism (most notably, Developing Broad Regional Policies, Regional Efficiencies, and Shared Vision). BUDGETARY IMPACT: None. STAFF ACTION: Staff wishes to get the Council's support for the CORE report in order to be listed as signatories. Representatives from CORE will be on hand to address any questions that the Council may have. ATTACHMENT A: CORE's Report Prioritizing Clean Energy and Energy Conservation in Colorado's Economic Development Strategy 2 77, 771, WE ag MOR R09 ME h" V R 1;"W" Pr[}[ Energy and Energy Conservation in Colorado's Econom Development 5/11/2011 To Governor Hicken|ooperan6 Staff, We are writing in regard toyour Bottom Up Economic Development Initiative. CORE's Board, staff and partners have attended a number of county and regional meetings, and we found them productive and thoughtful. Thank you for creatively addressing Colorado's economic needs. However, duo to the size and scope of this effort, we found it necessary to submit a recommendation that specifically addresses economic growth through the support of efficient and clean uses of energy. This report is divided into five concise sections: energy efficiency and conservation, clean energy, transportation, fossil fuels, and market synergy. Significant economic potential exists in each of these areas. Your predecessor, Governor Ritter, and thousands of students, CEOs, elected officials and activists around the state have made Colorado a leader in innovative energy investment. Moreover, Colorado is blessed with a bounty of solar access and wind potential, universities, laboratories, investors, and utilities equipped to capitalize on new opportunities The recommendations discussed in this report create financial growth and savings potential for a broad spectrum ofColoradans. Instituting progressive policy measures in support of clean energy and efficiency has a litany of domestic and international success stories. Germany's electricity Feed-in Law supporting clean energy has created a job sector that now outnumbers their famous automobile industry. Since 2009, a similar effort in Ontario, Canada has created over 20,000 jobs. |n Colorado, the Governor's Energy Office, the Office uf Economic Development and International Trade and stakeholders around the state have brought clean tech companies to Colorado: between 2008 and 2010 the state added an estimated 4,500 new jobs in the clean energy economy. Investing in efficiency, renmwa6|*y and community-based transportation initiatives retains more money in the local economy, hedges against rising energy costs and fosters greater economic competitiveness for Colorado businesses. Combined, these efforts help establish Colorado as an international hub for clean energy technologies and innovation. We, and the forthcoming list of signatories, urge you to consider each of the recommendations addressed. We look forward 10 your continued leadership in pursuing timely state legislation that supports clean energy, resource conservation and environmental protection. Best regards, Nathan Rat|ed6e Executive Director Community Office for Resource Efficiency CC: All State Senate and House Representatives 0 000 0000 =3 EB 0) 000 0000 C3 C3 ES ES (D EBB 000 0000 C3 C3 EEBO EO ED ID J ED ED ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND CONSERVATION "Energ y efficiency mnot}mt tile |mw hanging fruit; it's the fruit onthe ground."/ --USSeretaryofEne�yStephenChu laying What's the Issue? According to a recent study published 6v McKinsey, the United States could reduce energy consumption by over 20% by 2020, a reduction that would lead to $1.2 trillion in savings A national energy efficiency campaign would be a boon for the oconumy -putting people back to work completing upgrades, saving property owners cash on their utility 6i||n and stimulating innovation and industry to do more with less. Dollars not spent on energy costs are dollars spent improving our communities, schools, neighborhoods and businesses.3 What's happening now? Boulder County was one of the first jurisdictions in the count/yto establish a Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) program. In its first two rounds in 2009 the County used its bonding authority to push over $9M in funding for home energy improvement loans. This funding went directly into the local economy, stimulating jobs and sustaining businesses during tough economic times. Every dollar loaned through PACE generated at least an additional $0.53in economic activity in Boulder Cuunty The Department of Energy (DOE) and the Governor's Energy Office (GE0) have invested mi||ionsin projects around the state to support similar efficiency efforts. Two cluster areas in Colorado Boulder, Denver and Garfield County and Eagle, Gunnison and Pitkin Counties— are partidpating in the DOE's Better Buildings Program. Better Buildings has provided 3-year funding and technical support for communities to establish comprehensive retrofit pvograms The programs are meant to test various retrofit tactics, from grassroots marketing and workforce development, to financing tools, data management systems, and utility U|tima te|�tkegoa|nftheooprogramyistonurma|ize*fHcioncyimprnvementsandtran� or partnerships. the residential retrofit market. Progressive building codes have also mandated that energy efficiency become standard.5 For example, Aspen/Pitkin established the Renewable Energy Mitigation Program (REMP) in 2000 to curtail excessive household energy consumption. (See highlight box for details.) REK4P has since been replicated in several juriodictions around the state. The Governor's Energy Office has also supported more progressive energy codes with grant fun6ing'vvorksh- ps and pu6|ications. Legislative action such as House Bill 07-0137, has increased the uptake in efficiency programs aovvo||.r HB 07-1037 requires that Investor-Owned Utilities (IOUs) provide efficiency programs that are cost effective to their customers. Since all efficiency programs must pass a cost benefit analysis, the mandate has allowed utilities to invest in efficiency improvements without hurting their bottom line. What are the opportunities? Provide state and federal tax incentives for efficiency improvements. Between 2005and 2010, the federal government allowed taxpayers to claim a 30% federal tax credit for efficiency improvements such as increased insulation or new windows. The tax credit decreased to 10% with a cap of $500 for 2011 and to date has not been extended past December 31 st, 2011. The state should lobby the federal government to continue the credit indefinitely, as it provides a huge stimulus tothe industry The state should also examine developing a state tax incentive program. Enhance building energy codes. In 2007 H8-1146 required that all communities with a building code adopt the 2003 International Energy Conservation Code (|ECC). The state should look into expanding this provision to communities not currently captured by the 2007 legislation. Energy cu600 stimulate the marketplace, creating demand for efficient products 2 and materials and a more educated workforce. Furthermore, the |ECC published a new code in 2009, which has been adopted in several communities around the state. The state should continue educating communities about the 2009 Code and additional 'above code' training activities, particularly in places that do not currently have a code in place. R�NIP Th e Jjp V0011 (REMP�� stal�(a hed OQO,`�s cerr� rye t the asp rrf�'rtkf�r r ty E Cd g de t t t esta l�s e r� tr t r ca an e l v erne b d t f"`64 c�ar�stru ticara pros T gel of k prca rs t errceurae eer :caraerttirr aid ef(c�r�cy hkrsve�rr, ecss cariumpi c are d rt�tga hrou, the �r lEat�rt of ast:'rervvle errgy stem an rrt Il fed `rsce OC}0° fEM h` raced eraege, sed thrvxng sralr rndusr and rased saver 9� A11 +the redrratte the cca it ramify "rra grants and ne at raffer rfg b E� P has r vid d rag e he rya re s ar �r� llat�e and i(PleansI)ars In racy kas efftcrr RP has also red as a rxtue eutreac irdh de (c kee s is er s ei r d a errg ed zari ex erg al�d r sours c�arrservattc n,issues Sire i, r f rc���s��s ve en �la(�she �I� t��°sted Eu�te, sa(�� a�k��r�dle, Srreawmas'�lrllag� Eag� Crsuy� Tetert Encourage the real estate community to include efficiency improvements within the Multiple Listing Service. Consumers need to see that investing in energy efficiency pays off on the assessment of their home. The GEO should continue its workwith Eco Brokers International, IRES, Metrolist, USGBC Colorado and realtor associations to establish a statewide standard that ensures the MLS accounts for efficiency improvements. The GEO should also continue to work with the Appraisal Foundation and the Appraisal Standards Board to establish clear standards for reflecting the value associated with a home's energy use. Extend Demand -Side Management (DSM) programs. The Public Utilities Commission (PUC) requires IOUs to implement cost effective efficiency programs. However, rural cooperatives and municipal utilities are currently exempt from this provision. State legislators should examine efforts to extend these programs to all utilities in the state, potentially through a public benefits charge (PBC) on utility bills or an efficiency provision placed on franchise fees. (The provision would require a percentage of all franchise fees go to local efficiency programs.) PBCs in 12 states generated $870 million in 2002/2003 and yielded nearly 2.8 million MWh in savings. At an average 0.03 /kwh saved, PBCs are a much more cost effective way to provide energy than new generation. Encourage Implementation of Energy Audit and Disclosure Ordinances. Several cities have implemented a point of sale energy disclosure requirement with various mechanisms for compliance, including incentives and fees. In 2009, Austin Energy passed an ordinance that requires buildings over 10 years old to provide proof of an energy audit prior to the sale of the property. By establishing a negotiating option at the point of sale that highlights efficiency investments, the program has enabled the City of Austin to get closer to reaching its climate action and energy conservation goals. Financing Investments in Energy Efficiency Coloradans need greater access to capital and affordable financing in order to invest in energy efficiency. Unfortunately, the lending limits and underwriting criteria of conventional loan products (i.e. home equity loans and lines of credit) leave many homeowners, landlords, and businesses unable to access the capital needed to invest in upgrading their properties. The irony of this situation, and perhaps the greatest justification for finding solutions to the problem, is thatfinancing efficiency improvements ultimately save the borrower money, thereby improving their ability to service debt and strengthening our collective economic condition. While the state and a handful of Colorado counties have taken measures to establish PACE financing programs (authorized under HB 08 -1350 and expanded under SB 10 -100 and HB 10- 1328), objections at the federal level have put these programs on hold. This is regrettable. Had property owners been given the ability to finance energy improvements on their property, PACE could have provided a direct and leveraged cash infusion of tens of millions of dollars into the economy, allowing property owners across the state to improve the efficiency of their properties, while creating hundreds of new jobs, primarily in the construction trades. We 3 4 00 encourage the state to pursue every effort to revive PACE as soon as possible. GREEN FIfVANCE A r u rtr ershr laetw es ►a K s ark y n� Cr€ st In'' s a 666 r��a6 profif t hezf y the ritish': r gavenrrsert ar�d ternns Frrtancial rvrces w�ID ride newly 0 rttril�on {>:wrira``rafsrcr�g carer ti.` rt;(aree r ii(trc lartrre rr�rt �r� east of �teerg ffiert eq�,refr:gr sui.` as Ir st3 i qtr f t$j "n ►c r s at�ng All b stn sse are el s le to (al Foy fanaric t; r n, n j e a reery he twp ar er ert itiancial ery c s wrll 'trod the n rtc�al acl irrg an Ct� r tiaEe flae. rrcatr�si irr ctf irr En yvh le li k aarr mast wolf use its,: Sir s rt ernino cc rka rr sr� frir efscirtcy`csprcle to ass tl aron ner and cast. rdrtg S s 'F tjrarx This rr rt rnertt c P,419, s tsa n rl Ite car g o r sfi f tlrrc g err rc y sa In k he Iarc Erarn i tea celitr`lfet,rrri rel crest svli rr�y lli`C.US)sc caer,r>? rrtillan tcrr sad car on Several counties across the state are actively working to develop loan programs that benefit from various types of credit enhancements. Partners include the GEO, the Colorado Housing Finance Administration (CHFA), and the private banking industry. Loan products could include a loan loss reserve or a rate buy -down fund, in order to extend more favorable terms and qualifying criteria to borrowers interested in making energy improvements to their properties. We encourage the state to continue to enhance and expand energy efficiency lending under CHFA`s Colorado Credit Reserve (CCR) and Green CCR. Colorado's SB 08 -184 authorized the Colorado Clean Energy Finance Program and enabled the state treasurer to invest up to $10 million per year (over three years) to provide below market rate loans to homeowners. With these loans, home improvements for energy efficiency and renewable energy may be financed. The program is designed to be self- sustaining as it is to be funded with securities payable from loan payments. The state treasurer and the GEO should be encouraged to streamline their administrative planning efforts and roll this program out immediately. Finally, Energy Performance Contracting is a financing and implementation model that has benefited greatly from contract oversight and facilitation provided through the GEO; however, its use has been largely limited to public sector facilities. As a partnership model, we would encourage expanding the use of this concept to commercial and multi family residential sectors. 4 CLEAN ENERGY "According to the Union of 11 Scientists, the generation of 20% of 6omamewoble sources by 2020 will lead to the creation of 4, 100 new jobs; $331 million in income to farmers, ranchers, and rural landowners; anincrease of$ISbillion in capital investment; $62 million in new local tax revenues; and, $Y billion it) energy aovings6v2O30--$2D0 for every (Co/o/ado) state resident, What's the issue? Nationally, the clean energy sector isbonming.`z From 2006-2008 Colorado attracted more than $600M in venture capital funding for clean energy projects. In 2007 there were 263Y jobs in clean energy in Colorado; by2O1U that number ballooned to over 7 Colo is one of the leading states for renewable energy development, ranking in the top ten for resources, generation and jobs created. However, with the industry growing as rapidly as it is, it's important that Colorado maintains its competitive advantage by supporting progressive state policies that attract investment and jobs to the state. What's happening now? One of Colorado's best assets is its access to an established research network and highly trained worNbrc*. Federal institutions such as the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREU the National Institute of Standards and Technu|og�and the National Center for Atmospheri Research have propelled Colorado's research capabilities to one of the top in the country. Clean tech programs at the University ofColorado and Colorado State University have also groomed a workforce ready tobe the next leaders in the country. Colorado ranks 3rd inthe nation for engineers and 6th in the nation for computer specia|ims. From transportation networks to proximity to major energy markets to good old-fashioned wind and sunshine --Colorado has it a||. The state is perfectly situated 1u provide materials to wind developers (the top 13 windiest utetoa are within 750 mi|es Moreover, Colorado ranks high for actual renewable resources at 5th and 11th in solar and wind. respectively. 18 Several multinational companies have taken note and moved their operations to Colorado. The world's leading vvindturbine manufacturer, Voatax opened its only plant in the Unite States in Colorado in 2007, Other global companies such asAbongoa SMA Solar, and GE Energy Controls have also established operations in Colorado. Po|icymakoo in Colorado have put the state at the forefront of renewable energy generation. In 2004, voters supported a measure to establish a mandatory Renewable Portfolio Standard (RP5)for utilities. Since then the mandate has grown from 10% to 30% of an IOU's purt6o|io, making it one of the more aggressive mandates in the cnuntry. Policies such as this have provided investors and businesses a signal that Colorado is open and ready for clean tech business. Since 2005, Colorado's solar generation has grown one hundred-fold, from 1 K4VVin 2085to103K4VVin2010.20 What are the opportunities? Actively recruit clean energy companies. There are several naa �onyVeotaocamotoCo|orado� however, one oft-cited is Colorado's leadership nn clean onorgyo At the time, Governor Ritte was espousing the New Energy Economy in boardrooms, state capitols and conference rooms around the country. Vestas listened, coming to Colorado despite better financial incentives from other competing states. It is vital the state dedicate human resources to recruiting 'game changer' companies like Veutas whose arrival precipitated the relocation of six ofi suppliers to Colorado. Make regulatory environment more amenable. The Governor's Energy Office had ahuge success in 2010 working with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to set up a pilot fast track process for small hydro projects. The GE(} will help 20 projects through the pilot program before starting work with FERC on an extended effort. Streamlining the regulatory process is imperative to Colorado's success with renewable generation. Several in-state developers have also acknowledged delayed transmission construction as a detriment to doing business in Co|omdo.zx Working closely with FERC, the PUC, G EO and utilities, the State should establish a more coherent and speedy regulatory process, which prevents the lengthy delay of projects. FEE0 CAW A f laenbl tfe ra�c+sc�rtr as rrreibl erarg+ ortth� ictric gr� a(�rag}crpg trtn a re ent between rener r le e r t rs and electric tatal� es Renewab e gen r��atorg:,`are laid pr° rn�urra Siace �rc tde�r lacsvri, rr str t tr aecr rerraourrtrrerg,,tjitrs pass rnet �ncresen tee thl) rite ase rn order e td c �rer th ►ncease cost paver to ta�rtsv�lfe eele tha feed 4 6;' aw rgtare a ancfes�.f )ust per tc+rih trr ch ccatcmer �tttrilrrr prors in ntari� anda� e�rt and �erm`rr have creed term caf tca,tsand: of n nabs Mayen trlr`d's uerlat�ae wind, solar,: gec thral aril d�as retxrcet �re�l pcs�rc�neda Inceratwaze a dot n l r raewa l s wit} t �sJ gh bnerg finer strst e t ec C no oqy Waste h 4 recap e frcie coal° fired er.lants +fir ppn ntrral gaellsulds tae rn tie plc Establish robust workforce training hubs. Thanks to some of the best research facilities in the country, Colorado's workforce is well educated and excels at advanced research. However, Colorado lacks some of the specialized technicians needed to maintain and manage of some of the larger wind farms and geothermal projects in the state. State legislators should promote training opportunities close to clean tech hubs through the Colorado Renewable Energy Collaboratory (CREC) network so that companies do not need to recruit out of state. Enhance commercialization of research. For all of its advantages as a tech hub in the Rockies, Colorado ranks 20th for the number of patents in the clean energy sector. Colorado legislators need to help bridge the gap from the lab to Main Street. A possible solution is to extend state tax credits to companies that use technologies developed or manufactured within the state, like New Jersey's Renewable Energy Manufacturing Incentive (NJREMI) program. (See the Market Synergy section for more information.) Financing Clean Energy Investments Many concepts that support clean energy also benefit energy efficiency and vice versa. As with energy efficiency, Coloradans need access to financial resources in order to invest in clean energy projects. Colorado should continue to improve access to financial tools that enable property owners to increase their energy independence, hedge against volatility and long term increases in utility pricing, and reduce their carbon footprint. Renewable energy systems are typically eligible to be financed with a PACE loan. This tool has proven effective in the past, and again, would benefit greatly from the state's influence in altering PACE to be a permitted financing tool under federal regulations. The Power Purchase Agreement (PPA) has proven to be another effective model for financing clean energy investments. This arrangement can be applied to various renewable energy technologies and can benefit private property owners, as well as public sector entities, such as schools and governments. The state should continue to facilitate partnerships and consider the deployment of state -owned assets for PPA's, as they are a rapid way to increase renewable energy interest and generation in Colorado. EXAMOL PRC7GF2AMS IN C?RE�C►N 1 4 €eg�rrrro�ng �irr 1C} the Gregor [epartrnent of; energy erttergd a a leader �n clraar ergY firancin`w�th the cratresri'' of tkaieate' Energy L raan. rc,gr`en T prrarrt Sf aaparrri En as pen are!" paid b:.; r rr w rs. an Ioar] unds e raised a trrg g rt ral bl ga ri: d h s, Ey.th end f th program, had tnan'd wa re thari�. t s rr I116h In`f +cal ner "I e trrsents in C I, s ee n �n r ducec an ther �nn0 apy �prograrra, resit en gal nergy to ct its car solar nst it fMC?ns Thrs progrorn alloWs i orne awners re eiue credjts t w rd th i re can Enccai ne to s fir acic Ong scalar sys erns to tpeir pr prty 6 TRANSPORTATION What's the Issue? Colorado's economic drivers are found both in its metropolitan areas and rural recreation and amenity -based communities. Mobility for this diverse workforce is critical to economic growth. For many Colorado communities, transportation energy costs are a significant portion of their cost of living. With housing costs becoming increasingly unaffordable in resort areas, it is often low- income workers who are disproportionately affected by high transportation costs. In 2008 Coloradans drove 46 billion miles, 70 percent more than in 1990 even though the state's population only grew by 16 Between 2002 and 2007, gasoline expenditures rose 86 percent in the state, causing Coloradans to spend $2.6 billion more to fuel their cars than they had just five years earlier. At the same time, transportation -based greenhouse gases increased 62 percent between 1990 and 2007 in Colorado. 0 0 What's Happening Now? Driven by convenience, safety and savings, demand for public transit is increasing. In 2008, 74 percent more Coloradans chose to ride transit than in 1991. An average commuter traveling 30 miles round trip for a full time position would save approximately $1,200 per year by transitioning to public transportation. Additionally, analysis has shown that within a given commuting zone, the growth in average net earnings are greater in rural counties with transit systems, than in rural counties without transit systems. House Bill 1331, "Incentives for Efficient Motor Vehicles," created financial incentives to help consumers purchase efficient motor vehicles. HB 1331 extends tax credits to consumers who purchase or convert vehicles that use "cutting edge" technology and petroleum reduction technology, including plug -in hybrid electric conversion technology. The bill, which extends tax credits until 2015 for most technologies, encourages consumers to consider a vehicle's air pollution score, its fuel economy, and its carbon footprint before making a vehicle purchase. What are the Opportunities? Advocate for walkable communities and bike corridors. Several areas around the country, including Boulder, CO, Charlottesville, VA and Austin, TX, have developed pedestrian walkways that bring substantial economic revival to previously underutilized areas. The state should provide additional transit funding for communities to invest in walkability measures, such as a pedestrian mall, rails to trails design and other similar efforts. Bike programs, such as Denver's Bike Sharing Program, also reduce traffic congestion and promote livability. Support regional planning organizations (RPOs) with dedicated funding. Developing independent RPOs allows for a variety of stakeholders and sectors to contribute to a comprehensive transit plan, which would provide a regional blueprint for economic growth and expansion of communities. Further, following such a blueprint provides better guidance for developing transit -ready growth, which helps reduce cost and supports Colorado's mobile workforce. Promote electric car charging stations and infrastructure. The market for electric cars is n Q growing rapidly. One of the greatest inhibiting factors is a lack of charging station infrastructure. Supporting the installation of charging stations would reduce fuel emissions, save drivers money and further establish Colorado as a leader in the clean tech marketplace. Encourage additional light rail services. Rail service connecting goods, services and the workforce to regional and national transport hubs is a significant opportunity to grow Colorado's economy. The Rocky Mountain Rail Authority estimates a high -speed rail network linking Fort Collins, Pueblo, Eagle County and DIA could bring $33 Billion to the state economy with new jobs, income and increased property values. Continued support of these efforts and coordination with similar federal planning efforts will ensure Colorado takes advantage of its diverse economic resources. 7 FOSSIL FUELS What's the issue? As of 2009, Colorado was the ninth largest coal producer in the US. 28 Colorado is also fortunate to have one of the largest natural gas fields in the country, the Piceance Basin. All told, the energy extraction industry in 2007 employed roughly 25,000 people, though this was largely (50 comprised of "support activities for mining. While the coal, oil and gas industries are large economic drivers for the state, Coloradans are not reaping the full economic benefit from the development of their natural resources, nor are they adequately protected from industry risks. For example, reports by Headwaters Economics and CORE's longtime Director, Randy Udall, illustrate the sizeable loopholes in Colorado's severance tax policy for the natural gas industry. 31 The tens of millions of dollars in lost annual revenue could otherwise be supporting community development or public education, for which it is primarily used in Wyoming. A myriad of other issues are also at play, including water use and water contamination from fracking and community and wildlife disruption from well pad development. Each of these scenarios presents significant negative externalities, such as the release of carcinogens into local water sources, which could easily affect the local economic livelihood. What's Happening Now? In 2010, the Clean Air -Clean Jobs Act was signed into law. The goal was to help 'clean' Colorado's energy supply and air quality. The Oil and Gas Conservation Commission was also recently expanded to include a greater diversity of members. The Commission then developed a series of new regulations addressing the location and effect of drilling rigs. Unfortunately, there is still much left to be done. As an example, a recent House Energy and Commerce Committee report "shows that 1.5 million gallons of fracking fluid containing a carcinogen were used in Colorado" between 2005 and 2009, a statistic that ranks Colorado 2nd in the country in the use of fracking contaminants. Contaminated water not only affects the health of Coloradans, but it has a deleterious effect on the state's economy. A large portion of Colorado's economy relies on tourism and its natural resources. Healthy rivers and healthy ecosystems are imperative to keeping tourism a prominent part of the economy. What Are the {.opportunities? Fix the severance tax loopholes for the natural gas industry. There are currently two major loopholes in Colorado's severance tax policy. First, the "stripper well" exemption, which requires no severance tax payment from wells that produce less than 90,000 cubic feet of natural gas per day or less; and secondly, the "ad valorem" deduction, which allows energy companies to deduct their county property taxes from their severance tax payment. Following are a few facts that illustrate the effect of these two loopholes: 33 Roughly three fourths of Colorado oil and gas wells pay no severance tax at all. In 2005, Colorado collected $132M in severance taxes. In Wyoming the same amount of production would have raised $382M, almost three times as much. In 2004, Noble Energy produced about $500M of natural gas in Weld County. They paid zero dollars in severance taxes to the State of Colorado. Analyze and re- assess potential impacts from fracking. Nationally and internationally hydraulic fracturing (fracking) has come under increased scrutiny, primarily due to the unknown and hazardous chemicals that are used and with good reason. A group of investigative journalists, ProPublica, "has documented more than 1,000 cases of water contamination near U.S. shale sites." 34 A recent New York Times article further supports these concerns. 35 Moreover, the recent Oscar nominated documentary, Gasland, highlighted similar water contamination complaints in Garfield County. The potential for increased fracking and increased contamination represents a huge financial uncertainty for the natural gas industry and local communities. 8 Help small towns avoid boom /bust cycles from energy extraction. Colorado's history is riddled with stories of mining's boom /bust cycle. Whether the mining was for silver in the 1880's or natural gas today, local communities have suffered from the surge and dearth of economic resources. Some of the factors contributing to this phenomenon are out of Colorado's hands. Other factors are not. One of the most important things the state can do, for communities sited near extractive energy sources, is to help create a diversified economy, which includes protecting natural resource and public lands for hunting, fishing, ranching and recreational activities. MARKET SYNERGY What's the Issue? Several of Colorado's largest economic sectors have benefited from growing the clean energy economy. Improving the way Colorado uses energy helps protect the natural resources that attract tourists. Supporting progressive energy policies inspires confidence in renewable energy service companies considering expansion or looking for a place to gain footing in a rapidly expanding market. Likewise, making Colorado a hub of clean tech research and development strengthens the universities and workforce to deliver higher paying jobs and professional careers. What Are the Opportunities? Manufacturing In order to reduce imports and increase exports, Colorado should focus efforts on developing 6d products for which a local or regional market exists, such as wind and solar energy technologies. A good example of a successful program is New Jersey's Renewable Energy Manufacturing Incentive (NJREMI), which provides rebates to New Jersey residents, businesses, local governments, and non profit organizations that purchase and install solar panels, inverters, and racking systems manufactured in New Jersey. In order to qualify as a certified New Jersey manufacturer under this program, companies must supply products manufactured with at least 50 percent of the product cost— including the labor, overhead, components, and raw materials from facilities located in New Jersey. The Program's economic development impact is two- fold: first, incentivizing private investments in renewable energy technologies (creating jobs for system installers, electricians, and engineers), and secondly, helping to establish a market for clean energy products manufactured in the state (creating manufacturing jobs). Higher Education Colorado should continue to invest in businesses and institutions that build our intellectual capital. We should take advantage of the opportunity to create and fill new professional level jobs with talented scientists and executives being trained in the state's numerous energy related higher education programs, as well as at the National Renewable Energy Lab (NREL). Governor Ritter developed the Colorado Renewable Energy Collaboratory (CREC) to build on the individual merits and developments being made at the Colorado School of Mines, CSU and CU. The Collaboratory's key goals are to create private public research relationships that provide rapid transfer of technology to the marketplace. As such, the center is not only grooming some of the best minds in the field, but also garnering financial interest from companies worldwide to invest in Colorado. Although Colorado's budget is strained, maintaining funding for higher education is absolutely essential to develop the state's capacity in the energy sector and remain competitive in national and international markets. Tourism Based on 2007 data, the Colorado Tourism Office (CTO) estimates that approximately 200,000 jobs, $9.8 billion in visitor spending, and $763 million in state and local taxes are attributable to the tourism industry. While the industry benefits from a diverse mix of cultural and recreational attractions for visitors across the state, it is well known that outdoor recreational activities represent a significant draw for visitors. Whether it's skiing, hunting, fishing, cycling or camping, a healthy natural environment, including the production of clean energy, is a major economic 9 asset to our state. As such, Colorado, its municipalities, the CTO and tourism partners should continually and consistently tout the many efforts aimed at protecting our natural resources and preserving vibrant ecosystems throughout the state. 'Pik Given the numerous statewide efforts to protect the health of our natural environment, whether establishing conservation funds, spearheading clean energy technologies, or improving our mass transit infrastructure, Colorado has an opportunity to claim a niche as a sustainability- oriented tourism destination. Aspen Skiing Company, as an example, has successfully used their energy and environmental commitments in national marketing campaigns. :PIrICIN CC�U►ti1TY'S HEALTHY R�tItRS d�f�1a STRE�4MS El1PJC► t krto rya rr t oorto �o rr .iaore tiorraC a ue off o n re ft 6,d sue s, rrr OQB, t oters l P�tE i t C rat a ro re a sales ta3c of 0 °d to e cue i ate c o esta 4i hrr a h9 ltd y Ra ys ara rearms `un The fhbf "t raa�rd a� r a rrs eve a er` tarty ro"E, ou r ni ts, re ers rr �a rrt a tr am flows,; ara erl t re 14, tt 14 k life rr rlaR a 9 t t f e "Th, i f rs Isc s c of t r'o not water co:nse'r a ro i ra r a r °ta16 a Jtaj rnpr o r r i ref it oe p s y a �y e y �q s ease Frtratel at toet#te zt�rrty' rra� retaf at6 .t G'MI �rt4d��k� 4dum� 4 4 t f t f Overall, the market synergies realized when sustainable energy policy is applied among the manufacturing, education and tourism sectors demonstrates how a shared commitment to a clean energy future can help us collectively increase the state's economic potential. As noted, continuing our commitment to growing clean energy investments will bring complementary growth to some of our largest industries. Additionally, we have a substantial interest in preserving the quality and beauty of our natural environment, arguably the lifeblood of our state economy. Changing course now would be a detriment to the physical and economic health, safety and welfare of all Coloradans. CONCLUSION Colorado experienced an 18% growth in clean tech jobs from 1998 to 2007 even as the industry was just gaining a foothold nationally. As the clean tech sector grows —which it inevitably will as technologies improve, alternative energy prices fall and carbon mandates are implemented —it is imperative Colorado remain a leading state in the industry. By continually developing progressive policies, Colorado will encourage greater industry investment and ensure Colorado's inclusion in the clean tech market. The state must not abandon its support of the Governor's Energy Office and the agency's mission to advocate for energy efficiency and renewable energy. The GEO has played an integral role in elevating Colorado to its leadership position and will continue to provide critical support. By promoting the adoption of progressive energy legislation, the GEO helped attract $30 million in Better Buildings funding from the Department of Energy. CORE and its regional partners urge Governor Hickenlooper to provide dedicated, long term funding to ensure this agency remains fully staffed. Furthermore, we ask Governor Hickenlooper to consider the implications of climate change when developing Colorado's future economic strategy. According to a recently published American Security Project report, Colorado will incur increased economic stresses due to climate change. 37 These effects should not and cannot be ignored as we plan for the future of our state. Just as Colorado has thus far benefited from being a leader in the clean tech sector, it will reap rewards from leading on innovative carbon reduction policies as well. Moreover, implementing additional clean energy and efficiency strategies will protect natural habitats, secure clean air and clean water, and benefit public health. Most importantly, we encourage Governor Hickenlooper to look at our energy and environmental situation through an honest and realistic lens, with a sense of opportunity an opportunity to protect our cherished heritage and natural assets, an opportunity to spur technological innovation, an opportunity to improve the lives of residents throughout the state, and an opportunity to grow Colorado's economy through the support of new, sustainable industry sectors. 10 FOOTNOTES 1. Department of Energy Press Release. 2009. DOE to Fund up to $445 Million for Retrofit Ramp Ups in Energy Efficiency. 2. McKinsey and Company. 2009. Unlocking energy efficiency in the US economy. 3. Environment Northeast. 2009. Energy Efficiency. Engine of Economic Growth. 4. National Renewable Energy Laboratory. 2010. Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) and Economic Impacts in Boulder County. 5. Southwest Energy Efficiency Project. 2003. Increasing energy efficiency in new buildings in the Southwest: Energy codes and best practices. 6. Governor's Energy Office. 2010. www.rechargecolorado.com 7. Pew Center on the States. 2009. The Clean Energy Economy: Repowering Jobs, Businesses, and Investments across America. 8. American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy. 2004. Five Years In: An Examination of the first half decade of public benefits energy efficiency programs. 9. ACEEE. 2010. Opportunities for increasing the penetration of energy efficiency by leveraging the resources of local governments. 10. Austin Energy. www.austinenergy.com 11. American Security Project. 2010. "Pay now or pay later: Colorado." 12. Pew Center for the States. 2009. The Clean Energy Economy: Repowering Jobs, Businesses and Investments across America. 13. Ibid. 14. The Energy Foundation. 2011. A Blueprint for a New Energy Economy. 15. Colorado Cleantech Industry Association(CCIA). 2010. Colorado Cleantech Action Plan: A roadmap to guide the development of Colorado's clean technology industry. 16. National Science Foundation. 2009. "Science and Engineering State Profiles." 17. Pacific Northwest Laboratory. August 1991. "An Assessment of the Available Windy Land Area and Wind Energy Potential in the Contiguous United States Navigant analysis. 18. NREL. 2008. "Center to Research New Ways to Convert Sunshine to Power and Fuels." 19. Vallin, G. 2010. "Colorado- A leader in Wind Energy." Renewable Energy World. 20. The Energy Foundation. 2011. A Blueprint for a New Energy Economy. 21. The Energy Foundation. 2011. A Blueprint for a New Energy Economy. 22. CCIA. 2010. Colorado Cleantech Action Plan. 23. Pew Center on the States. 2009. The Clean Energy Economy. Repowering Jobs, Businesses and Investments across America. 24. CoPIRG Foundation. 2010. Colorado's Transportation Crossroads: Priority Transit Projects for the 21st Century. 25. Denver Regional Council of Governments. RideArrangers' Commuter Savings Calculator 26. CoPIRG Foundation. 2010. Colorado's Transportation Crossroads: Priority Transit Projects for the 21st Century. 27. Rocky Mountain Rail Authority, 2010. High -Speed Rail Feasibility Study. 28 National Mining Association. 2010. U.S. Coal Production by State and by Rank. 29. Corporation for a Skilled Workforce. 2009. Industry Guidebook: Energy Extraction. 30. Headwaters Economics. 2011. Fossil Fuel Extraction and Western Economies. 31. Udall, Randy. 2007. "Torched and Burned: Why Does Colorado Subsidize the World's Most Profitable Industry." Community Office for Resource Efficiency. 32. Sherry, Allison. 2011. "Colorado No. 2 in Carcinogen -laced 'fracking' fluids." Denver Post. 33. Udall, Randy. 2007. "Torched and Burned: Why Does Colorado Subsidize the World's Most Profitable Industry." Community Office for Resource Efficiency. 34. Schiller, Ben. 2011. "Fracking Comes to Europe, Sparking Rising Controversy." Yale Environment 360. 35, Revkin, Andew. 2011 "Study Links Flammable Gas in Water and Nearby Drilling." New York Times. 36. Pew Center on the States. 2009. The Clean Energy Economy: Repowering Jobs, Businesses and Investments across America. 37. American Security Project. 2011. Pay Now, Pay Later. Colorado. 11 e S I 'le ",'I y"ffi�v M'p RE IpMn cl, TO: SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL FROM: RUSS FORREST, TOWN MANAGER SUBJECT: MANAGER'S REPORT DATE: July 5, 2011 EOTC The next EOTC meeting is scheduled for July 21, 2011 at 4:00 p.m. in Snowmass Village. Items /Strategic Plan Updated on June 28, 2011 The following Table is a summary of the action plan from the various topics discussed at the retreat in January. Action Priority Timing Who Base Village Next Steps 1 When Foreclosure is Russ Forrest completed Economic /Fiscal Actions 1 STO Metrics -FAB meeting to review Susan Hamley STO metrics on July 13 Board Structure -Sept. 19, 2011 Susan Hamley (ASC Position) Summer Events/ -March 21 (Complete) Marianne Marketing Rakowski Sales Tax Study -March 21, 2011 Marianne (Complete) Rakowski Financial Updates June 6, 2011 /July 5, M.R. 2011 Ice Age Discovery 1 Long Term/Tusk Next check point is Tusk Force Force /Complete July 18th Business Plan 2011 short term -On going TM Reports Russ Forrest actions Susan H. Housing Housing Policy for 1 (Complete) Chris Conrad Development Housing Projects 3 Guidelines completed Joe Coffey on June 20 Final Phase of Rodeo scheduled for July 5tH Environment 2 EAC Structure Council to review Lesley /EAC candidates on July 18th REOP Policy May 2, 2011 (approved Mark Kittle Discussion 2nd Reading) Urban Renewal Authority 2 At any point Council Russell Forrest would like to have this discussion -need a ur ose statement Capital Improvement 3 August 1 or 15th Hunt Walker, Process Solid Waste Collection 3 Staff is recommending Hunt Walker EAC review and then review with Council in summer Pedestrian Crossing 3 August 1st Art Smythe, David Recommendations Peckler, Hunt Walker West Village Transportation 3 Will review with the CIP David Peckler Facilities on August 1st and 15th Staff Development 3 July 5 Russ Forrest Town Fiscal Sustainability 3 August 15 Marianne and Russ Forrest Other Pending Actions The following is a summary of actions that either the Council has requested or actions staff has proposed and is working on for the Town Council. Staff Action Status Date to follow -up Contact w/ Council Finance Marianne GID Advisory Once the foreclosure is complete, bring After Base Village Board back the discussion of the GID Foreclosure is Advisory Board to the GID Board. complete but before the budget process begins for 2012 budget Other Chris Conrad Sign Code Planning will review current sign code Summer 2011 and discuss revisions with the Town Council 5th Draft SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL REGULAR MEETING AGENDA JULY 18, 2011 PLEASE NOTE THAT ALL TIMES ARE APPROXIMATE ITEMS COULD START EARLIER OR LATER THAN THE STATED TIME CALL TO ORDER AT 4:00 P.M. Item No. 1: ROLL CALL Item No. 2: PUBLIC NON AGENDA ITEMS (5- minute time limit) Item No. 3: COUNCIL UPDATES Item No. 4: WINTER PARKING PLAN FOR 2011 -2012 (Time: 30 Minutes) ACTION REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: Approve a parking plan for next winter. -David Peckler Page (TAB Item No. 5: DISCUSSION POTENTIAL FUNDING SOURCE TO SUPPORT FARE SUBSIDIZED BUS SERVICE BETWEEN ASPEN AND SNOWMASS VILLAGE (Time: 30 Minutes) ACTION REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: Discussion of potential alternatives to the EOTC fully funding the fare Subsidized RFTA service between Aspen and Snowmass Village -David Peckler Item No. 6: MANAGER'S REPORT (Time: 10 minutes) Russell Forrest ...........................Page (TAB Item No. 7: AGENDA FOR NEXT TOWN COUNCIL MEETING ...........................Page (TAB Item No. 8: APPROVAL OF MEETING MINUTES FOR: ...........................Page (TAB Item No. 9: COUNCIL COMMENTS /COMMITTEE REPORTS /CALENDARS Page (TAB) Item No. 10: ADJOURNMENT A 00 07 -18 -11 TC Page 2 of 2 NOTE: Total time estimated for meeting: Approx 1.5 hours (excluding items 1 -3 and 8 —11) ALL ITEMS AND TIMES ARE TENTATIVE AND SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT FURTHER NOTICE. PLEASE CALL THE OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK AT 923 -3777 ON THE DAY OF THE MEETING FOR ANY AGENDA CHANGES. SNOWMASS VILLAGE REGULAR MEETING MINUTES MAY 16, 2011 CALL TO ORDER AT 4:00 P.M. Mayor Bill Boineau called to order the Regular Meeting of the Snowmass Village Town Council on Monday, May 16, 2011 at 4:02 p.m. Item No. 1 ROLL CALL COUNCIL MEMBERS PRESENT: Jason Haber, John Wilkinson, Fred Kucker, Markey Butler, and Mayor Bill Boineau. COUNCIL MEMBERS ABSENT: All council members were present. STAFF PRESENT: Russ Forrest, Town Manager; John Dresser, Town Attorney; Art Smythe, Chief of Police; Barb Peckler, Administrative Assistant; Rhonda B. Coxon, Town Clerk PUBLIC PRESENT: Madeleine Osberger, Julie Ann Woods, Rhonda Bazil, Chris Nolen, Kit Hamby, Dr. Kirk Johnson, Guy Courtney, Dan McEachen, Sandy Jackson and other members of the public interested in items on today's agenda. Item No. 2 PUBLIC NON AGENDA ITEMS There were no Public Non Agenda items for discussion. Item No. 3 COUNCIL UPDATES Council Member Kucker Council Member Kucker announced that he is a grandfather once again, and Council congratulated him. Council Member Wilkinson Council Member Wilkinson noted that trail work is continuing on the Droste Property and staff will begin cutting the trail up to the radio tower. Mayor Boineau Mayor Boineau stated he just returned from a road trip and noted that after reading the papers in other areas of the country, it's safe to say everyone is having budget issues similar to Snowmass Village. q 40 05 -16 -11 TC Minutes Page 2 of 7 Council Member Butler Council Member Butler stated she just returned from California and said that some portions of California's economy seem to be starting to come back. Butler asked about the water main replacement plan from Snowmass Water and Sanitation. Item No. 4 UPDATE FROM ICE AGE DISCOVERY COMMITTEE //TUSK FORCE At this time the Tusk Force introduced themselves for the Council and public. Julie Ann Wood a member of the "Tusk Force" stated the purpose for this meeting was to update Council on the efforts thus far of the Ice Age Discovery Committee (IADC) or the "Tusk Force Council will receive a presentation, a proposed scope of work. The specific concept that the IADC is proposing is described in the PowerPoint Presentation. She stated that the Tusk Force has spent a considerable amount of time researching and learning how exhibits and interpretive facilities are planned, designed, and constructed. From the research it has become clear that professional assistance is needed in completing the following: Market Research on the proposed market demand for proposed facilities, Development and design of exhibit and interpretive facilities. Potential professional fund raising assistance may also be needed. For example the DMNS engaged the services of a professional fund raiser for the short -term $1 million goal for the summer dig, and eventually, construction and fabrication services will be needed to complete a physical space and the exhibits themselves. Given professional services are needed the Tusk Force is proposing two phases of work. This first would include developing a detailed concept for Town Council's approval. A brief description of the recommended concept is included in the PowerPoint presentation. This concept includes three elements: Programmatic offerings and educational programs, e.g., informal science education programs and events, science camps, experiential outdoor educational activities, workshops for scientists, and more. Dispersed offerings, a valley -wide network of interactive science related sites and trails which will interpret the ice age dig, other prehistoric features and the natural science unique to the area through stories, kiosks, trails, tours, water quality test stations, a telescope, and more. Small physical space, i.e., a sustainable physical facility with exhibit and multi- purpose areas, such as a permanent Discovery Center, which will be the central convening place for site -based programs, a welcome center for information on other offerings and sites, an interactive center with permanent and traveling exhibits, a retail area, and the Tusk Force recommended organizing body's administrative office. If Council approved of the direction of this proposed concept, it would then be further developed in the next two months. This detailed concept plan would be completed 060 so* 05 -16 -11 TC Minutes Page 3 of 7 through the Tusk Force effort and with the assistance of our facilitator. No additional services are anticipated to complete this phase except for $1500 /month for every month this project extends past July 1, to pay for additional facilitation costs. This detailed concept would include: A description of the alternatives considered and the rationale for developing a preferred alternative. A detailed description of the concept with general space /exhibit needs. In addition it would include a description of programmatic elements of the preferred concept. Specific recommendations on partnerships needed to develop the design and operate the required facilities. A proposed scope of work with a proposed budget for market analysis, design, and a rough description of capital needs. A financial plan for paying for Phase Two. The Detailed Concept would be presented to Council for its approval prior to moving forward with Phase Two. Although the entire scope for Phase Two is not completely developed, it is anticipated that it would include: A detailed market analysis with a detailed operational plan and budget. A schematic design of facilities and exhibit detailed enough to develop a cost estimate for a capital campaign. A specific fund raising campaign plan. Phase Two will require resources to complete and specific ideas will be provided to pay for the professional services in Phase One. The Committee anticipates delivering a draft concept plan (Phase One) to the Town Council in August with a proposed time frame for Phase Two. The action being requested of Council at this time is Council input on the specific concept described in the attached PowerPoint presentation. Council consensus on the two phases of plan development, i.e., an creation of a detailed concept (phase 1) followed by a detailed design phase using design consultants (phase 2), et al 05 -16 -11 TC Minutes Page 4 of 7 Council approval on a request for $3,000 (two additional months for facilitation) for continued Phase One needs. If Council is generally supportive of this request it would be integrated into the June 6 budget discussion. Town Council Comments: Council spoke to the following issues: who bears the costs, the involvement of the Town now and moving forward, how will we market this, what value are we offering the tourist, this information should be in the next phase and presentation to the Council. Council stated they would not be able to approve the additional funding request at this time but it would be presented within the Financial update scheduled for June 6. Dr. Kirk Johnson from the Denver Museum of Nature and Science was present and provided another large shoulder bone of a mastodon. Kit Hamby from Snowmass Water and Sanitation department spoke to the Council on how he found this bone during the de- watering process. They spoke to the excitement on the site and noted there would be a Press Conference at 10:00 a.m. at the Snowmass Village Ice Age Discovery Center. Woods also spoke to the popularity of the Discovery Center and the number of people that have visited it since its opening. Item No. 5 UPDATE ON KRABLOONIK OPERATIONS Town Council requested that staff provide an update to confirm that the Krabloonik dog sled business is currently operating in compliance with the terms of its lease with the Town and applicable PUD conditions. Due to Krabloonik operating under a lease provided by the Town, and is regulated by a specific PUD ordinance, it is appropriate for Council to be provided with periodic operational updates to ensure that the terms and conditions of these agreements are being met. Chief of Police Art Smythe provided a report of the regulations and conditions that are most applicable to this update 1. Condition 9 of Ordinance No. 13, Series of 2004, an Ordinance Approving The Krabloonik Land Use Exchange Agreement which states that, "the applicant or operator shall continue to comply with all applicable provisions in the State Statutes, Article 80, for a Pet Animal Facility, and the number of dogs on the site shall be restricted to the previously implied or understood limit of 250 dogs." 2. Condition 12 of the Krabloonik Lease and Option with the Town of Snowmass Village, with an effective date of September 25, 2006 which states that, "The tenant shall 0005�luwwp 05 -16 -11 TC Minutes Page 5 of 7 promptly comply with all laws, ordinances, rules, regulations, requirements, and directives of the federal, state and municipal governments or public authorities and of all their departments, bureaus and subdivisions..." He provided the results of the latest dog count at Krabloonik conducted by our Animal Control Officers on May 4, 2011. This count shows a total of 231 dogs on site with a new litter due on 05/11/2011. Smythe also provided the most recent State inspection report for the Krabloonik Kennels. This assessment was conducted by a PACFA inspector on March 30, 2011. The report indicates that no violations were found and that Krabloonik's license to operate a Dog Breeding Facility remains in good standing. The dog exercise plan that was submitted by Krabloonik to the State and has been accepted by the PACFA licensing authority is also included. It also should be noted that there have been no violations of our local animal ordinances related to the operation of the Krabloonik Kennels in the past year. Dan McEachen the owner of Krabloonik was available to address questions from Council. Council had concerns with the new litters and how the number of dogs stays below 250. McEachen stated he adopts dogs to Alaska and adopts out to employees. He noted at this time there is no breeding plan in place at Krabloonik. Council Member Haber asked about industry standards for the plan presented. McEachen noted that the dogs are also prone to heat stroke. Council would like the number of dogs to stay below at or below the 250. Item No. 6 SECOND READING OF ORDINANCE No. 4 SERIES OF 2011 CREATION OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL ADVISORY BOARD This is the second reading of Ordinance No. 4 Series of 2011 establishing the Snowmass Village Environmental Advisory Board. Town Manager Russ Forrest noted that there is a copy of the ad in today's packet for Council comment. Haber asked for clarification with the ad and the specialized board seats. There being no further discussion Council provided the vote for second reading. John Wilkinson made the motion to approve the second reading and roll call vote of Ordinance No. 4, Series of 2011 establishing the Snowmass Village Environmental Advisory Board. Mayor Bill Boineau seconded the motion. The motion was approved by a vote of 5 in favor to 0 opposed. Voting Aye: Jason Haber, John Wilkinson, Fred Kucker, Markey Butler, and Mayor Bill Boineau. Voting Nay: None. 4p�� so 05 -16 -11 TC Minutes Page 6 of 7 Item No. 7 MANAGER'S REPORT Town Manager Russ Forrest spoke to roads and mud and flood watch, if you see anything that needs attention please feel free to call 923 -5330. He also noted that the road department will be paving roads throughout the Town. Forrest stated that the Work Plan from the Council retreat is on page 33 and he wanted to acknowledge the direction received from Council to date on these issues. There was a short discussion by Council on the foreclosure and receivership. Item No. 8 AGENDA FOR NEXT TOWN COUNCIL MEETING June 6, 2011 At this time the Council and staff reviewed the agenda for the June 6, Town Council meeting, which will begin at 3:00 p.m. Council Member Butler and Council Member Kucker will not be attendance at this meeting. Town Manager Russ Forrest informed Town Council he will be taking a family vacation and missing the June 20th meeting and that Hunt Walker will be the Acting Town Manager during his absence. Item No. 9 APPROVAL OF MEETING MINUTES FOR April 18, 2011 Regular Meeting Markey Butler made the motion to approve as amended the Minutes for the Regular Meeting of the Snowmass Village Town Council on April 18, 2011. Fred Kucker seconded the motion. The motion was approved by a vote of 5 in favor to 0 opposed. Voting Aye: Jason Haber, John Wilkinson, Fred Kucker, Markey Butler, and Mayor Bill Boineau. Voting Nay: None. Council Member Wilkinson submitted minor changes to the Town Clerk. Item No. 10 COUNCIL COMMENTS /COMMITTEE REPORTS /CALENDARS Mayor Boineau stated that May 20th, 2011 is the Annual Town Clean up day, please meet at the Snowmass Recreation Center at 9:00 a.m. and there will be BBQ after clean up at 12 noon. Please come join us. Council Member Wilkinson stated that the Melton Ranch trail is closed due to construction at the Snowmass Mountain Condos, he is wondering about the timing on this closure. Council Member Haber spoke to the raw materials in the entryway adjacent to the WO' 05- 16 -11TC Minutes Page 7 of 7 Roundabout do not make a very welcoming statement for the entrance to our Village. He commented on the heavy equipment and the overall look of the area. Item No. 11 EXECUTIVE SESSION The Town Manager Russ Forrest stated at this time there is no need for the Executive Session. Town Council will now meet in Executive Session pursuant to C.R.S. 24 -6- 402(4) and Snowmass Village Municipal Code Section 2- 45(c), to specifically discuss two items Determining positions relative to matters that may be subject to negotiations, developing strategy for negotiations, instructing negotiators pursuant to C.R.S. 24- 6- 402(4)(e) and Snowmass Village Municipal Code Section 2- 45(c)(5); and Conferences with an attorney for the purposes of receiving legal advice on specific legal questions pursuant to C.R.S. 24- 6- 402(4)(c) and Snowmass Village Municipal Code Section 2- 45(c)(2); Item No. 12 ADJOURNMENT At 5:48 p.m. Mayor Bill Boineau made the motion to adjourn the Regular Meeting of the Snowmass Village Town Council Meeting on Monday, May 16, 2011. Fred Kucker seconded the motion. The motion was approved by a vote of 5 in favor to 0 opposed. Voting Aye: Jason Haber, John Wilkinson, Fred Kucker, Markey Butler, and Mayor Bill Boineau. Voting Nay: None. Submitted By, Rhonda B. Coxon, Town Clerk 00��00 Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat 1 2 EMU Concert 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 4 OF JULY Town Town Office's Council Closed! Meeting 4:00 .m. Rodeo Free Concert 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 Rodeo Free Concert 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 Town Council Meeting 4:00 m. 4 h 7 Culinary Arts EOTC 4 p.m. Rodeo (Snowmass) Free Concert 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 Rodeo Free Concert 31 Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat 1 2 3 4 5 6 Town Council Meeting 4:00 .m. Rodeo Free Concert 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 Rodeo Free Concert 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 Town Council Meeting 4:00 M. Rodeo Free Concert 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 Community Picnic!!! 28 29 30 31