Loading...
10-17-11 Town Council Packets SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL REGULAR MEETING AGENDA OCTOBER 17, 2011 PLEASE NOTE THAT ALL TIMES ARE APPROXIMATE ITEMS COULD START EARLIER OR LATER THAN THE STATED TIME CALL TO ORDER AT 4:00 P.M. Item No. 1: ROLL CALL Item No. 2: PUBLIC NON AGENDA ITEMS (5- minute time limit) Item No. 3: COUNCIL UPDATES Item No A: CONTINUATION OF PUBLIC HEARING AND FANNY HILL CABINS MINOR PUD AMENDMENT (Time: 10 Minutes) Continued from June 20, 2011 ACTION REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: Open the Public Hearing, and determine if requested continuance by applicant should be granted to another fixed date, time and place. -Jim Wahlstrom ...........................Page 1 (TAB A) Item No. 5: PUBLIC HEARING RESOLUTION NO. 30 SERIES OF 2011 RODEO PLACE SUBDIVISION- SECOND MINOR AMENDMENT AMENDING FINAL PLAT AND RESOLUTION NO.. 15, SERIES OF 2010 (Time: 60 Minutes) ACTION REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: Approve, Modify or Deny Resolution No. 30, Series of 2011 -Chris Conrad ...........................Page 3 (TAB B) Item No. 6: PRESENTATION ON THE MARKETING SPECIAL EVENTS AND GROUP SALES (MSEGS) STAKEHOLDER PLAN AND RECOMMENDATION ON THAT PLAN FROM THE FINANCIAL ADVISORY BOARD. DISCUSSION WITH (MSEGS) ON ADDITIONAL RECOMMENDATIONS ON GOVERNENCE AND 2012 SUMMER BUDGET (Time:120 Minutes) ACTION REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: Receive recommendations by the FAB and Marketing Special Events and Group Sales Board on Stakeholder Plan. -Susan Hamley /FAB /MSEGS Board ..................Page 14 (TAB C) 10-17-11 TC Page 2 of 2 Item No. 7: MANAGER'S REPORT (Time: 10 minutes) --Russell Forrest ...........................Page 87(TAB D Item No. 8: AGENDA FOR NEXT TOWN COUNCIL MEETING Page 97 (TAB E) Item No. 9: APPROVAL OF MEETING MINUTES FOR: Page 99 (TAB F) Item No. 10: COUNCIL COMMENTS /COMMITTEE REPORTS/CALENDARS Pagel 06 (TAB G Item No. 11: ADJOURNMENT NOTE: Total time estimated for meeting: Approx 3.5 hours (excluding items 1-3 and 8 —11) ALL ITEMS AND TIMES ARE TENTATIVE AND SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT FURTHER NOTICE. PLEASE CALL THE OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK AT 923-3777 ON THE DAY OF THE MEETING FOR ANY AGENDA CHANGES. MEMORANDUM TO: Snowmass Village Town Council FROM: Planning Department DATE: October 17, 2011 SUBJECT: CONTINUATION OF PUBLIC HEARING FANNY HILL CABINS MINOR PUD AMENDMENT Pursuant to Section 16A -5 -390, Amendment of Final PUD Municipal Code of the Town of Snowmass, the application proposes removal of Condition #1 in the previous approval Ordinance No. 23, Series of 2004, for the Fanny Hill Cabins envisioned on Parcel 7, Woodrun Unit Five Subdivision indicating "no building permits will be issued for any of the Buildings in the Project until Phase 2B of the Base Village PUD is substantially complete." Applicant: Don Schuster, Vice President Aspen Skiing Company Brush Creek Land Company, LLC Planner: Jim Wahlstrom, Senior Planner I. PURPOSE AND ACTION REQUESTED OF COUNCIL The Applicant has submitted a request per the attached letter dated October 4, 2011 (Attachment "A to continue the public hearing to April 16, 2012. II. APPLICABLE REGULATIONS Municipal Code Section 16A- 5- 70(2)d. Continuance of public hearing "The body conducting the public hearing may, on its own motion or at the request of the applicant, continue the public hearing to a fixed date, time and place. An applicant shall have the right to request and be granted one (1) continuance. All subsequent continuances shall be granted at the discretion of the body conducting the public hearing only upon good cause shown." III. STAFF RECOMMENDATION The applicant had the right pursuant to the Code to request one public hearing continuance, made on May 26, 2011 and granted on June 20, 2011 to the October 17, 2011 Town Council meeting date. Town Council may continue the hearing again to April 16, 2012 provided good cause has been shown. IV. NEXT STEP Continue the public hearing to a fixed date, time and place. Attachments A. Applicant's requested continuance letter dated October 4, 2011. 1 1 ATTAC HMENT "A" ��N��� ����0���� U� ^mncm�xowao��mumv October 4,2O1I mm^r RUS5 Forrest, Town Manager Chris Conrad, Planning Director Town ofSnovvrnassVillage Post Office Box 5OlO Snnvvrnass Village, CO 8I615 Dear Sirs: On behalf of the Brush Creek Land Company, LLC, we respectfully request a continuance for the m m Town Council review of the Fanny Hill Town home application from October 17 unti|Apri|16 2012. We are requesting a continuance based on the feedback from Council Members that they would like to have more clarity on the direction of the Base Village prior to considering our request to move forward with this development. Even if the scheduled foreclosure sale on November 16 th were to occur, we believe it will take some time to document the sale and fora new oxvner/deve|operto develop a plan for implementation, which will include the round'a-bout and SVVSD line extension required for any additional development including the Fanny Hi||Tovvnhonnes. Please let us know if you need anything further to process this continuance. Sincerely, Don Schuster Vice President PO. Box 1348 Aspen, CO82612'1248 970'9234220 momaopon000nmu0000m Printed on Recycled Papa SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT A PUBLIC HEARING WILL BE HELD BEFORE THE SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL. THE PUBLIC IS INVITED TO ATTEND AND COMMENT. DATE: October 17, 2011 TIME: During a regular meeting that begins at 4:00 P.M. WHERE: Town Hall 0130 Kearns Road, Council Chambers, 1st Floor Snowmass Village, CO WHY: To receive public comment on an application by the Town of Snowmass Village seeking to amend Rodeo Place Final Plat and Resolution No. 15, Series of 2010. This second amendment proposes to combine 1,728 square feet of Open Space A with Lot 4, thereby increasing the size of Lot 4 to meet the zoning requirement for a 2- bedroom single family home and reducing the size of Open Space A The proposal increases the total number of residences within the subdivision by one (1) to twenty -nine (29) while maintaining a total of twenty -four (24) lots as originally approved on approximately 8.5 acres zoned Multi- family (MF). CODE: Application will be processed pursuant to the Town of Snowmass Village Municipal Code Section 16A -5 -450, Amendment of final plat. INFO: Additional information regarding the proposal is available for inspection at the Snowmass Village Planning Department or by telephone at (970) 923 -5524 during normal business hours. Written comments are encouraged and will be accepted until the close of the public hearing; for inclusion of written comments in the Council packet, submissions must be made one week prior to the public hearing to the following address: Snowmass Village Planning Department P.O. Box 5010 Snowmass Village, CO 81615 Attn: Chris C. Conrad, Planning Director Telephone: (970) 923 -3777 Internet Access to Council email: http: /www.tosv.com Citizen Feedback Hotline: (970) 922 -6727 or clerk @tosv.com Rhonda B. Coxon, Town Clerk Posted and Published in the Snowmass Sun on September 28, 2011 3 MEMORANDUM TO: Snowmass Village Town Council FROM: Planning Department DATE: October 17, 2011 SUBJECT: PUBLIC HEARING AND RESOLUTION NO. 30 SERIES OF 2011 Second Minor Amendment Rodeo Place Subdivision Final Plat and Resolution No. 15, Series of 2010 Applicant: Housing Department, represented by Dan Rotner, Coburn Development Planner: Chris Conrad, Planning Director I. PURPOSE AND ACTIONS REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: Applicant is requesting approval to amend the Rodeo Place Subdivision plat, specifically involving Lot 4 and "Open Space A and to amend Town Council Resolution No. 15, Series of 2010 "Resolution 15 Resolution No. 39, Series of 2006 "Resolution 39 originally approved and specified development parameters for the Rodeo Place Subdivision). Action Requested: Conduct the Public Hearing and then approve, modify or deny Resolution No. 30, Series of 2011. II. SUMMARY OF PROJECT: Applicant is proposing to combine 1,728 square feet of Open Space A with Lot 4 by extending the parcel boundary into a ditch easement (part of "Open Space A that runs through the subdivision (See Attachment 1). This increases the area of Lot 4 from 3,323 square feet to 5,051 square feet and complies with the zoning requirement for the construction of a 2- bedroom single family home. The proposal, if approved, would increase the total number of residences within the subdivision by one (1) to twenty -nine (29) while maintaining a total of twenty -four (24) lots as originally approved on about 8.5 acres zoned Multi- family (MF). III. BACKGROUND: In 2006, Rodeo Place Subdivision was approved as Resolution 39. The approval reduced the total number of lots from twenty -five (25) to twenty -four (24) and further specified that Lot 1 was a tri -plex, Lots 2 -3 were duplexes, Lots 5 -24 were detached, single family homes and that Lot 4 should be "utilized as a neighborhood park/tot lot or other approved use." On February 2, 2009, Town Council directed the Applicant to proceed with planning and designing Phase 2 of the Rodeo Place development that included Lots 1 and 4. As directed at that time, Applicant submitted an application for a Minor Amendment to the original subdivision approval. The proposed amendment to Resolution 39 sought to: 1) clarify inconsistencies in lot numbering between the Resolution and the recorded plat; 2) eliminate the central trash facility requirement; modify the maximum floor area limits for Lots 21 -24; and, 3) permit limited off street parking within setback areas. It also proposed to develop two (2) duplexes instead of a tri -plex on Lot 1 and construct a 2- bedroom single family home on Lot 4. 4 On March 15, 2010, Town Council held a public hearing concerning the proposed Amendment; the public hearing was then continued to April 5, 2010 when Resolution 15 was approved for the minor amendments, including Lot 1 being permitted to have two (2) duplexes instead of a tri -plex. Council did not approve the replatting of Lot 4 to include a portion of Open Space A based on two (2) Specific Findings: 1. Although increasing the lot size from 3,323 square feet to 5,051 square feet will enable the construction of a two (2) bedroom single family residence, the need to retain the existing building envelope limits the design of the residence presented such that replatting is unwarranted at this time. 2. Conveying Lot 4 would include a restriction within the drainage easement portion of the parcel limiting planting and restricting placement of improvements in any way that could affect the maintenance, operation, repair, alteration or replacement of drainage facilities within the easement. It was felt that private ownership of that portion of the ditch easement could be problematic in the future. Applicant is requesting that Council review this Minor Amendment application and reconsider its March 15, 2010 decision by approving the replatting of Lot 4 to the centerline of the drainage easement within a portion of Open Space A so that a deed restricted, 2- bedroom single family home can be developed on the property. III. APPLICABLE REGULATIONS The application proposal qualifies as a `Minor Subdivision Amendment' pursuant to Code Section 16A- 5- 450(1)(b) of the Municipal Code. The applicable review standards are specified in Municipal Code Section 16A- 5- 450(3). IV. DISCUSSION ITEMS: ALTERNATIVES AND IMPLICATIONS: Lot 4. The lot is currently 3,323 square feet in size and zoned Multi- family (MF). Within the MF zone district, the minimum lot area requirement for a dwelling unit is 3,000 square feet and 1,500 square feet per bedroom plus 500 square feet for each additional bedroom; therefor, a 1- bedroom unit requires a minimum lot size of 4,500 square feet and a 2- bedroom unit requires 5,000 square feet. Applicant is proposing to increase the lot size to 5,051 square feet and provide sufficient lot area to allow for the construction of a 2- bedroom single family home by utilizing a portion of the drainage easement within Open Space A. The subdivision has seven (7) lots that abut a fifty (50) foot wide drainage easement that is part of a historical drainage system running from the Horse Ranch Subdivision to Brush Creek. The initial Rodeo Place Subdivision included the drainage easement area within the abutting lots. Resolution 39 states that the Town Council felt that including the easement area within the lots "could interfere with storm flows" and directed that the lots, including Lot 4, be reconfigured so the lot lines did not go to the centerline of the drainage easement. Resolution 39 also stated that Lot 4 could be "utilized as a neighborhood park/tot lot or other approved use" since it did not meet the Multi- family (MF) zone district minimum lot area requirement of 5,000 square feet for a 2- bedroom residence. Staff Comments: The Town is currently the owner of Lot 4 as well as the drainage easement area (Identified as "Open Space on the subdivision plat) and is developing plans to restrict the drainage as mitigation wetlands with the Army Corps of Engineers. Should Lot 4 be reconfigured to include any additional area within the drainage 5 easement, that area must be restricted to prohibit the placement of any improvements within it by the current or future owner of Lot 4. V. STAFF FINDINGS AND RECOMMENDATIONS: Staff recommends approval of the Minor Amendment of Resolution 15 to establish development parameters for Lot 4 while not amending the Final Plat based on the following Findings and Conditions: A. Approval of the Minor Amendment of Resolution 15 without amending the Final Plat Amendment 1. Specific Findings a. A detached, single family residence is an appropriate use for the property. b. Although increasing the lot size from 3,323 square feet to 5,051 square feet would meet the dimensional requirements to enable the construction of a two (2) bedroom single family residence within the MF zone district, the need to retain the existing lot configuration outside the drainage easement makes it a Nonconforming Lot and requires a Variance if a single family residence is to developed. c. Conveying Lot 4 would include a restriction within the drainage easement portion of the parcel limiting planting and restricting placement of improvements that in any way could affect the maintenance, operation, repair, alteration or replacement of drainage facilities within the easement. It is a belief that private ownership of that portion of the ditch easement is problematic and therefore shall not occur. 2. Conditions a. Amend Resolution 15 to establish the height limit and maximum floor area (FAR) for Lot 4. b. Retain Lot 4 as originally platted in terms of its configuration, shape, size and building envelope. c. Authorize the Applicant to prepare and submit to the Planning Commission a Variance application requesting approval to deviate from the provisions of the Municipal Code, specifically the Dimensional Limitations for Minimum Lot Area within the MF zone district and building setbacks to allow for the construction of a 2- bedroom single family residence. B. Two (2) alternative actions are also outlined for consideration: Alternative 1131: Denial of the Minor Amendment to Resolution 15 and Final Plat; OR Alternative 1132: Approval of the Amendment to Resolution 15 and Final Plat with Conditions. B1. Denial of the Minor Amendment to Resolution 15 and Final Plat 1. Specific Findings a. Although increasing the lot size from 3,323 square feet to 5,051 square feet would enable the construction of a two (2) bedroom single family residence, the need to retain the existing building envelope limits the design of the residence presented such that replatting is not warranted. 6 b. Conveying Lot 4 would include a restriction within the drainage easement portion of the parcel limiting planting and restricting placement of improvements in any way that could affect the maintenance, operation, repair, alteration or replacement of drainage facilities within the easement. It is believed that private ownership of that portion of the ditch easement is problematic and therefore shall not occur. 2. Conditions a. Lot 4 and Open Space A shall remain as originally platted. b. Lot 4 shall be utilized as a neighborhood park/tot lot or other approved use. B2. Approval of the Minor Amendment to Resolution 15 and Final Plat with Conditions 1. Specific Findings a. A detached, single family residence is an appropriate use for the property. b. The proposal to increase the lot size from 3,323 square feet to 5,051 square feet enables the construction of a two (2) bedroom single family residence within the MF zone district, while retaining the existing platted building envelope and allowing for the design of a single family residence that is in character with the existing neighborhood. c. The proposal for Lot 4 to contain additional area within the drainage easement portion of the parcel prohibits placement of any improvements that could affect the maintenance, operation, repair, alteration or replacement of drainage facilities within the easement. Private ownership of that portion of the ditch easement can be mitigated with proper restrictions. 2. Conditions a. Maximum Height: 28 feet from existing or finished grade whichever is more restrictive. b. Maximum FAR: 2,100 square feet (Basement is prohibited). c. Subdivision Layout: Lot line may go to the centerline of with drainage easement; any improvements are prohibited within that portion of the lot. d. Building Design: All site improvements including roof overhangs, decks, patios, storage, play -sets, etc. shall be located entirely within the platted building envelope; and driveway and walkways may not be located anywhere within the 50 -foot wide drainage easement. e. Landscaping and Grading: Any grading, sitework or landscaping shall receive prior approval from the Planning Department to ensure that it complies as mitigation wetlands with the Army Corps of Engineers and does not impact stormwater flows. f. Fencing: A rounded or split rail fence limited to three (3) rails not to exceed forty -two (42) inches in height shall be installed along the building envelope 7 boundary that abuts the drainage easement prior to issuance of a Certificate of Occupancy. VI. NEXT STEPS: If the Minor Amendment to Resolution 15 is approved without replatting Lot 4, Council may direct Applicant to prepare a Variance application pursuant to Municipal Code Section 16A- 3- 220(c)(1), Non conforming Lots for review by Planning Commission. If Council denies the Minor Amendments (Alternative 131) no further steps are required; if the Minor Amendments are approved to replat Lot 4 and Open Space A, the Second Minor Amendment -Rodeo Place Final Plat needs to be finalized, signed and recorded prior to the issuance of a building permit. Attachment: 1) Enlarged exhibit showing proposed platting action. 2) Resolution No. 30, Series of 2011 Handout: Application Packet (In Council boxes) 8 Lry v O 4 Vj O v O L v O L4 O�1C��;cEmOov3 W Q Vo0 3� r c o Q t a z�o ATTACHMENT 1 Q Va PORTION OF OPEN SPACE A PROPOSED TO BE COMBINED WITH LOT 4 TO INCREASE LOT SIZE i ol "f Ix i I x`91 IF I I i .1. ri N1 0'31" �o ATTACHMENT 2 1 TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE 2 TOWN COUNCIL 3 4 RESOLUTION NO. 30, 5 SERIES OF 2011 6 7 A RESOLUTION CONCERNING A SECOND MINOR AMENDMENT OF RODEO PLACE 8 SUBDIVISION FINAL PLAT ANDAMENDING RESOLUTION NO. 15, SERIES OF 2010. 9 10 WHEREAS, the Housing Department on behalf of the Town of Snowmass Village 11 "Applicant submitted a land use application for the Rodeo Place Subdivision on July 14, 12 2006 that contained twenty -five (25) lots with twenty -nine (29) affordable housing units on 13 approximately 8.5 acres within Tract A of the Entryway Subdivision; and 14 15 WHEREAS, the Rodeo Place Subdivision was approved by Town Council 16 Resolution No. 39, Series of 2006 (Resolution 39); and 17 18 WHEREAS, the recorded subdivision plat created twenty -four (24) lots of which Lots 19 2 and 3 were duplex lots and Lot 1 was identified as a triplex lot; and 20 21 WHEREAS, Lots 5 -24 were intended for single family residences and Lot 4 was 22 approved to be platted as a lot and "utilized as a neighborhood park/tot lot or other 23 approved use and 24 25 WHEREAS, the First Minor Amendment -Rodeo Place Subdivision was approved 26 by Town Council Resolution No. 15, Series of 2010 (Resolution 15); and 27 28 WHEREAS, the first amendment to was to: 1) correct inconsistencies in lot 29 numbering between Resolution 39 and the recorded plat; 2) remove the requirement for a 30 central trash facility; 3) modify the maximum floor area limits for Lots 21 -24; 4) permit 31 limited off street parking within the setback areas as specified; and 5) enable Lot 1 to 32 contain two (2) duplexes while not permitting Lot 4 to be re- platted utilizing a portion of 33 "Open Space A" to increase the lot size from 3,323 square feet to 5,051 square feet and 34 allow the construction of a two (2) bedroom single family residence; and 35 36 WHEREAS, to better achieve the purposes of the Entryway Master Plan, the 37 Applicant submitted a Second Minor Amendment application on September 01, 2011 and 38 supplemental information on September 28, 2011 that addressed the land use 39 requirements for an Amendment of Final Plat as set forth in Section 16A -5 -450 of the 40 Town of Snowmass Village Municipal Code "Municipal Code and 41 42 WHEREAS, the second amendment application requested that Lot 4 be re- platted 43 using a portion of "Open Space A" to increase its size from 3,323 square feet to 5,051 square 44 feet and permit the construction of a two (2) bedroom single family residence; and 45 46 WHEREAS, the public hearing notice was published in the Snowmass Sun on 47 September 28, 2011 for the Town Council meeting on October 17, 2011 to hear a 48 presentation of the proposal by the Applicant, consider Town staff recommendations and 49 receive public comments as part of the application review; and 50 10 TC Reso 11 -30 Page 2 51 WHEREAS, the application was reviewed and processed in accordance with the 52 provisions outlined in Sections 16A -5 -450 of the Municipal Code. 53 54 NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, by the Town Council of the Town of 55 Snowmass Village, as follows: 56 57 Section One General Findings. Snowmass Village Town Council finds that: 58 59 1) The submission requirements for the application were adequately provided 60 pursuant to Sections 16A -5 -40 and 16A- 5- 450(2)(b) of the Municipal Code and 61 included written and graphic materials in sufficient detail to deem the application 62 complete for review. 63 64 2) The proposed application qualifies as a `Minor Amendment' pursuant to Section 65 16A- 5- 450(1)(b) of the Municipal Code and this second amendment, as approved 66 in Section Two below, complies with the review standards set forth in Section 16A- 67 5- 450(3) of the Municipal Code. 68 69 Section Two Amending Resolution No. 15. The Town Council hereby approves the 70 following clarifications and /or amendments to Town Council Resolution No. 15, Series of 71 2010, as follows: 72 73 1. Section Three, Paragraph B(1), Maximum Height, is hereby amended to read 74 as follows: 75 76 1. Maximum Height: 28 feet (Lots 1 -3) from existing or finished grade 77 whichever is most restrictive. 78 28 feet (Lots 4 -12; and Lots 23 -24) from existing or 79 finished grade whichever is most restrictive. 80 28 feet (Lots 13 -22) from finished grade due to fill 81 conditions. 82 83 2. Section Three, Paragraph B(2), Maximum FAR, is hereby amended to read as 84 follows: 85 2. Maximum FAR: Lots 1 -20, excluding Lot 4: 86 3,000 square feet/unit total (0.75 Not Applicable) 87 2,100 square feet (above grade) 88 1,250 square feet (below grade) 89 90 Lots 21 -24: 91 3,000 square feet/unit total (0.75 Not Applicable) 92 Buildings limited to 2 levels including basements 93 94 Note: The Maximum FAR for Lot 2 shall be as may be established by 95 Planning Commission specific design review and floor area variance 96 approval. 97 98 3. Section Three, Paragraph C, Subdivision Layout, is hereby amended to read 11 TC Reso 11 -30 Page 3 99 as follows: 100 101 C. Subdivision Layout: The overall subdivision layout that includes the 102 roads, alleys and residential lots shall be as follows: 103 104 2 Let 1 may be p as of t he e r subdivisi !i y t sh rem in 105 may 106 plans are submitted and appFeved by Town Go Lot 4 shall be platted as a 107 lot and may be utilized as a single family residential lot subject to Planning 108 Commission floor area variance approval as may be obtained pursuant to 109 Section 16A- 3- 220(c)(1), Nonconforming Lots, of the Municipal Code. 110 111 4. Lots 3, 4, 5,13,14, 23, 24 and 25 could interfere with storm flows and therefore, 112 they shall be reconfigured so the lot lines do not go to the centerline of the 113 drainage easement. 114 115 Section Three Amending Rodeo Place Subdivision Plat. The Town Council hereby 116 (denies) the following second amendment to the Rodeo Place Subdivision, as recorded 117 on August 1, 2007 in Plat Book 84 at Page 70 as Reception No. 540522 in the records of 118 the Pitkin County Clerk and Recorder, as follows: 119 120 1. Lot 4 may be re- platted to the centerline of the drainage easement, as shown on 121 Exhibit "A to increase the lot size from 3,323 square feet to 5,051 square feet and 122 permit for the construction of a two (2) bedroom single family residence while 123 decreasing the area of Open Space A. Specific restrictive language shall be added 124 to the Second Minor Amendment Plat defining the final lot configuration and 125 restricting the placement of any improvements by the lot owner within the drainage 126 easement of record.) 127 128 Section Four Conditions. Town Council (approves) the Minor Amendment(s) subject to 129 the following conditions: 130 131 1. Lot 4 shall remain as originally platted with the following Conditions: 132 133 a. Land Use: The property is a nonconforming Lot. The maximum potential 134 development shall be for a 2- bedroom single family home subject to Planning 135 Commission Variance approval obtained pursuant to Section 16A- 3- 220(c)(1) 136 of the Municipal Code, otherwise the lot shall be used as a neighborhood 137 park /tot lot or other approved use. 138 139 b. Development Parameters: Maximum height is twenty -eight (28) feet from 140 existing or finished grade whichever is most restrictive; Maximum floor area 141 (FAR) is 2,100 square feet and a basement is not allowed; Maximum number 142 of bedrooms is two (2); and two (2) off street parking spaces are required. 143 144 c. Building Design: The site specific single family residence, including roof 145 overhangs and decks, may intrude into the platted setbacks adjacent to 146 Stallion Circle and Bronco Court if approved pursuant to 16A -5 -240, Variances, 12 TC Reso 11 -30 Page 4 147 of the Municipal Code. Patios, storage sheds, play -sets, etc., driveway, off 148 street parking and walkways shall not be located anywhere within the 50 -foot 149 wide drainage easement. 150 151 c. Landscaping and Grading: Any grading, sitework or landscaping within the 152 drainage easement shall receive prior approval from the Planning Department 153 to ensure that it complies as mitigation wetlands with the Army Corps of 154 Engineers and does not impact stormwater flows. 155 156 Section Four: Severability If any provision of this Resolution or application hereof to 157 any person or circumstance is held invalid, the invalidity shall not affect any other 158 provision or application of this Resolution which can be given effect without the invalid 159 provision or application, and, to this end, the provisions of this Resolution are severable. 160 161 INTRODUCED, READ AND APPROVED on the motion of Council Member 162 and the second of Council Member by a vote of in 163 favor and opposed, on this 17 day of October, 2011. 164 165 166 TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE 167 TOWN COUNCIL 168 169 170 171 Bill Boineau, Mayor 172 ATTEST: 173 174 175 176 Rhonda B. Coxon, Town Clerk 177 178 APPROVED AS TO FORM: 179 180 181 182 John Dresser, Town Attorney 13 August 31, 2011 COBURN Chris Conrad creating great places" Planning Director Town of Snowmass Village 130 Kearns Road Snowmass Village, CO 81615 Re: Rodeo Place Lot 4 Open Space A, application for Minor Amendment of Final Plat. Dear Mr. Conrad, Attached are the application materials for a Minor Amendment of Final Plat for the Rodeo Place Subdivision Lot 4 Open Space A. This application package contains the following materials: Minimum Contents Rodeo Place Lots 1, 4 Open Space A, application for Minor Amendment to Final Plat (1 page) Written Description: Rodeo Place Lots 4 Open Space A, application for Minor Amendment to Final Plat (4 pages) Draft Minor Amendment Plat: Lots 1, 4 and Open Space A, Rodeo Place, Town of Snowmass Village, County of Pitkin, State of Colorado (1 2436 sheet) Draft Improvement Survey, Minor Amendment Plat: Lots 1, 4 and Open Space A, Rodeo Place, Town of Snowmass Village, County of Pitkin, State of Colorado (1 24x36 sheet) Draft amendment of Resolution 39, Series 2006 (7 pages) Proposed Lot 4 architectural site plan, floor plans and elevations (1 2436 sheet) Included are 3 copies of the entire application in 11x17 format and 2 copies each of the Plat, Improvement Survey and Architectural Plans. Please accept this application for a Determination of Completeness as defined in Section 16A -5 -50. Sincerely, Daniel R. Rotner, AIA Senior Architect, Coburn Development, Inc. Coburn Development, Inc. 3020 Carbon Place, #203, Boulder, CO 80301 Minor Amendment to Final Plat 303 -442 -3351 www.cobumdev.com Rodeo Place Subdivision Last edit: 8/31/20111 Minimum Contents Rodeo Place Lot 4 Open Space A, application for Minor Amendment to Final Plat 1. For all applications per Sec. 16A-5-40 1.1 Applicant's contact information: Daniel R. Rotner, AIA Senior Architect Coburn Development, Inc 3020 Carbon Place, #203 Boulder, CO 80301 P.303- 442 -3351 F. 303 447 -3933 drotneo_coburndev.com See attached copy of e -mail dated 05/28/09 from Russell Forrest, Town Manager, authorizing Coburn as the applicant for this project. 1.2 Legal Description: The legal description is included on the Subdivision Plat Minor Amendment document 1.3 Disclosure of Ownership: A current title commitment is included as part of this application. 1.4 Written Description: See the following Written Description: Rodeo Place Lots 1, 4 Open Space A, application for Minor Amendment of Final Plat. 1.5 Vicinity Map: A vicinity map is included on the Subdivision Plat Minor Amendment document 1.6 Other maps: Additional drawings have been provided per the minimum contents required for the application for Minor Amendment of Final Plat as listed below. 1.7 Base Fee: Fees have been waived for this application for development approval on Town owned property. See attached copy of e -mail dated 05/28/09 from Russell Forrest, Town Manager, waiving fees for this application. 2. For a Minor Amendment of Final Plat per Sec. 16A-5-540(2) 2.1 Minimum Contents for any application as listed above. 2.2 Written Description: See the following Written Description: Rodeo Place Lot 4 Open Space A, application for Minor Amendment of Final Plat. 2.3 Other Information: a. Draft Minor Amendment Plat: Lot 4 and Open Space A, Rodeo Place, Town of Snowmass Village, County of Pitkin, State of Colorado b. Draft Improvement Surrey, Minor Amendment Plat: Lot 4 and Open Space A, Rodeo Place, Town of Snowmass Village, County of Pitkin, State of Colorado c. Redlined copy of Resolution 15 Series 2010 with proposed revisions to language for an new adopting resolution for a Minor Amendment Plat addressing Lot 4. d. Proposed Lot 4 architectural site plan, floor plans and elevations Coburn Development, Inc. 3020 Carbon Place, #203, Boulder, CO 80301 Minor Amendment to Final Plat 303 442 -3351 www.coburndev.com Rodeo Place Subdivision Last edit: 8/31/20112 Written Description: Rodeo Place Lot 4 Open Space A, application for Minor Amendment to Final Plat This application for Minor Amendment to Final Plat has two primary objectives: 1. Adjustment of the lot line boundary between Lot 4 and Open Space A to create a buildable lot per the requirements of the Town of Snowmass Village Land Use Code 2. Revisions to Resolution 15 Series 2010 which are intended to revise language in the resolution to be consistent with the proposed changes to Lot 4. Lot 4 and Open Space A lot line adjustment The purpose of the lot line adjustment between Lot 4 and Open Space A is to allow Lot 4 to be a conforming lot for development of a residential dwelling unit consistent with the original subdivision application. a. The recorded plat allocates 3,323 s.f. of land area to Lot 4 which complies with the minimum lot area of 3,000 in the MF zone district but is below the minimum lot area required for development of a residential dwelling unit. b. The proposed amended plat defines a lot line revision between Lot 4 and Open Space A that creates a lot with a land area of 5,051 s.f., adequate for development of a 2 bedroom single family residence consistent with the original subdivision application. c. No change is proposed to the platted drainage easement running over the property. d. No change is proposed to the building envelope. e. No change is proposed to the maximum floor area allowed on the lot. f. No change is proposed to the existing utilities serving this lot. Water and sewer connections have been provided as a part of the approved utility plan and subsequent infrastructure installation. Revisions to Resolution 15, Series 2010 The proposed changes to the language affect multiple areas of the resolution and are intended to redefine the language for a new resolution adopting an amended Subdivision Plat for Lot 4 and address the following issues: a. Revisions to the Sections 1 and 2 of the Resolution, General and Specific Findings, redefining the language in these sections to allow for the development of Lot 4. b. Revisions to the amendment language in Section 3 of the Resolution to include Lot 4 in the criteria defining Maximum Height, Maximum FAR and Subdivision Layout c. Revisions to Section 4 defining the new amendment to the Subdivision Plat related to Lot 4. d. Revisions to Section 5 addressing the Lot 4 Minor Amendment Plat. Analysis of compliance with the Review Standards for a Minor Amendment of Final Plat a. Consistent with subdivision: o The proposed plans are consistent with the single family home and duplex character of the existing subdivision. Coburn Development, Inc. 3020 Carbon Place, 4203, Boulder, CO 80301 Minor Amendment to Final Plat 303442 -3351 www.coburndev.com Rodeo Place Subdivision Last edit: 8/31/20113 No changes are proposed to the building envelopes established on the original plat. The adopted original adopting resolution for the subdivision, Resolution 39, Series 2006 approved a subdivision with 25 lots and 29 units. This minor amendment would result in a subdivision with 24 lots and 29 units. The proposed revisions to the Lot 4 lot lines allow for this to be a conforming single family home lot. Again, the goal is to allow for the construction of 29 units as approved for the original subdivision. b. No adverse impacts: The proposed changes are consistent with the original subdivision application and no adverse impacts are created. o Relocation of the lot line on Lot 4 to the centerline of the drainage easement allows this to be a conforming lot. The function of the drainage easement is protected by restrictive language on the Minor Amendment Plat and the building envelope is not changed from the recorded plat to avoid adverse impacts c. Not change character: The proposed revisions are consistent with the original approved Subdivision plan. o The single family home on Lot 4 was anticipated in the original subdivision plan application. This will be the smallest single family home in Rodeo Place d. Comply with other applicable standards: The proposed revisions are consistent with the original subdivision application and resolution. The findings contained in the resolution confirmed compliance with the applicable subdivision standards. No nonconforming conditions are adjusted to increase the non conformity of any lots or structures Coburn Development, Inc. 3020 Carbon Place, #203, Boulder, CO 80301 Minor Amendment to Final Plat 303 -442 -3351 www.coburndev.com Rodeo Place Subdivision Last edit: 8/31/20114 September 27, 2011 COBURN Bob Nevins creating great places" Contract Planner Town of Snowmass Village 130 Kearns Road Snowmass Village, CO 81615 Re: Rodeo Place Lot 4 Open Space A, application for Minor Amendment of Final Plat. Dear Mr. Nevins, Attached are revised application materials for a Minor Amendment of Final Plat for the Rodeo Place Subdivision Lot 4 Open Space A in response to your Application Completion Review of September 21, 2011. This application package contains the following materials: Redlined Application Completion Review indicating responses to incomplete items. Revised Written Description: Rodeo Place Lots 4 Open Space A, application for Minor Amendment to Final Plat (4 pages) Revised Proposed Lot 4 architectural site plan, floor plans and elevations (2 2436 sheets) Included are 3 copies of the revised application materials in 11x17 format and 2 copies each of the Architectural Plans. Please let us know if additional materials are required to complete this application. Sincerely, Daniel R. Rotner, AIA Senior Architect, Coburn Development, Inc. SEP 2 8 2011 «'iWage 1q,,/ �evP-IoPment Coburn Development, Inc. 3020 Carbon Place, #203, Boulder, CO 80301 Minor Amendment to Final Plat 303 -442 -3351 www.cDbumdev.com Rodeo Place Subdivision Last edit 9/27/20111 September 27, 2011 The application document has been revised as noted below in red underlined text. Daniel R. Rotner, Al Coburn Development, Inc drotner @coburndev.com To: Dan Rotner, Coburn Development, Inc. From: Snowmass Village Planning Department RE: Minor Amendment of Final Plat -Rodeo Place Subdivision Application Completion Review Date: 21 September 2011 Section 16a -5 -50 Staff review of application: Staff determines the application received September 1, 2011 for a Minor Amendment of Final Plat -Rodeo Place Subdivision to be "Incomplete" with the deficiencies indentified below. The deficiencies need to be remedied in a timely manner so Staff can prepare the required Public Notices and complete its Staff Report and Draft Resolution for inclusion, if possible, into the Town Council packet for the meeting on October 17. Staff is available to meet with the Applicant and to discuss the proposed amendment, application requirements, review standards and review process. Municipal Code Section 16A- 5- 450(1)b. Minor Amendment of Final Plat, shall comply with: Procedures of Subsection (2) Procedures for minor amendment of final plat: a. Pre application conference is mandatory prior to submission of an application. Has not occurred. If you are not in town perhaps Chris can meet with Joe or Bob Kaufman. We need to coordinate the public notice mailing and posting schedule. We intend to advertise in Snowmass Sun next week and target the October 17 meeting for action. b. Submission of application. 1. Minimum contents as specified in Section 16A- 5- 40(b): (a) Authorization. (1) Owner's permission. We will accept Russ Forrest's August 22 email which implies he has consented to allowing "Coburn and Rudd to move forward... The Town Manager still needs to authorize a waiver of Planning fees. See attached copy of e- mail from Russ Forrest (b) Minimum contents. (1) Name, address, telephone number and power of attorney. We will accept Russ Forrest's August 22 email which implies he has consented to allowing "Coburn and Rudd to move forward..." as the owner's representative. (2) Legal description. Complete. (3) Disclosure of ownership. Complete. (4) Written description. Incomplete but accepted to commence review. Is this Rodeo Place Subdivision- Second Minor Amendment? Yes, this has been clarified in the new "Summary and Background" section. Clearly specify the amount of land in SF /AC that is being re- platted from Open Space A to Lot 4 and state the revised totals for these two areas; the building envelope area (net developable) should also be identified in relationship to the other single-family lots /house sizes -how does this lot compare? See revisions to "Lot 4 and Open Space Lot Line Adjustment" section Has the project density increased by this Amendment and if so by how much -24 lots /29 units (increase of 1 unit instead of a neighborhood park on Lot 4) from the initial approval of 24 total lots 127 units with neighborhood park on Lot 4 to 24 total lots /28 units (First Amendment -2 duplexes /Lot 1 instead of a tri- plex)and a neighborhood park on Lot 4? No change in the approved overall unit count and density is proposed A brief background summary of the project and an outline of the modifications that have occurred (and when) would be helpful for the decision- makers and public. See the new "Summary and Background" section. (5) Vicinity Map. Complete. (6) Other maps: Incomplete but optional. Proposed floor plans need to be dimensioned with floor area summary table; it is also advisable to include a Context Map showing the footprints of the other residences and driveways in the neighborhood to show relative scale, building orientation and access /parking. Photos of the lot and its relationship to the drainage easement and the adjacent homes should also be included as part of the application See the attached revised site plan and unit plans /elevations We would prefer to present photographs and site diagrams in the Council presentation if that is acceptable (7) Base fee. Incomplete- see (a)(1) above for fee waiver by Town Manager. See attached copy of e -mail from Russ Forrest 2. Written statement. See (b)(4) above. 3. Other information. See (b)(6) above. Standards of Subsection (3) Review standards: Not required for initial submission but it is recommended you consider the following comments: a. Consistent with original subdivision. Incomplete- explain "how" this proposal is consistent with the intent of the original subdivision (i believe the original proposal included 25 lots, but Council approved a 24 -lot subdivision to minimize impacts to The Crossings and is this proposal considered to be an "enhancement" and if so, explain "why" it is. See additional explanation b. No substantially adverse impact. Incomplete -need to explain "why" and /or "how" the proposed 2 -story house will not have an adverse visual impact on the existing adjacent residents and "why" the elimination of the neighborhood park will not have an adverse impact on the enjoyment of the land abutting upon or across the street. See additional explanation c. Not change character. Incomplete -need to address the issue of "character" and how the proposal is consistent with the subdivision in terms of siting, scale, architecture, materials, colors, landscaping, etc. As a note, Lot 4 was originally platted as a lot, but not approved for single-family development due to its size, shape and relationship to the street and drainage easement. See additional explanation d. Comply with other applicable standards. Incomplete- explain how the proposed amendment meets the intent of the original subdivision approval and the standards as set forth in the adopted Resolution. The original subdivision application proposed29 units on 25 -lots that were platted to the centerline of the ditch easement; Council then approved 28 units on 24 -lots that did not include lot areas within the ditch easement, eliminated a lot that abutted The Crossings and designated Lot 4 as a neighborhood park or other use. See "Summary and Background" section. Written Description: Rodeo Place Lot 4 Open Space A, application for Minor Amendment to Final Plat This application for Minor Amendment to Final Plat has two primary objectives: 1. Adjustment of the lot line boundary between Lot 4 and Open Space A to create a buildable lot per the requirements of the Town of Snowmass Village Land Use Code 2. Revisions to Resolution 15, Series 2010 which are intended to revise language in the resolution to be consistent with the proposed changes to Lot 4. Summary and Background This application addresses the Town of Snowmass Village's request for a Second Minor Amendment to the Rodeo Place Subdivision Plat. This amendment, if approved, will allow for the development of a single family detached dwelling unit on Lot 4 of the Rodeo Place Subdivision. The General Findings in the original Resolution approving the Rodeo Place Subdivision, Resolution No. 39, Series of 2006, noted that "The Subdivision Plat creates twenty -five (25) lots, that contain one (1) triplex unit: two (2) duplexes; and twenty -two (22) single family homes for a total of twenty -nine affordable units on 8.55 acres At buildout, "Rodeo Place" has the potential for a maximum density of 3.4 units /acre." The goal of this application is to allow the Town of Snowmass Village to exercise the full development rights granted in the original subdivision approval in its mission to provide affordable housing to the citizens of the municipality. The following considerations are relevant to this application: a. The original approving Resolution noted that "Lot 4 may be platted as a lot and utilized as a neighborhood parkitot lot or other approved use" This application proposes that the "other approved use" should be a dwelling unit consistent with the approved unit count and density of the subdivision. b. The original approving Resolution noted that "Lots 3, 4, 5, 13, 14, 23, 24 25 could interfere with storm flows and therefore, they shall be reconfigured so that the lot lines do not qo to the centerline of the drainage easement" This application proposes that the lot line reconfiguration be replaced with a restrictive easement that accomplishes the same objective of preventing storm flow interference. c. The original approving Resolution noted that "Applicant shall provide further study of Lots 5.10 and if there is a reduction in the total number of residential lots it shall be processed as a Minor Amendment of Final Plat" This study resulted in the elimination of two lots along the project's east property line to reduce the potential impact of the project on neighboring property owners. This change eliminated a lot for one small home of approximately 1,300 s.f., that was originally planned to be located along that portion of the project boundary. Coburn Development, Inc. 3020 Carbon Place, #203, Boulder, CO 80301 Minor Amendment to Final Plat 303.442 -3351 www.cobumdev.com Rodeo Place Subdivision Last edit: 9/27120112 d. This proposed amendment to Lot 4 was previously presented to Town Council for approval on March 15, 2010 along with modifications to Lot 1 that would allow for the construction of four (4) units on that lot in place of the three (3) originally approved. In the Memorandum presented to Town Council at that time, Town of Snowmass Village Planning Staff recommended that "Town Council authorize the proposed amendments However, Town Council made the determination that re- platting was unwarranted at that time due to fact that the building envelope limits the design of the residence. Changing economic conditions and market assessment by the Town of Snowmass Village Housing Office have demonstrated that market demand exists for this type of dwelling unit. This will be the most affordable single family home in the Rodeo Place Subdivision. As a result, the Town Council has requested a reconsideration of the previous Council decision. Lot 4 and Open Space A lot line adjustment The purpose of the lot line adjustment between Lot 4 and Open Space A is to allow Lot 4 to be a conforming lot for development of a residential dwelling unit consistent with the original approved subdivision application, subject to further study subsequent to approval. a. The recorded plat allocates 3,323 s.f (.076 acre). of land area to Lot 4 which complies with the minimum lot area of 3,000 in the MF zone district but is below the minimum lot area required for development of a residential dwelling unit. b. The proposed amended plat defines a lot line revision between Lot 4 and Open Space A that re -plats 1,728 s.f (04 acre) of Outlot A to be part of Lot 4 and creates a lot with a land area of 5,051 s.f. (.12 acre), adequate for development of a 2 bedroom single family residence consistent with the original subdivision application. Open Space A will be reduced in area from 75,545 s.f (1.734 acres) to 73,817 (1.695 acres). c. No change is proposed to the platted drainage easement running over the property with the exception that additional restrictive language has been added to the Amendment Plat to specifically limit improvements in the drainage easement area. d. No change is proposed to the building envelope of 1,495 s.f. For comparison adjacent Lot 3 has a building envelope area of 2,448 s.f. or 1,224 s.f. per dwelling unit. Lot 5, has the largest building envelope in the subdivision at 6,230 s.f. e. No change is proposed to the maximum floor area allowed on the lot. f. No change is proposed to the existing utilities serving this lot. Water and sewer connections have been provided as a part of the approved utility plan and subsequent infrastructure installation. Revisions to Resolution 15, Series 2010 The proposed changes to the language affect multiple areas of the resolution and are intended to redefine the language for a new resolution adopting an amended Subdivision Plat for Lot 4 and address the following issues: a. Revisions to the Sections 1 and 2 of the Resolution, General and Specific Findings, redefining the language in these sections to allow for the development of Lot 4. Coburn Development, Inc. 3020 Carbon Place, #203, Boulder, CO 80301 Minor Amendment to Final Plat 303.442 -3351 www.cobumdev.com Rodeo Place Subdivision Last edit: 9/27/20113 b. Revisions to the amendment language in Section 3 of the Resolution to include Lot 4 in the criteria defining Maximum Height, Maximum FAR and Subdivision Layout c. Revisions to Section 4 defining the new amendment to the Subdivision Plat related to Lot 4. d. Revisions to Section 5 addressing the Lot 4 Minor Amendment Plat. Analysis of compliance with the Review Standards for a Minor Amendment of Final Plat a. Consistent with subdivision: The proposed plans are consistent with the single family home and duplex character of the existing subdivision. No changes are proposed to the building envelopes established on the original plat. units. SeFies 2006 appleved a subdivisien with 25 lot-- 2 11 1 units. Thms rninAr amendment would Fesult in a subdivis'en with 24 lets and 29 Although the original approving Resolution mandated further study of Lots 5 10, it did not specifically reduce the overall density and unit count in the application. To the contrary, the General Findings specifically note that "The Subdivision Plat creates twenty -five (25) lots... for a total of twenty-nine affordable units" approval of this amendment allows the project to meet this original objective. The proposed revisions to the Lot 4 lot lines allow for this to be a conforming single family home lot. Again, the goal is to allow for the construction of 29 units as approved for the original subdivision. b. No adverse impacts: The proposed changes are consistent with the original subdivision application and no adverse impacts are created. Relocation of the lot line on Lot 4 to the centerline of the drainage easement allows this to be a conforming lot. The function of the drainage easement is protected by restrictive language on the Minor Amendment Plat and the building envelope is not changed from the recorded plat to avoid adverse impacts This proposed amendment does not increase the density of the originally approved subdivision. The original approving resolution allowed for an "other approved use" on Lot 4 and did not specifically rule out the use of this lot for a dwelling unit. Due to the Town's substantial investment in the adjacent recreation center the need for the potential neighborhood park or tot lot is substantially reduced. There are ample opportunities for recreation immediately abutting the subdivision and the inclusion of an additional home allows another family to take advantage of this existing investment. The utility connections for this dwelling unit were installed as part of the original infrastructure installation. There will be minimal disruption to the subdivision during construction. Coburn Development, Inc. 3020 Carbon Place, #203, Boulder, CO 80301 Minor Amendment to Final Plat 303 -442 -3351 www.cobumdev.com Rodeo Place Subdivision Last edit: 9/27/20114 Development of Lot 4 allows the Town to take advantage of the existing investment in infrastructure and property acquisition at the Rodeo Place site. The unit density of this lot will be less than that of the adjacent lot on the other side of the creek and the impact on the drainage easement will be similar or less than that existing part of the project. c. Not change character: The proposed revisions are consistent with the original approved Subdivision plan. The single family home on Lot 4 was anticipated in the original subdivision plan application. This is an Affordable housing project intended to serve the citizens of the Town of Snowmass Village. The proposed home will be the smallest and most affordable single family home in Rodeo Place. d. Comply with other applicable standards: The proposed revisions are consistent with the original subdivision application and resolution. The findings contained in the resolution confirmed compliance with the applicable subdivision standards. No nonconforming conditions are adjusted to increase the non conformity of any lots or structures Coburn Development, Inc. 3020 Carbon Place, #203, Boulder, CO 80301 Minor Amendment to Final Plat 303 -442 -3351 www.cobumdev.com Rodeo Place Subdivision Last edit: 9/27/20115 TOWN QFGNO0O0ASSVILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL A RESOLUTION AMENDING RESOLUTION NO. 59, SERIES OF 2005. CONCERNING THE RODEO PLACE SUBDIVISION. WHEREAS, the Housing Department on behalf ofthe Town of Gnowmaoa Village ("Applicant"), submitted a land use application for the Rodeo Place Subdivision on July 14, 2O0O that contained twenty-five (25) lots with twenty-nine (29) affordable housing units on approximately 8.5 acres within Tract Aof the Entryway Subdivision; and WHEREAS, the Rodeo Place Subdivision was approved by Town Council Resolution No. 3Q. Series of2O0O (Resolution 3Q");oOd tkr f��� �rprm»AA b�7�v�u�=�� �����f��~ Re <s WHEREAS, the recorded subdivision plat created twenty-four (24) lots of which Lots (P-C, 2 and 3 were duplex lots and Lot 1 was identified as otrip|ex lot; and WHEREAS, Lots 5-24 were intended for single family residences and Lot 4was approved to be platted as a lot and "utilized as a neighborhood park/tot lot or other approved ube";and VVHEREAS, the Applicant is requesting approval to mnoond Resolution 39 to enable Lot 4 to be re-platted include o podiun'of"Open Space A" so as to be increased in size from 3.323 square feet tn 5.051 square feet and permitted for the construction of a two (2) bedroom single family residence, and -and- WHEREAS, to achieve the purposes of the Entryway Master Plan, the application addressed the land use requirements for Subdivision ao set forth in Gnuwmama Village Municipal Code (''K8unioipa|Code"), Section 18A-5'4OO;and WHEREAS, the public hearing notice was published in the Snuvvmaso Sun on for the Town Council meeting on u hear o presentation of the proposal by the Applicant, consider Town staff recommendations and receive public comments aa part of the application review; and VVHEREAS, the application was reviewed and processed in accordance with the provisions outlined in Sections 1GA-5-45Oof the Municipal Code. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESC)L\/ED, by the Town Council of the Tumm of Snowmass Village, as follows: TC Reso 10 -15 Page 2 Section One General Findings. Snowmass Village Town Council finds that: 1) The submission requirements for the application were adequately provided pursuant to Sections 16A -5 -40 and 16A- 5- 450(2)(b) of the Municipal Code and included written and graphic materials in sufficient detail to deem the application complete for review. 2) Blew The proposed application qualifies as a `Minor Amendment' pursuant to Code Section 16A- 5- 450(1)(b) of the Municipal Code and the amendment satisfactorily complies with the review standards outlined below per Section 16A- 5- 450(3) of the Municipal Code as follows: a) The proposed amendment is consistent with, or an enhancement of, the original PUD approval; b) The proposed amendment does not have a substantially adverse effect on the neighborhood surrounding the land where the amendment is proposed, nor has a substantially adverse impact on the enjoyment of land abutting upon or across the street from the subject property; c) The proposed amendment would not change the basic character of the PUD or surrounding areas; and d) The proposed amendment acceptably complies with the other applicable stan- dards for review of a subdivision application as specified above. Section Two: Specific Findings. The Town Council considered whether to permit the re- platting Lot 4 to include a portion of "Open Space A" by extending the parcel boundary into the ditch easement. it was determined that the inclusion of a portion of the ditch easement should w*occur based upon the following: 1. o Increasing the lot size from 3,323 square feet to 5,051 square feet will enable the construction of a two (2) bedroom single family residence, 4e. TV 2. Conveying Lot 4 would include a restriction within the drainage easement pIrtion of the parcel limiting planting and restricting the placement of improvements in any way that could affect the maintenance, operation, repair, alteration or replacement j of drainage facilities within the easement. s I Section Three Amending Resolution No. 33, The Town Council hereby approves the following clarifications and/or amendments to Town Council Resolution No. 39, Series of 2006, as follows: 1. The Rodeo Place Subdivision, as recorded, contained twenty -four (24) lots. TCReoo10-15 Page 2. Section Throe, Paragraph B(I), Maximum Height, is hereby amended to read as follows: 1. Maximum Height: 28 feet (Lots 1Xfrom existing or finished grade whichever ia most restrictive. 28 feet (Lots 5-12; and Lots 23-24) from exist or finished grade whichever ie most restrictive. 28 feet (Lots 13'22) from finished grade due tofill conditions. 3. Section Three, Paragraph B(2), Maximum FAR, is hereby amended to read as fm|lnxva: 2. Maximum FAR: Lots 1-0 and 5-2O: 3,00O square feet/unit total (O.75 Not App 2.1UD square feet (above grade) 1.25O square feet (below grade) Lots 21-24: 3,000 square feet/unit total (0.75 Not Applicable) Buildings limited to2 levels including baaenl*nba 4. Section Three, Paragraph C, Subdivision Layout, is hereby amended tm read as follows: C. Subdivision Layout: The omaneU subdivision layout that includes the roado, alleys and residential lots aheU be as follows: I. The subdivision shall contain a maximum of twenty-four(24) |obs. 2. Lot 1 may be platted as part of the overall subdk/ision, yet it shall rommkl undeveloped at this time or until more site-specific geotechnical and architectural plans are submitted and approved by Town Council. 3� Lot* 3, 4, 5.13.14, 23. 24 and 25 could interfere with storm flows and thenafono, they h U remai 4. sha be reo i n an ea"u",cv,uoeuom' ^v the garages are accessed via the rear alley and not the public street. 5. Section Three, Paragraph D(1) is hereby amended to delete the phrase: ^vvithin u central trash enclosure" S. Section Three, Paragraph Q(2), GemYoglu Hazard Areas, is hereby amended to read as follows: TC Reso 16 -15 Page 4 2. Section 16A -4 -50, Geologic hazard areas, steep slope and ridgeline protection areas: based on the information presented and the site visit, Lots 2 and 3 shall be developed as duplex lots. Lot 1 shall be platted and may be developed as two (2) duplex units subject to the terms and conditions of Ordinance No. 7, Series of 2010. i 7. Section Three, Paragraph D(4), Water supply, sewage disposal, solid waste disposal and utilities, is hereby amended to read as follows: 4. Section 16A -4 -230, Water supply, sewage disposal, solid waste disposal and utilities: Trash collection shall be curb side at each individual residence. 8. Section Three, Paragraph D(6), Off street parking standards, is hereby amended to add the following: Required off street parking shall be permitted in front yard setbacks in driveway areas in front of garage doors as long as the entirety of the parking space is contained within the boundary of the property and a minimum 10' separation is maintained between the back of curb at the right of way and the parking space. Required off street parking shall be permitted in rear yard setbacks with the following restrictions: Nose in spaces: provide a minimum 4' separation to the rear property line. Parallel spaces: the entire space shall be contained within the property line. 9. Section Three, Paragraph D(9), Building design guidelines, is hereby amended to read as follows: 9. Section 16A -4 -340, Building design guidelines to preserve community character: All buildings and structures will have a western heritage ranching theme with rustic, durable materials. Houses on Lots 5 -9 shall generally be one -story in height with the dominant ridgelines running in a north /south direction; garages shall be oriented to the street and setback behind the front fapade of the home to minimize their impacts on The Crossings. Two -story houses are appropriate on Lots 11 -25. Section Four Amending Rodeo Place Subdivision Plat. The Town Council hereby approves the following amendments to the Rodeo Place Subdivision, as recorded on August 1, 2007 in Plat Book 84 at Page 70 as Reception No. 540522 in the records of the Pitkin County Clerk and Recorder, as Section Ave Conditions. Town Council approves the amendments subject to the following conditions: TC Reso 10 -15 Page 5 4- 1. The Applicant shall complete, before the subject "Minor Amendment Plat for Lot A; Rodeo Place" is placed of record, all actions or matters that in the opinion of the Town Planning Director or Town Att orney are necessary to satisfy or dispense with the requirements of the Municipal Code. Should problems arise that cannot properly be resolved at the administrative level, they will be presented to Town Council for direction. 2. Upon resolution of the outstanding technical comments, three executed mylars for the subdivision exemption shall be submitted to the Planning Department within thirty (30) days of the date of administrative approval of the plat. 3. The Planning Director shall review the plat to ensure it complies with the terms and conditions of approval and obtain signatures for all of the applicable plat certificates. 4. The Applicant shall thereafter cause the plat to be recorded, at the Applicant's expense, in the records of the Pitkin County Clerk and Recorder's Office. Section Six: Severability If any provision of this Resolution or application hereof to any person or circumstance is held invalid, the invalidity shall not affect any other provision or application of this Resolution which can be given effect without the invalid provision or application, and, to this end, the provisions of this Resolution are severable. INTRODUCED, READ AND AP PROVE D -en4he metien- of- Council Member Lewis- l �e seeend �f Eotmcil Met��er- V�lfikir�sert �t--a- vet- e-- o��- in- #aue�- ar�>�- Q- eppesed et•clffin-were- al�sant: I i TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL BH Boineau, Mayor A A I O)IJ Rhonda B. O Clerk APPRO D S TO FORM: John 6resser, Town Attorney 0:11vsr101aw1 .snow- e�rxrl4or as -•we» s °..e m re Au sort 10.160. ftlt m 10 a 0011 10JI 6M a ,RSa��o h aJR�gt A s O a p c gy5yt N �m A ;u Sq 0 'y b i A 1 i D T Vm L6TZ 11 2z 0 NvmC Rg g*a R,o Hai m V y n V O Xoc o cD N 0 0Z 8a Rags• -.8 ua; ,s I I OC Wn &0 zlZ CTI 4111 a .D ooh s °0 3$�mu��'N�� wG�M ��YAc� ho (��lTl NO Nil Is 1 �Ne Am �0 y QMNR a o J vo H� f.404NAOq Y 9 ��i y N 8 M IN O N 11 t� a o u n mo o_ Ja o 00 r C x' m n oj�D F n p. N' F YYJ� o h E.c hi, 1 c.. o� o 0 4 m•3 N�o N a J 4 J n n NoNtO n`a°nmC x n N S 2 n0.°„ oJt JU on'^�• y o n �4 N• 4a Q4y o °n4 0 ^9•^' o ,o p m 4 a. N`c J' a pn n.Nn J' Y ON00 jOb� N•� F n O, n °Cn°r0 °Y On A of 4�'C �•J'�O Jon jO N0� ny o n k F o n�•J N` ANN a J j A J n1 a n pV c� o O nh p k Fn'"J n n Jjn a °Q In N o JAN O S y` oAJ O l O A'j 4 a,ORCN a J 'n;O ,J O o Q k J 4A F•�•� ti 4 J' t° F 4 °y a�G•n Noe SaNy 4 o y -On a ^a yJ •a� o� o y y^i R g A JOpf Ob� p bi 01 A N QO J O O G' RYA n u N i� S4n R4 O� Q p j p 0 4F. F mnF n n �`cn Y F Y ON oho. o n n o J t °D� J o•JO o f o UJC J F °po�F cN po p� E Oj�. ?O S� O J N �y °'Q�p 4 °O °NO• l `,Z j ?�4 �,j� i N 4 A R 2 J Oy'��C. QY on O�1 O 4 +N O A R�'J n�� O O pp'j Nj C o.p 0� S^ R L �lpS 1 O.p•. Oyr 4 O JpN OQ�O�C OW 1 40 A 0 N.�� On aA� f nC C Y N ��'J P Nl0'• np Y nN n o4n b p o �o.a oc nNONN n o n' ry, Oj. jl nt°p Ot T4 R A N O �R, p 4 N' r °RO a�J. OY UE m a 4 l n Y n' m0. oa FS�nO R� aJ as ��o na v v po ca•�: <N°ryyop v� a. N ti J o vo�"t o °t a 'a °m•�.N t 3 t 0 o J7 Y4o F n N a y N J�ao. n i .°.a oN ym o� J, o a s °nEC•,.Ny nN h v N m AS° m 4 o O 4t n x, 4o TS N' p N p D x`11 n ^t1n $paa n c�. •..ate of Qy�CryN G' a\ o O JFi n R a o z J a J T N "S 3N17H9/H Y y J n �O m n J p p X91 0:11 99119100 SNOW- tNmrltor4- M- AlP.my S w mo, ro AW "It 10,1 m FwHed mN 18 AW Mll IO.2.Po *en 3•, FW $QSmo a m b',°ac a c ol Z z 3 y5' C =N O m m m 0 N y b A Q Z O m 33 N C7D0O—CO 1 m oz�= l: mm y NornC z Ana n o O; cn m z o p y 0 p o N O N V o m F° �s ti1� l �1 t0 �D far Ip pl X000 0 (J(� In Ul V UO OD P. bt Nom• N Tn W N D� V o y as "ssaaa8as �a 4 I I I I I I I r m21 5 1 *a d ti Q� OkSp y.I �OCSOj'0 00 Q OOn N.�j O N�'N �^pCNON N'C N m ROa O tia.c` c,m� a N ym4N ',��•�oi3nm Pei am N o °,�3¢aao��c o`�yoa4 4 o��` n O o..,.ca �`�a.2on a m 0 4�¢� o� 4toom o �'am Nm a'�'��ooa2o� 1 �0 4R j� j ry l H ;1 O•°Itij O jJP��yN4R m �r ImA l+`, n a .�<�.N 2•'i��m, n 3 P o �4 p 0 a ,�o `I m Op �SO� j� �`0 R C aooa tipmtm PA 2`sa O' S RO FPmN a ti� m a.anN ^RR Oa ^OQ \4R m S a �•QN y' y &'Qao .o a °Qn�m``,i.ml: O b40 I V �N JR D O a a U° A J.I O'a Pn 00 �:{m PU� ^aa.NO Dy�O `y t.. ,.N maa4�'�4 TSJ yO' ma O t�� 0.4 N ma'CO N ?p P g 6• Y �1 a F Oqj Qm o Fy 3NI7H71H y a SRI a ,m. ti +R Nm N v 91F 2 ca nova m> sut 4 m tv CD I p� '9 O co III I y I A l I D I I I I I I I I I n to 1 r^ I n y I I y VJ N m m I I m co C m a m b m o m I b m m a Pill! j Owl I I I I I g I I N Al I I i I a 0 a m a &aa ga °off O 9 7 w�ao l\ po T °s A X C) o r oc /4 1 y TOT mmm oo x 4k o CD r a�i o Z- ul A, II r l i A p II I i I•` Vil Cb oo Do S 2 a A D mrm m u �X ADO -'y'� I O Q���"O�c —n r pm °cjmia I z z -p ipmpm m r9 i °Q,�e I t s CD C cl RE 7 ,O CD O. 4OYi n3o 3e ''o N F� Jpb o au r Nn w a S Fm OR i N il i 1 I II C,) rr, CO) 3r rT, rn 9 Z�� CD L I-L El :1 I I i I� i i� d I J I h n I I I I I I I I I'_'� I I I I I I 1A I I I I I I ��J Ra I W�— ]z._c. _YT 27'-Y MIONO HEIGHT I L 71 9 p rTj It 6 CD 4 CD a 0 C) zi 0 ID C, 0 9 ol C) 3' SUIL010 HEINT ow.c; im"T CD CD nlk C� CD 9 go 1= a+ I CD W MEMORANDUM To: Snowmass Village Town Council From: Snowmass Tourism Office (STO) Date: October 17, 2011 Subject: STO Stakeholder Report 1. PURPOSE: The purpose of this discussion is to: o Review the Stakeholder Report (Attachments A B) and the Financial Advisory Board's recommendations. Staff believes it is critical to find agreement on goals (page 3 and 16 of Attachment A) so that we can celebrate success when goals are achieved and make corrections when they are not. The Council is requested to provide direction on finalizing the stakeholders report based on the FAB's recommendations. o Receive an update from STO on the 2012 Budget (Attachment C- Marketing, Special Events, and Group Sales Budget) 2. BACKGROUND: On March 21, 2011 the Marketing, Special Event Group Sales Board (MSE &GS) and the Town Council met to discuss summer events, measurements, and governance. From that meeting the Financial Advisory Board was asked to work with the MSE &GS in creating a measurement for their operations. The MSE &GS and FAB Boards have now met on several occasions and discussed appropriate measurements for events and group sales. FAB also asked for additional information which is in Attachment D along with responses to Town Council questions. On October 10 the FAB met again with the MSE &GS to review an updated stakeholders report and make final recommendations to the Town Council which is included at the end of the memorandum. Since August 10, the MSE &GS Board has met twice to discuss the stakeholder report, governance structure and other fundamental topics regarding communication and the relationship with both the Town and the business community. The Lodging Advisory Committee (made of Lodge managers and sales marketing representatives) has also met with the Group Sales Team to discuss appropriate measurements. The Stakeholder Report attempts to synthesize complex input from the FAB, MSE &GS Board, Lodging Advisory Committee, and staff. Also attachment E from Group Sales further elaborates on the reality of what Group Sales does and realistic measurements for both the Department and individuals in the Department. Attachment E reflects a very honest and complex discussion that has occurred with the lodging community regarding a measurement for group sales. 14 3. DISCUSSION POINTS A. Stakeholders Report: The primary purpose of this meeting is to review recommendations from the FAB regarding the adequacy of the Stakeholder Report for maintaining financial accountability (Attachment A). This plan is attached and is intended to outline goals, describe current funding for programs, share performance around programs, and propose new goals and changes in the 2012 program. Of particular note in the plan is performance against key goals: Sales tax increased every year since 2003, with a dip in 2009 when the recession kicked in. Recovery began in 2010 with sales tax up 2% over 2009; 2011 is up over 7% as of August, with June, July and August performing up Y/Y by 18 13% and at least 14.5% respectively. Occupancy increased every year since 2003, with a dip in 2009 when the recession kicked in. 2010 was up2 Winter 2010/2011 was up 8 and June through August landed up Y/Y by 19 18% and 25% respectively. Over the last several months there have been significant discussions between the MSE &GS Board, staff and the lodging community on the goals for Group Sales. The existing system for accountability was built for the SRA model which is not relevant to the current organization's structure or role. Snowmass Group Sales does not contract business; it reaches out into the marketplace, facilitates relationships and generates leads and opportunities for the lodging community and conferences. Therefore, goals used in typical hotel settings do not apply. Given the Group Sales organization needs to be measured and held fully accountable, a new evaluation system made up of two equal components would be more effective. Macro goals and pipeline goals would evaluate the overall gains and losses of group business in Snowmass, while emphasizing "aggressive" sales behavior and rewarding members of the sales team for true performance. The attached details the proposed new system. The depth and breadth of the measurement process has increased with the inception of new tools and available data. Online, in particular, now offers tracking mechanisms which show the direct impact of Snowmass Tourism's online advertising on lodging bookings. To better understand event performance, guest surveys were developed; the number of responses was too low to be meaningful and a new process will be implemented with iPads next summer, likely with an outside research company. Creating surveys for stakeholders will also give us a better sense of return from events for them. B. Highlights for a 2012 Budget: The MSE &GS Board has had several meetings regarding the measurements and the 2012 summer budget and they will meet again on October 14` It is anticipated they may review additional recommendations with the Council on October 17` Since this information is not 15 in the budget (Attachment C), an additional discussion could be scheduled for November 7` The 2011 revised budgets seek to apply higher- than forecasted sales tax revenue realized from 2010 and from a portion of 2011 incremental sales year to date (against a very conservative forecast) to an expanded marketing and group sales program. Key highlights to note in the proposed budgets are: Marketing Group Sales: $50K and $25K respectively towards hard start -up costs for American Airlines to enter this market in the 2011 revised budget and 2012 proposed budget. Marketing: Increased Winter Marketing to support expanded seasonal advertising and a joint plan with local partners to promote American Airlines. Increased Summer Marketing to drive the new summer branding to promote the new Snowmass Family Adventure Vacation product and to increase social marketing. Changes to summer events expenses and revenues based on recent evaluation. Mountains Mammoths: Snowmass Summer Family Adventure Vacations is an all inclusive, family "camp" designed for those who want a convenient vacation experience that is healthy, action oriented. It provides a perfect mix of family time and time for parents and kids to "play" independent of one another. This family vacation concept takes all of the lodging and activity -based programming (ACES, Learning Tree, Anderson Ranch, Recreation Center, CIVIC) and bundles it into a succinct product -based offering. Aimed primarily at the leisure travel market, the product will also be a turnkey family incentive solution for companies that offer travel -based incentives to their top producers. Mountains Mammoths will compete against the likes of Disney, the cruise ship and dude ranch offerings. A business plan needs to be developed to identify feasibility around programming, fulfillment and operations. At the October 5` Marketing Board meeting, the Board approved to place $10,000 in the 2011 revised budget to create a business plan for this concept. Attachment F provides more ideas and a cost proposal for this concept. o Branding: New research was conducted to better understand our key audiences, including their perceptions, interests and drivers of a decision to vacation here in summer. A brand positioning statement focused on "Adventure" and "Discovery" came out of this work, as well as a tag line that creates an emotional connection to what they will experience here: "Small Mountain Charm. Big Mountain Wonder." Creative concepts are completed and will be rolled out for summer 2012; they have been adapted for 2011/2012 winter advertising and will be transitioned for groups marketing. o Special events: All summer events Snowmass Tourism produces, seeds, and /or sponsors were evaluated. Changes are proposed to ensure they are providing the greatest impact for the resort overall and its various stakeholders at the best financial value as an integral component within the holistic summer program. Worksheets are attached for each event. The Marketing Board will complete their review of the proposed summer program this The philosophy entails viewing events not as 16 individual 'products' but as components within the overall marketing plan for the season; they are promotional tools much like traditional advertising and sales in contributing to awareness, return trial, and spend regardless of when they visit. C. Increased Stakeholder Communications: In this fast paced environment, timely communications are even more critical. A plan that puts greater emphasis on outward and inward engagement is being defined and rolled out within the next month. In addition to historical communications, seasonal launches are returning from a two year hiatus with a business community event scheduled for 12/13. A new Director's Report will also be produced and multi purposed by specific audience, i.e. Board, Council and Community, every other month. In addition, the Stakeholder Plan will be evolve (quickly) into a business plan for communication to the Council, Board, and Community. D. Recommendations FAB Recommendations: The FAB and the MSE &GS Board reviewed several iterations of Attachment A and B. They also discussed the Group Sales goals (Attachment E) and there was significant collaboration between the two Boards. Attachment A acknowledges what can be measured looking back and significant time was devoted to how to measure effectiveness moving forward. The FAB recommended the following be added to the measurements for MSE &GS operations. 1) Compare Occupancy among 6 other competitive resorts for summer /winter. Although the 6 other resorts may be different for the summer vs. the winter. 2) Adjust for inflation on sales tax year to year. Measure Occupancy and Daily (or Monthly) Sales Taxes for Lodging to a Baseline adjust for inflation on a year -to -year basis. 3) Measurements need to be by Season (Summer vs. Winter) Using Attachment B as a point of departure, Do a write up for each marketing campaign and event. In that write up include Goal, Expectation using criteria and rationale for the goal goal should be somewhere between current trend and aggressive (recognizing that "awareness" could be a goal) for campaign or event Occupancy /ADR /RevPar during period of event Sales Tax by day or month from Lodging Participation of people) in event /traffic or impressions for a marketing campaign Spend /per person at event multiplied by attendees =Total spend by event. This should then be compared to a comparable period of time without an event 17 4) FAB supports the concept of measuring Group Sales performance as articulated in Attachment E. Macro goal (50% of the total goal) evaluates the amount of business put on the books for the future within a given year (how to figure out what business did the Group Sales Department "touch NOTE: The may change for this category. Pipeline Goal (50% of the total goal) looks at the effort and activity of the department as a whole and quantifies the type of output that can be truly accounted for. NOTE: The may change for this category. (There was one dissenting vote which wanted to measure bookings) 5) Winter has much higher ROI- Market Winter Aggressively! 6) Marketing Budget should have a 10% Reserve and a 15% Unappropriated Fund Balance (which can be used if ROI case can be made). (VISE &GS INPUT: The MSE &GS Board has actively worked with the FAB and Staff to develop the stakeholder report and look at what can be developed as measurements in the future. The MSE &GS Board is meeting on October 14` to further discuss the summer program and consider other recommendations for the Town Council's considerations. The MSE &GS Board has specifically addressed the following which may be further discussed: Improved Communications with Stakeholders Ideas /Recommendations on Governance Summer programs in 2012 Attachments: Attachment A: Stakeholders Report Attachment B: Supplement on Events Attachment C: MSE &GS Budget Attachment D: Response to specific questions from FAB Council Attachment E: Group Sales Goals and Measurements Attachment F: Snowmass Family Adventure Vacations Product 18 a l N0WMASS u t N Al 7 x: SINIOWMASS TOURISM 2010 SUMMER 2010/11 WINTER RVA"E"OLDER REPORT EXECUTIVE SUMMARY TA ALE 0 F CONTENTS PURPOSE 2 GOALS 3 RESULTS 4 BUDGETS.................. 12 2012 OUTLOOK 17 CONCLUSION 19 GLOSSARY 20 20 m������ ��00������� �����m���m��m Winter ��0� �m m�m�/� Stake holder ��������0�� ��������00������� ���N@�������@��� ��^��v����������m�� Summary Snowmass Tourism conceptualizes, develops and delivers marketing, special events and group sales initiatives that help drive the economic engine and ouateinebi|ity of this resort. We do this bydeveloping comprehensive integrated marketing programs for each aeamun. We create special events primarily in summer as triggers to a Snuvvmaao decision when guests are weighing Snowmaeu against other attractive Colorado reaorta, but also in winter to enhance the experience, And we support the awareness, interest and booking of groups business into Snvvnmaae lodges yaar-round. The exe U P 00 E Present the goals we are committed bzachieving Show results against the three primary goals. Share aspirations not yet achieved, Illustrate how the two sales tax budgets (village-wide marketing events and lodging-only) are allocated and why. Provide information about how we stack up against some in our competitive set and what we need todo more ofor differently tn enhance our ranking. Review the effectiveness of special events and seasonal marketing campaigns within the limits of current data and metrics 10 the extent they can bemeasured. Review group sales revenue goals and results historic and YTD our team helped surface and secure. Present 2O12 goals and new programs tobaintroduced. 21 Our G GOALS SNOWMASS TOURISM IS TASKED WITH ACHIEVING THREE PRIMARY ANNUAL GOALS: BROAD G 2010 SPEC RE SULT'S 0 Increased sales tax Budgeted Flat to 2009 Summer General Fund up 3% Y/Y; up 7% revenue from baseline'' Summer Lodging Tax up 17% Y/Y i i 2010111 Winter General Fund up 8 up C 12% from baseline' j 2010/11 Winter Lodging Tax up 12% Y/Y I Increased occupancy Y/Y i 1% Y/Y while in Recession 2010 up 1,5% Y/Y at 34.5% compared to 33% in 2009; adjusted, it was up 2 I Winter up 4% from 39% to 43 up from 41% to 47°10 adjusted i Summer was flat at 20% Y /Y; adjusted, it was up 22 Group Sales revenue $5.3MM (booked into lodges, $3.5MM (booked multiple years in 2009 not contracted through our rather than rolling business into 2010 department) which resulted in $5.9M booked through Snowmass Tourism against goal /153% of goal achieved) i At the end of second quarter 2011, tracking at 53% of $4.8M annual goal Baseline 2002 Summer and 2002/2003 Winter, one year before TOSV Marketing Events program became active (May 2003) 2009 adjustment of 6% for incremental bed base and 2010 adjustment of 10% for further incremental bed base �w 22 E The 8ULT8 WHAT WAS THE IMPACT ON SALES TAX? Sales tax increased every year since 2003 when the Marketing Special Events program was put into place until the major recession hit in summer of 2008 and was thoroughly felt in 2009. Reduced Revenue Per Available Room (RevPAR) as a result of less visitation and more deals/ lower lodging rates during the recession further impacted sales tax. The economy has since started to recover with 2010 sales tax landing up 1.8% over 2009 and winter 2010/2011 was up 8 2011 YTD as of the end of August is up about 7 June, July and August were up 18 13% and 14.5% respectively. Snowmass is returning to the historical annual positive trending. ANNUAL HISTORICAL SALES TAX ($K) 1400 12001 i f 47 1000 n MR Zug soo r 401 0 r' I BM 200 r r 2005 2004 2005 2008 2007 2008 2009 2010 Fain wIr►ter months of tecember tftrauhlfarch generate about 72 °4 a# the enure year's sales fax re�renue Gampetit�an �s mare #ierae than e�ier end we need Jd aggressively prorrrote this season to shay ta#a a# mind and reat�ze our share: a# business that �s needed �a support non:= v��ntermonths 23 HOW DID SALES TAX PERFORMANCE COMPARE TO OTHER MOUNTAIN RESORT COMMUNITIES 2006 TO 2009? A percent change in sales tax for Snowmass, compared to six other mountain communities, revealed that Snowmass was #3 "less worse" in 2009 than in 2006 pre- recession. While the recession impacted everyone, we were also dealing with overarching impacts of not being able to sell the Conference Center space for more than two years out. This constraint manifested in the marketplace with perceptions that the resort was `closed'. The stalled Base Village and related foreclosures also generated negative implications. POST RECESSION TAX COMPARE DOWN 0 F h s -2 UZI 1 -6 N B 7b r c -12 Breckenridge Vail Snowmass Aspen Steamboat Winter Park Steamboat Springs 24 WHAT WAS THE IMPACT []NOCCUPANCY? bnowmasa Tourism subscribes 10 K8TRip a service that provides local and competitive data to help us understand occupancy performance. K8TRiP measures daily, weekly, monthly and seasonal occupancy as well as Average Daily Re1a RavPAR and competitive ranking reports. Summer 2010 occupancy remained flat to 2009. However, adjusted for additional inventory, it was up2 percentage points, Winter 2010/2011 landed 3 percentage point; higher than winter 2UOA/281O; adjusted for inventory, it was upS percentage points. Oooupancyforaummer2O11iepaoihgupbySpencentagapointaoeofAuguatwithJune,Ju|yund August upan encouraging 19% 18% and 25% respectively. This data indicates Snowmaao has begun \o recover and ia resuming the historical positive trend. HOW DID OCCUPANCY COMPARE TOOTHER RESORTS? SUMMER: Snovvmeoa currently ranks in the middle of our competitive set in summer, placing 7th out of 14 resorts in 2010. Summer business has room to grow as it represents the greatest opportunity and can give lodges and merchants o more sustainable multi-season livelihood, We are essentially 't|oaed"from mid-April until early June, and experience minimal visitation in October and most nf November until opening day onThanksgiving. Other resorts' situations are not asdrastic, MONTH OF ASPEN SNOWMASS ADJUST. FOR NEXT NEXT NEXT T NEXT NEXT HE NEXT AGGREGATE NEXT NEXT NEX XT NEXT NEXT OCCUPANCY ADDITIONAL HIGH HIGH HIGH HIGH HIGH HIGH HIGH HIGH HIGH HIGH HIGH LOW TOTAL INVENTORY OCC, O= OCC, 5 19% 3996 WINTER: In winter, we were in the top of our competitive set, ranking first for highest occupancy in K4avoh a month heavily promoted with Kids Ski Stay Free plus a magnet time for Brazilians. December started strong due to a large group booked into an otherwise slow tirreframe, February eavv a dip, which usually enjoys Mardi Gras business, an did April since Easter did not fall in this month. The fierce competitive |andeuape, particularly related to international guests, cannot be understated. Aggressive promotion must continue to be placed on our core customer the winter guest. MONTH OF ASPEN SNOWMASS ADJUST. FOR NEXT 1 NEXT !NEXT NEXT T NEXT NEXT RE 4EXT AGGREGATE OCCUPANCY I I I NEXT I NEXT NEX XT I NEXT I NEXT I ADDITIONAL HIGH HIGH I'HIGH HIGH HIGH HIGH HIGH HIGH HIGH HIGH I HIGH I HIGH WHAT IS THE INVESTMENT INSPECIAL EVENTS AND H[>VV [}O THEY BENEFIT THE RESORT? To achieve success against the seasonal increased sales tax revenua, occupancy and group business goals, the summer marketing campaign in particular must offer a variety ofbrand promises and experiences that attract visitors to Gnowmaae. Aba|anuad calendar ofspecial events that appeals to our four target audiences is one of the weapons required in our arsenal of a holistic Snowmaas summer program. Feedback from focus groups conducted in Denver last fall re-confirmed that many drive-distance travelers believe Snowmaea in 'remute.'a one totwo hour drive beyond many other attractive resorts, even though we are right next door to Aspen which enjoys a very robust summer. These participants also told us that events are 'triggers' to their summer destination decisions. They said they expect to get the entire vacation package conjured up by mountain naaorta. and the events that appeal {u them are what tend to push them into their decisions. The current submission process does not break out data by events (where known) by groups business, or by other reasons and types of visitors for lodging. Sales tax revenue is not reported on edai|y basis to be able to hone in on non-lodging spend during special events oreven isolated to a weekend. Without 'owning' any transactions that occur in the Village (except for two paid events), it is not possible to state conclusively how these events benefitted the Town coffers o,8novvmaaa businesses. Guest surveys will be conducted during bigger events next summer 10 get at least o sense of what people 'think'they spent during their sJay. We will also survey the business community for their feedback. A comprehensive analysis of summer events has been conducted and changes to 2012 are being proposed to maximize their value and minimize cost without losing quality urappeal. 2010 'CHILI _Aki�TIENDANCE 11'4500 ____j 1500- �300 23,000 12000-3000 0 55K liEVENU2 [3K K 7K 1150K 41 W NET LODGING OCC 1 28%F 37%St N/A 349K 148K LDG REV EST' 1 121K `Aon' SOME CONSIDERATIONS THAT COME INTO PLAY IN DETERMINING WHICH TYPES OF EVENTS TO PROGRAM INCLUDE: Balance in types of events is required to appeal to our four different target audiences Families, Aggressive Athletes, Empty Nesters and Independents which also provides balance for our different types of lodges and merchants. Aspen events and its arts cultural options should continue to be leveraged in our portfolio of offerings. We should continue to recognize that the typical American traveler is time impoverished" Less time anxiety over destination choice and activities Long weekend getaways are most popular and lowest hanging fruit (4 hours maximum drive) Over 30% take `Speed Vacations' 6 days total from start of planning to end of vacation Value still drives most decisions; packaging lodging and events activities are attractive to many travelers. US Travel Association THE CHART BELOW ILLUSTRATES THE IMPACT OF SPECIAL EVENTS AND WEEKEND DRIVE TRIPS. 100% 1 R.Port Dtic 117411 21 vs. 2010 es o18lJ1 4th of July JAS Labor Day N11i 1_ 831n1 JAS Culinary 2010aedM1/10 7096 Blast the Mass 2DIMWa aw bookk. x m 2010. o18115 60% Chili 50% 1 Pepper Ice Age a 40% I 30% J 20% 10% -20% 30% -40% 1 IMPACTS OF SPECIAL EVENTS Recent research na-oonfinneddhedprospeotivaguesteexpmctamountainneaort8ode|ivercertain amenities, such as great scenery, hiking, biking, fishing, etc., while events are the actual 'triggers' that compel them to buy. As such, avonio are not stand-alone products; they are important tools that help fill out 'holistic summer marketing program' and they deliver benefits far beyond the 1imefnamo they actually occur. Leveraging events to get people 10 Snovvmaes is an initial goal; once guests visit, research shows that over 70% move into the loyalty bucket and return regardless of an event. Events provide a tangible reason for media to accept our invitation to visit nmwm000.Snowmaaa Chili Pepper Brew Fest, Snowmass Culinary Arts, and Snowmass Balloon Fest alone drew impressive media attendance which generated event and non-event stories that realized over 8 million impressions, with some cross-over into winter articles. An event iaanadvertisement. h gives uo another story iu tell that can stand out inacluttered marketplace over a period nftime. Awareness of Snowmass as a summer destination is achieved throughout pre-event timeframes. Event promotion includes a presence in national regional magazines, regional local newspapers and radio, online banners and travel providers, outdoor billboards, social marketing, television and much more, Events equate 10 incremental jobs and hours for employees on busier days. Events open the door to sponsors who provide a halo of credibility and expand our reach into their vast networks of potential visitors in numerous ways, i.e. presence on their websites and in thai,eb|ante. social buzz from their employees, our logo on products in grocery stores with enter-to-win sweepstakes, etc. Return guests' word-of-mouth about events extends awareness exponentially. Online social conversations play a big role as measured in online activity, particularly with Facebook. Events communicate that we are 'open'when some competitors perpetuate messages that say otherwise (conference center delays, Silvertree sale 'closing,' base village foreclosure, etc.). Events are sales tools to help secure group business. Several meeting planners conducting onsite visits during Jazz Aspen Snowmass, Snowmass Chili Pepper Brew Fest and Thursday Night Free Concerts left with an extremely positive overall experience ofSnowmaee. which influenced their decision to bring theirgroups—and substantial revenue —to this resort community. HOW IMPORTANT ARE THE FOLLOWING EVENTS IN YOUR TRIP PLANNING PROCESS? Responses from over 700 contacts in our guest database and contacts from Colorado Tourism advised the importance of events that influence their decision to select Snowmass; whether or not they came for these events or if they have ever been here in summer is unknown. Over half indicated that Snowmass Chili Pepper Brew Fest is a very important /important factor and Jazz Aspen Snowmass was rated the most important in our portfolio. VER I IMPORTANT SOM EWHAT IMPORTANT NOT IM CULINARY ARTS FEST 45.7% 31,1% 23.2% BALLOON FEST 46.9% 311% 22.0% CHILI PEPPER BREW FEST 57.4 f24.0% 18.6% SNOWMASS RODEO 35.2% 1.2% 33.6% BLAST THE MASS BIKE RACE 29.6% 1.7°% 38.7% JAZZ ASPEN SNOWMASS 77.3 13.9% 8.8% FREE OUTDOOR CONCERTS" 84.7% 8.9% 6.3% HOW DOES SNOWMASS TOURISM CONTRIBUTE TO GROUP SALES? Group Sales plays a critical role it represents about 40% of business in winter and 60% in summer. Our function is to generate qualified leads through relationship building, superior customer service and creative marketing. We do not sign contracts but rather manage and support the process and send leads directly to the properties. Given we may have initiated a lead that didn't come through our office, it is not always evident that Group Sales impacted a booking or return group. A revised way of tracking performance has been proposed for 2012. Given most respondents were not locals, scoring likely meant the `notion' of free outdoor concerts is appealing, not necessarily the actual Thursday Night Series as research clone specifically for this event showed no lodging impact at all. s 1 29 BOOKINGS TRACKED AGAINST GOALS IN 2009 AND 2010 ARE SHOWN AS FOLLOWS: GROUP SALES HISTORIC PRODUCTION ($MM) s.s r 43 a 38 35 GOAL 3 ACTUAL 24 �.F 20 2 1 t 20D8 2007 2008 2008 2010 2011 PACING AT 53% OF GOAL AT MIDYEAR 2011 There are anomalies in group sales performance, with some clear successes and some goals not met. The measurement process has also not been consistent each year. While revenue contracted with lodges through our office is almost always actualized in the year it is due to arrive, it is currently unconfirmed. If lodges are willing to provide this information, we can add this step to the measurement process going forward. National Sales Managers can be assigned geographically for greatest efficiencies or vertically to leverage industry expertise. Given there are only four National Sales Manager positions (three currently filled) a combination of the two approaches is in play for 2011. In addition to effective and targeted marketing, establishing a presence in new and emerging markets, and interaction with qualified potential customers in order to generate leads, social groups and FIT sales are also being explored. This includes a business plan for development of all- inclusive family summer vacations and outreach to summer tour operators, travel agencies, international receptives and other entities that have the ability to become partners in promoting and selling Snowmass to their client base. The theory is that it's not as important what form our visitors take but rather that they contribute to `heads on beds' to support the overall growth and health of our economy. ASPIRATIONS NOT YET ACHIEVED The Board and staff acknowledge two key areas that have not come to fruition. Establish a top tier summer strategy for Snowmass Village; and Achieve effective two -way communications with constituencies and engagement as envisioned in the charter. E 30 The U D G E T 8 WHERE DOES THE FUNDING COME FROM? A 2.5% Village -wide Marketing Special Events tax passed in November 2002 to create an organization within the Town and the necessary funding to develop and deliver a multi season marketing and events program. It yielded $2.5MM in the first year and the investment subsequently produced results of $3.3MM to $4.OMM in annual sales tax. In November 2005, a 2.4% Lodging -only tax was passed to support a Group Sales program. The Lodging tax generates $1.OMM $1.3MM annually. HOW ARE BUDGETS ALLOCATED? The Marketing Special Events budget is developed annually with four primary areas of focus: Winter Marketing /PR; Winter Events; Summer Marketing /PR; Summer Events. Balance between seasons is essential the three key months of winter (January- March) generate 70% of sales tax revenue while summer represents the greatest opportunity for improvement. Marketing and sales activities initiated to collectively achieve these primary goals are measured individually. Typically no one single channel correlates to a specific result as people engage with brands, do their research and buy in many different ways; the modern marketing funnel is more complex than the traditional. Individual metrics include google analytics (shows website visits and spikes when ads and stories hit, number of unique visitors, page views, etc.); number of impressions and /or ad equivalencies from media articles; growth in number of contacts added to the guest database; increased facebook friends and twitter followers; qualified group relationships /leads generated and revenue supported; sponsorship sales cash and in -kind; referral traffic to lodges; and more. Too extensive to highlight in this summary report, details are included in the comprehensive 2010 Summer 2010/2011 Winter Stakeholder Report, Section VIII. FOUR PRIMARY SPEND BUCKETS ($K) 598 871 28% 32% ill, l WINTER MARKETING I SUMMER MARKETING WINTER EVENTS SUMMER EVENTS 205 1074 831 I" We are constantly surfacing and learning about new measurement tools, particularly with online marketing. An example is the ability now to measure actual lodging revenue; we can demonstrate conclusively that a $18K online Balloon Fest campaign generated $33K in direct lodging revenue. 12 31 Outside of personnel, marketing and event account lines, there is a $50 /per citizen annual rebate, office rent, up to 10% /year in capital expenditures, Fanny Hill usage fee, TOSV services for events, and general office and operating equipment and related expenses. Staffing decisions are based on the most efficient and cost effective approach. A Public Relations Manager position, for example, was added in 2009. This replaced a part -time contractor arrangement and resulted in reduced expenses and increased productivity and efficiency. Daily interaction with Snowmass Tourism colleagues, living the brand on a daily basis and pitching in on overall department priorities makes the entire team more successful. Conversely, in diving into social media, an agency relationship is more effective at this point to guide our internal team given the large and diversely experienced staff they have to execute multiple aspects of this growing technology.* MARKETING BUDGET BY CATEGORY ($K) 750 666 25% 22% i PERSONNEL MARKETING 38 ADMIN (NON- STAFF) 1% REBATE EVENTS 187 lit 6% Videos illustrating the revolution of social marketing can be found on YouTube.com; one good example is htip: /www.youtube.com /watch ?v= 61LOrUrEWe8 &feature related. i 'r jl 32 2010/2011 WINTER ($K) Given the competition is more fierce than ever, winter relies heavily on marketing to communicate reasons to choose Snowmass for their snow sports vacation. Except X -Games which brings business on its own merit, many smaller events enhance the guest experience which factors into decisions to return. 205 16% ADMINISTRATION MARKETING EVENTS 2010 SUMMER WITH EVENT REVENUES ($K) In summer, a large share of the budget funds special events, most of which are free to attend. Summer marketing is heavily focused on event promotion to communicate these `triggers to buy,' along with an overall promotional message and lodging offering that is most aggressively executed within drive distance. 11n ADMINISTRATION MARKETING !EVENTS GROUPS BY CATEGORY ($K) The Group Sales budget is heavily allocated to personnel given sales is the business of building relationships. Connecting with people in meaningful ways requires traveling to meet with prospects, producing creative events outings that allow for close interaction, initiating familiarization tours of Snowmass and some degree of trade shows. New products and incremental opportunities that should propel us further faster are being identified for 2011. 172 15% i PERSONNEL I ADMIN (NON- STAFF) MARKETING DIRECT SALES I li, i h I I'�YI ii I'�ii I II Ii I!I i 2010 SUMMER MARKETING PLAN BREAKDOWN ($K) WHERE ARE DOLLARS INVESTED AND WHY? Marketing success is measured by results achieved from integrated seasonal campaigns there is rarely one specific measure that clearly directly results in a booking. It's a myriad of executions that hit consumers that work collectively to generate awareness. Whether it's seeing print ads, reading articles, getting eblasts, hearing radio ads or noticing billboards, all of these efforts work together to create an awareness and then an action. 60 25 5% ONLINE 11% MOBILE 75 REG PRINT 14% 10 REG RADIO 2% LOCAL PRINT 50 LOCAL RADIO 9% SOCIAL 10 OUTDOOR 0 2 /O 20 COLLATERAL 4% 75 MISCELLANEOUS 14% 2011 SUMMER MARKETING BUDGET ($K) The 2011 summer marketing includes more online social media. It also accounts for development of branding around "discovery" and "adventure" which works well with the Ice Age Discovery that will be played out within the next year and heavily leveraged by Snowmass Tourism as a key differentiator. 15 9 200 2% 75 28% 0 ONLINE 11% w 0 MOBILE a 0 REG PRINT 35 REG RADIO 5%-,- LOCAL PRINT 20 40 LOCAL RADIO 3% 6 0 SOCIAL OUTDOOR 75 v COLLATERAL 11% 80 100 MISCELLANEOUS 11% 14% 2010/11 WINTER MARKETING PLAN BREAKDOWN ($K) The importance of winter marketing is evidenced with strong returns in both occupancy and sales tax revenue. Snowmass Tourism does not 'own' any transactions to be able to create ski and stay packages, so we leverage Aspen Skiing Company's promotions. Promoting Kids Ski Stay Free in March, for example, influenced the following results: A 25% increase in sales tax revenue YN Snowmass ranked first in occupancy in our competitive set 85% of the ski stay packages booked through SAS were booked into Snowmass Given four key months of winter generate about 72% of annual sales tax revenue, we cannot take winter for granted. It requires consistent and aggressive promotional muscle to maintain our status in an increasingly competitive marketplace. 40 65 85 7% 11% 25 .ONLINE 15/0 4% 15 LOCAVREG PRINT ONO 0 LOCAL RADIO 30 5% SOCIAL OUTDOOR 55 COLLATERAL 10% MISCELLANEOUS NATIONAL PRINT CORE PUBS 60 DIRECT MAIL 180 20 10% 32% 3% "0 O UTLOOK BROAD GOAL 2012 S PECIFIC i fTB SULTS 0 Increased sales tax revenue 3% Winter 3 °io Summer Increased occupancy Y/Y Winter 3% Summer 3 TBD Group Sales revenue To be defined when baseline is established TBD and new measurement program is adopted and i n place SUMMER PROGRAM ADVANCEMENTS BRANDING: New research was conducted to better understand our key audiences, including their perceptions, interests and drivers of a decision to vacation here in summer. A brand positioning statement focused on "Adventure" and "Discovery" came out of this work, as well as a tag line that creates an emotional connection to what they will experience here: "Small Mountain Charm. Big Mountain Wonder." Creative concepts are completed and will be rolled out for summer 2012; they have been adapted for 2011/2012 winter advertising and will be transitioned for groups marketing. The Ice Age discovery plays quite well into this new positioning and we will be leveraging it as a key brand and programming differentiator. SPECIAL EVENTS: All summer events Snowmass Tourism produces, seeds, and /or sponsors were evaluated. Changes are proposed to ensure they are providing the greatest impact for the resort overall and its various stakeholders at the best financial value. FAMILY ADVENTURE VACATION PRODUCT: Mountains Mammoths: Snowmass Summer Family Adventure Vacations. This is a new all- inclusive, family "camp" designed for those who want a convenient vacation experience that is healthy, action oriented It provides a perfect mix of family time and time for parents and kids to "play" independent of one another. This family vacation concept takes all of the lodging and activity -based programming we already offer in Snowmass and bundles it into a succinct product -based offering. Aimed primarily at the leisure travel market, the product will also be a turnkey family incentive solution for companies that offer travel -based incentives to their top producers. Mountains Mammoths will compete against the likes of Disney, cruise ships and dude ranch offerings. 36 INCREASED STAKEHOLDER COMMUNICATIONS In this fast paced environment, timely communications are even more important. A plan that puts greater emphasis on outward and inward engagement will be rolled out in November. In addition to historical communications, seasonal launches are returning from a two year hiatus with a business community event scheduled for December 13. A new Director's Report will also be produced and multi purposed by specific audience, i.e. Board, Council and Community, every two months. To help propel upward trends and support a stronger economy and connection with the business community, we are also focused on the following: EVOLVED MEASUREMENTS The depth and breadth of the measurement process has also increased with the inception of new tools and available data. Online, in particular, now offers tracking mechanisms which show the direct impact of Snowmass Tourism's online advertising on lodging bookings. To better understand event performance, guest surveys were developed; the responses were too low to be meaningful and a new process will be implemented with ipads next summer. Creating surveys for stakeholders will also give us a better sense of return from events for them. RE- ENERGIZED GROUP SALES PROGRAM The Group Sales system has been ineffective and needs to be changed. It was built for the SRA model which is not relevant to the current organization's structure or role. Snowmass Group Sales does not contract business; it should aggressively reach out into the marketplace, facilitate relationships and generate leads and opportunities for the lodging community and conference spaces; therefore, matrices used in typical hotel settings do not apply. Given our organization and employees need to be measured and held fully accountable, a new evaluation system made up of two equal components will be more effective. Macro goals and pipeline goals will evaluate the overall gains and losses of group business in Snowmass, while emphasizing "aggressive" sales behavior and rewarding members of the sales team for true performance. 1� 37 7 "NCLUS �ON COC The Marketing Special Events program was established in 2002/2003; Group Sales was added in 2006. Sales tax revenue and occupancy grew year over year from this baseline. The trend reversed when the recession hit and negatively impacted tourism for destination resorts nonoes the nation particularly in 2000. It turned around in Snowmanm in 2010 and 2011 is resuming the positive upward trending. An imbalance ofresidential and commercial mix in the mail and the base continues 1ocreate an unsustainable environment for our businesses. The bed base and residential growth have not kept pace with the increase in commercial square footage. Areoen\ study conducted by the 8novvmasa Village Financial Advisory Board showed businesses in both nodes are operating at various degrees of sales per square footage that are below the $400/sqft benchmark required to be successful. 0e can not market our way out of this situation. Regardless of the very real infrastructure and recession challenges, we did realize an improvement in overall performance in 2010 with sales tax revenue landing up almost 2% over 2009 and winter specifically was up 8%. Occupancy landed up 1.5% for the yea,; acUua1ad it was up 2%, with winter 2010/2011 —1ha most profitable season by for up S%. 2011 is also encouraging with General Fund sales tax up around 7% YTD Lodging sales tax up almost 11%. and Group Sales business pacing u\53%of goal aaofmid-year. Several new marketing, event and group business opportunities are in development to maximize the effectiveness of our budgets and resources in increasing tourism. Summer brand differentiation is being played out with 'adventure' and 'discovery' themes and the unique extraordinary |oa Aga Discovery presents o differen1iator that will be more heavily leveraged es the Tusk Force Committee officially passes the baton 10 a new 6O1 (u) 3. Both of these efforts will be integrated with compelling dispersed programming for all ages and interests on and nM the mountain. Snowmass Tourism is increasing its focus in the explosive arenas of online and social marketing, and Group Sales is expanding its efforts against social groups to help fill more lodges without significant meeting space while also adding new lead distribution sources. This community hao, and will continue to have, our team's utmost commitment (o the economic success of Snowmass Village as a whole and to achievement of the vision outlined in the Aspiration Statement. Thank you for your valuable partnership and collaboration towards this goal. SuaenHam|ey Snowmaea Tourism Director GLOSSARY TERM/REFERENCE DEFINITION ASPEN/SNOWMASS-LOVING One of three FIT target audiences identified in the 2001 research conducted FAMILIES I I for the Aspen Skiing Company by the Z-Group. Defined as wealthy, well educated, middle-aged parents that have visited A/S before or have a propensity to take this type of vacation. Have a work hard/ play hard attitude and define value based on what they get. ADR (AVERAGE DAILY RATE) Average rental income per occupied room in a given time period. ADR, along with the property's occupancy and revenue per available room (RevPAR), are the foundations to measure financial performance. The ADR is calculated by I dividing the total rooms revenue by the number of rooms occupied/sold. 1 EMPTY NESTERS One of three target audiences identified in the 2001 research conducted for the Aspen Skiing Company by the Z-Group. Wealthy, married, 50+, intermediate skiers/adventurers, with no children at home. Ski/adventure cautiously and often with their spouse, and who love being outdoors. FAMs I Familiarization tours are programs created for journalists, tour operators travel agents or meeting planners to experience a region. destination or resort property first-hand. They have been described as the most cost-effective means of marketing a tourism product I that exists. FIT Free and independent Traveler: Frequent Individual Traveler; Fully Independent Traveler. Leisure, vacation traveler. J GENERAL FUND In public sector accounting, it is the primary or catchall fund of the government. It records all assets and liabilities of the entity that are not assigned to a I special purpose fund. It provides the resources necessary to sustain the day- today activities and thus pays for all administrative and operating expenses. GROUP SALES A department within Snowmass Tourism which is focused on selling to i groups Corporate, Incentive, SMERF (social including ski groups, military, education, religion, fraternal), and associations. Groups are defined as a I minimum of ten room nights that include at least three nights. IMPRESSIONS Number of people who were likely exposed to an ad, article or other marketing 1 activity based on circulation, subscription, readership, viewership, website visitation, etc. INCENTIVE TRIPS I Vacation travel arranged by or through an employer and awarded as a motivational bonus to qualifying employees or salespeople. The majority of traditional incentive trips imply a group of people for whom an activity and I entertainment program is tailored. I INDEPENDENTS A fourth new FIT target audience identified since the 2001 research conducted I for the Aspen Skiing Company by the Z-Group. Groups of friends or couples I traveling without kids. i OCCUPANCY The overall occupancy measurement for properties, calculated by dividing rooms occupied by rooms available. S_ ­_____i STAKEHOLDERS Businesses in Snowmass Village who collect a sales tax that fund s Snowmass Tourism's work, i.e. lodges, merchants, adventure companies and services. I Partners with a vested interest in the success of the resort are also considered I stakeholders. Y/Y Year over Year J YOUNG AGGRESSIVE ATHLE One of three target audiences identified in the 2001 research conducted for the Aspen Skiing Company by the Z-Group. Less educated than other three target groups, 18-24, single, hard core skiers/riders, who ski (and mountain bike) very frequently with friends and prefer aggressive terrain and taking risks. 39 SN0WMASS 1,I)RA c TOURIS ct rV, Attachment B Snowmass Chili Pepper Brew Fest Description Microbrew competitions and samplings, International Chili Society and local chili cook -offs with tastings, musical talent on Friday and Saturday. Date(s) First weekend in June June 3 -4, 2011 Primary Audience(s) Young middle age adults, Denver and Front Range visitors Purpose /History Conceptualized and introduced in 2004 to help impact the soft month of June. Sunday featured a laid back free locals' competition which was eliminated in year 5 due to expense. About 1200 people came in year 1 when it was on the mall; it then moved to the hill to accommodate all the growing components and since put ICS cooks on the mall. Attendance grew to 3 -5K; it will remain about the same every year with the current budget. It can grow if talent is elevated, and it can explode as JAS did with significant investment; however, weather will always remain a huge factor financial risk. The number of moving parts is substantial; it costs a lot to produce as is. The branding, however, is very well established in Colorado and beyond; this event is a story about the vitality in Snowmass which extends beyond the weekend and it's differentiated from other brew fests with the addition of chili. 2010 2011 Attendance 4500 4000 Expense $230K $234K Revenue $166K $158K NET Expense $64K $76K Ticket Pricing Fri Conc $20 Fri PP $30 Fri Conc $20 Fri PP $30 Concert music FriChmp $50 Sat Con$25 FriChmp $50 Sat Con$30 Party Pass also chili brews Sat PP $35 SatChp $55 Sat PP $40 SatChp $60 Champion plus tequila WkndC $40 Wknd PP$55 WkndC $40 WkndPP$55 ($5 more day of) WkndCh$75 WkndCh $75 Occupancy 28% Fri 37% Sat 33% Fri 45% Sat Est Lodging Revenue $52K $69K $60K $81K $122K ADR $105 $140K ADR $100 Promotional Investment About $50K is spent on promotion regionally online and around $10K locally. While this is necessary to get the word out about the event, we'd promote Snowmass summer in Denver front range regardless. Chili Pepper Brew Fest gives us something more to talk about that resonates with Colorado's love of brews, chili and music three strong components. Prominent billboards, print ads, radio and online marketing all capture attention and build awareness of Snowmass. 41 Intangibles This is now a signature Snowmass event. It kicks off summer in the Valley with a fun party and is the first big festival in the high country. It has grown in popularity and is now well known throughout Colorado. A substantial amount of funding has been geared towards it over the years to keep telling the story that Snowmass has vitality. Focus groups, online surveys, website stats, media interest and anecdotal feedback tell us it's working quite well in this regard. As with all outdoor events, weather is a huge factor on attendance. A big part of the event's appeal is that it's very affordable, the value is very high. Options 1. Eliminate the event. 2. Accept the annual loss and continue as is. 3. Eliminate majority of Friday's activities. Omit the ICS component which, while a unique and interesting component particularly to media, has requires lodging and labor. Reduce the amount of paid lodging for Brewers. Place brewers in bars /restaurants or on mall during Friday with just a few on the mall for tastings and light music; perhaps a chili cooking class or dual cooking challenge for entertainment. Saturday, those brewers stay on mall and remaining brewers go on the hill as usual. Increase talent for Saturday to the extent possible after break -even. Try to grow the local chili cook -off aspect; recognize the increase in chili expense without ICS. Without the ICS cooks, we can now move the event to the following weekend and reduce the pressure often felt from slow snowmelt. RFTA service remains an issue for another week but the third week in June is Food Wine and the Valley is tapped on volunteers. Revisit increasing ticket pricing, continuing to provide value but recognizing that greater talent can command a certain level of pricing. Estimate: $175K expense, $150 revenue, net $25K investment 4. #3 above, but invest an additional $30K into talent. Estimate: $215K expense, 193K revenue, 22K net It must be noted that The Silvertree Hotel has been a generous in -kind sponsor every year. We will outreach to lodges to try to get sufficient rooms to cover the talent and brewers; if not successful there will be an incremental cost this summer for lodging. We have reached out to Westin management and they're open to a sponsorship discussion. In any case: Over the years we have invested in -kind sponsorship back into the event to enhance it. We will now put savings towards the expense budget where possible. A cash Title and /or Presenting Sponsor is always a lofty goal and can make the difference between a net expense investment and break -even; ultimately, a profit that can go towards increasing talent every year. Long term vision is for this event or a variation of it to become a week -long music, food brews festival that fills the Village with components on the mall, on the Hill, in the base and ideally other locations in Snowmass Village. 2012 Goal: TBD depending on outcome of event profile 42 Thursday Night Free Series Description A series of eight outdoor concerts on Fanny Hill Date(s) Eights Thursdays in July- August Primary Audience(s) Community /Roaring Fork Valley locals. Appeals to all ages. Very family- oriented enhanced by kids activities which are popular. Purpose /History Started very small some 20 years ago with local passing around a hat to have music on the Hill. This is a staple in the Valley and probably the most popular consistent series around, with attendance of 2,000 0 2500 each week and as many as 3,000 some nights. It was handed to us the year after the Marketing Special Events department we were formed and all contributions came to a stop but from one generous donor which since recently stopped. Given it is against Colorado law for people to bring alcohol into the venue, we put a bar in place (versus no alcohol at all) and it has created a revenue stream that varies by concert depending on weather, and to a small extent, type of music crowd. The event does not draw overnight visitors yet it provides guests who are in town a fun, memorable free night of entertainment. When weather is iffy, we still draw crowds but restaurants benefit from food beverage sales in their establishments. This event, like many others, is a tremendous sales tool for group meeting planners, VIP guests, sponsors and media, and gives us a perk to offer for in -kind support and contests. For groups in town, it's free built -in entertainment. An ongoing challenge is the need for a 501(c)3 to apply for the liquor license and Town staff can not legally do that; we tap into an event contractor now because of this and it's silly. 2010 2011 Attendance 2- 2500 /event average 2- 2500 /event average Expense $152K $150K (need to move $30K out of this (need to move $30K out of this line for stage set -up and strike as line for stage set -up and strike as it's used for many events all it's used for many events all summer) summer) Revenue $32K (down from $60K due to $30K lost donor NET Expense $120K $120K Ticket Pricing Free Free Occupancy N/A N/A Est Lodging Revenue N/A N/A Promotional Investment Minimal; posters around the valley as it's mostly WOM 43 Options 1. Eliminate the event. 2. Continue the event as is, looking for ways to cut costs and increase sponsorship as always each year. 3. Beer and wine continue to be sold for as little as $2 /each; this is a commitment staff made to Council to keep the event affordable for concert goers. We can retain that policy and increase beer can sales (versus glasses) by $1 which also speeds things along. Bar staff can be cut by at least 3 yet we don't want to create long lines so some liberties based on music crowd and weather can help dictate these cuts. We need to save on ice somehow; potentially a one -time expense of purchasing an ice truck, which also requires storage yet possibly could be rented out to offset the cost. This event can be completely run by Snowmass Tourism versus pieces of it as we do today, if the liquor license issue can be resolved. The downside is that an outside promoter in the music industry has the edge in negotiations and the ongoing interaction with suppliers that it might only wash yet with our staff's labor beyond what we already do today for this event. After the concerts, people who go to Base Village get "stuck" as the Sky Cab closes shortly after and the shuttles are periodic and hard to locate if you don't know your way around. This speaks to the incremental expense on behalf of the Town to run the skittles as the GID to fund them is shrinking. We would like to see merchants leverage the event more, i.e. each week guests are asking to purchase vendor merchandise and it is very sporatic whether it is available. This impacts establishments who miss out on business and it reduces opportunities for sales tax revenue. Here again, it must be noted that The Silvertree Hotel has been a generous in -kind sponsor every year. We will outreach to lodges to try to get sufficient rooms to cover the talent for 8 weeks; if not successful, there will be an incremental cost this summer for lodging. We have reached out to Westin management and they're open to a sponsorship discussion. 2012 Goal: Same as historical attendance; continued happy community and Valley 44 Snowmass Culinary Arts Festival Description Three to five celebrity chefs doing cooking demonstrations in an intimate setting (conversational); Palette of Pairings featuring artistically displayed gourmet foods paired with various wines, liquors, spirits and specialty beers for two hours; art vendors woven throughout the mall throughout the weekend. Last year several restaurants held special culinary dinners and brunches which built out the event calendar. This aspect didn't occur in 2011. Date(s) Saturday, July 23rd Primary Audience(s) Foodies ranging from 26 to 80 years old Purpose /History To diversify our event portfolio in providing an experience for a higher end demo, Snowmass Culinary Arts was conceptualized and introduced in 2010. The first year had a fantastic turn -out and great reviews. 2011 also saw a good turn -out; a separate Palette of Pairings ticket was offered at a lower price than the full day with cooking classes included. 2010 2011 Attendance 300 400 Expense $80K $65K; Original budget of 80K 15K sponsorship offset Revenue $22K $20K NET Expense $58K $45K Ticket Pricing $65 Full day $65 Full day, $45 Palette of Pairings Occupancy 53% Sat 69% Sat Est Lodging Revenue $122 ADR $116K $116 ADR $144K Promotional Investment Around $60K regionally (Denver front range) and $10K locally. Summer promotion would occur regardless of the event, and Culinary Arts gave us another story to tell to build awareness of Snowmass. Intangibles Weather both years was picture perfect which is important for an outdoor culinary event. Attendee feedback was fantastic with some urging us to make it a two day event. The celebrity chef talent and tent eat up a big part of the budget. We filled the classes with seating for 100 people but the expense is about $30k. Bringing in a consultant to better understand culinary events and where we might save money without losing the quality and appeal of the event could be helpful. Some guests who did not buy a ticket were partaking in food which wasn't appreciated by those who did buy; we need to tighten this up with servers and pourers doing a better job checking wristbands or secure an area for Palette of Pairings. Having the Art vendors out on both Friday and Saturday created great flow and vitality. 45 Options 1. Eliminate the event. 2. Eliminating the celebrity chefs is an option given the significant costs that go into that component. However, doing so would make it another food wine event and we have one already in the fall through Rotary. Recommend at least keeping the local chef class component (includes purchasing food). 3. Seed the event for another summer, reducing costs where possible without reducing quality. If we believe this event can really take off like Food Wine Classic which started in Snowmass before moving to Aspen, maintaining quality is essential to be able to secure the right /big sponsor(s) needed to cover expenses. Culinary Arts has the potential to be Snowmass' version with a laid back, artistic twist. 4. Seek out an existing similar event elsewhere that can appeal to this target audience and bring them to Snowmass. Seed them on a decreasing scale for 1 -3 years. In any case, if the event continues, we received requests from people who only wanted to attend the seminars so we'll offer three types of tickets going forward: All Day, Palette of Pairings Only, and Classes Only. We also had requests to hold the event over two days which is more likely a longer term goal. 2012 Goal: TBD based on event profile after evaluation by Board; as is, 600 attendance and 10% increase in occupancy; Additional sponsorship 46 Snowmass Balloon Fest Description Over 30 hot air balloons in Snowmass over a long weekend. On Thursday we do a Hot Air Media Challenge, hosted media from Denver, front range and the Valley. Friday is a down valley race, and Saturday and Sunday stay in Snowmass on the softball field. Pilots go up each morning and a special Balloon Glow on Saturday evening is a highlight with tethered balloons lighting up the sky, great music, kids' activities and bbq for sale. Date(s) 3` weekend September (two weekends after Labor Day) Primary Audience(s) All ages but primarily families Purpose /History A tradition that began 36 years ago. The event used to be held in June. It moved to the fall to be less dependent on weather although September can still have inclement conditions and times when balloons can't go up. Snowmass Balloon Fest is an amazingly beautiful photo opportunity for guests and media, and it's difficult to gauge just how much exposure we get from the thousands of people taking photos who then email, post, upload, etc. for their friends to enjoy Snowmass virtually. Pilots also share their photos with media who publish them and often note Snowmass as the location; Rand McNally featured our event on the cover of their annual atlas. 2010 2011 Attendance About 2000 each weekend Saturday morning cancelled; About morning and Saturday 2500 on Saturday evening and on evening (Glow) Sunday morning Expense $47K $47K Revenue $5.5K $14K (includes merchandise sales and nice $10K cash sponsorship NET Expense $41.5K $33K Ticket Pricing Free Free Occupancy 39% Fri 45% Sat Waiting for final occupancy Est Lodging Revenue $98 ADR 148K $115 ADR 160K Promotional Investment $43K regionally and $10K locally. Tons of free photography in return. Balloon Fest is promoted with Wine Fest to give guests on the fence regarding a visit to Snowmass two reasons to come here. Online ads performed phenomenally well, with 20,300 visits and a bounce rate of only 17% while the online campaign was running (under 20% is exceptional performance). This media campaign performed better than everything else this summer. $30K in lodging revenue was realized directly from the Balloon Fest event campaign; this doesn't include any lodging that was booked by any other off- or on -line mechanisms. 47 Intangibles Weather is a HUGE intangible. It can be perfect some or all of the days and thousands of people attend. Or it can be the opposite and no balloon activity can take place. This year, the Media Challenge and Saturday morning were cancelled; Saturday evening and Sunday morning were pretty perfect. With Saturday's rain -out, the mall was packed all the morning and restaurants weren't able to serve everyone. The Ice Age Discovery Center had over 150 people visit throughout the day We include Wine Fest in Balloon Fest promotions; while this doesn't serve the core visitors that are family, it does give some Denver /front range guests on the fence one more reason to decide to come to Snowmass this weekend. The beautiful photography can't be understated. Options 1. Eliminate the event. 2. Eliminate portions (flights) of the event. Not recommended as it's already at the mercy of weather and reducing days creates greater risk that balloons won't be able to fly for some portion of the weekend. Additionally, pilots likely wouldn't travel here for fewer days. 3. Charge for the event. Not recommended. Cannot secure. Don't need to be on the ballfield in any case can watch from anywhere so no reason to buy a ticket, which would also reduce vendor sales. 4. Continue the event as is with a loss and deem it acceptable for the exposure it delivers. It is common place at all balloon events that the towns pay for fuel, lodging, and one dinner for the pilots given the pilots put on the show for free. Always strive to reduce expenses where possible recognizing there are some short cuts we just can't take for safety purposes. Continue to push sponsorship and consider additional revenue sources. Being fairly cumbersome to manage over a period of time when we're busy with other events, bringing the planning and execution would be too big a stretch for department resources. 2012 Goal: With event continuing as is, same as historical numbers which again are completely dependent on weather; people in awe taking photos and sending them to friends, while not measureable, is anecdotally always a plus; happy pilots, based on a survey, reinforces their commitment to keep flying in Snowmass 48 Blast the Mass Description Mountain bike competitions in Snowmass over a three day period. Includes cross county, downhill and Date(s) August 5 -7; changes each year Primary Audience(s) Aggressive athletes; young adults and kids Purpose /History This event appeals to a target audience that fulfills our outdoor athletics niche. It provides another means to showcase the gondola and new biking trails. In its 10th year, the event continues to be an economic driver of lodging and lower end spend from participants in the competitions as well as their friends and family. A small camping component is required to be able to host this event; it's capped at 100. 2010 2011 Attendance 400 500 Expense $5.5K $14.5 includes running lifts Revenue $400 SkiCo took lift sales and $7K Lift sales and camping invoiced difference revenue NET Expense $5K $7.5K Ticket Pricing Free Free Occupancy Thurs 35% Fri 40% Sat 48% Thurs 63% Fri 65% Sat 70% Est Lodging Revenue $122 ADR $270K $110 ADR $392K Promotional Investment N/A Intangibles An event from a third party promoter which has minimal costs compared to rooms, vitality, and marketing the mountain as a mountain bike destination. This event in years past has been expensive, but now has a great ROI as we have been able to limit expenses due to the fact that staff knows this event forward and backwards. Options 1. Eliminate the event 2. Continue to support the event and its growth while leveraging it to tell a bigger adventure story. Modify the course to showcase the mountain even more and to be as relevant as possible to this niche crowd's changing race preferences. 2012 Goal: Increase attendance to 600 participants and their friends family; increased media articles about Snowmass as an evolving mountain bike mecca 49 EMU Festival Description A new music festival with heavy focus on environmental practices, education and adventure on and off the mountain. Date(s) July 2nd Primary Audience(s) Young -mid adults Purpose /History First year 2011, 3rd party promoted event. Part of strategy to bring producers to town who take on risk and rewards. The weekend was selected based on having two other reasons for people to come to Snowmass (7/4 holiday with some spillover from Aspen and JAS Aspen) in an effort to make a bigger impact on one weekend. 2010 2011 Attendance N/A 2000 Expense $3.5K estimate bus service support Revenue N/A NET Expense $3.5K Ticket Pricing $60 Occupancy 47% no event/ for 79% highest occupancy on record comparison for July 4`" weekend Est Lodging Revenue $122 ADR $103K for $116 ADR $164K comparison Promotional Investment $3840 Intangibles Weather. Ability of third party to perform. Options 1. This first year event was not very successful for the promoters. With a list of things to change, including the date which benefitted us but not them as the risk takers and the type of music which skewed too low, we hope it returns with plans to fill a weekend on its own. The people who did come were primarily from out of town and beyond Colorado; it's designed to pull overnight stays. The third party promoted event had crews from NY /Miami investing over $225K into our town to make this event happen. They are seeking a large financial sponsors and if secured they do plan to return despite their huge loss last summer and we may need to help seed it to a greater extent with some means of return should it turn a profit. Increase on- mountain events. 2. Invite them back with no seed money. 2012 Goal: Encourage EMU to return; help seed it as a sponsor (benefits) and set an attendance goal of 4000 50 Colorado Relay Description A relay running race of 150 teams, 10 people /team. The event has been going on for 14 years, beginning in Georgetown and most recently ending in Carbondale. It's a benefit for multiple charities and produced by a third party. Date(s) August 27th Primary Audience(s) Affluent Athletic mid -older adults Purpose /History We secured the opportunity to not only include Snowmass on the route but to finish here, which meant 1500 racers and another 100 or so crews /guests in town on Saturday with overnight stays. It created tremendous visible vitality here. 2010 2011 Attendance N/A 1600 Expense $500 3` party producer support Revenue 0 NET Expense $500 Ticket Pricing Free Occupancy 40% Est Lodging Revenue $110 ADR $79,200.00 Promotional Investment N/A beyond usual communications Intangibles Weather was good. This was a fabulous third party promoted event both organizationally as well as in bringing a large group of people here for a day. A normally slow weekend was made busy with zero expense on our part. Options 1. Eliminate the event. 2. Bring it back next summer. Merchants loved it as 1500 people were roaming the mall all day. Support a second event the promoter owns that will include Snowmass. 51 Automobilia Exotica Description A car show featuring exotic automobiles, a race at Woody Creek track, and related entertainment Date(s) Saturday, July 30th Primary Audience(s) Car enthusiasts; higher end demo; families, old and young Purpose /History This was a potential piece of group business that was turned into an event. 2010 2011 Attendance 400 700 Expense $4K $3K Revenue 0 0 NET Expense $4K $3K Ticket Pricing Free Free Occupancy 50% Fri 52% Sat 75% Fri 78% Sat Est Lodging Revenue $114K $122 ADR $163K $116 ADR Promotional Investment $700 Intangibles Mountain Fair was the same weekend but didn't take away from the success of this event. Options 1. Eliminate the event 2. Continue to grow the event while reducing seed money for another summer for it to start to pay for itself. Costs very little to execute and helps to sell and promote room nights (about 100 rooms). Creates great vitality for the mall, base and participating hotel sponsor. 52 Oktoberfest Description Traditional Oktoberfest with beer garden and German entertainment Date(s) September 10 (Saturday after Labor Day) Primary Audience(s) Family -all ages; tend to draw Empty Nesters who enjoy the music and like to dance Purpose /History A traditional event to bring vitality to the mall. Created primarily as a bridge between Labor Day and Balloon/Wine weekend to give some merchants a reason to not close early for the summer. 2010 2011 Attendance 600 400 Expense $8K $7K Revenue $1.5K $2K NET Expense $6.5K $5K Ticket Pricing Free Free Occupancy 15% 25 Est Lodging Revenue $98 ADR $26,400.00 $115 ADR $51,750.00 Promotional Investment $1205 Intangibles Weather is always an impact with outdoor events. This event is made very difficult due to the liquor license issue. Expenses dropped as this event is now managed internally, but revenues cannot be realized as long as we cannot run the bar. We do get a $3K sponsorship in cash for this event. Options 1. Eliminate the event. The only concern is lack of vitality between Labor Day and Balloon/Wine weekend but this is an option. 2. Maintain it as a typical smaller sized attendance but still fun event with a nice vibe, especially for empty nesters 3. Go big with beer garden tents and a set -up much like the real deal in Germany. Build out a two day event with enough activities including a sporting event to encourage weekend stays. Bar is essential to do this as is a big start -up budget. Would have to really believe in it and focus advertising on a specific audience given most people won't visit Snowmass three weekends in a row (JAS Balloon/Wine). 4. Replace the event with something new that's focused on an audience different than JAS and Balloon/Wine. Doesn't necessarily need to be an event could be a promotion. 53 Jazz Aspen Snowmass Description Major music festival on the Snowmass ballpark and soccer field Date(s) Friday- Sunday of Labor Day weekend Primary Audience(s) Independents; Friday music skews younger with bands like Girl Talk and Corporate Thievery; Saturday and Sunday bring adults of all ages for classics like Steeley Dan and newer but big draws such as Zach Brown (with always popular Michael Franti). Purpose /History Snowmass Tourism does not produce this event, we are a sponsor. For a sponsorship fee we get a full package of benefits from broad and specific marketing over 5 -7 months (plus year -round presence on their website) to onside booth, tickets and required call -to- action for lodging packages. When talent is strong as it was in 2011, this event can have the highest occupancy of any weekend in the entire year. The investment has changed from $167.5K with potential to earn an additional $32.5K based on attendance goals, to $200K flat with increased marketing benefits, to $150K flat over the past few years with same benefits as the $200K level investment. 2010 2011 Attendance 23,000 Expense $150K $150K Revenue N/A N/A NET Expense $150K $150K Ticket Pricing Occupancy Fri -71%, Sat -78%, Sun -64% Fri -67%, Sat -92%, Sun -90% Est Lodging Revenue $368,064 $96 ADR $493,020 $110 ADR Almost exclusively JAS Almost exclusively JAS Promotional Investment Ancillary to leverage marketing opportunities, i.e. producing ads, creating jumbotron video, providing logo items for Sonoma Jazz goodie bags, etc. Intangibles This event is very high quality, high impact and promotionally beneficial investment across time and geography. The only involvement on part of staff is leveraging all the marketing and having a booth presence onsite. It's a tremendous sales tool for us and meeting planners have been influenced to bring their groups here while experiencing the finest aspects of Snowmass Village. Options 1. Do not sponsor the event. Take the risk it will not happen or it could leave Snowmass (this evaluation does not consider a move to Buttermilk). 2. Continue to sponsor it at the same level with same benefits. 3. Increase sponsorship fee and benefits. Staff doesn't believe spending more will get much more; we're already as full with lodging as we can possible be. 54 x 0 a A x N N N N N N N N N N N x N 6 0 g O O p O 'rt C C y G w w w w w W EV o 0 o c o 7J 0 t1 Ca th n t� o 0 0 0 0 o c .0 0 C% O d 0 0 0 H N 4 Is7 r O O tr� ro o d o G o �T in to (n to O r m N J ,p. ro ro ro r O o y b O p W b m U p H w HH H 7 p f �o3 r i 7 ro M H r y ro H (-I t r7 It C r Vi ,4 `a in CCCCCZ"''' N I i7 x tT z N in H cn n to y z C n E1 y ro N W, ai d 7 U) 0 to co O !cam. b y r» H r, r m o z n PO N H w W W w W I N N I N N N W r W W W b I I SJ W i W W G d N A x1 N b Y m N U N b W FJ N N N N N N O m M b to fJ N N 0 O I b b N b 0 N W p, O O b 0 rV i-3 W W I W W W I H M N .ry 1 m m m m m Y J N I N N O w m C lfl C11 Ui In (11 lO b b la b U to 4 0 W O q p C N O iA m r m m m O r 4 0 0 0 0 0 p O I O O O O O O 4 0 0 0 0 0 m m m t�1 N .yr• tj w lJ W w w No Y to J J N r1 J W; 1p N O W N T N N r Y i•+ W W 0 6 W 0 M C B� !n to C r en N I W q 0 61 N p r In 0 4 0 0 i71 N N N N /p�mq�v N N N fn 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 W r W W b7 r 1 G x r x 1 C N F�•r I 61 m v1 a Y A r W N H O N N J O O W w N O w w CD li Y H H N In In w W I O n11 m m [D °m 0 1"n Fl t W W W w w M M N M Y 01 6t 111 0 0 Y A d+ p Ip Om 4 J r .~j QCW� I n N N N r A N N O OW O O O W p O O O O O M M 4) Q N rp z r x I P ry7 N N 1 N N N I d N N La M N N N i b 0 47 111 :n N N W b b O r o O O R J to In O 0 0 p m d O d x N p O O tl 0 0 A O O O M N N i r 1 Y N M N In I r w 1 W W d1 M N NO H N M N N N Cn S 0 0 0 0 0 ✓r r 0 0 O G O x„ Qt Cn hl I W lJ W W W 1 m Ct 1 M W N N N N N N to O O N N N N O Vi 0 o Y N Y t Y �gq J O N 000 0 0 0 0 0 0 H V 1 W W w W W N N N N N OI tl d til N O r O N Cn 0 0 y r I FW, CYC O 8l G r O1 4 Ot 1p i b O O O O O 1? O A O 0 0 0 W r wj (!1 M 0 0 0 0 0 0 r J V In m CC W m m w 1 W W W w r W W W m Oa [tt c1 m O r 5 5 tt+ 'Q to Cn F, w I ur N ',l7 N N I N N N 01 I N .n o rA r r? a m m c 1 O O O tfi to N N N y N N N n N N N N N N N N h N N a O O G O G O tl O p 0 h N N N N 0 0 0 I N o O o o O O O O O O O O p G p0 O p 0 0 0 p I r l (J M 0 0 0 o O G O O O QQQ O G M O U O O O P G O p O O C O U 0 0 O O G O G tr�1 0 ro O O g O b y Mp O O O O N M N N N G M M N N N to W to Ut In to Ln m ls1 O O d G O N to Ur tom' it M R7 C7 Q 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 M M N N N N N N tp co h7 N N N N N Ea O H M N H gj rp .da rp. 1 rF J+ W A rA rF rP �i M �yH^ N N t N :.i H O 0 0 0 0 UI U 7. }C Y a N d+ I N N Ij Y N r !-r O H C m N n RI f+f o� H M ?'�*fr o M C G to !n LZ M M M M Gt G� 01 ""1 7H N CCO b xi H M H M 7 y JI .'I. S' ro 'L' in M i� H G M� M o (n G +G. �y7 ro ro b V) C H H H H ro ro f; {R r n w M M t�nnnr m firt1F+ H� 9m M r r r r H j-I G t r H ro 'tf C �nxy H a 1'7 ?7 X1 M 3 r H r r xz zaoa H� hJ H 0 h n 0 N W 7. r H ,;1 in H H M to 'O k° O M df M ttv r t� 01 H 0 to M n H n x o rn t7 N y ro to M O �MM bN +iy r to ro It co m c z co co ta W N r N Y r H r W r OL lG� O eP 1 A O N N W r t m r N O W w 1n m J� r g ti O m l a. In W H m p mrna,gy al O N y 4 -J O r b N Ij F A y I r�N H KJ to !n !n N N A In O O r O tJ (P Ut N N W u'>• W y y O O 1 Q O 0 0 I N p O G O O g 0 0 Uf 0 0 O O O O O P O O N r FJ O O rP O m LS Q K Q o N 10 0 O O p Cn m y r P tl'. N W N N rH r rl. 1n N tit W rn g Y J Ln O O I O p 0 0 In r N 0 0 0 O g O 0 y 0 0 W r m Co 0 0 0 0 o W O O lli O d> 1 G O p 0 0 0 rn 1 Ol at C o o O 6 C to w 1 w ou+a. O C r O p 0 0 W r W O m In 'J O O p O N N m r (n II W a� W W m N O O r O O O 4 0 0 bo O 4 0 4 0 0 0 1 tU M r M W N r N r P O r 0 0 0 0 A r A p O O y 6 0 0 0 y O q O r 00 O o 0 0 0 W 1n C O J000,3 V1 H G O 000 r o N H a H� u GS C (n to t to to o O O O O O tQ O 0 0 0 r O 17 m Q r r O O g N O q O C y 0 0 m I m m W W V Ln M 01 1 r i N O O A p y N tl W Y W A y a, rn N T r N N y. y m 11 1p iA p v y CC�� O N o O O i G O O P O 1 O O O O O O O O O g 6 0 O r O O tl 6 0 0 0 y' J G Q h O .In y co W b kn N 1 N >b a) W i W a1 N r y W y I G O 1 O m N rn W W N N N y u g N W W N N m M 00 a O I I 1 1 W r W N tp 1p rP in N 1 to Y F"' M v I y tl O G p 0 O I x 0 0 0 h: y tl 4 G W N I N N y H a N 1p b 6 W la R. G G O N Vi O O I tl O Q 0 O, O O O O O O O Q O O P Q O r O O O Q C O O .P r nh O O to O �i Ll d I A Ut tp .P In O O O. N I'' w N 5 y y m to 00 O O N n O 0 0 p 0 q r O N T r CT1 O Ut 0 0 g 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 M O O O N N N N N 0 0 N FJ N N N N N N N N N ro ro N N N N N tJ N O O O p O p A 1 N N N N N N N N N t N N N N N n b 0 0 a p O A 0 U 0 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 i 0.0 I i•) r N N ro In In In U to Ut N N N Lit ♦n I bi I O O O O O O O O O d i N N N N N N N N N N N I y .y rVD R1 In !n {n. N to lfi Vt U� y ^p n t7 1 N N N N N N N M M Y M M RI in N Y pj r0 (A H y W W N M rF N i m .J tl in 7�, i I w Q wC C N LT) a, y HHQ vpcnr H ar zoaioz za p1 [n n 7, G) x I'q to W. 'C tr, i+7 H Gi x K xt 666 O n n Xt H H t+l H o x t"H<h�i l� t r xo c,r7��mE�ay�zr`" c tro4� CC? M co H cn�bK H Ho HC N o n�yhu�x xH� x N cxs CI rn in xbHw H taoy gd �t�r� C H in ��1 e rn Vi C Vi x Y rn y co In p 4� y Gj H N n 20 b Q M W :il z I i W t0 in YO t' N 1 ..3 J L,.I k, In iJi V O U N N W W a O p N In N tlt i lA m N N N y N 01 N rG m m in w I O N O O O O O i L M O UI O N O {NO M, w Ja N N W W in I W N g a O N O O of k I a W N O O lQ O W in M w w l Y I M u x K7 N Af I N m b m 0 w w Y b W W 7-+ Y O\ H N W h.a N I N N W V1 0 o in m C 0 4 0 U A G to !n O 1 0 y O m W W N bJ r H O O O O 0 0 0 C a 0 U 0 0 0 O O O p p p N 0 0 N H J J J I p I P 0 0 O I p 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 a 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 p I 0 a 0 as 0 p 0 0 0 [S O Y O a 0 0 p p t+l M Y w M N S; M in M j+ b V'` W W m q O 0 0 to In m O J C O k p 0 to Ut p m W S 4 W U1 N N N W H a O 0 0 0 0 0 P P 0 0 O C O a 0 0 0 p 0 H O O p I C 1 I M I M W W N in t: ,p tn V w N W W Y H O W W W in Y W O O p O a 0 a A. O q N N Ut W b q h+ W to 'A in O O U 0 i p O O O O p t rl 61 1 01 O I 4 0 d O I O O O 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 a C 4 0 O O O d O O° [Y I O O O O O O g 0 0 0 0 0 a 0 0 A 0 q W w w M Y Y i M I w W m N N i N G w C1 W W M LT W to N N rc -j N O 0 0 0 O O O C to b O J 0 O O O• In In D? 0 i O W O O L O N K W O N n .A. O O a 0 0 to 0 g q p p O 0 0 0 0 p O p 0 0 0 0 0 0 C O d �y 1 w� O O Ut In M G1 ko 1 I N W m W q O C 4 �F m W N N O N i2. to p CO m b to in O p 0 0 0 0 0 O O 0 0 0 d 0 0 N C O O i N W W W W W J I p p 0 O I O O O p O O O O G O O N In m to in I :n C w O p V I N I V I O I O O A O I O O O O O O O O O O O O O O p O O C O 0 0 0 0 0 O O b p O p O I O O O C O O O O O O q C•7 t W I W W U+ Ui u M N Y v v y Y L. W w q C co rp u W N ti to I Ut ro W in C N O O O O g O O p O 0 0 0 0 0 00 00 0 0 0 0 0 q ��j (e2 1 O O 'J a 00 0 a 0 0 0 0 C•7 O to u' 0 w w N Y b m .a I w w b w t ut `I a M w N L N O O W cl rn r v [L NJ I Vt In O° Vt J V+ m i 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Q N a O d d 0 O O (�}t o a p o c c o H a c p o a o a o g o o a d w I O >h ON in t4 in 7 Ut i W w m N O C W O In In 5 t IIn FJ p N Y v v ro O p p p p t O O O 0 o, O N tin W W t F 4 0 0 U7 O O p N I Qry ON 47 CJ Y w x a Cl OO x O O O p d yy d 0 O C C C w w 'v 4 ,c n m t 0 0 0 o 3 n M o y o u yy} Ui y rn 860 yG o 0 0 0 to o b ro fd o t'r t�by� tn�oay t�voEka N z rm M n r N N O H H to cs C tq co ch I„ b C H n in a m n 3 H O ter z 0 0 1 4 0 0 I t M N m10 ID to °p (n U+ to to N O 1 O 10 4 A! !F+ !P A In N N la I w to W OJ M 0 0 0 o p N N N N a1 C1 Vt F+ O O 6 T Q\ ah N 01 a5 U p O Q1 Oh tOJ C� Q v, v' vlhntno 00 m mm H N y p N to N N m m m! m p a 1 a i M r ra H. to lD b rG �0 in to to m N W N r N N N w to b rP H Ln lri U5 VI In L Q\ Q O d d Gi m m 55 m I 40 i0 to k• yy til V A� x�1 a fi 1 T U\ O O r O C O A d O d r i x a x M r N r r D b r o D b rn l o n N w r w w ro O N n win bbbc 1 00o pv w w H h N d r k O C+1 a1 111 VI V] w In m at A rt- F .P A O p 0 qa d r p p x h r Y r I t Y N N N N N N ww wwwa, l a to I db Oo 1 J n N rF+ .P F• !F .P :n r N g O U V, to b t4 bj hl d N Y to bw ON a% `D 40 W 1 Ui 4 n y N U Ut Vi U t H N O 00, 1 A r[ to m op d r N N �1 Q 1 �i J a, 1 al V1 M C ca qS Q G O 1 0 0 4l O O 40 1 t 1 V: Q 5 V r i N N h> f i 1 w W 4n N U: fi at N M b t0 �6 �w 0 N 5 X C Gi 0 v u, 1*1 W N 4 e 0 ul O O Z, O N vj 10 W L-2 W cn 3: Cq 0 w 03 tp a 1:0 A. al H tn P tl C7 t- H H l o H 11 M M in to rA C5 to r G r P1 vi H M W V1 0 ko i" o N w CO IQ w W M H W Oj co -V 00 o 0 0 0 to Ln 0 0 0 0 0 10 O F, Ul a 0 o 00 0 co t:l 0 O ul 0 o p a p 0 0 a 1 U, 10 CD U, 0 N Ol 0 0 0 EO o 0 0 w 0 0 0 0 H W m a O m VI Ln 0 0 0 0 (n Ln 0 Lb 0 m 0 0 0 ton In 0 O It p N 0 g 0 0 0 ON 0 0 0 0 01 Im a 0 0 10 0 0 m 0 W tv C, W w CD w CO '0 ON zn m w Ln 0 a tv In tp 0 M U] A 03 L U, 0 O 0 OQ w 02 00 oo a a, '0 m 0 N W" C, In 5✓ ID o 0 a, N m x a G r x �syy: O D O O x H 5 'p Ll GI Is: y rox+, R in n 4 y O O O O r cI ,D t 4 q v y H V P p N f-I H r (q 01 s 71 tl1 01 z I�"I. Cq t2+.ro (l°�1 M tG w Fi i7H H Cf �rroroxo 4 C Vy O Z ty o p r n m 7 C'1 ry HH 11 M n o r 1 01 tb N Ln r O t ('!ai N N N 0 r OW 0 N lh 1 I O O W X1 n :v ti 1T s I +n J i J I G e4. N N W W W h7 fa< s J O N t)1 O lii C N O o f O r 0 0 O a O G 0 0 O iq W N I k n I x ss a, I rn i I �a Ul H m ,0 I L N ON W p N I., s t11 T s pl iYJ S ON m r,' 0 1 O G O G O p 1n N Ov .1 p G O o o o 0 O o 0 0 0 o 0 Q p C in LA 0 I L F ro Y Y Y r Y N N U iD 10 N N H O G1 G! N N 2J N j a' In O 0 0 0 0 0 O x Y N N c, m N 11 I N r N to u+ U W N iG l0 %0 10 I p, 0 0 O r 0 0 0 0 0 p C1 t W O 00000 O M Y Y N Y N w W i w; u w N N ro J t0 10 I 10 tiff r ti0 t O r O O o I O O O p p 00 [+1 N I7 I N to u 60 N T i rQ N N hf n to I a v+ U w to z 0 w Attachment D Town Council Budget Meeting Notes for 2012 Budget Marketing Special Events: 1) Why are salaries and benefits going up and why is benefit greater? The payroll and payroll benefit increases are in line with the numbers the rest of the Town departments have budgeted. The Payroll increase accounts for the merit increase awarded to Town employees by the Council in July of 2011. There are no payroll increases budgeted for 2012. The payroll benefit line increases at a greater amount than payroll to account for the 14% budgeted increase for health insurance costs. Specific to Group Sales, we had no Director until May and a budgeted National Sales Manager position was not filled until October; 2012 is adjusted for full staff. 2) What is the $30,000 in premiums? Branded items help keep Snowmass top of mind among tourists, media, meeting planners, sponsors, promotional partners, community, et al. They range from stickers, pens, post -its, chip clip, lippies, mugs, water bottles, jump drives, and other inexpensive to moderately priced items for mass distribution to specialized items like viewfinders that sit on desks, coffee tables and other visible places and provide constant reminders of Snowmass. Canvas bags are a great example of walking ads that make their way around the country, as are Snowmass stickers kids put on their helmets and backpacks. Premiums are distributed by our office, at guest service locations and via lodges at trade shows, fams, sales calls, etc. 3) What is the $625,000 in Winter Marketing for specifically? See attached I. 2010/2011 Winter Marketing Budget Breakdown 4) Online Marketing —The website isn't good. What should the website be producing? While creative and format can be viewed good, bad or indifferent based on the individual user's personal preferences, website numbers document performance. .coin coin andbrew.com culinaryandarts coin Date Range May 31 Sep 29 June 30 Sep 29 May 22 Jun 11 July 1 —July 31 Aug 30 -Sept 29 Visits 54,528 2,508 10,573 6,260 6,042 Page Views 172,710 5,572 31,212 17,959 20,300 Avg. Time 2 :29 1:46 2:41 3:05 2:08 New Visits 77.57% 68.22% 63.58% 78.1.8% 70.34% Top Content /home 45,437 /home 2,934 /home 9,448 /home 7,434 /sched.htm /stay /accommoda /activities 1,117 /2011 -sched /schedule.htm 12,720 tion 14,822 /whats— coming 4,702 3,193 /gallery.htm /play 11,193 517 tickets 3,839 /tickets.htm 1,866 /shop /dine /contact 155 /music 2,539 1,856 /lodging.htm 7,459 lodging.htm 1,1832 /special 7,273 1,1.45 Websites need to be reviewed time to time as tools and technologies evolve to ensure they are working as well as possible, particularly as our online advertising efforts increase. Snowmass Tourism has requested bids for an audit of the current main site and proposed changes will be evaluated. 61 5) Summer events ROI on each event See attached B. Supplement on Events 6) What is the $675,000 in Summer Marketing for specifically? See attached III. 2011 Summer Marketing Budget Breakdown 7) What is the $75,000 for Public Relations? A budget that allows us to build relationships with regional /national media to increase awareness of and stimulate interest in Snowmass as an attractive destination. Working these relationships results in newspaper magazine articles, radio broadcasts, TV, blogs and online posts that encourage people to spend their vacations and weekend getaways here. Expenses are incurred in covering inbound media fams (discounted lodging, meals, activities), outbound regional /national visits to sell Snowmass, hosting events, participating in media trade shows and co- hosting networking forums with partners. Dollars are also expended in updating necessary PR tactics such as an annual media guide and press kit, e- blasts, videos, b -roll and photography, advertorials, clipping services, satellite press release distribution, and access to a national database. The PR budget covers Snowmass Tourism's community outreach programs such as the Business Community Winter Launch and the new Four Rivers Historical Alliance. P.R. efforts are a cost efficient way of achieving exposure and they complement the higher expense of marketing and advertising, plus readers trust stories told from credible and objective third parties more than paid ads. Given the constantly changing tourism industry and the local climate, continuous strategic development in public relations is a vital part of the marketing mix for Snowmass Tourism. Group Sales: 1) How many groups and of people that came from Jan 1, 2011- Dee 31, 2011? 2) Projections for 2012? The Group Sales system is ineffective and needs to be changed. It was built for the SRA model which is not relevant to the current organization's structure or role. Snowmass Group Sales does not contract business; it should aggressively reach out into the marketplace, facilitates relationships and generates leads and opportunities for the lodging community and conference spaces, therefore, matrices used in typical hotel settings do not apply. Given our organization and employees need to be measured and held fully accountable, a new evaluation system made up of two equal components would be more effective. Macro goals and pipeline goals would evaluate the overall gains and losses of group business in Snowmass, while emphasizing "aggressive" sales behavior and rewarding members of the sales team for true performance. The attached E. Group Sales Goals Measurement details the proposed new system. 62 Other 1) What is the charge of the MSE &GS Board? To be in service to the Town's Aspiration Statement. See attached V. MSEGS Municipal Code and VI. Snowmass Tourism Organization 2) What is /should be the Board make -up? The Board in its inception was made up of two At Large, one Lodging, one Retail, and one Restaurant representative each. In 2002 when the lodging tax was passed and Group Sales came under the Town, two additional Lodging seats were added. Given many changes since the MSE &GS program began their work nine years ago, they have taken a pause to review the current structure and governance and will share their ideas in the October 17 Council meeting and discussion. 3) What is the proposed American Airlines opportunity? See attached VII. Stay Aspen Snowmass Memo to the MSE &GS Board 4) What is 10% towards capital improvements? The maximum amount per year (10% of the total annual Marketing budget) that is allowed to be spent on capital improvements. It was put in place given concerns that government might spend the budget outside of its true purpose of marketing events, i.e. bus stops. Examples of tourism oriented capital improvements are a p.a. system on the mail, roofing system for the summer outdoor stage, international informational kiosk and event tents. 63 2010 -2011 TOSV BUDGET (K) �o 9 Travel and Leisure Family FP Oct Travel and Leisure -Nat'l Circ. FP Jan Travel and Leisure -Nat'l Circ.* 1/3 pg Use in 2011 Added value Travel and Leisure Family* 1/3 pg Use in 2011 Added value *Or get 10,000 AMEX names in lieu of 2 1/3 pg. ads in Nat'l circ as a Added value using 1 OK names for AR direct mail Outside Magazine FP Buyer's Guide Outside Magazine FP Dec Outside Magazine FP Jan Sub -Total 137 Print Partnership w /SkiCo /split costs Online Mobile Sub -Total 50 Ski Magazine FP Dec Ski Magazine FP Jan Powder FP Nov Powder FP Jan Powder FP Feb Denver Post Snow Report (print, online) Sub -Total 75 Sub -Total 30 Skico Online Coop Sub -Total 65 Colorado.com email Yearly Lead Monthly Email Campaign to TOSV DB Outside.com eBlast 60,000 subscribers Added Value Sub -Total 6 CAC Vacation Planner FP Winter OSVG State Vacation Guide FP Yearly OSVG State Vacation Guide Summer Budget Added Value Concierge Guide 2pg Season Sub -Total 12 Sub -Total 15 Winter Calendar Poster print in house Weekly Activity Ads placement cost no weekly ads/flyers only Winter Promo Poster print in house Winter Mall Map print in house Weekly Activity Flyers print in house start 12.13 Winter Launch Ad Holiday Shopping Activities Ad placement cost buy 3, get 3 in AT /SS Holiday Shopping Activities Ad placement cost 2 ads in AND Holiday Shopping Specials Flyer print in house Disabled Vets Ad Retail /Apres Specials Ad placement costs (AT) buy 3 1 /2s, get 3 1/2s; (SS) buy 1 1/2s, get 1 1 /2s Ski Cc Kiosks in Aspen, ABC, Snowmass Snowmass Bucks Snowmass Bucks Redemption Sub -Total 21 Early Winter Brochure Late Winter Brochure printing only Brochure Distribution CAC Brochure Distribution AAC CTO Polybag Direct Mail 1 drops 12.15 perfect storm 64 CTO Polybag Direct Mail 2 drops 1.1 kids ski free 50K Direct MaiVOccupancy Gaps drops 1.31 printing $5250; AR $10K Postage Fulfillment Sub -Total 60 9,9 vY�� TorchLight Parade Winterskol Mardi Gras (3.8) (AT) buy 3 1 /4s, get 3 1 /4s; (SS) buy 1 1/4, get 1 1/4 St Pats (3.17) (AT) buy 3 1 /4s, get 3 1 /4s; (SS) buy 1 1/4, get 1 1/4 Sub -Total 2 Promotional Concepts Planning Coordination Promotional Concepts Design CW Planning Coordination (post 9.30) TMRC Design (post 9.30) Shipping Photography National Usage Family Photo Shoot Sub -Total 100 TOTAL 573 Season Budget 575 Difference 2 65 0 'k E 72 cz 0 w o OL C a R 0 ƒ 2 k I E e 7 E Cr. CD 3 %t// 0 m e w 2 E C: U) k t 2 N 0 k f I W C) D D 2 0 P W k c ƒ 2 5 2 LU s k rn f ƒ a) c s o I 2 f e :3 m D f E t O R e c o a) E 7 a CIO o CO n•- c m 2 c m e g m T- 2 2 E. o cz t s k w 2 t m r- o 2 o@ 5 e k 5 R\ I 3 7/ s O -o m 0 0 c 2 U c o 3 2 c E r e o o e o c m c� 7 w� o�» o o c g m O 2 w L m o Q m cn JE b 2 f k k h w ƒ j 3 3 3 3 3 3 bb MENEM C U O O C O C O O O U O C +J O cl U W U !A O O N n OD P. 00 N I- T 6G U C N 0 O Y U i O O O LO i O O 0 E E O O C 0 co Z C Lo CD LL 6a N Q E co C C p O co a. o o E c o U E E E I— E E C° p O p o cn 0 CL L Q j N N 0 O E O L p (n (n W cn 0 O o� o c n o "aUU °o HD ca C'3 C del -�!�U d� a� a 1 0 LL LL M I 68 va'l Coa.6 Administration Personnel Nondiscrimination §2 -2 j ARTICLE XIII ARTICLE XIV Nondiscrimination in Employment Marketing, Group Sales and and Services Special Events Board Sec. 2 -291. Statement of policy. Sec. 2-311. Establishment., It is the express policy of the Town to com- A permanent Marketing, Group Sales ands ply with the provisions of applicable law by all Special Events Board, specifically designated1{ officials and employees. (Ord. 10 -1997 §2) advisory, is hereby created for the purposes of; Sec. 2 -292. Compliance coordinator. (1) Marketin g, The Town Manager shall be the coordinator (2) Creation, promotion and execution, o for compliance with the provisions of all appli- special events; tr cable law. For purposes of the Americans with w Disabilities Act, the Town Manager shall be the (3) Public relations; and x ADA Coordinator. (Ord. 10 -1997 §2) ,T¢: (4) Sales and marketing programs W." Sec. 2 -293. Appeal procedure. attract group reservations;:: Any person who feels aggrieved due to pur- for development of tourism for the benefit of:Ef `fir ported noncompliance of the provisions of the Town as a whole. The members of the law by the Town shall inform the Town Man- shall collectively possess relevant skills and`r,, ager in writing and request correction of the knowledge in the areas of marketing, gigu�i:' purported noncompliance, The Town Manager sales, special events, public relations-,rs shall investigate the purported noncompliance interpersonal relations, management and .te and take such actions as are necessary and building. The Board shall carry out its powers proper to alleviate any actual noncompliance. and duties with the express mandate that its:,:' Such investigation shall be completed expedi- decisions be made for the benefit of the Town.a' y tiously within thirty (30) days; provided, how- a whole. (Ord. 11- 2002 §1; Ord. 18 -2005 §1) ever, that under circumstances where the Town 1 Manager determines that an extended period of Sec. 2 -312. Qualifications. investigation is required, such investigation shall be completed in a period not greater than six (6) All members of the Marketing, Group Salest months from the receipt by the Town Manager and Special Events Board shall be Town ra of the instance of purported noncompliance, dents or employed in the Town. No member a The provisions of this Section shall not apply to the Town Council shall serve on the Board. Thy employment- related matters between the Town Town Council may only remove members of the and an employee. (Ord. 10 -1997 §2) Board, as. follows: Secs. 2 -294 -2 -310. Reserved. (1) For misfeasance, nonfeasance cu malfeasance of office by approval of �r. majority of the members of the Town' Council; or n Supp. 14 69 F Admi nistration Personnel Marketing, Group Sales Special Events Board §2-312 (2) For any reason, by approval of at Sec, 2 -314. Advisory Committee. x least three- quarters of the members of the r.. Town Council. (Ord. 11 -2002 1; Ord. 18- The Marketing, Group Sales and Special 2005 §2) Events Board shall create and appoint two (2) Advisory Committees to assist the Board in the i Sec. 2 -313, Composition. exercise of its duties. Committee members shall be employed y group p oyed within-the constituent rou the y K The Marketing, Group Sales and Special represent. One (1) Advisory Committee shall be Events Board shall consist of seven (7) members made up substantially of members of the lodging k and one (1) ex officio member. The members of constituency group that support the success of 3r the Board, subject to the provisions of Section 2- the Marketing, Group Sales and Special Events 316 of this Code, shall be the following: Board and shall advise the Marketing, Group 4 f s`:.. Sales and Special Events Board on group sales (1) One nominee of the Snowmass budgets, programming and an 1 i g p g' g p eratio s. The 5 Village lodging Indust nominated from the g g g rY other Advisory Committee is intended to be lodging businesses that were members of the composed of members from related industries Snowmass Village Resort Association by that support the success of the Marketing, Group virtue of a covenant or other restriction on Sales and Special Events Board, including the real property upon which the business representation of specific industries such as the i was operated; transportation industry, and entities such as the Aspen Chamber Resort Association, the Aspen (2) One (1) nominee of the Snowmass g Company, Skiin Com an the Snowmass Lodging �'t: Village lodging industry nominated from the Association, the Snowmass Resort Association, lodging businesses in Snowmass Village; Stay Aspen Snowmass, nonprofit cultural organizations and the like. Members of the (3) One (1) nominee of the Snowmass Committee shall serve at the pleasure of the Village lodging industry nominated from the Board. (Ord. 11 -2002 §1; Ord. 18 -2005 §4) e'a lod g g m businesses in Base Village; Sec. 2 -315. Initial appointment and initial (4) One (1) nominee of the Snowmass terms of office. Village retail industry; The Marketing, Group Sales and Special (5) One (1) nominee of the Snowmass Events Board shall be appointed by the Town Village food and beverage industry; and Council to serve overlapping terms of three (3) years, which shall expire at the first regular (6) Two (2) members at- large; and r meeting of the Town Council annually. The initial term of the additional member of the _y.., (7) One (1) ex- officio member of the Board to be appointed by the Town Council Board appointed pursuant to Paragraph 2- 313(c), to represent the ongoing development above shall be two (2) years and the initial term of the additional member of the Board appointed business in the Town: Said ex- officio pursuant to Paragraph 2- 313(c), above shall be member of the Marketing, Group Sales and one (1) year. (Ord. 11 -2002 §I; Ord. 1.8 -2005 Special Events Board shall be a nonvoting §5) member but shall enjoy all other rights of Board membership, including the right to be Sec. 2 -316. Terms of office and k= present during executive sessions of the Board. (Ord. 11 -2002 §1; Ord. 18 -2005 §3; appointment. Ord. 6 -2007 1) (a) Following the completion of the initial terms of office, each succeeding team shall be for three (3) years. 2 70 1 Supp. I4 Administration Personnel Marketing, Group Sates &Special Events Board tb) A nomination for membership to the nominee of an induct K I Marketing, Group Sales and Special Event industry or m a kM Board shall be made to the Town Council by the Board. (Ord. 11- 2002 §1; Ord, 18 -200. Viz.. Snowmass Village retail, food and beverage, and Sec. 2-31, lodging industries. An industry nominee need Attendanc at rrmeetii�s gs� not be a member of that industry. One (1) Each member of the nomination is to be presented to the Town Events Board regul Qtmg an y each industry, Council bh ny, °r in the case of the shall attend all scheduled meetings t the lodging industry as per the requirements of ticable. In the event an :y Q Section 2 -313 of this Code; provided, however, consistently late for Commenc f t)ie; that in the .event an industry, or the lodging tiled meeting, or absent g ntz r w industry as per the requirements of Section 2 from two five regularly scheduled mm two co 313 of this Code, cannot agree on a nominee, p rior ap proval multiple nominees may be nominated. In membe of the of a ma on 1. tf i .l ty of a11. `t1r�e Board, such action shall determining the nominee for an industry, only a sidered misfeasance of office and s hall, cii lj I business that is licensed pursuant to Section 4 -2 tute grounds for removal. be c of this Code may vote, one {I) vote ger business. (Ord• 1 1 -2002' Sec. 2-318. Vacancies.° (c) The Town Council must appoint the nominee of an industry identified in Subsections In the event that a vac occurs v 2- 313(1 (4) and (5) to the Board, if the Marketing and S eci n_,lhe. nominee is qualified and if only one ()Person Council I P al Events Board, the'1oHr� is nominated by the indus shall appoint a new member to sei�e_:th industry. If m appointment shall: ore than one remaining term. Such a (1} person is nominated to the Board by an accomplished in a manner s ecified 1 industry identified in Subsections 2 -313 (4) 2 -305. (Ord. 1 i- 2002 §1) p m Sectioit;�.�v�, and (5), the Town Council must appoint one (1) 00 of the industry nominees. In the event an Sec. 2'319, r y industry fails to designate a nominee, then the Organizational meetings; H 1' Town Council shall choose the member of the hYlaws.? ,0 z ii Board for the industry. The Town Council may The e it refuse to appoint a nominee to the Board of an Events Board shall t elect ar a annual and fr om i fs- r;A tl industry identified in Subsections 2- 313(1), (4) membership, officers whosffi for a slraii 'f e terms of o I and (5), only if at least three quarters of the be for one (I) re members ear with eligibility bers of the Town Council, present and election. The Board shall adopt bylaws for its voting, do not approve the nominee; in which organization and for the transaction of its busi- event, the Town Council may choose and ness not inconsistent with the provisions of this k appoint the member of the Board for that Article. All meetings of the Board shall be opera industry, to the public and the Board shall keep a ublic J record of proceedings Board meetings (d) The members of the Board nominated be held at a minimum of quarterl Ord. I1- pursuant to Subsections 2- 313(2), (3) and (6) 2002 1) y f shall be chosen and appointed by the Town Council. Sec. 2 -320. Powers and duties, (e) A business may only have one (1) In addition to carrying out its purpose, the employee, officer, owner or holder of any Marketing and Special indices of ownership in the business be a Events Board shall have R the following powers and duties: Supp. 14 2 -26 71 Administration PersonneI Marketing, Group Sales Special Events Board §2-320 i 1 (1) develop programs and policies to ARTICLEXV accomplish its purposes; and Second Homeowners Advisory Board (2) authorize the Town Manager to enter into contracts or agreements to carry out its Sec. 2 -336. Establishment. purposes, including administrative support; and An advisory Second Homeowners Advisory i. Board is hereby created by the Town Council to (3) direct the expenditure of funds for carry out such duties as directed by the Town marketing, including print, electronic media Council and generally to provide a mechanism as well as mail and direct mail solicitation; of communication and education between for public relations; and administrative second homeowners and the Town, (Ord. 09- expenses; and 2005 1) (4) create, promote and execute special Sec. 2-337. Qualifications. events; and All members of the Second Homeowners (5) prepare an annual budget for Advisory Board must be nonresident fee simple approval of the Town Council; and owners of property in the Town or the app P P tY designated representative of entity fee sim le 1 (6) coordinate with the Town Manager to owners of real property in the Town who reside insure monies are spent consistently with the in the Town for not greater than five (5) months approved budget for the Board; and a calendar year and are not registered voters in i K the Town. (Ord. 09 -2005 1) (7) annually provide Town Council with i a. business plan that includes relevant See. 2 -338. Composition. I performance standards; and The Second Homeowners Advisory Board l; ;:.(8) make quarterly reports to Town shall consist of seven (7) members composed of: :Nountil showing performance of the approved business plan. Prior to malting a (1) Three (3) owners of condominiums/ �A't eport Council, the Marketing and Special townhomes /multi family dwellings; r ve is Board and Town Council will mutu- :.;filly agree to a report format. (Ord. 11 -2002 (2) Two (2) owners of single- family 1 homes; and 21 -2 -335. Reserved. (3) Two (2) at -large owners. Members may not be from the same complex s:. association; this applies to all of the above til categories. (Ord. 09 -2005 1) ii' 2 -2 7 72 Q O Cs 0 d.., UY w .e z �IL a� °'oc m �71 oC v� a f w W r c;Y LU we a cne cn E� O� w M I U CO 0 c p N' O� w� W �cn �O Cn J G C fl. n' f W O 'J 0 j t+ i (n cn =cQ° O t� i L O i O z Cl) cn O ttf 'r w N Y�aO IVccQ ImQ;�� U�� z r 73 STAY ASPEN/1\11SN OWMAS S r. Aiji, 4 C E N T R A L R E S E R V A T 1 0 N S August 2, 2011 Snowmass Marketing and Special Events Board Via: Susan Hamley, Director of Snowmass Tourism Town of Snowmass Village P.O. Box 5010 Snowmass Village, CO 81615 Re: Request for Support, Aspen /Snowmass Start -Up Incentive Package for American Airlines This letter is intended to formally follow -up on a discussion that took place with the Snowmass Marketing and Special Events Board during executive session on June 2, 2011. At that time unanimous "intent to support" was expressed toward a proposed start-up incentive package to lure American Airlines (AA) into the Aspen Pitkin County Airport (ASE). AA has since publicly announced their plans to launch seasonal winter and summer service into ASE from both Dallas/Ft. Worth (DFW) and Los Angeles (LAX) beginning December 15, 2011. Those winter flights are now loaded into the GDS and open for sale through all global distribution channels. The request being made to the Town of Snowmass Village is to match proposed cash contributions and marketing reallocations through public sources from the City of Aspen as follows: $75,000 start -up cash due to AA by January 14, 2012. $50,000 reallocation of marketing dollars toward a dedicated destination -wide marketing fund for AA to help ensure the success of their initial 2011 /2012 winter season at ASE. $100,000 reallocation of marketing dollars toward an additional dedicated destination -wide marketing fund for AA to promote future seasonal service (summer 2012 and /or winter 2012/2013). Thank you very kindly for your consideration of this request. I should stress that AA is entering the Aspen /Snowmass market at their own risk, and their start-up costs and ongoing pilot training costs here will be considerable. No airline would ever launch service into a new market in today's environment at current fuel costs without some sort of incentive package. The package we have put together with your support along with additional private sector support is what has made this exciting opportunity possible for our destination. BY: STAY ASPEN SNOWMASS Bill Tomcich President 425 Rio Grande Place Aspen, Colorado 81611 www.stayasp 74 ass.com 877.602.7736 970.925.9000 Fax 970.925.9008 RWonses to FAQ Questions GROUP SALES METRIC Total Group Sales by Year B S ales Person Winter vs. Summer In the Macro portion. of the group s al es matrix-. each individual sales manager (or rn group ore accurately. Account Manager) will. be judged on the performance of their vertical market, Z!71 Given the fact that. the Group Sales Department is a too] for the lodging coiri-munity and We do zn not contract business, a system predicated on rooms sold or dollars generated does not work. With regard, to segregating group sales in winter and surm we need to look at a few things. In the n.i.eetings business, majority of business is booked for` the spring and fall.. While We have obstacles during these dinefran.ies we must begin to push the edges of our traditional seasoms into the spring and fall. Additionally, it is dernmental to put this winter/summer mentality into the marketplace as the opportunity does exist i in some circunistai.i.ces to move groups into rinieframes that work for Snownia, If We PO-Siti011 ourselves as winter /summer only then many planners will have no reason to pick up the phone at all. Additionally, there has been a lot of discussion that We don't need (YFOLLP business in the winter. If occupancies around 60% are acceptable. then that might he a good tactic. Furthermore,, based on the fact that the AIR in winter is substantially higher than in the summer. that might give credence to actually making winter more of a priority, With this being said, at. this time and until winter occupancy is upwards of 9055. no logical reason exists ro make One season a priority of the other and segregate the reporting segregate Number of Rooms Booked Return Customers New Business The Macro por—tion of the metric Will focus on rooms booked. By focusing on rooms booked as opposed to revenue numbers we are creating a system without prejudice. In other words. sales 41 m.anaaers are not incentivized for promoting the higher end properties with higher room rates. In the new system, "all rooms are created equal." The Pipeline. Goal portion of the new matrix focuses on the prospecting new clients. tl I generating new leads, hosting FAM trips, etc, Of course there is a big need to keep the business we have, but the emphasis of the Pipeline Goal is the new and of course, to create a a pipeline of business 75 com-inor Z:�, to Snowiria o ss, Snvvniass has not had a pipel meeting of eemmeeting n business and. quite frariklv, it won't happen without new business. Effort and Activity Leads Calls FAM Trips Vertical This is detailed in the nadrix document. Other Questions: Timing of the Process i.e. developing the lead, booking the group, delivery of the group (actual stay here) Unfortunately every 01-00p is different. Sonic, groups plan 3 monrtis in advance. others 3 scars. Additionally, others move from the pr- oposal phase into contract daick other groups have boards anl panels that need to he consalled so turn times can be loncl Lastly. many of these issue, are out of the hands of the Town given that we have no role in the actual contract and operation Of the CIFOLIP, How much is Group Business vs. FIT Currently we cannot inea.sure, this, With Our proposed reporting via MTRIP we will finally he able to understand this with a good degree of accuracy M Stan at beginning of 2012 M Establish baseline numbers M Who gets credit for the room.. -Property, TOSS. or both? Receiv "credit" will no longer be an issue with this proposed matrix M Cost per Head With our new reporting from MTRIP we will be able to calculate this number. Addidonafl,y., by tracking this number moving forward, we will be able to know how we are trending when it comes to bein!-z an efficient organization. 76 SPECIAL EVENTS METRIC Sales Taxes Year Season Month Lodging Year Season Occupancy Day ADR RevPar Events Total Cost of By Market Lodging Value Event (inc Marketing) Revenue Net Cost Attendance Lodging Value to Net Cost Ratio Footnotes- intangibles Weather Other Events The event: evaluation worksheets included in the packet provide this information.. Other Questions: What's the "Okay" Breakeven? 80/20? 50150? The `okay' hreakeven point is being determined by the Marketing, Special Events Group Sales Board in an upcoming sunnier events evaluation, The philosophy is that events are not individual products, they are components of the overall summer promotional program to build awareness. ge nerate nerate return tri.al visitation, and encourage spend, much like traditional advertising does. What's the rationale for holding the event? Included in event evaluation worksheets. A portfolio of events balanced by target audiences serves as another promotional element in the overall. marketing plan to tell the Snownlass Z story as an active, fun, diverse place to visit in summer regardless of when guests actually Z�11 Z17 come here. Larger events help put 'heads on beds' and they are sales tools that have been helpful when leveraged to secure groups which result in greater revenue. Smaller events zn provide vitality in the commercial cores to enhance the guest experience and increase, word of mouth which is free, Survey of event go-ers? Survey of Lodges 77 A guest survey of Chili. Pepper Brew Fest in 2009 revealed good ts. there wa g o f a. no question included regarding their anticipated spend. however. Guest survevs for Chili Pepper Brew Fest and for Culinary Arts in 2.01 I were conducted. The response rate was far too low to be meaningf and we will be looking to have a professional organ f u C�I L -anization conduct them for us Lodging going forward, and m.ercharitsurveys will be, conducted by Z7 Lodging Snowmass Tourism for larger events in summer 201.2, al How to evaluate the "success" of the event The event evaluation worksheets included in the packet provide this information, MARKETING METRIC e Website Bounce Rate o I 10ain site This wehsite. is priniardy a portal to provide i nformation with the goal of getting them W click on (bounce out) to a site where they can book lodaino, lift tickets, full vacat packages, etc. An audit. will tell us if these bounce rates are good meaning browsers are leaving to book which t� -1 Z71- is behavior we want to see or whether they're leaving because they cant find wh.at they want and go elsewhere to look:. 0 Summer 2011. 37.02%. This rate could be lowered by better using our t directing linking. For example when ema about culinary we do Z� I 'Ll feature the Culinary site., but we. also use www,siiowmasstourisi. coin in the footer. That footer link could be befter linked by sending the user to information about Culinary within www instead of just the homepage. Our bounce rate. with GoogJe is 31.95% which is great with organic searches, 0 Winter 201.0-2011: 33.75%. Winter performs better than summer as we have greater awareness as a ski resort and guests seek out our site. Good use of Keywords directing to the homepage. also helps. Google bounce y Z-- rate for the winter is 32.50%. Same thoughts for footers and general web Z, brand of www,sno t, I the rate down further, wmasstourism.com should bring o Regardinc, bounce rates from online ad campaigns with a specific promotional Z� purpose, i,e, events, googIe reports that anything under 20% is rare and excellent. Over 35% it's of concern and more than 50% needs to change Three of four event-specific websites are performing exceptionally well., and a quick assessment of Culinary Arts reveals simple changes such as "Buy Tickets" more prominent on the h-ornp m4— and "Click Here For Lodging" at the top of 47- 78 that page that should increase performance. Statistics achieved during the Summer online ad campaigns: ZI Chili Pepper 22% Culinary 3317c Ice Age 18% Balloon Pest 17 Time spent on the site Total traffic Referrals Date Niay 31 —Sep 29 June 30 —Sep 29 iViay 22 —Jun 11 July of 1 —Ju 31 Aug 30-Sept 29 Range Visits 54,528 2,508 10,573 6,260 6,042 Page 172,710 5,572 31,212 17,959 20,300 Views Avg, Time 2:29 1:46 2:41 3:05 2:08 New 77,57% 68,22% 63,5�8% 78.18% 70,34% Visits T o p /home 45,437 /home. 2,934 /home 9,448 /home 7,434 /5ched.htm 12,720 Content /stay/accommoda /activities 1,117 /2011-sched /schedule.htrn /gallery,htm 1,866 tion 14,822 /whats 4,702 3,193 /lodging.htm /play 11,193 517 tickets 3,839 /'Lickets.htm 1,1832 /shop/dine /contact 155 /music 2,539 1 7, 459 /lodging.htm /special 1 145 Other Questions: Website should be re-done We have three quotes co i from consultants to do an audit Too many web-sites-inefficient Audit will address this Cost for all these web-sites All Sites are in maintenance mode which we do internally, except the Group Sales site which will be done. shortly and then internally updated. Special enhancements are priced per feature. such as they surface. We spend 5450/year for hosting afl of the sites as well as TOSV.com and Sno\vniassRecreation.com. Evaluate efficiency of Website Annually Part of upcoming audit 79 80 Attachment E COLORADO PROPOSED GROUP SALES CHANGES We Are In Need of Change When speaking about the matrix that is used to quantify the efforts of the TOSV group sales departments, two things are very obvious. First, a change needs to be made to the current system that is in place now, because by all accounts it has been largely ineffective. Second, we need to install a system that paints the overall picture of the group sales department affect on group business in Snowmass, while at the same time, emphasizing "aggressive" sales behavior and rewarding members of the sales team for true performance (in other words, a system that holds the organization and its employees accountable). What does a Destination Marketing Organization or CVB do (or in our case the Town Tourism Dept.)? Although in this case we are talking specifically about the group sales arm of the tourism department, I believe that the definition provided by Destination Marketing Association International (DMAI) best sums it up: "Destination marketing organizations (DMOs), often called convention and visitor bureaus, are not -for- profit organizations charged with representing a specific destination and helping the long -term development of communities through a travel and tourism strategy. DMOs are usually membership organizations bringing together businesses that rely on tourism and meetings for revenue. For visitors, DMOs are like a key to the city. As an unbiased resource, they can serve as a broker or an official point of contact for convention and meeting planners, tour operators and visitors. They assist planners with meeting preparation and encourage business travelers and visitors alike to visit local historic, cultural and recreational sites." Looking at this definition is extremely important because before we can set up a system to judge performance, we must truly understand the scope of the department. One of the keys to the description which rings true for the TOSV group sales department is the fact that DMO's do not contract business. Because of this fact, traditional matrices, such as the ones used in a typical hotel setting cannot be properly applied to this organization. This is the tactic that has been used in the past, and as has been stated, has been ineffective. A New System for Evaluation Because Group Sales is a tool of the community, and not a contracting entity, I believe the department should be evaluated in two different ways. Equal credence should be given to what can be called macro goals and pipeline goals In short, the macro goal (50% of the total goal) evaluates the amount of business put on the books for the future within a given year. Given the relationship of the department to the town and the fact that this is a macro -look at group sales in Snowmass, this number does not reflect the involvement that the department had with particular pieces of business, rather, it tells us whether or not the town is advancing as a whole. Additionally, through detailed reporting, we will learn whether or not the town is advancing in various vertical markets. 81 The metric for the macro goal will be created through lodging properties retroactively reporting their actualized numbers for 2010 and 2011 to MTRIP. Taking into consideration that there should be a direct correlation between the actualized numbers in a year and bookings made in the year for future years, these numbers can be used to set a baseline. This baseline plus a percentage of growth will be used to set the macro goal for the sales team. The pipeline goal (50% of the total goal) looks at the effort and activity of the department as a whole and quantifies the type of output that can truly be accounted for. Because, lead generation is such an important facet of the mission of the group sales department (and perhaps the most important part of the pipeline) it will actually be broken out as its own subset. Please note that in and above the fact that this pipeline goal is a matrix for gauging performance, it speaks to the need of creating a pipeline of business, something that Snowmass has been sorely in need of for quite a long time. The pipeline goal would be set -up as follows: 20 64 qualified leads sent per quarter* (256 qualified leads per year) 10 910 new prospect calls made per quarter (3,640 calls per year) 7 28 site tours for prospective business per quarter (112 site tours per year) 7 80 sales calls per quarter (320 sales calls per year) 6%- 8 FAM's (familiarization trips) per year New leads will be given double credit. The definition of new as well as qualified will have to be set. Instead of quarterly this metric must be handled on a yearly basis due to the seasonality of Snowmass. In other words Q 1 and Q3 are much better for FAM's then Q2 Q4. Additionally, parameters on FAM's must be set (quality of guests and guest count). Please note that these trips will be for new potential clients; entertaining existing clients will not count in this metric. I feel that the system suggested above addresses the issue of accountability, but more importantly lays the foundation for a fruitful future. It is time now to stop focusing on what has been ineffective in the past and lay down the fundamentals for success in the group/ meetings business. 82 Attachment F COLORADO Mountains Mammoths: Snowmass Summer Family Adventure Vacations The Premise Mountains Mammoths is an all- inclusive, family "camp" designed for families who want an all- inclusive vacation experience that is, healthy, action oriented and provides a perfect mix of family time and time for parents and kids to "play" independent of one another. It is also a means to further promote existing programs such as those from CMC, ACES, Ski Co. Summer Programs, Anderson Ranch and make these programs more accessible to our groups and guests. At Mountains Mammoths families would have their choice of accommodations from economy to luxury and their choice of daily activities inside a loose framework in which some days are family activity days and other days see the kids and adults go on separate activities. Additionally, nighttime programming would follow the same format in which some nights are "family nights" and other are kid only/ adult only nights. Community/ Economic Benefit This family vacation concept takes all of the lodging and activity -based programming that we already offer in Snowmass and bundles it into a succinct product -based offering. Lodges, outfitters, the Ice Age non profit and the Aspen Ski Company all stand to benefit directly from Mountains Mammoths as they will be direct contributors to the content of the program and partners in the operation of it. In addition, many of the cultural and educational resources in Snowmass will be tapped to help create one -of -a -kind programming that will be unique to our destination. Additionally, restaurants and merchants will see business in that guests will have free time in the village and the programming will include dinner vouchers on some evenings that can be used at any restaurant in the village for the explicit purpose of driving traffic to that business segment. The FIT (Frequent Individual Traveler) Program On the surface this is definitely a product that will be sold directly to individual families. In no uncertain terms, we are asking that families take their one big summer family vacation here in Snowmass via this summer family adventure offering. Henceforth, we will be competing against the likes of Disney, the cruise market, dude ranch type offerings and more. In short, the marketplace is crowded, so this needs to be a special offering. Summer Family Adventure Vacations for Groups With regards to positioning the Mountains Mammoths product, the not -so- obvious market is the group incentive market. Family incentive trips are becoming more and more prevalent among companies that offer travel -based incentives for their top producing employees. We will have a turn -key product (that can be modified a bit of course) that should allow us to be a player in this group incentive market. 83 Next Steps If this is a product that the town feels is viable from a conceptual standpoint, many processes need to take place in order to take it to market. First, all of the programming elements /partners must be brought to the table in order to lay the foundation for Mountains Mammoths. Potential partners include: Anderson Ranch, Colorado Mountain College, Aspen Ski Company, ACES, lodging properties, restaurants/ caterers recreational providers (blazing paddles, Recreation Center) and cultural/ educational organizations. All of these elements must be combined in a coherent, attractive, user friendly format. With this, price points must be developed for the different versions of the offering. In addition to the structure of the product itself, the fulfillment side of producing such a packaged product must be developed. How will we make the program available online? If people need more information, who do they call? Who will process credit cards for those families that wish to by the product? Who will answer the phones when people want more information? Additionally, the fulfillment company must be able to distribute payments to the various programming partners as well as providing each entity as well as the Mountains Mammoths operational lead with manifests in order to keep guests and activities organized. There are a lot of options out in the marketplace, however, it is vital that proper fulfillment piece is selected because of obvious financial and organizational issues. Additionally, in many cases this will be a customer's first dealing with Snowmass and we must make a positive first impression. Finally, from a "groundwork" perspective, a discussion must take place about the operation of such a product. Is Mountains Mammoths something that TOSV should operate with the assistance of various partners in the village? Or should the operation of the program be put out to bid to bidders in the community and beyond (with strong marketing support of TOSV)? The decisions made with regards to programming, fulfillment and the operation of Mountains Mammoths will lay the foundation to create a business plan. The business plan, which needs to include a full financial plan, will tell us if we should move forward with development and marketing of the product or if our money is better spent elsewhere. Marketing Mountains Mammoths If the program was deemed feasible by the community, the marketing effort would have to begin immediately. First the audience would have to be identified (i.e. travel agencies specializing in family travel, luxury travel consortiums, on -line travel agencies, loyalty rewards companies, incentive travel companies, etc.) and the appropriate collateral would have to be developed to speak to these segments. Knowing that this would be a high -end, yet value -based offering and knowing who we will be competing against, the collateral piece would have to be a very high -end dynamic piece that speaks to both the FIT and group markets. Additionally, opportunities will be examined and leveraged in specified markets (i.e. billboards and ads in direct flight markets as well as marketing opportunities for a "light" version of the product in the drive market). Finally, a new piece of the Snowmass Tourism website would have to be built. This would act as an online brochure and would have the functionality for transactional booking, of course. 84 Selling the Vacation Program As has been mentioned the family vacation product will be sellable in the group/ meetings market, however, in reality this is a leisure product. Currently, we do not have a mechanism for speaking and selling to high -end travel agencies, travel agent consortiums, travel wholesalers, online travel agencies, bank rewards companies, etc. In order for this program to ultimately be successful, this issue must be addressed. An experienced leisure sales person must be brought into handle this market. Not only would this person sell the product, but they would sell Snowmass as a whole, which is sorely needed in a marketplace we need to be in. Costing Below are the costs associated with creating and selling the family adventure product. Description Cost Per Unit Units Total Contracted Staff for program development 60 25 6,000.00 Collateral Development 7,500.00 Marketing $50,000.00 Leisure Sales Manager 75,000.00 Leisure Sales Manager- Benefits 23,547.00 Travel Expense 15,000.00 Client Entertainment 10,000.00 TOTAL ESTIMATED COST 187,047.00 *Please note that the contracted staff will not have to be added to the overall budget. There is enough cushion in the contracted line item to account for this addition. Also, there has been an operational cushion built into the expense side of the budget. Operational costs will be built in to the cost of the program, however, if a certain plateau has not been reached than operational overages will need to be covered. This safety net has not been reflected above as the plan is that it will be offset by revenues. An Alternate Course Forward As mentioned in the "selling the vacation program" section, Snowmass Village currently does not have a mechanism for speaking and selling to high -end travel agencies, travel agent consortiums, travel wholesalers, online travel agencies, bank rewards companies, etc. Furthermore, it can be said that Snowmass as a whole is a bit of an unknown commodity to non skiers across the country. With this, it raises the question of how effective we should expect to be by bringing this type of product, in a bit of an unknown destination to customers who have had limited or no interaction with us. If we feel that this might be an issue, would it not make sense to "soften the beach" so to speak? Perhaps a good strategy would be to develop this leisure sales mechanism to begin the Snowmass discussion with potential customers who we are currently not tolled to speak with. All of the programming elements could be presented to 85 these customers in more of an ala carte fashion to begin growing awareness and booking incremental business in Snowmass. After we have developed relationships with these customers and positioned Snowmass as a viable and exciting family destination, then a product such as Mountains Mammoths could be introduced into the marketplace. Given the type of competition in this crowded marketplace, laying this type of groundwork could be essential to the program's success and could be a less risky way of moving forward. The Future This product certainly could be a game changer for Snowmass. With this we must be aware of the size and scope of our competition and the fact that similar offerings by some of our competitors have failed in the past. We must learn from these failures in order to create a top -notch product that is priced in such a way to be very competitive in the marketplace. We must also take into account that Snowmass as a whole is a bit of an enigma nationally and Snowmass as a summer destination is largely an unknown. With this, it may take a number of years to truly put a product like this on the map and we must be prepared for this. Additionally, we must take the necessary steps to take this vacation product out into the marketplace because a passive approach or a marketing -only approach simply will not get the job done. 86 TO: SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL FROM: RUSS FORREST, TOWN MANAGER SUBJECT: MANAGER'S REPORT DATE: October 17, 2011 EOTC Meeting October 20 The next EOTC meeting is scheduled for Thursday, October 20 at 4:00 p.m. in the Aspen City Council Chambers. The meeting will be hosted by Pitkin County. The primary topic is the 2012 budget. Attached is additional information from David Peckler on this discusion. CAST Meeting October 27 28 The next CAST meeting is scheduled for October 27 (starting at 6:00 p.m.) and October 28 in Park City, Utah. Please contact Barb Peckler for reservations at 923 -3777. Items /Strategic Plan Updated on October 11, 2011 The following Table is a summary of the action plan from the various topics discussed at the retreat in January. Action Priority Timing Who Base Village Next Steps 1 When Foreclosure is Russ Forrest completed Economic /Fiscal Actions 1 STO Metrics -Basic framework for a Susan Hamley metric agreed to by FAB and MSE &GS Board. October 17th Board Structure -March 21 (Complete) Susan Hamley Summer Events/ -March 21, 2011 Marianne Marketing (Complete) Rakowski Sales Tax Study Marianne June 6, 2011 /July 5, Rakowski 2011 /next one as part of Financial Updates 2012 Budget M.R. Ice Age Discovery 1 Final report given to 501 c3 will move Complete Business Council on August 15, forward with long Plan 2011. 501 c3 will move term actions /STO forward with will continue mentation. TOSV operation of new lease at exhibit center current exhibit center Housing Housing Policy for 1 (Complete) Chris Conrad Development Housing Projects 3 Guidelines completed Joe Coffey on June 20 Council gave authorization for final phase of Rodeo on July 5 th Environment EAC Structure 2 EAB's formed and Lesley /EAC working on plastic bag issue and SW REOP Policy May 2, 2011 (approved Mark Kittle Discussion 2n Reading) Urban Renewal Authority 2 Council asked that Russell Forrest information on a URA be made available to members that have questions. No meetings tanned at this time. Capital Improvement 3 August 1 September Hunt Walker, Process 12 On Sept 12 Council identified high priority project which Staff will develop more detailed budgets and action plans Solid Waste Collection 3 Staff is recommending Hunt Walker EAB review and then review with Council Pedestrian Crossing 3 September 6 Complete Art Smythe, David Recommendations Peckler, Hunt Walker West Village Transportation 3 Reviewed with the CIP David Peckler Facilities on August 1 St and 15 Council asked that staff review previous planning work on this project at a future meeting. Staff Development 3 July 5 h (Complete). Russ Forrest Town Fiscal Sustainability 3 September 12 Marianne and Com lete Russ Forrest Other Pending Actions The following is a summary of actions tha the Council has requested or actions staff has proposed and is working on for the Town 88 Staff Action Status Date to follow -up Contact w/ Council Planning Chris Conrad Sign Code Planning will review current sign code November 21, and discuss revisions with the Town 2011 Council Planning Development Staff will review input from customers December 5, Review Process on Development review process and 2011 make recommendations on improving the process. Town Clerk Rhonda Paperless The Town Clerk will prepare a October 3, 2011 Coxon Packets for presentation for Council on Council implementing a paperless packet for Council meetings and include with that a demonstration of available technology. Public Works Public Works Creation of a Council requested that a discussion be November 7, parking area scheduled in the future with input from 2011 across from staff on the costs and other design Public Work site implications for creating trail head for the Tom parking that historically was there. Blake Trail 89 t t MEMO To: Russ Forrest, Town Manager From: David Peckler, Transportation Director Date: October 10, 2011 Re: Update for EOTC Meeting on October 20, 2011 At the EOTC meeting on Thursday, October 20, 2011 at 4:00 pm in the Aspen Council chambers the members will be approving the 2011 Revised and 2012 Proposed budget. The budget includes the No- Fare Aspen Snowmass -Woody Creek bus service (Bus Service) through 2012. However, a decline in Use tax revenues and the continuation of the 2/3 allocation of the potential surplus to the Entrance to Aspen (ETA) fund are creating a "discretionary' funding deficit. Discretionary funding is covering the cost of the Bus Service and the SH82 AABC pedestrian crossing design and engineering (PED Bridge). The EOTC budget will have a cumulative surplus in 2011 of close to $10,000,000. The surplus is now split between a $6,400,000 reserve for a regional transit project in Snowmass Village and $3,562,000 for the ETA. I do not have the updated budget at this time, so I am referring back to the budget information presented by Tom Oken to the EOTC at their last meeting (see attached). The ETA allocation is based on the potential surplus available after the committed funding for RFTA and maintenance of the tax collection are deducted. In 2011 Revised the net revenues for the ETA allocation are about $1,160,000. 2/3's for the ETA of this amount is $775,000. However, the final surplus in the EOTC fund after all the discretionary expenditures are made is $446,500. The difference between the actual fund surplus and the surplus used for the ETA creates a negative discretionary funding balance of $327,321. There was agreement among the EOTC that the $250,000 for the PED Bridge work would be repaid to the ETA fund at $50,000 per year over five years. Due to lost Use tax revenues there is now an additional $127,321 to be repaid to the ETA. Continuing the Bus Service to 2016 in Scenario #3 shows that there is little remaining discretionary funding and the reimbursement of the ETA fund is still $188,979 short. Possible solutions to create a positive discretionary funding balance are: Potential taxing solutions to achieve $700,000 annually to fund the Bus Service subsidy include: A. 0.12 sales taxes by Aspen and Snowmass Village. B. 0.35 mill property taxes in Aspen and Snowmass. C. The RTA enacts a Visitor Benefit Tax in the Upper Valley jurisdictions. Adjust the ratio for the Entrance to Aspen reservation to 60 Do away with the Bus Service. Cut the Bus Service in the spring and fall. Te Bus Service has been successful to this point and there are many benefits to a wide range of people should it be continued. Use increase on the service despite the recession and a projected increase in use would have been 15.9 The Bus Service remained strong compared to all other RFTA routes over the last three years of economic downturn. All trips between Aspen and Snowmass Village 0 Page 1 90 declining by 10.5% from 2008 to 2010 compared to a 25.3% decline in the Valley service. It is popular with year round residents and guests who might drive otherwise. 44% of people with a car cited the free service as their key reason for using RFTA. It helps spread use over the peak periods, moving from a 4:45 pm peak to spreading the peak into the evening hours. The Bus Service is a unique feature of the area. It is likely part of the reason the ASC skier visits grew by 4.3% from 2008 -09 to 2009 -2010 while all the Colorado Ski County USA resorts only grew by only 0.5 Finally the service provided financial relief to working residents in the upper valley. Transportation costs account for roughly 19.3 cents out of every dollar of family expenses. Transportation expenses are second only to housing costs and they are greater than the cost of food. These are all significant benefits to the residents, guests and employees in the upper valley. Page 2 91 AGENDA ITEM SUMMARY TO: Elected Officials Transportation Committee (EOTC) FROM: Tom Oken, Pitkin County Treasurer MEETING DATE: July 21, 2011 SUBJECT: Review of 2011 Budget Multi -Year Plan Attached for discussion at your meeting are three scenarios for the multi -year financial plan: Scenario #1: Adopted 2011 Budget and Multi -year Plan Scenario #2: Revised 2011 Estimate and Multi -year Plan Scenario #3: Revised 2011 Estimate and Multi -year Plan with continued No -fare Bus Service Scenario #1: Adopted 2011 Budget and Multi -year Plan To provide some direction for future funding, the EOTC, at its August 2009 strategic planning meeting, agreed to save at least 2/3 of annual net revenue for the Entrance -to -Aspen Project with the remaining 1/3 available for discretionary projects such as the no -fare Aspen Snowmass bus service. (See the bottom of the Multi -year Plan spreadsheet for the calculation of these allocations.) A separate allocation of $6.43 million was also maintained for Snowmass Transit Improvements. Discretionary projects approved in the 2011 budget were as follows: No -fare Aspen Snowmass -Woody Creek bus service at $581,525 $250,000 for the design and engineering of a pedestrian crossing from AABC to the Airport bus stops. These resulted in a budgeted discretionary funding deficit for 2011 of $246,453 which was approved by the EOTC to be advanced from the Entrance -to -Aspen (ETA) reserves. Although the EOTC cannot commit future councils and commissioners beyond the 2011 budget year, it did indicate its future intent by inclusion of the following items in the Multi -year Plan: X -Games transit subsidy at $50,000 per year Funding for the no -fare Aspen Snowmass -Woody Creek bus service through the end of ski season in 2013 Repayment of the budgeted 2011 discretionary funding deficit of $246,543 out of discretionary funds over five years at $50,000 per year beginning in 2012. By ending no -fare Aspen Snowmass -Woody Creek bus service in 2013, the Multi -year Plan shows enough discretionary funding to repay the 2011 deficit in 5 years and to end 2016 with a $3.276 million cumulative discretionary funding surplus. 92 Actual 2010 Results Year -to -date 2011 Results and Revised 2011 Estimates Scenario #1 also shows the actual results for 2010. Sales tax revenues increased by 6.2% from 2009, exceeding the budgeted 4.5% increase by $58,000. The net benefit to the EOTC fund was significantly less, however, since 81% of sales tax collections are distributed to RFTA. Through May of 2011 sales tax collections are up by 7% over the same period in 2010. If this trend continues through year -end, sales tax will exceed budget by $308,000 this year, but after the distribution to RFTA the net increase to the EOTC would be only $58,400. Although up by 18% over 2009, use tax collections fell $119,000 short of budget in 2010. Since use tax is collected primarily on building materials purchased outside of.the county for use here, future collections will reflect the sharp decline in the local construction industry. For 2011 we estimate that use tax collections will be $300,000 under budget. Scenario #2: Revised 2011 Estimate and Multi -year Plan This scenario incorporates the revised estimates for sales and use tax in 2011 and extends them through 2016. Although sales tax estimates are increased by more than $300,000 per year (approximately $60,000 net) from Scenario #1, use tax estimates are decreased by an average of $400,000 per year, anticipating no significant rebound in the construction industry. As a result, the estimated discretionary funding deficit for 2011 has increased from $246,453 to $327,321. By ending no -fare Aspen Snowmass -Woody Creek bus service in 2013, the increased 2011 discretionary funding deficit can still be repaid in 5 years, but the cumulative discretionary funding surplus in 2016 drops to $2.371 million from the $3.276 million in Scenario #1. Scenario #3: Revised 2011 Estimate and Multi -year Plan with continued No -fare Bus Service This is a `what if scenario for extending the no -fare Aspen Snowmass -Woody Creek bus service beyond the end of ski season in 2013. There is enough discretionary surplus in the years 2012 through 2016 to fully fund no -fare service, but the remaining discretionary funding (averaging $28,000 per year) is insufficient to repay the 2011 $327,321 deficit within 5 years. At the end of 2016 the discretionary funding deficit to be repaid is still almost $189,000. While there are too many uncertainties in this scenario to base any policy decisions on it now, it does indicate that the financial future may be more difficult than expected when the 2011 budget was adopted. Consequently, efforts to find alternative funding sources for the no -fare service should be continued. 93 Scenario #1: Adopted 2011 Budget and Multi -year Plan EOTC Transit Project Funding Actual Budget Plan Plan Plan Plan Plan 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 FUNDING SOURCES: a) Pitkin County 1/2% sales tax 3,580,664 3,523,000 3,565,000 3,608,000 3,651,000 3,695,000 3,739,000 b) Pitkin County 1/2% use tax 815,178 981,000 1,030,000 1,082,000 1,136,000 1,193,000 1,253,000 c) Investment income mist. 112,981 101,687 179,000 282,000 417,000 335,000 491,000 d Brush Creek Lot rentals 12,550 15,600 15,600 15,600 15,600 15,600 15,600 Total Funding Sources 4,521,373 4,621,287 4,789,600 4,987,600 5,219,600 5,238,600 5,498,600 FUNDING USES: 1) Use tax coAectlon costs 159 073 117,032 122 884 129 028 135 479 142 253 __14060; 2 Admmistr4Gye cost allocation 36 437 31 674 33 258 34 921 36 667 38 500 40,425 3j` Bus stop satety lmptvs cab A p In lieu 8,186 12500 12 813 13133 13 461 13 798 14143 4) X Camas transit subsidy 50 000 5Q000 50 000 50 DOD 50,000: SO 000 50 000: 5)r Brush Creek parkmg.expanslon; annual operabng costs 33 341 34 400 35 776 37 207 38 695 40 243 41 853 �6)� RE rA coptnbutlp(81 04% of 1%2% sales9ax} 4;686J 7) Snowmass Village transit improvements ($6.5 million total) 6,430,165 8) Buttermilk to Roundabout bus lanes, construction 475 822 carryover from 2009 9) No -fare Aspen Snowmass -Woody Creek bus service (10/1/09- 4/15/13) 551,071 581,525 604,786 248,625 10 SH82 AABC pedestrian crossing design engineering 250,000 Total Uses 4,216,800 3,932,170 3,748,592 3,436,837 9,663,237 3,279,222 3,325,872 EOTCANNU >SURPLUS %(DEF)C 3Q4,573 i;;< x 689,117; �1,04.9�008,'. "�1, 550, 783_' 4, 443;837,)' °�1- ,959;378," °;2,972;728,' E OTC C UMULATIVE: SURPLUSI(DEFICIT) FUND BALANCE S 9,545,256 10,234,373 11,275,381 12,826,144 8,382,507 10,341,885, 12,514,613; Revenue nroiections: a) salestax budgeted 4.5% 0.0% 1.2% 1.2% 1.2% 1.2% 1.2% sales tax actual 6.2% -1.6% +7% thru May, $308,000 over budget if trend continues, however, since 81.04% to RFTA, net over budget is only 58,400 b) use tax budgeted 35.2% 5.0% 5.0% 5.0% 5.0% 5.0% 5.0% use tax actual 18.0% 20.3% projecting a 16.6% decline $300,000 under budget c) investment earnings rate 1.20% 1.10% 1.75% 2.50% 3.25% 4.00% 4.75% Calculation of amount allocated to Entrance -to -Aspen Pitkin County 1/2% sales tax 3,580,664 3,523,000 3,565,000 3,608,000 3,651,000 3,695,000 3,739,000 Pitkin County 1/2% use tax 815,178 981 1,030,000 1,082,000 1,136,000 1,193,000 1,253,000 less"committedfundin9 "(2b4,730) (264 288) (274 302) (284 ",794) (295 "Z86) less'RFTA'contribLOon 81s04a/ ot.1 /2 °✓n "sales ha% 2;901,770 2,855;039 2,889;076 2;923,923 2,558,7717 'd 2,994,428 3,03TO86 Net revenue to be allocated 1,206,035 1,403,355 1,451,194 1,501,789 1,553,928 1,608,778 1,666,128 Annual 2/3's allocation to Entrance -to -Aspen 804,023 935,570 967,463 1,001,193 1,035,952 1,072,519 1,110,752 50,000 per year reimbursement to ETA for 2011 discretionary funding deficit 50,000 50,000 50,000 50,000 46,453 lus /minus remaining annual discretionary funding 23,528 246,453 Year= end;fGnd balance "desig'nafed.f6r Enffance to= Aspen_ 3',115,091.,. "3,804;20"821z671 ;872,864 8,081,335 Calculation of amount allocated to discretionary funding EOTG >3NNUALSURPLUS "(afteriunding operaklo(ts 304 573 689,117 °.1,041;008. 1,550 763:'.' `(4,443 631) ,1,959;378 2172 728, plus use of designated fund balance for bus lanes construction carryover from 2009 475 922,, 6,430,165 less Annual 2/3's allocation to Entrance-to-Aspen 804,023 935,570 967,463 1,001,193 1,035,952 1,072,519 1,110,752 Remaining annual discretionary funding (23,528) (246,453) 73,545 549,570 950,576 886,859 1,061,976 less 50,000 per year reimbursement to ETA for 2011 discretionary funding deficit 50,000 50,000 50,000 50,000 46,453 Net remaining annual discretionary fundin after ETA reimbursement 246,453 23,545 499,570 900,576 836,859 1,015,523 Cumulative =rema)rJAMOls"cOPrIa v gafterE?Areimbursemerit v,wN_,23,545 52 116,_x;:923,69,1 ,a _2260,651 3,2,7 „6,Q7 =.3 2011 discretionary funding deficit yet to reimburse (246,453) (196,453) (146,453) (96,453) (46,453) Fund balance designated for Snowmass Villag transit improvements 6,430,165 6,430,165 6,430,165 6,430,165 7/18/2011 94 11 EOTC w 2010 actual.xlsx Scenario #2: Revised 2011 Estimate and Multi -year Plan EOTC Transit Project Funding Actual Revised Revised Revised Revised Revised Revised Estimate Plan Plan Plan Plan Plan FUNDING SOURCES: 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 a) Pitkin County 1/2% sales tax 3,580,664 3,831,000 3,877,000 3,924,000 3,971,000 4,019,000 4,067,000 b) Pitkin County 1/2% use tax 815,178 680,000 680,000 650,000 683,000 717,000 753,000 c) Investment income misc. 112,981 101,687 175,000 268,000 387,000 281,000 405,000 d Brush Creek Lot rentals 12,550 15,600 15,600 15,600 15,600 15,600 15,600 Total Funding Sources 4 4,628,287 4,747,600 4,857,600 5,056,600 5,032,600 5,240,600 FUNDING USES: 1 Use tax collection oosis 159 073 717 032 122 129 028 "a a 135 479 142 253 149,368` 2) Administrative cost allocation 36 437 31 674 33258 4' 921 36 667 38i5D0 40 425- 3 Bus stop safety imprvs cab nde to ttou 9186 12,500 12 813 �3 133 13 461 13 798 14 143`, 4) X Games transit subsidy 50 000 50,000 SO 000 50 000 50 OOp 50 Q00 59 000 5) Brash Creek parking' expanslon annual operating costs 33 341 34 400 35,j76 X37 207 38 695 40 243 41 853: 6� RFTA 1(81 04 °h of l2�o sales,taxj. u__, i, 2901,770, 3,1,04,642 3,141,921,_ 3;180 010 32�6 3256 3;295 897 7) Snowmass Villa Village transit Improvements ($6.5 million total) 6,430,165 8) Buttermilk to Roundabout bus lanes, construction 475 4 carryover from 2009 9) No-fare Aspen Snowmass -Woody Creek bus service (10/1/09 4/15/13) 551,071 581,525 604,786 248,625 10 SH82 AABC pedestrian crossing design engineering 250 Total Uses 4,216 800 4181,773 4,001.437 3,692 924 9,922.565 3 541,792 3,591,683 EQTCxANN..UAL SURPLUS DEFICIT. 304157 „3.;;:. 446, "5,f4 74 .6`163 "i �Bd,676 ;,`,.;(4 865; @65)? 1 °`490,808 4 j;tig8;91;7 EOTC CUMULATIVE SURPL /(DE FICIT) FUND BALANCE- 9;545,256. 9,991,770 10,737;933 11;902,609 7,036,644 8,527,452 10,176,369 Revenue oroiections: a) sales tax estimate 6.2% 7.0% 1.2% 1.2% 1,2% 1.2% 12% b) usetax estimate 18.0% -16.6% 0.0% -4.4% 5.0% 5.0% 5.0% c) investment earnings rate 1.20% 1.10% 1.75% 2.50% 3.25% 4.00% 4.75% Calculation of amount allocated to Entrance -to -Aspen Pitkin County 1/2% sales tax 3,580,664 3,831,000 3,877,000 3,924,000 3,971,000 4,019,000 4,067,000 Pitkin County 1/2% use tax 815,178 680,000 680,000 650,000 683,000 717,000 753,000 less commuted funding (288 (245;806) (254,730) (264 288) (274 302). (284,794} (295; 86 Tess RFTAdorifnbu0on 81:04 of,1)2 °1 sales tax 2;901,770 3JO0 ,'642 3,141;921 3,980,010 k 3,218,098 3;256;988 3;295;897 Net revenue to be allocated 1,206,035 1,160,752 1,160,349 1,129,702 1,161,600 1,194,208 1,228,317 Annual 2/3's allocation to Entrance -to -Aspen 804,023 773,835 773,566 753,135 774,400 796,139 818,878 50,000 per year reimbursement to ETA for 2011 discretionary funding deficit 50,000 50,000 50,000 50,000 127,321 p lus/minus remaining annual discretionary funding 23,528 327,321 Yeah 6d J u`nd designated for- Entrance, to= Aspen, 3'115, 091„ "3;561,605 <:,.",q, 385;171 =`5;1,88,306 =6;012;706.;, fi;858,845 °;,;7,805,044.: Calculation of amount allocated to discretionary funding E,OTC ANNUAL SURPLUS "(afterfunding opetalions) r 304 573 446;514.," 748, 163"' ,1;164,676 „(4 865 965 1 490,8Q8 1 648,9,1Z"' plus use of designated fund balance for bus lanes construction carryover from 2009 }J5 922, 6,430,165 less Annual 2/3's allocation to Entrance-to-Aspen 804,023 773,835 773,566 753,135 774,400 796,139 818,878 Remaining annual discretionary funding (23,528) (327,321) (27,403) 411,541 789,800 694,669 830,039 less 50,000 per year reimbursement to ETA for 2011 discretionary funding deficit 50,000 50,000 50,000 50,000 127,321 Net remaining annual discretionary funding after ETA reimbursement 327,321 77,403 361,541 739,800 644,669 702,718 Qyiiillatv,,_e remain(ng =discretiona sftinil[hg.affer$ETA keimtiursement'M (77,493P „2$4139. „(;023,938 7,68g;fiQ� a 2,374,,32 2011 discretionary funding deficit yet to reimburse (327,321) (277,321) (227,321) (177,321) (127,321) Fund balance designated for Snowmass Village transit improvements 6,430,165 6,430,165 6,430,165 6,430,165 7/18/2011 95 11EOTC wrevised esfimatexlsx Scenario #3: Revised 2011 Estimate and Multi -year Plan with continued No -fare Bus Service EOTC Transit Project Funding Actual Revised I Revised Revised Revised Revised Revised Estimate Plan Plan Plan Plan Plan FUNDING SOURCES: 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 a) Pitkin County 1/2% sales tax 3,580,664 3,831,000 3,877,000 3,924,000 3,971,000 4,019,000 4,067,000 b) Pitkin County 1/2% use tax 815,178 680,000 680,000 650,000 683,000 717,000 753,000 c) Investment income misc. 112,981 101,687 175,000 268,000 374,000 240,000 321,000 d Brush Creek Lot rentals 12,550 15,600 15,600 15,600 15,600 15,600 15,600 Total Funding Sources 4,521,373 4,628,287 4,747,600 4,857,600 5,043,600 4,991,600 5,156,600 FUNDING USES: 1,) Use tax collection costs 159 073 117 032 122 884 129 028 135 479 142,253 149 366' 2) Administrative cost allocation 36;4 31,674 33 258 34 921 36 667 38 500 40 d25 3} Bus stop tmprvs I cab ride In Ueu 9,186 12 500 12,813 13133 13 461, 13 798 14143 4} X Oames trenslt subsidy 50 000 50 000 50 000 `50 000 v 50,000 50 000 50 000 5� Brush _Creek parlupg expansion annual operating costs „33 341 34,400 35 776 X37 207 38 695 46,243 46 7) Snowmass Village transit improvements ($6.6 million total) 6,430,165 8) Buttermilk to Roundabout bus lanes, construction 475 922, carryover from 2009 9) No -fare Aspen Snowmass -Woody Creek bus service (10/1/09- 4/15/13) 551,071 581,525 604,786 628,977 654,137 680,302 707,514 10 SH82 AABC edestrian crossin desi n en ineer n 250,000 Total Uses 4,216 800 4,181,773 4,001,437 4,073,276 10 576,702 4,222,094 4,299,197 EOTCANNUALSURPL`USI(DEFJCIT) �s, 4,673'�> 44fi;514. .r�, 796; 163. °���(5,533;fi02} ,i;:7fi9;5S76 .;x`657,403; EOTC CUMULATIVE SURPLUS /(DEFICIT FUND BALANCE 9,545,256 9,991,770 10,737,933 11,522,257 5,989,156 6,758,662 7,616,064" Revenue nroiections: a) sales tax estimate 6.2% 7.0% 1.2% 1.2% 1.2% 1.2% 1.2% b) use tax- estimate 18.0% -16.6% 0.0% -4.4% 5.0% 5.0% 5.0% C) investment eamings rate 1.20% 1.10% 1.75% 2.50% 3.25% 4.00% 4.75% Calculation of amount allocated to Entrance -to -Aspen Pitkin County 1/2% sales tax 3,580,664 3,831,000 3,877,000 3,924,000 3,971,000 4,019,000 4,067,000 Pitkin County 1/2% use tax 815,178 680,000 680,000 650 683,000 717,000 753,000 less commdted,funding ::;;'(288`037} (245 so6j 2fi4730 (264 288} 27 302 289;794 IessRFTA,conVibuOom 81,:04 %of i12. °IAsalesrtax 2,9Q1170 =F 3;104842 3,141;921 3;180,Of0 3;2,18;098 3;256;998 .s 3;295,897E Net revenue to be allocated 1,206,035 1,160,752 1,160,349 1,129,702 1,161,600 1,194,208 1,228,317 Annual 2/3's allocation to Entrance -to -Aspen 804,023 773,835 773,566 753,135 774,400 796,139 818,878 50,000 per year reimbursement to ETA for 2011 discretionary funding deficit 50,000 50,000 50,000 50,000 127,321 lus /minus re aining annual discretionary funding 23,528 327,321 Xeaf Drill fundYb '.Ala'rlcedesigndted}�orEtrance to?/gspen v? 3;95,09,1„ ,:.3;5,81805: 9,38517�1�588;3086,0(12F706;.;> „6�856i845. x;7,805044 Calculation of amount allocated to discretionary funding EOTC ANNUAL SURPLUS;(after funding operations 304 573 446, 614. ';746,163 ;784 3,24 533 102) 769,506 "857;403: plus use of designated fund balance for bus lanes construction carryover from 2009 Q75 922, 6,430,166 less Annual 2/3's allocation to Entrance -to -Aspen 804,023 773,835 773,566 753,135 774,400 796,139 818,878 Remaining annual discretionary funding (23,528) (327,321) (27,403) 31,189 122,663 (26,633) 38,525 less 50,000 per year reimbursement to ETA for 2011 discretionary funding deficit 50,000 50,000 (50,000) 50,000 127,321 Net remaining annual discretionary funding after ETA reimbursement 327,321 77,403 18,811 72,663 76,633 88,796 Z OO I tive.retnaining discretiona funtl it .affe "r ETA irselneiit (77,403) x, >r(96213 r x (2$8 979) 2011 discretionary funding deficit yet to reimburse 327,321 277,321 227,321 177,321 127,321 Total discretionary funding deficit (327,321) (354,724) (323,534) (200,871) (227,504) (188,979) Fund balance designated for Snowmass Village transit improvements 6,430,165 6,430,165 6,430,165 6,430,165 7/18/2011 96 11EOTCwrevised no-fare.xlsx 2ND Draft SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL REGULAR MEETING AGENDA NOVEMBER 7, 2011 PLEASE NOTE THAT ALL TIMES ARE APPROXIMATE ITEMS COULD START EARLIER OR LATER THAN THE STATED TIME CALL TO ORDER AT 4:00 P.M. Item No. 1: ROLL CALL Item No. 2: PUBLIC NON AGENDA ITEMS (5- minute time limit) Item No. 3: COUNCIL UPDATES Item No. 4: PUBLIC HEARING AND RESOLUTION NO. 27 SERIES OF 2011 APPROVING THE 2012 BUDGET (Time: 60 Minutes) A RESOLUTION SUMMARIZING EXPENDITURES AND REVENUES FOR THE TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE AND ADOPTING FOR THE CALENDAR YEAR BEGINNING ON THE FIRST DAY OF JANUARY, 2012 AND ENDING ON THE LAST DAY OF DECEMBER, 2011 AND APPROPRIATING SUMS OF MONEY TO THE VARIOUS FUND FOR THE 2012 BUDGET YEAR. ACTION REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: Approve, Modify or Deny Resolution No. 27, Series of 2011. Marianne Rakowski ...........................Page (TAB) Item No. 5 FIRST READING ORDINANCE NO. 05 SERIES OF 2011 AMENDING THE 2011 BUDGET (Time: 10 Minutes) AN ORDINANCE AMENDING THE 2011 BUDGET FOR ALL FUNDS FOR THE TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE ACTION REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: Approve, modify or deny First Reading of Ordinance No. 05, Series of 2011. Marianne Rakowski ...........................Page 1(TAB C) Item No. 6: MANAGER'S REPORT (Time: 10 minutes) Russell Forrest ...........................Page (TAB Item No. 7: AGENDA FOR NEXT TOWN COUNCIL MEETING ..............................P g (TAB a e 97 11-07-11 TC Page 2 of 2 Item No. 8: APPROVAL OF MEETING MINUTES FOR: Page (TAB Item No. 9: COUNCIL COMMENTS/COMMITTEE REPORTS/CALENDARS Page (TAB) Item No. 10: EXECUTIVE SESSION Town Council will now meet in Executive Session pursuant to C.R.S. 24-6-402(4) and Snowmass Village Municipal Code Section 2-45(c), to specifically discuss three items: a) Personnel matters, except if the employee who is the subject of the session has requested an open meeting, pursuant to C.R.S. 24-6-402(4)(f)(1) and Snowmass Village Municipal Code Section 2-45(c)(6); Provided, there is an affirmative vote of two-thirds of the quorum present at this meeting to hold an Executive Session and for the sole purpose of considering items (a) (b) and (c) above. Provided further, that no adoption of any proposed policy, position, resolution, regulation, or formal action shall occur at this Executive Session. Item No. 11: ADJOURNMENT NOTE: Total time estimated for meeting: Approx 2 hours (excluding items 1-3 and 8 —11) ALL ITEMS AND TIMES ARE TENTATIVE AND SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT FURTHER NOTICE. PLEASE CALL THE OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK AT 923-3777 ON THE DAY OF THE MEETING FOR ANY AGENDA CHANGES. 98 1 SNOWMASS VILLAGE 2 REGULAR MEETING MINUTES 3 TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2011 4 CALL TO ORDER AT 4:18 P.M. 5 6 Mayor Bill Boineau called to order the Regular Meeting of the Snowmass Village Town Council 7 on Tuesday, September 6, 2011. 8 9 Item No. 1 ROLL CALL 10 COUNCIL MEMBERS PRESENT: Jason Haber, John Wilkinson, Fred Kucker, Markey 11 Butler, and Mayor Bill Boineau. 12 COUNCIL MEMBERS ABSENT: All council members were present. STAFF PRESENT: None. 13 PUBLIC PRESENT: John Dresser, Town Attorney, Rhonda B. Coxon, Town Clerk, Hunt Walker, Public Works Director, Russ Forrest, Town Manager, Susan Hamley, Marketing Director, and other Member of the Public interested in today's Agenda items. 14 15 Item No. 2 PUBLIC NON AGENDA ITEMS 16 17 Rob Shields a homeowner at the corner of Meadow Lane and Meadow Drive and spoke of his 18 concerns about rentals in the area. The Snowmass Homeowners Association states they cannot 19 do anything due to the covenants. He also spoke to the Noxious Weed Management Plan of 20 and is wondering if the Town can help with this situation. Shields also spoke to the 4 trucks 2 21 snowmobiles and motorcycles in the renters yard. He wants to know what the Town can do for 22 them. Public Works Director will take a look at the Management Plan to see what the trigger is. 23 24 Town Attorney John Dresser stated it is legal to park cars in front yards as long as they are not 25 up on blocks and they are operating vehicles. He stated that the Town does not have 26 ordinances against trailers etc. but the Snowmass Homeowners Association does. The Town 27 was incorporated after the Snowmass Homeowners was established. 28 29 Item No. 3 COUNCIL UPDATES 30 31 Council Member Haber asked if there is a de -brief with the Town regarding Jazz Aspen 32 Snowmass. Chris Conrad stated there will be an operational de -brief with staff. Haber will email 33 some comments to Conrad for discussion at that meeting. 34 35 All of Council enjoyed the weekend and thanked town staff and all volunteers including the bus 36 service. 37 38 Item No. 4 RESOLUTION NO. 24 SERIES OF 2011- A SUBDIVISION EXEMPTION FOR 39 THE CONDOMINIUMIZATION OF AN EXISTING DUPLEX INTO TWO RESIDENTIAL 40 CONDOMINIUMS ON LOT 4, RIDGE RUN UNIT ONE SUBDIVISION 99 09 -06 -11 tc Minutes Page 2 of 7 41 Senior Planner Jim Wahlstrom stated the purpose of this meeting would be to review the 42 subdivision exemption request for the condom iniuzation of the duplex on Lot 4, Ridge Run Unit 43 One, and either approve, approve with condition or deny the accompanying resolution. He noted 44 that Lot 4, Ridge Run Unit One contains 31,766 square feet or 0.73 acre. The property along 45 North Ridge Lane is zoned Duplex (`DU'). The maximum floor area permitted for the lot is 4,500 46 square feet. The two units within the duplex are almost mirror images of each other, both 47 containing 2,245.5 square feet. The subdivision exemption would create 2 residential 48 condominium units, each with fee simple interest in and title to an individual air space contained 49 within a the unit. 50 51 Council reviewed the Resolution and made some corrections within the resolution and changed 52 some language and dates. 53 54 Markey Butler made the motion to approve as amended Resolution No. 24, Series of 2011. Fred 55 Kucker seconded the motion. The motion was approved by a vote of 5 in favor to 0 opposed. 56 57 Voting Aye: Jason Haber, John Wilkinson, Fred Kucker, Markey Butler, and Mayor Bill Boineau. 58 59 Voting Nay: None. 60 Item No. 6 RESOLUTION NO. 25 SERIES OF 2011- A SUBDIVISION EXEMPTION FOR 61 THE INTERLUDE CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION INC. AND AUTHORIZATION TO 62 IMPLEMENT ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES FOR PROCESSING CERTAIN 63 SUBDIVISION EXEMPTION REQUESTS IN WEST VILLAGE 64 65 Town Attorney John Dresser provided background for Council and noted that they be aware that 66 the remaining SRA assets, including common area and other slivers of land within West Village, 67 need to be conveyed to abutting landowners in order to complete the ultimate dissolution of the 68 SRA. Staff has determined that subdivision exemption review and approval for the SRA land 69 transfers pursuant to the dissolution plan would be very similar to the application currently under 70 review. Staff recommends that Council consider a delegation of authority to permit and 71 implement administrative procedures that permit the processing of the numerous subdivision 72 exemption applications in West Village that need to occur for SRA land transfers to adjacent 73 landowners pursuant to the plan. Please refer to Section Five of the enclosed resolution which 74 describes the administrative procedure being proposed. 75 76 It is requested that Town Council either approve, approve with modifications or deny the 77 accompanying resolution (Attachment 2).The Applicant received a 1.277 acre parcel of land 78 from the SRA on January 28, 2011. The land is located between their condominium buildings 79 and Fanny Hill. The Applicant had received another piece of common area located between 80 their project and Laurelwood on June 6, 1989. Both land transfers are technically subdivision 81 violations pursuant to Section 16A -5 -410 of the Snowmass Village Municipal Code "SVMC 82 With subdivision exemption approval, the Applicant will be able to record an exemption plat 83 effectively combining Units H -1 and H -2, West Village (containing the original Interlude 84 condominium buildings) with the land conveyed by the SRA. 85 86 Fred Kucker made the motion to approve Resolution No. 25 Series of 2011 Interlude 87 Condominium Association and authorization to implement administrative procedures for 88 processing certain subdivision exemption requests in West Village. Jason Haber seconded the 100 09 -06 -11 tc Minutes Page 3 of 7 89 motion. The motion was approved by a vote of 5 in favor to 0 opposed. 90 91 Voting Aye: Jason Haber, John Wilkinson, Fred Kucker, Markey Butler, and Mayor Bill Boineau. 92 93 Voting Nay: None. 94 Item No. 5 INTERLUDE REOP WAIVER 95 96 Chief Building Official Mark Kittle stated the purpose of this discussion is to review and 97 determine whether or not to waive the REOP fees for proposed snowmelt and associated 98 components for the Interlude Condominium Association. Jami Downs and Skip Sinclair, 99 representing the Interlude, presented Council with information regarding this request and were 100 available for comments and questions. They are proposing snow melting approximately 6,000 101 square feet of courtyard that is currently owned by the Town and maintained by the Interlude. 102 They referred to pictures in the packet of the condition of this area in the winter. Due to lack of 103 sun this area is very icy and slick until May. 104 105 Staff recommends a compromise of an on -site or off -site renewable energy system in 106 conjunction with a reduced overall snowmelt area. A detailed site plan should be submitted to 107 evaluate and reduce the actual snowmelt area required to ensure public safety. Once the 108 minimum area of snowmelt to ensure public safety is determined, council will revisit. 109 110 Dave Spence from Destination Resorts noted that this project meets all the criteria listed in the 111 Ordinance for requesting a waiver and asked that Council please consider approval of the 112 requested waiver. 113 114 Bill Boineau made the motion to approve the request to grant a waiver for the Interlude as long 115 as they take possession of the property from TOSV first. Fred Kucker seconded the motion. 116 The motion was approved by a vote of 4 in favor to 1 opposed. 117 118 Voting Aye: John Wilkinson, Fred Kucker, Markey Butler, and Mayor Bill Boineau. 119 120 Voting Nay: Jason Haber 121 Item No. 7 PEDESTRIAN CROSSING RECOMMENDATIONS 122 123 Chief of Police Smythe stated that the subject of pedestrian crosswalks comes up over and over 124 again and he stated that this informational discussion was identified as an action in the 125 Council's 2011 Work Plan and also mentioned as an item of interest to the PTRAB. 126 127 He stated that development submissions, road improvements, bus stops installations and 128 citizen's requests are just some of the activities that have triggered a discussion and 129 contemplation of a marked crosswalk to address pedestrian safety. He noted Council and staff 130 should be able to provide a consistent response to requests for these installations and the pros 131 and cons should be carefully considered prior to installation. 132 133 Chief Smythe referred to a handout included in the packet named "What you need to know 134 about Crosswalks provided by the Colorado Department of Transportation. He recommended 135 that an engineering study be completed prior to the approval of a marked pedestrian crosswalk 101 09 -06 -11 tc Minutes Page 4 of 7 136 at a new location. Council discussed problem areas and provided some solutions for 137 consideration. 138 139 Item No. 9 MANAGER'S REPORT 140 141 Acting Town Manager Hunt Walker reminded Council of the Budget Meeting on Wednesday, 142 September 21, 2011 at 8:30 a.m. He also noted that there will be a Special Meeting on 143 Monday, September 12, 2011. The Special Meeting will be to discuss the capital projects 144 planning to prioritize capital project and a report from the Finance Director on financial 145 sustainability of the Town's revenue sources. 146 147 Item No. 8 REQUEST FOR COUNCIL CONSENT TO A SPECIAL REVIEW APPLICATION 148 FOR A BUBBLE OVER TWO OF TOSV REC CENTER COURTS IN THE WINTER TIME 149 150 Acting Town Manager referred this item to the Recreation Center Director Andy Worline. 151 Worline stated that the Town Council is being requested, as the property owner, to consent to a 152 Special Review application for a "Tennis Bubble" to cover up two -four of our outdoor courts for 153 indoor tennis in the winter. This tennis bubble would provide an additional recreational 154 opportunity for all the users year round. The addition of this facility will most likely significantly 155 increase membership for those tennis players that are looking for a place to play in the winter. 156 An indoor tennis facility would add another amenity in the mix which broadens the overall 157 appeal of this resort when vacationers are making a decision between Snowmass Village and 158 our competitors. ACE -IT has contacted the TOSV Parks Recreation Department with a 159 proposal of donating the cost of purchasing and construction cost of a tennis bubble. The 160 Tennis Bubble would seasonally cover two of the tennis courts at the Town Park Recreation 161 facility with the goal of covering four in the future. For the last three years, ACE -IT has been 162 working with the City of Aspen to possibly enclose courts to create public year -round tennis. 163 After some progress this group decided to explore other sites that may be more suitable for an 164 enclosure for covered tennis courts. ACE -IT has determined that the Snowmass Village Tennis 165 courts are more suitable for this type of facility because of the court construction, access to 166 public transportation, public parking and the proximity to the Snowmass Village Recreation 167 Center that will provide adequate supervision. 168 169 ACE -IT has provided a preliminary Performa that indicates this facility will bring in revenue that 170 exceeds the operating cost of the facility during the winter months. That would mean that the 171 cost to the town would be minimal and would not increase the subsidy for the Parks 172 Recreation department. 173 174 TOSV currently offers a summer tennis program for all ages. These programs have grown in 175 popularity so much that they have started offering indoor tennis in the gymnasium during the 176 winter months. 177 "Recreation" is the underlining zoning for the property that the existing four courts are 178 located on, and the outdoor tennis courts are an allowed use. The installation of a tennis 179 bubble would require Special Review for enclosing the courts, similar to the process the 180 Recreation Center went through. 181 Staff recommends the Town except ACE -IT's proposal to fully fund the capital cost of installing 182 a bubble over two (2) tennis courts and potentially four courts in the future for the following 183 reasons: 184 102 09 -06 -11 tc Minutes Page 5 of 7 185 1. ACE -IT will fund the capital cost of construction and installation. 186 2. Added Recreational amenity for Snowmass Village Residents and 187 Guests. 188 3. A winter marketing tool brings guests into Snowmass Village who 189 may not be skiers 190 4. Potential for increased membership reducing subsidy 191 5. More affordable tennis programming opportunities 192 Beth Mehall a resident of Snowmass Village, provided a presentation for Council. She 193 explained ACE -IT is a community based organization formed to promote and support tennis 194 opportunities throughout the Roaring Fork valley. She noted that that their current focus is to 195 create a seasonal indoor tennis facility with quality programs and affordable rates that is publicly 196 accessible to both locals and guests. 197 198 Mehall provided a PowerPoint presentation and various reasons why this is an ideal location for 199 the tennis bubble. Through public donations, ACE -IT will raise capital funds needed to 200 seasonally enclose two to four existing Snowmass Recreation Department tennis courts. She 201 said that Snowmass Village will own the bubble, with the agreement that indoor tennis programs 202 and court time will be made accessible to the public, and fees will remain as low as possible 203 while still paying for operational expenses. 204 205 Rob Simpson, High School Tennis Coach for the boys team and Assistant Coach for the girls 206 team for Aspen High School, spoke to the increased interest in tennis, and the bubble would be 207 very beneficial for all who play. 208 209 Ilene Hinchliffe, resident of the Valley and tennis teacher at CMC, spoke to only being able to 210 play three months a year. She also noted the cost of tennis is much more inexpensive than 211 most sports. 212 213 Taylor Thulson spoke to being an avid tennis player and would be eternally grateful if the 214 Council would consider approving the bubble at the Snowmass Recreation Center. 215 216 Suzanne Thulson, mother of Taylor, also spoke to the need for an indoor court. Her main wish is 217 for the kids to have somewhere to play tennis in the winter months. 218 219 Miles Keilin has played tennis for three years. He feels the bubble would be a great asset. 220 221 At this time the Mayor explained the process and put the question to the Council. Council 222 Member Wilkinson has concerns about having the Entry Way Master Plan not completed and he 223 feels this should be done first. 224 225 Fred Kucker made the motion to approve consent for the applicant to use the tennis courts in an 226 application for special review. Markey Butler seconded the motion. The motion was approved 227 by a vote of 4 in favor to 1 opposed. 228 Voting Aye: Bill Boineau, John Wilkinson, Markey Butler, and Fred Kucker. 229 230 Voting Nay: and Jason Haber. 231 Item No. 10 AGENDA'S FOR NEXT TWO TOWN COUNCIL MEETINGS September 12, 2011 Work Session 103 09 -06 -11 tc Minutes Page 6 of 7 September 19, 2011 Regular Meeting 232 Mayor Boineau stated that there will be a Special Meeting on September 12, 2011 and noted we 233 have a meeting on September 19, 2011 with the Pitkin County Commissioners. He also 234 reminded the Council about the budget meeting. 235 Item No. 11 APPROVAL OF MEETING MINUTES FOR 236 July 5, 2011 Regular Meeting 237 Council Member Wilkinson stated there was an "r" missing within the minutes and challenged 238 the Clerk to find it! 239 240 John Wilkinson made the motion to approve the Minutes as amended of the Snowmass Village 241 Town Council for the Regular Meeting on July 5, 2011. Fred Kucker seconded the motion. The 242 motion was approved by a vote of 5 in favor to 0 opposed. 243 244 Voting Aye: Jason Haber, John Wilkinson, Fred Kucker, Markey Butler, and Mayor Bill Boineau. 245 246 Voting Nay: None. 247 Item No. 12 COUNCIL COMMENTS /COMMITTEE REPORTS /CALENDARS 248 249 Council Member Wilkinson 250 The Snowmass Village Trails Committee will be working on the naming of the Droste Property. 251 He also mentioned the Healthy Mountains Communities will have a ballot Referendum on the 252 upcoming County Ballot which will be a slight increase and before the electorate in November. 253 254 Mayor Bill Boineau 255 He has been approached by an artist David Nelson from Marble and he will forward his 256 information to the Tusk Force. 257 258 Item No. 13 EXECUTIVE SESSION 259 260 AT 7:00 p.m. 261 262 Bill Boineau made the motion to approve entering into Executive Session Markey Butler 263 seconded the motion. The motion was approved by a vote of 5 in favor to 0 opposed. 264 265 Voting Aye: Bill Boineau, John Wilkinson, Markey Butler, Fred Kucker, and Jason Haber. 266 267 Voting Nay: None. 268 Determining positions relative to matters that may be subject to negotiations, developing 269 strategy for negotiations, instructing negotiators pursuant to C.R.S. 24- 6- 402(4)(e) and 270 Snowmass Village Municipal Code Section 2- 45(c)(5); and 271 272 Conferences with an attorney for the purposes of receiving legal advice on specific legal 273 questions pursuant to C.R.S. 24- 6- 402(4)(c) and Snowmass Village Municipal Code Section 2- 274 45(c)(2); 275 104 09 -06 -11 tc Minutes Page 7 of 7 276 At 8:02 p.m. 277 278 Fred Kucker made the motion to approve reconvene to the Regular Meeting of the Snowmass 279 Village Town Council on Tuesday, September 6, 2011. Bill Boineau seconded the motion. The 280 motion was approved by a vote of 5 in favor to 0 opposed. 281 282 Voting Aye: Bill Boineau, John Wilkinson, Markey Butler, Fred Kucker, and Jason Haber. 283 284 Voting Nay: None. 285 Item No. 15 ADJOURNMENT 286 287 At 8:03 p.m. 288 289 Fred Kucker made the motion to adjourn the Regular Meeting of the Snowmass Village Town 290 Council on Tuesday, September 6, 2011. Jason Haber seconded the motion. The motion was 291 approved by a vote of 5 in favor to 0 opposed. 292 293 Voting Aye: Bill Boineau, John Wilkinson, Markey Butler, Fred Kucker, and Jason Haber. 294 295 Voting Nay: None. 296 Submitted By, 297 298 Rhonda B. Coxon, CMC 299 Town Clerk 105 2011 Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Town Council Meeting 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 Town Council EOTC Meeting Meeting 4:00 M. Aspen Council Chambers 4:00 p.m. 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 Go i 106 in i 2011 Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Town Council Meeting ii 13 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 25 25 26 Town Council Thanksgiving Meeting Day! 4:00 m. 27 28 29 30 107