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02-22-11 Town Council Packets(2) u;� y TO: Town of Snowmass Village Town Council FR: Jeff Dickinson, MEP, Biospaces, Inc. RE: REOP Program DT: 22 February 2011 The Town of Snowmass Village REOP program is designed to limit the amount of non- renewable energy used for heating and cooling of homes and businesses within the town limits. The program utilizes existing, nationally recognized programs, such as the HERS (Home Energy Rating System). HERS is a nationally recognized system overseen by the Residential Energy Services Network (RESNET), which gauges the energy efficiency of a home. Homes that qualify to be Energy Star are homes that earn a HERS Rating of 80 or less. The typical home in the US scores a 100. Why- Aligns with the Town's Environmental Sustainability Plan's Goals. Requires an outside qualified Rater to inspect the home for compliance. Requires larger homes to account for their increased energy use by being more efficient (ie: better insulation and heating system) Allows less efficient homes to offset their energy use by paying into a fund that will provide energy improvements or renewable energy systems elsewhere in the community. Fee offset calculations: The fees were determined by analyzing the cost of increasing insulation, windows, boilers for various sizes of homes and determining the square foot cost increase. This generally amounted to approximately I% of construction costs. Commercial Projects are required to prove they are 15 -30% better than existing national energy codes, such as the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) or ASHRAE Standard 90.1. (American Society of Heating Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Engineers). Engineers designing systems for commercial buildings are familiar with these standards, and will generally design buildings that exceed them. These standards include building envelope, lighting and mechanical system requirements. Exterior Energy: Exterior energy use such as: Snowmelt, Pools and Spas can use as much energy as an entire house, sometimes more. The intent of this ordinance is to discourage the use of exterior energy, while not prohibiting it. Fees for exterior energy use are based on engineering data for system performance and calculated with Pitkin County climate data for temperature and historic snowfall rates. Snowmelt systems consume on average: 81.8 kBtu /sf per year at 100% efficiency. Swimming Pools consume, on average: 332 kBtu /sf per year Hot Tubs consume, on average: 430 KBtu /sf per year. By comparison, homes consume in the range of 30 -60 KBtu /sf per year. There are certain exemptions within the code for driveways, and free standing hot tubs. Fees: Snowmelt: $34 per sf, Spas:$136 per sf, Pools: $176 per sf Renewable Energy Offsets Solar Thermal Panels (water or glycol filled): The average solar thermal panel produces 273.75 KBTU per sf of collector per year. This is based on year round production, and is therefore not effective in the summer nor when the home is unoccupied, for heating water. Therefore, we cannot take full credit for the energy produced in offsetting snowmelt. The consensus is to reduce the solar thermal effectiveness by a factor of 3. Photovoltaic (PV) Panels produce electricity from the sun. In Colorado, the average PV panel produces approximately 1500 kwh per year per KW of installed PV. This is also based on year round production, however, most systems are tied into the electric grid and able to feed it year round. Renewable Credits: For houses having good solar access and properly designed roofs, credit is given for installed solar systems. Solar Hot Water: $125 per sf of installed system. Photovoltaic $6.25 per installed watt.