Loading...
02-12-01 Town Council Packet i i TCOOOOOOP w_ v� i d N i � &sr SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL WORK SESSION 02-12-2001 2:30 — 3:30 P.M. PARCEL "N" EMPLOYEE HOUSING DISCUSSION -- Marianne Rakowski/Joe Coffey. . . . . . Page 1 (Tab A) 3:30 — 3:55 CODE OF ETHICS DISCUSSION -- Steve Connor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 27 (Tab B) 3:55— 4:00 BREAK t#i#*##iii**i##t****###i#if#fi#i###iiitikiii*i#lifi#itifi#t*#iii*iii*tttt**tit#ti####*i*ii*i SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL SPECIAL MEETING 02-12-2001 CALL TO ORDER AT 4:00 P.M. Item No. 1: ROLL CALL Item No. 2: PUBLIC NON-AGENDA ITEMS (5-Minute Time Limit) Item No. 3: JOINT TOWN COUNCIL/PLANNING COMMISSION MEETING SNOWMASS CHAPEL PRE-SKETCH PLAN DISCUSSION -- Jim Wahlstrom. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 41 (Tab C) Item No. 4: FIRST READING — ORDINANCE NO. 08, SERIES OF 2001 CONSIDERATION OF FIRST READING OF AN ORDINANCE AMENDING AND RESTATING THE PROVISIONS OF CHAPTER 10 ARTICLE V OF THE MUNICIPAL CODE CONCERNING THE REGULATION OF SMOKING BY PROHIBITING SMOKING IN ALL ENCLOSED PUBLIC PLACES. -- Steve Connor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 45 (Tab D) Item No. 5: ADJOURNMENT NOTE: ALL ITEMS AND TIMES ARE TENTATIVE AND SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT FURTHER NOTICE. PLEASE CALL THE OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK AT 923-3777 ON THE DAY OF THE MEETING FOR ANY AGENDA CHANGES. TOWN COUNCIL COMMUNIQUE Meeting Date: February 12 2001 A ends Item: Parcel 'N' Financing Presented By: Marianne Rakowski, Finance Director *Presentation—Approximately 5 minutes Core Issues: * Parcel 'N' Financing—3 Scenarios * Subsidy required to finance Parcel 'N' per each scenario General Info: At the February 5, 2001 Town Council meeting,the Town Council requested that the bond financing scenario be reworked to incorporate all three town home purchase price estimates. The construction costs in all three scenarios have been changed to incorporate the cut in costs by Norris and Associates($365,494)and the value engineering savings ($50,000). Based on these three financing scenarios, I have also recalculated the subsidy required to support the construction of the Parcel 'N' project for each scenario. Included in your packet is (A) Parcel 'N' Financing Scenario's per each town home purchase price estimate and (B)Parcel 'N' subsidy per each scenario. I have also included the bond financing backup per financing scenario, which are listed as C 1-6 1-6 and 1-6). Council Options: 1) Choose the financing scenario that best fits the Towns needs. Staff Recommendation: Staff recommends Scenario#1. PARCEL 'N' A Financing Scenarios Scenario 01 Scenario#2 Scenario#3 Construction Funding Flnanci 6 3,459,948 E 3,342,135 i 3,097,700 11955.16 1 17;_ u zw nt Inc on bond proceeds lla.av 114.7go X108, Int Inc on cepOzd Interest $ 7,842 S 7,384 $ 6,848 Available for construction $ 6,641,597 i 5,641,697 0 6,541,597 BOND FINANCING Bond Costs Bond Financing Bond Financing Bond Financing Bank/Bond Principal E 3,705,000 6 3,580,000 $ 3,320,000 Construction Interest(12 months) $ 185,250 6 179,000 6 166,000 Sale of Units Interest(8 months) $ 108,375 6 104,708 E 97,126 Total $ 3,998,625 0 3,863,708 $ 3,583,125 Repayment of Bonds Sale of Units $ 3,820,000 6 3,890,000 E 3,420,000 Capitalized Interest $ 185,250 $ 179,000 E 166,000 Total $ 4,005,250 $ 3,869,000 E 3,586,000 NET PROFIT/LOSS $ 6,825 $ 6,292 0 2,875 PARCEL*N'TOWN HOME PURCHASE ESTIMATES FOR EACH FINANCING SCENARIO Scenario#1 Scenario#2 Scenario#3 10. 3 BEDROOM UNITS $ 250,000 E 240,000 $ 225,000 6.2 BEDROOM UNITS 6 220,000 6 215,000 6 195,000 TOTAL SALES PRICES 6 0,020,000 S 510001000 6 5,420,000 PARCEL 'N' SUBSIDY POSSIBLE FUNDING SOURCES U dated 217/01 Scenario#1 Scenario R2 Scenario 113 GENERAL FUND SOURCES AVAILABLE PMH Reserve(Housing Fund) $ 26.525 6 26,525 $ 28,525 Housing Reserve(Grade's Mitigation) $ 19,462 $ 19,462 S 19,462 Housing Reserve-budgeted 2000 $ 100,000 $ 100,000 S 100,000 Excise Taxes-2000 revenues $ 812,300 $ 812,300 E 812,300 Escrow-ASC for Employee Housing $ 22,908 $ 22,906 $ 22,908 Total General Fund Sources $ 961,193 $ 981,193 $ 981,193 SOURCES FROM OTHER FUNDS RETT Fund(if property Is Town owned $ 139,190 $ 139,190 $ 139,190 or controlled;It would be during con- struction;for landscaping and land- scaping Irrigation) Road Fund(pick up the costs to build $ 1801000 $ 160,000 $ 160,000 road from Parcel'K'to Parcel'N') Total Sources From Other Funds S 299,190 $ 299,190 $ 299,190 Total va a e Funds Sources to used and renald from Excise Tama Capital Reserve Fund: S 315,000 $ 437,000 $ 691,000 On June 21,1999,the Financial Advisory Board presented a recommendation to the Town Council regarding the use of funds In the Capital Reserve Fund. If the Town Council feels the funding for Parcel'N'fella within the criteria,the above amount Is the calculated amount based on the Financial Advisory Boards requirement. The payback to this reserve would occur over 2.3 years from future excise taxes. Housing Reserve Fund $ 140,000 $ 140,000 S 140,000 Mountain View I Reserve Fund $ 200,000 $ 200,000 S 200,OOD Mountain View II Reserve Fund $ 20,000 $ 20,000 $ 20,000 Total Borrowed Funds 6 675,000 797,000 GRAND TQTAL ALL FV $ 1,90.300 8 1. 02/07/2001 10:16 FAX fg1014 SOURCES AND USES OF FUNDS SNOWMASS VILLAGE HOUSING DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION SERIES 2001 SNOWMASS BONDS(note payments) Employee Housing Project So.9: Sales Price of$3,820,000 6/.,&y W;O Dated Date 03/15/2001 ` `), Delivery Dale 0311512001 C-an Sources: Ilss���� Bond Proceeds: Par Amount 3,705,000.00 Other Sources of Funds: Town Donation Proposed 1,955,164.92 5,660,184.92 Uses: Project Fund Deposits: Construction Costs(11 5,416,113.17 Other Fund Deposits: Cap Int.Fund(2) 185,250.00 Delivery Date Expenses: _ Underwriters Discount 27,787.50 DTC/CUSIP 600.00 Trustee 1,600.00 Legal Fees 30 000.00 87.6 Other Uses of Funds: Contingency 14.25 5,660,164.92 Notes: 111 Construction Fund Invested at 5.60%with level draws over 14 months. 121 Cap.Int.Fund Invested At 5.50%;Interest earnings used In Conebuollon Fund. Sized for Interest payments required on 9/15MI and 3/15/02 and Is shown drawn on those dates. Sales assumed to occur 50%each on 9/15102 and 11/16/02. Fab 7.2001 s:oe am Prepared by KIRKPATRICK PET nS QUANTITATIVE GROUP (Sammru Village 00:NDC-0INOTE03) 02/07/2001 10:16 FAX IM015 BOND DEBT SERVICE SNOWMASS VILLAGE HOUSING DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION SERIES 2001 SNOWMASS BONDS(note payments) Employee Housing Project Sc.3: Sales Price of$3,820,000 Dated Date 03/15/2001 Dellvery Date 03/15/2001 Annual Period Debt Debt Ending Principal Coupon Interest Service Service 03/15/2001 09/162001 92,625 92,625 03/162002 92,625 92,625 195,250 09/16/2002 1,815,000 5.000% 92,625 1,907,626 11/15/2002 1,890,000 5.000% 15,760 1,905,760 03/162003 3,813,376 3,705,000 293,625 3,998,526 3,998,625 ae Feb 7,2001 0:05 am Prepuad by KIRKPATRICK PETTIS OVANTI TATIVEE GROUP i8nownrae Vlllaaa 0oHDC.01N0T1&D3) 02/07/2001 10:16 FAX - ®018 NET DEBT SERVICE SNOWMASS VILLAGE HOUSING DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION SERIES 2001 SNOWMASS BONDS(note payments), Employee Housing Project So.3: Sales Price of$3,820,000 Total Cap Int. Not Annual Date Principal Interest Debt Service Fund(2] Debt Service Not DIS 09/1512001 92,625 92,625 82,825 03!15/2002 92,825 92,625 92,625 09H512002 1,615,000 92,625 1,907,625 1,907,825 11/1512002 1,890,001 15,750 1,905,760 1,905,760 03115=3 3,813,375 3,705,000 293,625 3,998,825 185,250 3,813,375 3,813,375 Notes: ]2]Cap.Int.Fund invested at 5.50%;Interest earnings used In ConsWed Fund. Sized for Interest payment required on 9H 6/01 and 3/16/02 and Is shown drown on those d &sea Fab 7,2001 9:00 am Prepared by KIRKPATRICK PETTIS QUANTITATIVE GROU (Snesrnasa yy laps 00:HOC-07NOTED3) 02/07/2001 10:16 FAX Q 017 I BOND SOLUTION SNOWMABS VILLAGE HOUSING DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION ■ i SERIES 2001 SNOWMASS BONDS)note payments) V Employee Housing Project ! So.3: Sales Price of$3,820,000 I Period Proposed Proposed Debt Service Total Adj Revenue Unused Debt Sery Ending Principal Debt SerAce Adjustments Debt Service Constraints Revenues Coverage 08/15MW2 185,250 •185,250 0911512002 1,615.000 1,907,625 1,907,625 1,910,000 2,376 100.12450% 10/16/2002 11/15/2002 1,890,OOD 1,905,780 1,905,750 1,910,000 4,250 100.22301% 3,705,000 3,998,626 •185,250 3,813,375 3,820,000 6,625 es� Note: 'Revenue Constraint'describes males,which are assumed to tour 60%each on 9/16102 and 11/15/02. Feb 7,2001 9:08 am Prspsred by KIRKPATRICK PETTIS QUANTITATIVE GROUP (Snowmau VY laps 00:HDC•01NOTED2) ------ — ------ 02/07/2001 10:16 FAX X 018 I PROJECT FUND SNOWMASS VILLAGE HOUSING DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION SERIES 2001 SNOWMASS BONDS(note payments) en 5 Employee Housing Project Sc.3: Sales Price of$3,820,000 Construction Costs[11(CONST) Interest Cap ln6 Fund Scheduled Date Depwlt 65.6% Principal (2y Draws Balance 03/158001 8,415,11317 1,955,164.92 1,955,164.92 3,459,948.25. 041158001 266,173.72 256,173.72 3,203,774.53 05/158001 30,542.06 223,933.53 1,698.13 266,173.72 2,979,841.00 081158001. 265,173.72 256,173.72 2,723,687.28 07/158001 266,173.72 256,173.72 2,467,493.58 DB/162001 266,173.72 256,173.72 2,211,319.64 09/152001 266,173.72 258,173.72 1,955,146.12 10/168001 256,173.72 258,173.72 1,698,972.40 11/168001 64,333.69 187,594:72 4,245.31 266,173.72 1,811,377.88 12/162001 256,173.72 258,173.72 1,255,203.96 01115/2002 256,173.72 256,173.72 999,030.24 02/152002 256,173.72 258,173.72 742,856.52 031158002 264,476.69 1,698.13 256,173.72 488,380.93 041158002 256,173.72 250,173.72 232,207.21 05/162002 23,968.51 232,207.21 256,173.72 5,415,113.17 118,842.26 5,415,113.17 7,641.67 5,641,897.00 moo I Y Feb 7,2001 0:06 am Prapamd by KIRKPATRICK PETTIS QUANTITATIVE GROUP (Snowman Village WHOC 0iNOTE03) UL/U 1/LUU1 lU:11 YAA I®019 BOND SUMMARY STATISTICS SNOWMA8S VILLAGE HOUSING DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION SERIES 2001 SNOWMASS BONDS(note payments) Employee Housing Project So.3: Sales Price of$3,820,000 Dated Date 03/152001 Delivery Date 03/162001 Last Maturity 11/152002 Arbitrage Yield 6/102138% True Interest Cost(TIC) 5.002138% Net Interest Cost(NIC) 8.000000% AS-In TIC 8.088101% Average Coupon 5.000000% Average Life(years) 1.585 Duration of Issue(years) 1.643 Par Amount 3,706,000.00 Bond Proceeds 3,705,000.00 Total Interest 283,826.00 Net Interest 293,826.00 Bond Years from Dated Date 5,872,500.00 Bond Years from Delivery Date 5,872,600.OD Total Debt Service 3,898,826.00 Maximum Annual Debt Service 3,813,376.OD Average Annual Debt Service 2,398,176.00 Underwriters Fees(per$1000) Average Takedown Other Fee Total Underwriters Discount Bid Price 100.000000 Per Avenge Average Bond Component Value Prim Coupon Llfa Note Payments 3,705,000.00 100.000 5.000% 1.665 3,705,000.00 1.585 All4n Arbitrage TIC TIC Yield Per Value 3,70.5,000.00 3,7D5.0OD.00 3,705,000.00 •Accrued Interest •Premium(Dlscourd) •Underwdtses Discount •Cost of Issuance Expense •Other Amounts -59,787.50 Target Value 3,705,000.00 3,645,212.50 3,705,000.00 Target Date 03/162001 03/15/2007 0311WODI Yield 5.002138% 6.056101% 6.002138% a. Feb 7,2001 9:00 am Prepared by KIRKPATRICK Pms oUANTrrATrvE GROUP (6rawnru Vlllapa 00:HDC-07NOTEW) 02/07/2001 10:13 FAX I®002 SOURCES AND USES OF FUNDS SNOWMASS VILLAGE HOUSING DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION SERIES 2001 SNOWMASS BONDS(note payments) Employee Housing Project Se.1: Sales Price of 63,690,000 �ce na�r i V Z Dated Date 031152001 Delivery Date 03/162001 • sources: Bond Proceeds: ParAmount 3,580,000.00 Otter Sources of Funds: Town Donation Proposed 2,077,263.15 6,657,283.15 Uses: Project Fund Deposes Construction Costs(1) 5,419,417.86 Other Furl Depoob: Cop Int.Fund 121 179,000.00 Delivery Dste Expenses: Underwriter's Discount 26,850.00 DTCICUSIP 600.00 Trustee 1,600.00 Legal Fass 90 DOO.Iq Other Uses of Funds: Contingency 15.50 5,657,283.15 Notes: ]1]Construction Fund Invested at 5.60%with level draws over 14 months. l2]Cep. Int.Fund Invested at 5.60%;Interest earnings used In Construction Fund. Stud for Interest payments required on 9116MI and 9116/02 and Is shown drawn on those date*. Saks assumed to occur 50%each on 9115/02 end 11/16/02. dan� 10 dowa Feb 7,2001 6:17 am Prepared by KIRKPATRICK PETTIS QUANTITATIVE GROUP (Browmsse Village 00*13"INOTEDI) 02/07/2001 10:13 FAX Q1003 BOND DEBT SERVICE SNOWMASS VILLAGE HOUSING DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION SERIES 2001 SNOWMASS BONDS(note payments) Employee Housing Project Sc.1: Sales Price of$9,690,000 . Dated Dote 03116/2001 Delivery Date 03/15/20D1 Period Annual Ending Principal Coupon Interest Debt Service Not Service 03116x2001 . 09/1512001 89,500.00 89,600.00 03/162002 89,600.00 88,600.00 179,000.00 09/162002 1,765,000 5.000% 89,500.00 1,644,500.00 11/1512002 1,525,000 5.ODD% 15,2D6.33 1,840,208.33 03/152003 3,884.708.33 3,680,000 283,708.33 3,883,708.33 3,883,706.33 _ ! ' l Feb7,4001 8:47m Naparod by KIRKPATRICK PETTIS OUANTITATIVE GROUP (Snwm*u Velape 00:HDC-01 NOTE01) 02/07/2001 10:13 FAX IM004 NET DEBT SERVICE SNOWMASS VILLAGE HOUSING DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION w 3 SERIES 2001 SNOWMASS BONDS(note payments) Employee Housing Project Sc. 1: Sales Price of$3,690,000 Total Copint, Net Annual Date Principal Interest Debt Service Fund(2] Debt Service Net D1S 09/152007 89,500.00 89,500.00 89,500 03/152002 89,600.00 89,600.00 89,500 091152002 1,765,000 89,500.00 1,844,500.00 1,844,500.00 11/152002 1,625,000 15,208.33 1,640,208.33 1,840,208.33 031162003 3,864,708.33 3,680,000 283,706.33 3,863,708.33 179,000 3,684,706.33 3,584,708.33 Notes: (2]Cap.Int.Fund Invested at 5.5011;Interest earnings used In Construction Fund. Sized for Interest payments required on 9/16101 and 3115102 and Is shown drawn on those date. L) dm - Fab 7,2001 8:47 am Prepared by WRKPATRICK PErns QUANTITATIVE GRouP (Snowman VWepa DOADC-01NOTEDI) 02/07/2001 10:14 FAX Q 005 I BOND SOLUTION • SNOWMASS VILLAGE HOUSING DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION SERIES 2001 SNOWMASS BONDS(note payments) Employee Housing Project Se.1: Sales Price of$3,880,000 Period Proposed Proposed Debt Service Total Adj Revenue Unused Debt Sam Ending Principal Debt Service Adjustments Debt Service Constraints Revenues Coverage 08/1512002 179.000 -179,000 09/15/2002 1,765,000 1,844,600 1,844,500 1,845,000 600 100.02711% 1011512002 11/1512002 1,826,000 1,640,205 1,840,208 1,545,000 4,792 100.26039% 3.580,000 3,853,708 -179,000 3,664,708 3,690,000 5,292 Ono / woe Note: 'Revenue Constraint'describes sobs,which are assumed to occur 50%each on WSW end 11116/02. Feb 7,2001 8:47 am Propered by KIRKPATRICK PETTIS OUANrITATIVE GROUP (Snowman Vltlapa 00:HDC-01 NOWDI) 02/07/2001 10:14 FAX 16006 PROJECT FUND SNOWMASS VILLAGE HOUSING DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION SERIES 2001 SNOWMASS BONDS mots payments) Employee Housing Project S0.1: Sales Pries of$3,690,000 Construction Costs[11(CONST) Interest Cap Int.Fund Scheduled Date Deposit 05.6% Principal 114 Draws Balance 03/1512001 6,419,417.65 2,077,283.15 2,077,263.15 3,342,134.50 04/152001 247,450.98 247,460.98 3,094,683.52 05/152001 29,502.08 216,308.06 1,840.83 247,450.99 2,878,376.44 061162001 247,450.99 247,450.99 2,630,924.46 07/15/2001 247,450,99 247,450.99 2,383,473.46 08/152001 247,450,99 247,460.99 2,136,022.47 09/15/2001 247,450.99 247,450.99 1,888,671.46 101162001 247,450.99 247,450.99 1,641,120.49 11/152001 62,143.07 161,2D5.83 4,102.09 247,450.99 1,459,914.66 12/152001 247,450.99 247,450.99 1,212,463.67 011162002 247,450.99 247,450.99 965,012.68 02/15/2002 247,450.99 247,450.99 717,561.69 03/1612002 245,610.16 1,640.63 247,450.99 471,761.53 04/162002 247,450.99 247,450.99 224,300.54 051152002 23,160.45 224,300.64 247,450.99 5,419,417.65 114,795.60 5,419,417.65 7,363.75 5,541,597.00 Feb 7,2001 8:47 am Pr"ree by KIRKPATRICK PETTIS OUAHTITATIVE GROUP (60OWNN%4118P 00:HDC-01NOTEDI) 02/07/2001 10:14 FAX ®007 BOND SUMMARY STATISTICS SHOWMASS VILLAGE HOUSING DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION SERIES 2001 SNOWMASS BONDS(note payments) Employee Housing Project Be.1: Sales Price of$3,690,000 Dated Date 0311541001 Delivery Date - 03/152001 Leal Maturity 11/162002 Arbitrage Yield 5.002137% True Interest Cost(TIC) 5.002137% Net Interest Cost(NIC) 5.000000% All-In TIC 8.1118822% Average Coupon 5.000000% Average LBe(years) 1.685 Duration of Issue(years) 1.643 Per Amount 3,580,000.00 Bond Proceeds 3,680,000.00 Total Interest 283,708.33 Net Interest 283,706.33 Bond Years from Dated Date 5,674,166.67 Bond Years from Delivery Dale 5,674,186.67 Total Debt Service 3,663,708.33 Maximum Annual Debt Service 3,664,708.33 Avenge Annual Debt Service 2,318,226.00 Underwriters Fees(per$1000) Average Takedown - Other Fee Total Underwriters Discount Bid Price 100.000000 Par Average Average bond Component Value Price Coupon Life Note Payments 3,580,000.00 100.000 5.000% 1.585 3,580,000.00 1.585 All-In Arbitrage TIC TIC Yield Per Value 3,580,000.00 3,580,000.00 3,580,000.00 +Accrued Interest +Premium(Discount) -Underwriters Discount -Cost of Issuance Expense -Other Amounts -58,850.00 Target Value 3,680,000.00 3,521,150.00 3,680,000.00 Target Date 03/152001 03/152001 03/162001 Yield 6.002137% 6.106622% 6.002137% _a Fab 7.2001 6:47 am Prepared by KIRKPATRICK PETTIS QUANTITATIVE GROUP (Swomass Village 00:HDC-0INOTE0I) 02/07/2001 10:14 FAX IZ 008 SOURCES AND USES OF FUNDS SNOWMASS VILLAGE HOUSING DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION SERIES 2001 SNOWMASS BONDS(nob payments) Employee Housing Project So.2: Sales Price of$3,420,000 Dated Date 031158001 Delivery Date 03/158001 }�N Souress: 1� see Bond Proceeds: �a► Pal Amount 3,320,D00.00 Other Sources or Funds: Town Donation Proposed 2,331,270.35 5,651,270.35 uses: Project Fund Deposits: Construction Costs[7) 5,428,570.34 Other Fund Deposits: Cep Int.Fund(2) 188,000.00 Delivery Date Expenses: Underwriter's Discount 24,800.00 DTC/CUSIP 600.00 Trustee 1,500.00 Legal Fees 30 000.00 �.19 Other Uses of Funds: Contingency 0.01 5,851,270.35 Notes: III Construction Fund invested at 6.50%with level draws over 14 months. [2j Cap.W.Fund Invested&15.50%;Interest earnings used in Construction Fund. Sized for Interest payments required on 9116101 and 3/1 SM2 and Is shown drawn on those detas. Sales assumed to occur 50%each on 9/15/02 and 11115/02. dF1110140rarr Fee 7.2001 0:03 am Prepared by KIRKPATRICK PETTIS OUANTITATIVE GROUP (Snowmsaa Muses DOMM01 NOTE02) 02/07/2001 10:14 FAX im 000 BOND DEBT SERVICE SNOWMASS VILLAGE HOUSING DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION SERIES 2001 SNOWMASS BONDS(note payments) Employee Housing Project Ease ?. So.2: Soles Price of$3,420,000 G Dated Date 031152001 Delivery Date 03/152001 Annual Period Debt Debt Ending Principal Coupon Interest Service Service 03/162001 091152001 83,000 83,000 03/162002 83,000 83,000 158,000 09/162002 1,626,000 6.000% 83,000 1,108,000 11/162002 1,695,000 5.000% 14,125 1,709,126 031152003 3,417,125 3,320,000 263,125 3,683,125 3,693,125 Soso Feb 7,2001 9:03 am Prepared by KIRKPATRICK PETTIS OUAKMATIVE GROUP (Snowmeae Vftge 00:HDCAINOTFA2) 02/07/2001 10:15 FAX X1010 i i NET DEBT SERVICE SNOWMASS VILLAGE HOUSING DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION r am 2001 SNOWMASS BONDS(note payments) G Employee Housing Project So.2: Sales Price of$3,420,000 Total Cap Int. Net Annual Dab Principal Interest Debt Service Fund 121 Debt Service Not D/S 09/152001 83,000 83,000 83,000 03/15/2002 83,000 83,000 83,000 09/152002 1,625,000 83,000 1,708,000 1,708,000 11/162002 1,895,000 14,125 1,709,126 1,709,126 03/152003 3.417,125 3,320,000 263,125 3,583,125 166,000 3,417,125 3,417,125 Notes: I 1 $ woo . (2)Cap.Int.Fund Invested at 6 %:Interest earnings used In Construction Fund. Sized for Interest payments required on 9115/01 and 311610 and is shown drawn on those dates. Feb 7,2001 9:03 am Prepared by KIRKPATRICK PETTIS QUANTITATIVE CROUP (6nowmaas Vlllege 00:HDC.OINOTED2) 02/07/2001 10:15 FAX Boll BOND SOLUTION SNOWMASS VILLAGE HOUSING DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION `v SERIES 2001 SNOWMASS BONDS(note payments) Employee Housing Project Se.2: Sales Price of$3A20,000 Period Proposed Proposed Debt Service Total Adj Revenue Unused Debt 8ery Ending Principal Debt Service Adjustments Debt Sella Constraints Revenues Coverage 08110002 166,000 -168,000 0911512002 1,826,000 1,708,000 1,708,000 1,710,000 2,000 100.11710% 10/152002 11/152002 1,895,000 1,709,126 1,709,126 1,710,000 875 100.05120% 3,320,000 3,583,125 -166,000 3,417,125 3,420,000 2,875 era �• Note: 'Revenue Constralnr describes sales,which are assumed to occur 60%each on 9/15/02 and 11/16A2. Feb 7,2001 9:03 em Prepared by KIRKPATRICK PETTIS QUANTITATIVE GROUP (Grammes Villrye OO:HDC-01 NOTED2) 02/07/2001 10:15 FAX ID012 PROJECT FUND SNOWMASS VILLAGE HOUSING DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION SERIES 2001 SNOWMASS BONDS(note payments) Employee Housing Project Sc.2: Sales Price of$3,420,000 Construction Costs Ill(CONST) Interest Cap Int.Fund Scheduled Dab Deposit 06.6% Principal (_) Dram Balance 03/15/2001 5,428,370.34 2,331,270.35 2,331,270.35 3,097,099.99 04/16!2001 229,309.00 229,309.00 2,887,790.99 05152001 27,339.08 200,448.30 1,521.67 229,309.05 2,087,342.69 08115/2001 229,308.05 229,309.05 2,438,033.64 07/16/2001 229,308.05 229,309.05 2,208,724.58 0811612001 229,309.05 228,308.05 1,979,415.54 09/16/2001 229,308.05 228,308.05 1,750,106.49 10/15/2001 229,308:05 229,309.05 1,520,797.44 1115/2001 67,688.93 167,917.95 . 3,804.17 229,308.05 1,352,879.49 12/15!2001 229,309.06 229,308.05 1,123,670.44 01/15/2002 229,309.05 229,308.05 894,261.39 02/15/2002 229,308.05 229,309.05 664,962.34 031162002 227,787.38 1,521.67 229,308.06 437,164.98 04/162002 228,309.05 229,309.05 207,855.91 051152002 21,453.14 207,855.91 229,309.05 - 6,428,370.34 106,378.15 5,428,370.34 6,947.61 5,641,697.00 aft.x don Fee 7,2001 8:03 am Prepared by KIRKPATRIG(PErn6 OUAHTITATNE GROUP (Snmrnua Wisps 00:HDG01 NOTED2) 02/07/2001 10:15 FAX Q013 BOND SUMMARY STATISTICS C SNOWMASS VILLAGE HOUSING DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION G SERIES 2001 SNOWMASS BONDS(note payments) Employee Housing Project Be.2: Sales Price of$3,420,000 Dated Date 03/16/2001 Delivery Dale 03/162001 Last Maturity 11/152002 Arbitrage Yield 5.002140% Tale Interest Cost(TIC) 5.002140% Net Interest Cost(NIC) 5.000000% All-In TIC 6.154118% Average Coupon 5.000000% Average Life(years) 1.555 Duration of Issue(years) 1.643 Par Amount 3,320,000.00 Bond Proceeds 3,320,000.00 Total Interest 283,125.00 Net Interest 253,125.00 Bond Years from Dated Date 5,262,600.00 Bond Years from Delivery Date 6,262,500.00 Total Debt Service 3,563,125.00 Maximum Annual Debt Service 3,417,125.00 Average Annual Debt Servlos 2,148,875.00 Underwriters Fees(per$1000) Average Takedown Other Fee Total Underwriters Dlsoount Bid Price 100.000000 Par Average Average Bond Component Value Price . Coupon LNG Note Payments 3,320,000.00 100.000 5.000% 1.585 3,320,000.00 1.585 All-In Arbitrage TIC TIC Yield Par Value 3,320,000.00 3,320,000.00 3,320,000.00 •Accrued Interest •Premium(Discount) •Underwriters Discount •Cost of Issuance Expense •Other Amounts 56,800.00 Target Value 3,320,000.00 3,263,100.00 3,320,000.00 Target Data 0311512001 03/152001 0311512001 Yield 6.002140% 6.154116% 6.002140% - s Fab 7.2001 9:03 am Prepared by KIRKPATRICK PETTIS OUA4YITATIVE GROUP (Snomness Vlllsee 00:HDODINOTED2) TOWN COUNCIL COMMUNIQUE Meeting Date: February 12, 2001 Agenda Item: Parcel "N' Unit Sale Prices and Construction Schedule Discussion Presented By: Joe Coffey—Housing Manager Mark Norris and Paul Broome of Norris and Associates Scott Smith of Reno, Smith Architects Core Issues: 1.Annual income required for the proposed sale prices. 2.Comparative deed restricted housing prices with higher and lower prices. 3.Marketability. 4. Level of finishes and cost reduction options. 5.Unit prices and construction budget. 6.Construction cost implications with delaying construction. General Info: 1. Annual income required for the proposed sale prices. Per information received from various lending institutions,the average annual income required for the units priced from$190,000. to $250,000.is$56,788.50 to $74, 225.47. The payments for a buyer, with average credit, are from $1,325. to $1,732. per month respectively on a 30 year fixed rate of 7.75%. 2.Comparitive deed restricted properties with higher and lower sales prices. Two 20-year-old Country Club Townhomes have sold in the past year for$243,000. and $278,000. These townhomes are approximately 1,530 SF with it garage. The higher assessment rate for these units has always been a concern for employees because the units are mixed with free market townhomes. Three Aspen—Pitkin County Fairway Three units have in the past year for$192,000., $193,000., and $202,000. These ten-year-old units are 1,568 SF and they do not have garages, only carports. The Mountain View 10-year-old deed restricted two and three bedroom units are selling for noz low around $125,000. and $154,000. The two bedroom units are 1,008 SF and the three bedroom units are 1,356 SF without carports or garages. 3.Marketability. Council requested information about the marketability of the Parcel "N"units and who may purchase the units. I have spoken with employees in both rental units and deed- restricted units who are very interested in this project. I currently know of approximately 20 employees who I consider potential purchasers. This project will open up many different types of Housing in the Village and may bring employees back from down valley. I believe most of the purchasers of these units will be double income families similar to the higher priced units we sell today. I also have two Snowmass Village employees who need the two handicapped accessible units. 4. Parcel "N" level of finish and cost reduction options. The Parcel "N' level of finish is considerably higher than the other deed restricted units in Snowmass Village. These units are proposed to have pine interior doors,tile and wood floors, quality wood cabinetry, rounded drywall comers, upgraded carpet, tile tub surrounds and wood clad windows. The roofs will be cedar shakes with corrugated metal roof accents. All the items listed above can be substituted to reduce construction costs. This project was always planned to be the premier employee housing complex in Snowmass Village. This will most likely be the closest deed restricted housing to the ski slopes the Town will ever construct. 5.Unit prices and construction budget. I have used the revised construction budget and unit prices for the three cost scenarios Marianne is presenting today. Parcel "N" Construction Cost Estimate as of 02-08-01 Building Construction $4,961,597. Ridge Condominium Inspections $ 15,000. Architectural $ 195,000. Civil Engineering $ 60,000. CTL Thompson $ 75,000. Water and Sanitation Tap Fee $ 50,000. eaWar Rock Removal /Dewatering 5,000. Construction Trash $ 15,000. Drapes and Blinds $ 32,000. Legal—S. Connor $ 8,000. Land Planner $ 15,000. Water and Sewer Design Fee $ 10,000. Owner's Contingency $ 150,000. *$50,000. Value Engineering ($ 50,000.) Estimated Total Construction Costs$ 5,541,597. * The Development Team and contractor have agreed to some value engineering decisions that will reduce the construction cost by $50,000. The value engineering will continue from the start to the finish of this project and more savings are anticipated. Parcel"N" Unit Sales Prices Some units vary in size and the prices listed in each scenario will change slightly from unit to unit. Scenario #1 Unit Sales Total $ 3,820,000. Average Sale Prices 3 Bedroom unit $ 252,728. 2 Bedroom unit $ 219,552. Scenario#2 Unit Sales Total $ 3,690,000. Average Sale Prices 3 Bedroom unit $ 244,126. 2 Bedroom unit $ 212,080. Scenario#3 Unit Sales Total $ 3,420,000. Average Sale Prices 3 Bedroom unit $ 226,267. 2 Bedroom unit $ 196,565. The final unit sales prices will be determined by the units total square feet, location and unit amenities. 6. Construction cost implications with delaying construction. Mark Norris and Paul Broome will discuss the cost implications of waiting until Fall to begin construction. I have attached a spreadsheet from Norris that explains the higher construction costs. Council Options: 1. Set unit sale prices. 2. Determine level of finish and materials used. 3. Start construction now or later. Staff Recommendation: Proceed with Parcel "N'and begin construction this Spring because the construction costs will only increase the longer the project is delayed. The unit prices in Scenario#2 are preferred but this will require a larger subsidy from the Town. Cost Impact With A Fall 2001 Start Norris and Associates TOSV Parcel N 20M 11:43 Rem Description Unit Low High Low unit High unit Low High Remarks tit Quantity Quantity Cost Cost Total Total 1 One month additional GC's MO 1.00 1.00 31,869 31,869 31,869.00 31,869.00 Winter-time construction 2 Concrete heating MO 2.00 2.00 3,000.00 3,000 6,000.00 6,000.00 Winter-time concrete 3 Willer conditions framing MO 4.00 4.00 3,000 3,000 12,000.00 12,000.00 Winter-time framing 4 Spring-time competitive bidding % 0.015 0.025 3,772,527 3,772,527 56,587.91 94,313.18 5 Material cost increases % 0.04 0.05 617,518 617,518 24,700.72 30,875.90 6 Labor cost increases % 0.05 0.06 142,589 142,589 7,129.45 8,555.34 7 Subcontractor cost increases % 0.04 0.06 3,772,527 3,772,527 150,901.08 226,351.62 _ 1 Sub Total 289,188.16 409,965.04 Fee 0 6% 17,351.29 24,597.90 Total 306,539.44 434,662.94 Estimated project cost with a spring start= 4,961,102 Estimated% of cost increase = 0.062 To 0.088 Estimated project cost with a fall start= 5,267,641 To 5,395,665 Fall start cost Pape 1 of 1 BCMI T O S V MEMORANDUM to: T. Michael Manchester, Mayor and Town Council Members from: Stephen R. Connor, Town Attorney subject: Code of Ethics Revisions file no.: TOW-10-73 date: February 8, 2001 In accordance with your directions I have reviewed Arnie Mordkin's January 15, 2001memorandum concerning revisions to the Code of Ethics. Arnie posed three questions regarding ethics and you have directed me to address question numbers 1 and 2. Additionally, I will provide you with suggestions for consideration of amendments and revisions to other provisions of the Code of Ethics. Question No. 1: Should a TOSV Councilperson be permitted, without prior approval of the TOSV Council, to lobby, either directly or indirectly, orally or in writing, any TOSV Board, Commission, Council or Authority, for or against any matter then pending before said Board, Commission, Council or Authority? Discussion: The Municipal Code current contains Section 2-97 Representation of Private Interest which states as follows: No official or employee shall appear on behalf of a personal or private interest before the Town Council,any commission or board of the Town,any department of the Town or the Municipal Court without the prior approval of the Town Council expressly set forth in a resolution. The intent of Section 2-97 clearly answers Question No. 1 in the negative. Arnie proposed to add an new section to the Municipal Code that appears to essentially have the same effect as Section 2-97. Arnie's proposed section does however add language specifying that the appearance cannot be 0... in person, by written means, or in any other manner...0 which is not expressly state in Section 2-97. Section 2-97 can be amended and restated to provide further clarity, as follows: No official or employee who has a personal or private interest in any matter proposed or pending before the Town Council, any commission, board or department of the Town is prohibited from attempting to influence the decision of any official or employee on any such matter, and no Town Council member may appear in a representative capacity in Municipal Court, without first obtaining approval of the Town Council;which approval shall be in the form of a resolution. OeV&wb T. Michael Manchester, Mayor and Town Council Members February 8, 2001 Page 2 1 do not believe that the addition of a separate section would be beneficial as the cumulative effect would be duplication of intent and purpose and would potentially lead to conflicting interpretation, since a "Town Councilperson° is an official of the Town as defined in Section 1-21. Additionally, the proposed language does not address the issue of an official attempting to influence the decision of an employee. Question No.2: Should a member of any TOSV Board, Commission or Authority have to recuse himself or herself, N that member's parent, grandparent, spouse, sibling, child or grandchild should testify before the Board, Commission, Council or Authority or present a position for or against any matter then pending before said Board, Commission, Council or Authority? Discussion: There is no specific provision of the Municipal Code that addresses Question No. 2. Section 2-92 provides that: Proper democratic government requires that officials and employees be independent, impartial and fiduciaries of the public trust. Obviously it is the duty of any official to be disqualified from any action in which the official cannot act objectively. Under such duty, the answer to Question No. 2 is in the negative only if the official has determined that an objective decision cannot be made and not generally because a relationship exists with another person. I believe that the obligation to recuse oneself under the circumstances set forth in Question No. 2 already exists provided that the official has determined that an objective decision cannot be made. The mere fact that a relationship between an official and another person exists does not necessarily mean that an actual or potential conflict of interest exists. It would appear to be more appropriate that the related person understand the nature of the official's position as a fiduciary of the public trust and abstain from attempting to present a position for or against any matter pending before the official, rather than predetermine that the official must be disqualified. Depending on the circumstances and nature of the testimony and evidence, either or both, provided by the related person a determination must be made as to whether a conflict of interest exists. I do not believe that you want to prohibit an official from making a decision merely because a related person desires to testify or provide evidence. The appearance of a conflict of interest in such a circumstance does not seem to be of a magnitude to WIM a T. Michael Manchester, Mayor and Town Council Members February 8, 2001 Page 3 create an actual conflict where one may not actually exist. Officials are elected or appointed to carry out certain duties and should not be precluded from doing so, unless there is a compelling public purpose for such a prohibition. I do not believe that the mere relationship with an official creates such a circumstance per se. Accordingly, I suggest that you decline to incorporate Arnie's proposal as a provision of the Code of Ethics. General Discussion: The Code of Ethics is intended to be a supplement to the provisions of the State Code of Ethics. As there has not been a discussion of the interrelationship between the Town and State provisions for some time, 1 suggest that we also evaluate the need for specific Municipal Code provisions in light of the standards that have been mandated by the State Statutes. To assist you in understanding the interrelationship, I am attaching the pertinent provisions of the State Code of Ethics and Criminal Provisions for your convenience. You will note specifically that the State Statute takes a different approach to gifts than the Town, while the Town has enacted more stringent requirement regarding ex parte communications. I believe that it would be easier for you and the other officials and employees to have one cohesive statement of what the Code of Ethics is rather than have to refer to both the Municipal Code and the State Statutes. In your discussion perhaps you will determine that a thorough revision of the Code of Ethics is necessary. Attachments: Pertinent provisions of the State Code of Ethics; 24-18-101 gt. sea. C.R.S. and 24-18-201 et. seg. C.R.S., and Criminal Provisions contained in 18-8-308 C.R.S. ^XWO Search Result 1 of 8 Home Edlt Search New Search Back to List .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 18-8-308 - Failing to disclose a conflict of Interest. :::: ::::::::: l ............................................................................. (1) A public servant commits failing to disclose a conflict of interest if he exercises any substantial discretionary function in connection with a government contract, purchase, payment, or other pecuniary transaction without having given seventy-two hours' actual advance written notice to the secretary of state and to the governing body of the government which employs the public servant of the existence of a known potential conflicting interest of the public servant in the transaction with reference to which he is about to act in his official capacity. (2) A "potential conflicting interest" exists when the public servant is a director, president, general manager, or similar executive officer or owns or controls directly or indirectly a substantial interest in any nongovernmental entity participating in the transaction. (3) Failing to disclose a conflict of interest is a class 2 misdemeanor. Source: L. 71: R&RE, p. 461, § 1. C.R.S. 1963: § 40.8.308. L. 79: (1) amended, p. 744, § 1, effective July 1. Law reviews. For article, "Director Conflicts: The Effect on Disclosure — Parts I and II", see 17 Colo. Law. 461 and 639 (1988). For article, "Conflicts of Interest in Government", see 18 Colo. Law. 595 (1989). Section deals with formal, express contracts. Former section prohibiting interest in contract by officer had to do with such contracts as the officer is charged with the duty of making, and with those in the awarding of which he has a voice, or vote, and clearly means formal, express contracts, which are in terms agreed upon, or awarded on bids. People v. Brown, 60 Colo. 276, 152 P. 1169 (1915) (decided under former R.S. 08, § 4994). Home Edlt Search New Search Back to List Search Result 1 of 8 OMW .l� Next Result Search Result 1 of 19 Home Edit Search New Search Back to Ltat f......�..............................._................24-18-101...�..Legislative declaratlon...................................................�....... 1...:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: :::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::..............:-:.................................................................. ... The general assembly recognizes the importance of the participation of the citizens of this state in all levels of government in the state. The general assembly further recognizes that, when citizens of this state obtain public office, conflicts may arise between the public duty of such a citizen and his or her private interest. The general assembly hereby declares that the prescription of some standards of conduct common to those citizens involved with government is beneficial to all residents of the state. The provisions of this part 1 recognize that some actions are conflicts per se between public duty and private interest while other actions may or may not pose such conflicts depending upon the surrounding circumstances. Source: L. 88: Entire article added, p. 899, § 1, effective July 1. Top Prey Beau k Next Resuk Search Result 2 of 19 H= Edit Search New Search Back to List ........................................................................................................................ 24-18-102 - Definitions. As used in this part 1, unless the context otherwise requires: (1) "Business" means any corporation, limited liability company, partnership, sole proprietorship, trust or foundation, or other individual or organization carrying on a business, whether or not operated for profit. (2) "Compensation" means any money, thing of value, or economic benefit conferred on or received by any person in return for services rendered or to be rendered by himself or another. (3) "Employee" means any temporary or permanent employee of a state agency or any local government, except a member of the general assembly and an employee under contract to the state. (4) "Financial interest' means a substantial interest held by an individual which is: (a) An ownership interest in a business; (b) A creditor interest in an insolvent business; (c) An employment or a prospective employment for which negotiations have begun; (d) An ownership interest in real or personal property; (e) A loan or any other debtor interest; or 04 1of10 (f) A directorship or officership in a business. (5) "Local government" means the government of any county, city and county, city, town, special district, or school district. (6) "Local government official" means an elected or appointed official of a local government but does not include an employee of a local government. (7) "Official act" or"official action" means any vote, decision, recommendation, approval, disapproval, or other action, including inaction, which involves the use of discretionary authority. (8) "Public officer' means any elected officer, the head of a principal department of the executive branch, and any other state officer. "Public officer' does not include a member of the general assembly, a member of the judiciary, any local government official, or any member of a board, commission, council, or committee who receives no compensation other than a per diem allowance or necessary and reasonable expenses. (9) "State agency" means the state; the general assembly and its committees; every executive department, board, commission, committee, bureau, and office; every state institution of higher education, whether established by the state constitution or by law, and every governing board thereof; and every independent commission and other political subdivision of the state government except the courts. .......................................................... ................... .................................... ..................................................................==.......................................... ............................... Source: L. 88: Entire article added, p. 899, § 1, effective July 1. L. 90: (1) amended, p. 447, § 10, effective April 18. L. 91: (8) amended, p. 837, § 1, effective March 29. Igo Prey Result Next Result Search Result 3 of 19 Home Edit Search New Search Beck to List 2of10 24-18-103 - Public trust - breach of fiduciary duty. (1) The holding of public office or employment is a public trust, created by the confidence which the electorate reposes in the integrity of public officers, members of the general assembly, local government officials, and employees. A public officer, member of the general assembly, local government official, or employee shall carry out his duties for the benefit of the people of the state. (2) A public officer, member of the general assembly, local government official, or employee whose conduct departs from his fiduciary duty is liable to the people of the state as a trustee of property and shall suffer such other liabilities as a private fiduciary would suffer for abuse of his trust. The district attorney of the district where the trust is violated may bring appropriate judicial proceedings on behalf of the people. Any moneys collected in such actions shall be paid to the general fund of the state or local government. Judicial proceedings pursuant to this section shall be in addition to any criminal action which may be brought against such public officer, member of the general assembly, local government official, or employee. (..:: . ::::::.. — ::: ...... _ .. .....� :. .... ::::. -:: :wWww : - -:. :::::: ::::::: ::: _ Source: L. 88: Entire article added, p. 900, § 1, effective July 1. In Prey Result Next Result Search Result 4 of 11119 Home EA Search New Search Back to List 24-18-104 - Rules of conduct for all public officers, members of the general assembly, local government officials, and employees. (1) Proof beyond a reasonable doubt of commission of any act enumerated in this section is proof that the actor has breached his fiduciary duty and the public trust. A public officer, a member of the general assembly, a local government official, or an employee shall not: (a) Disclose or use confidential information acquired in the course of his official duties in order to further substantially his personal financial interests; or (b) Accept a gift of substantial value or a substantial economic benefit tantamount to a gift of substantial value: (1) Which would tend improperly to influence a reasonable person in his position to depart from the faithful and impartial discharge of his public duties; or (II) Which he knows or which a reasonable person in his position should know under the circumstances is primarily for the purpose of rewarding him for official action he has taken. (2)An economic benefit tantamount to a gift of substantial value includes without GM 3of10 limitation a loan at a rate of interest substantially lower than the commercial rate then currently prevalent for similar loans and compensation received for private services rendered at a rate substantially exceeding the fair market value of such services. (3) The following shall not be considered gifts of substantial value or gifts of substantial economic benefit tantamount to gifts of substantial value for purposes of this section: (a) Campaign contributions and contributions in kind reported as required by section 1-45-108, C.R.S.; (b) An occasional nonpecuniary gift, insignificant in value; (c) A nonpecuniary award publicly presented by a nonprofit organization in recognition of public service; (d) Payment of or reimbursement for actual and necessary expenditures for travel and subsistence for attendance at a convention or other meeting at which such public officer, member of the general assembly, local government official, or employee is scheduled to participate; (e) Reimbursement for or acceptance of an opportunity to participate in a social function or meeting which is offered to such public officer, member of the general assembly, local government official, or employee which is not extraordinary when viewed in light of the position held by such public officer, member of the general assembly, local government official, or employee; (f) Items of perishable or nonpermanent value, including, but not limited to, meals, lodging, travel expenses, or tickets to sporting, recreational, educational, or cultural events; (g) Payment for speeches, appearances, or publications reported pursuant to section 24-6-203; (h) Payment of salary from employment, including other government employment, in addition to that earned from being a member of the general assembly or by reason of service in other public office. (4) The provisions of this section are distinct from and in addition to the reporting requirements of section 1-45.108, C.R.S., and section 24-6-203, and do not relieve an incumbent in or elected candidate to public office from reporting an Item described in subsection (3) of this section, if such reporting provisions apply. Source: L. 88: p. 901, § 1. L. 92: (3)(g) and (3)(h) amended, p. 874, § 103, effective January 1, 1993. L. 94: (3) amended and (4) added, p. 1827, § 4, effective January 1, 1995. In Prey Result Next ResuR Search Result 5 of 19 Home Edit Search New Search Beck to Llet woo w--, 4of10 24-18-105 - Ethical principles for public officers, local government officials, and m p I o y es. (1) The principles in this section are intended as guides to conduct and do not constitute violations as such of the public trust of office or employment in state or local government. (2) A public officer, a local government official, or an employee should not acquire or hold an interest in any business or undertaking which he has reason to believe may be directly and substantially affected to its economic benefit by official action to be taken by an agency over which he has substantive authority. (3) A public officer, a local government official, or an employee should not, within six months following the termination of his office or employment, obtain employment in which he will take direct advantage, unavailable to others, of matters with which he was directly involved during his term of employment. These matters include rules, other than rules of general application, which he actively helped to formulate and applications, claims, or contested cases in the consideration of which he was an active participant. (4) A public officer, a local government official, or an employee should not perform an official act directly and substantially affecting a business or other undertaking to its economic detriment when he has a substantial financial interest in a competing firm or undertaking. Source: L. 88: Entire article added, p. 902, § 1, effective July 1. Igp Prey Result Next ResuR Search Result 8 of 19 Home Edit Search New Search Back to tst I d 5 orto ------------ ------------------ 24-18-108 - Rules of conduct for public officers and state employees. .............................................................. .............................................................. (1) Proof beyond a reasonable doubt of commission of any act enumerated in this section is proof that the actor has breached his fiduciary duty. (2) A public officer or a state employee shall not: (a) Engage in a substantial financial transaction for his private business purposes with a person whom he inspects, regulates, or supervises in the course of his official duties; (b) Assist any person for a fee or other compensation in obtaining any contract, claim, license, or other economic benefit from his agency; (c) Assist any person for a contingent fee in obtaining any contract, claim, license, or other economic benefit from any state agency; or (d) Perform an official act directly and substantially affecting to its economic benefit a business or other undertaking in which he either has a substantial financial interest or is engaged as counsel, consultant, representative, or agent. (3) A head of a principal department or a member of a quasi-judicial or rule-making agency may perform an official act notwithstanding paragraph (d) of subsection (2) of this section if his participation is necessary to the administration of a statute and If he complies with the voluntary disclosure procedures under section 24-18-110. (4) Repealed. ..........................................................................I.................................................................................................................................. Source: L. 88: Entire article added, p. 903, § 1, effective July 1. L. 91: (4) repealed, p. 1[83 ­effective. . . . . ...March. .. . ..29. ..........................................................I................... Too Prey Result Next Result Search Result 9 of 19 Home Edit Search New Search Beck to Lfat 6 of 10 24-18-108.5 - Rules of conduct for memb rs of boards and commissions. ................. ................ (1) Proof beyond a reasonable doubt of commission of any act enumerated in this section is proof that the actor has breached his fiduciary duty. (2) A member of a board, commission, council, or committee who receives no compensation other than a per them allowance or necessary and reasonable expenses shall not perform an official act which may have a direct economic benefit on a business or other undertaking in which such member has a direct or substantial financial interest. ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... . 117So.u r c a L 91: Entire section added, p. 837, § 3 effective M a r ch 29. . .................. ............. ToD Prey Result Next Raw Search Resuft 10 of 19 HQ= Edit Search New Search Back to Llst 24-18-109 - Rules of conduct for local government officials and employees. ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... (1) Proof beyond a reasonable doubt of commission of any act enumerated in this section is proof that the actor has breached his fiduciary duty and the public trust. (2) A local government official or local government employee shall not: (a) Engage in a substantial financial transaction for his private business purposes with a person whom he inspects or supervises in the course of his official duties; or (b) Perform an official act directly and substantially affecting to its economic benefit a business or other undertaking in which he either has a substantial financial interest or is engaged as counsel, consultant, representative, or agent. (3) (a) A member of the governing body of a local government who has a personal or private interest in any matter proposed or pending before the governing body shall disclose such interest to the governing body and shall not vote thereon and shall refrain from attempting to influence the decisions of the other members of the governing body In voting on the matter. (b) A member of the governing body of a local government may vote notwithstanding paragraph (a) of this subsection (3) if his participation is necessary to obtain a quorum or otherwise enable the body to act and if he complies with the voluntary disclosure procedures under section 24-18-110. (4) It shall not be a breach of fiduciary duty and the public trust for a local government official or local government employee to: (a) Use local government facilities or equipment to communicate or correspond with a member's constituents, family members, associates; or �V WO 7 of 10 member's constituents, family members, or business associates; or (b) Accept or receive a benefit as an indirect consequence of transacting local government business. Source: L. 88: Entire article added, p. 903, § 1, effective July 1. 122 Prey Result Next Result Search Result 11 of 19 Home Edit Search New Search Beck to List 24-18-110 - Voluntary disclosure. A member of a board, commission, council, or committee who receives no compensation other than a per diem allowance or necessary and reasonable expenses, a member of the general assembly, a public officer, a local government official, or an employee may, prior to acting in a manner which may impinge on his fiduciary duty and the public trust, disclose the nature of his private interest. Members of the general assembly shall make disclosure as provided in the rules of the house of representatives and the senate, and all others shall make the disclosure in writing to the secretary of state, listing the amount of his financial interest, if any, the purpose and duration of his services rendered, if any, and the compensation received for the services or such other information as is necessary to describe his interest. If he then performs the official act involved, he shall state for the record the fact and summary nature of the interest disclosed at the time of performing the act. Such disclosure shall constitute an affirmative defense to any civil or criminal action or any other sanction. Source: L. 88: Entire article added, p. 904, § 1, effective July 1. L. 91: Entire section amended, p. 838, § 4, effective March 29. JQ2 Prey Result Next Result Search Result 15 of 19 Home Edit Search New Search Beck to Llat 00�r 8of10 F .......................... 24-18-201 - Interests in contracts. (1) Members of the general assembly,public officers, local government officials, or employees shall not be interested in any contract made by them in their official capacity or by any body, agency, or board of which they are members or employees. A former employee may not, within six months following the termination of his employment, contract or be employed by an employer who contracts with a state agency or any local government involving matters with which he was directly involved during his employment. For purposes of this section, the term: (a) "Be interested in" does not include holding a minority interest in a corporation. (b) "Contract" does not include: (1) Contracts awarded to the lowest responsible bidder based on competitive bidding procedures; (11) Merchandise sold to the highest bidder at public auctions; (III) Investments or deposits in financial institutions which are in the business of loaning or receiving moneys; (IV) A contract with an interested party if, because of geographic restrictions, a local government could not otherwise reasonably afford itself of the subject of the contract. It shall be presumed that a local government could not otherwise reasonably afford itself of the subject of a contract if the additional cost to the local government is greater than ten percent of a contract with an interested party or if the contract is for services that must be performed within a limited time period and no other contractor can provide those services within that time period. (V) A contract with respect to which any member of the general assembly, public officer, local government official, or employee has disclosed a personal interest and has not voted thereon or with respect to which any member of the governing body of a local government has voted thereon in accordance with section 24-18-109 (3) (b) or 31-4-404 (3), C.R.S. Any such disclosure shall be made: To the governing body, for local government officials and employees; in accordance with the rules of the house of representatives and the senate, for members of the general assembly; and to the secretary of state, for all others. Source: L. 88: Entire art icle added, p. 905, § 1, effective July 1. JQQ Prey Result Next ResuR Search ResuR 16 of 18 Home Edit Search New Search Beck to Llst 9 of10 24-18-202 - Interest In sales or purchases. .. .... . . ............. ...........I Public officers and local government officials shall not be purchasers at any sale or vendors at any purchase made by them in their official capacity. .. .......................................................................................... ............................................................................................ Fs­o-c- L 88: Entire article added, p. 906, § 1, effective July 1. I=Prey Resuk Search Resuft 17 of 19 tL9.= Edit Search Now Search Beck to .............. . 24-18-203 - Voidable contracts. ................................................................ .............I ....................... ...................... ...... Every contract made in violation of any of the provisions of section 24-18-201 or 24-18-202 shall be voidable at the instance of any party to the contract except the officer interested therein. I ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ ............. .... ......... ... . ............. ..... .... .. . Sour 88 E n ti r a a r ti cl a a d d e d p. 9 0 6, § 11 effe c:ti v a J u i y 11 ......................................--- ............................................................................................... IM Prey Resuit Back to List tLQ.= Edit Search New Search LIA 10 of 10 TOWN COUNCIL COMMUNIQUE Meeting Date: February 12, 2001 Agenda Item: No. 3 Presented By: Jim Wahlstrom, Senior Planner Core Issues: ➢ Massing of the building in relation to surrounding area Building and steeple heights Acceptability of the proposed land swap with adjacent owner and the re-subdivision of Parcel 7 D Appropriateness of the architecture D Appropriateness of exterior finishes, especially the roofing materials Adequacy of parking considering the proposed Increase of floor area and uses Encroachment of the new structure and bell tower/steeple Into the 25- foot wetland setback D Adequacy of open space/landscape area ➢ Emergency access ➢ Pedestrian circulation General Info: The following Items Is a brief description of the proposal: • A 7,400 square foot sanctuary structure would connect onto the east side of the Community Center; The structure is clad with natural stone and glass portals, and incorporates steep roof pitches; • The sanctuary Is designed to accommodate 300 persons with additional overflow capacity of approximately 50 persons; • The lower level of the structure Is envisioned for meeting rooms, church school rooms, counseling spaces and choral practice space; • The highest roof form is 62 feet high and will be stepped; • A 68-foot high stone and glass bell tower is proposed at the southeast corner of the sanctuary; • The existing footbridge would be replaced by a wider fire lane/pedestrian stone bridge; • The proposed expansion would Include a subdivision to enlarge Parcel 7 by taking up adjacent owner land in Parcel 10 (golf course property). The golf course restrooms would also be located to lower level of the new structure; and • Expanded fire lane access is part of the plan Attachments: 4• Land use and development standards for portions of Parcels 7 and 8 for the Final PUD for the Snowmass Club Subdivision following Ordinance 08, Series of 1997. Note: The current proposal does not following may of the standards that were established earlier. 4 Parcel map showing change In boundary line location te Snowmass Chapel/Anderson Ranch Master Plan per Reso. 97-45 4 See separate handout of 11'x17"binder set from applicant Council Options: 1. Provide direction and list of concerns for applicant to proceed to Sketch Plan if In general favor of proposal 2. Indicate reasons why proposal is not acceptable If It Is generally viewed unfavorably 3. If needed, direct applicant to submit another re-sketch plan review Staff Provide the applicant and staff with a list of Issues and concerns Recommendation: regarding the proposed pre-sketch plan following the above noted options goo TC 97-08 Page 5 Exhibit A LAND USE AND DEVELOPMENT PARAMETERS for Portions of Parcels 7 and 8 of the Final Planned Unit Development for the Snowmass Club Subdivision Lot 1, Snowmass Interfaith Chapel Subdivision, a portion of Parcel 7 Permitted Uses: Chapel Public Meeting Rooms Counsel Rooms(4) Daycare Study Kitchen Administrative Offices(3) Residential Unit(Accessory) Maximum Number of Dwelling Units: One unit not to exceed 1,200 sq. ft. Maximum Building Ground Coverage: 15,000 sq. ft. Maximum Parking and Driveway Coverage: 8,000 sq. ft. Maximum Building Height: 40 feet above existing natural grade except at the steeple, which shall be designed in proportion to the building and shall be subject to approval of the Town Council. Average Building Height: 25 feet Lot 2A Snowmass Interfaith Chapel Subdivision Replat"A", a portion of Parcel 8 Permitted Uses: Parking Trails Minimum Number of Parking Spaces: 105 Maximum Number of Parking Spaces: 120 Non-separability: Ownership of Lot 2A shall not be transferred independently of Lot 1 too to C = 05.3✓ •/ NWBC12"E WM 2 / NS 1C8 =-!w 52.09'36"E 60D0 p= 46 R=529.55 •1. T =225.83' • �� . CREEK RD. .52' C =415.46' CB=N 41.50'24"E ,/ BRUS 'OTED1 N64•Sd IOE __--•r © N64.5500 A.P. 1 i i r,. I G= 05.24 23" P' Via✓ `.. j .. �,`� ' R=1352& L =127.5d T =63.84 C =12254 / •' SaL Sepzszr\ CO =N21°26'49 E i® _ g„_ E ^V W.C. TO THE SW COP SEC.L T95,PBSW IV nN+1-1 � J 1r+rn v DEDICATED i Ai�Jw O RL PACE 7 az. t • ' E ? •'�O / 3.30 Ac. RESERVED 3tE.gY �.a,• .,1 �� ,6► 1 e 2$fF�Ir. FOR FUTURE N06•xi'OO�W /-� DEDICATION Y75•L•W�E 1l19i �J �' PARCEL B �„ 5-65 AC �.:1 W583° 00 189,()0• O SNOWMASS WILDCAT FIRE A v PROTECTION G e g - G=118'31'36" DISTRICT FIRE • a • v - R=5000' STATION PARCEL 6 L =1034:$ BOOK 256 2 91 4 T=81 'PAGE BHA- °•[/ 8 i ® 6:92 AC. '$. C= eN3517fi'4d'W OWL CREEK RD. N 69.2438'W PEc/KN Y PL.AT I) 3B-7d eoDN w2 M4E 2Li�• N64•I /// WiL4TTED •. 3497 '1 W PROP. LIN 559. R.O.W. NON-TA NON TAN6EN EO1�I 6=2x•57'58' a.IO°07'd Az 2r1o'o0' A. � ' R=216 74 R s 228.4Y R =x61.81' OS•S4' 0'28.09'12" R s 858.61' �.�j R-591.64' 1 L =94.44'. C =x0.36' L •218.97 L •8844 L =290.71' T =4798 T =20.23' T =185d 7 .4x.26' T=148.35 C =93.70 C =40.30' =216.92 C :8840' IC=2828Q' CB s N81°5337W CB= N70.28B1Y Ca Sp- C8sK81 Co.S73.6136"W it .._....r.��l"F,'n _ Yom,• .r- .._. M4� I 11 rl .PI � 1 t GI J}• I .I r i r 611 •\• 41 Mai (Al LI LI I•I_ l 1 1 L a Y �R A TOWN COUNCIL COMMUNIQUE Meeting Date: February 12, 2001 Presented By: Stephen R. Connor, Town Attorney Subject: ORDINANCE No. 5, SERIES OF 2001. AN ORDINANCE AMENDING AND RESTATING THE PROVISIONS OF CHAPTER 10 ARTICLE V OF THE MUNICIPAL CODE CONCERNING THE REGULATION OF SMOKING BY PROHIBITING SMOKING IN ALL ENCLOSED PUBLIC PLACES. Overview: Following the February 5, 2001 work session, at your direction I have modified the proposed amendments to the Municipal Code to prohibit smoking In all enclosed public places and areas immediately adjacent thereto. Although you discussion was to prohibit smoking only In enclosed public areas, logic dictated that you did not want to effectively create a smoking area at the entrance to or the exit from an enclosed public area. Accordingly, I included these areas In the area where smoking Is prohibited. I suggest that you consider what the denotation of "an area Immediately adjacent to an enclosed public place" Is for clarity. I recommend that you consider the effect of environmental tobacco smoke on the public in public places that are not enclosed, especially outdoor eating areas. It Is logically Inconsistent to prohibit smoking in enclosed public places without establishing a nonsmoking area In all public places. Accordingly, I suggest that you consider that designated nonsmoking areas be mandatory in unenclosed public places especially eating areas. The employee proponents recommend that the Ordinance become effective at the end of the ski season to allow time for the affected businesses to post signs and to prepare for Implementation of the nonsmoking provisions. I believe this is a good logistical idea, however I did not Incorporate It in the Ordinance since your direction was for Immediate effect. Recommendation: Adopt the Ordinance on first reading and set a noticed public hearing to receive all possible public comment prior to second reading, although such a hearing Is not required by the Home Rule Charter or the Municipal Code. TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL ORDINANCE No. 5 SERIES OF 2001 AN ORDINANCE AMENDING AND RESTATING THE PROVISIONS OF CHAPTER 10 ARTICLE V OF THE MUNICIPAL CODE CONCERNING THE REGULATION OF SMOKING BY PROHIBITING SMOKING IN ALL ENCLOSED PUBLIC PLACES. WHEREAS, the Town Council enacted smoking regulations by the adoption of Ordinance No. 6, Series of 1989; and WHEREAS, in considering Ordinance No. 6, Series of 1989, the Town Council found that studies by the Surgeon General of the United States, the National Academy of Sciences and other health organizations have linked passive exposure to tobacco smoke (second hand smoke) to a variety of negative health conditions in nonsmokers; and WHEREAS,the current provisions of the Municipal Code authorize smoking in bars, restaurants and public places in certain limited circumstances; and WHEREAS, employees of bars in which smoking is permitted have petitioned the Town Council to prohibit smoking in their work places as they feel that they are unnecessarily being exposed to environmental tobacco smoke which they believe to be detrimental to their health; and WHEREAS, the Surgeon General of the United States issued a fact sheet in 2000 concerning Clean Indoor Air Regulations; and WHEREAS, the fact sheet contains the following information regarding environmental tobacco smoke (ETS): 1. As reported in 1992 by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency(EPA), exposure to tobacco smoke in the environment can cause lung cancer in adult nonsmokers. Environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) also has been linked to an increased risk of heart disease among nonsmokers. 2. ETS causes about 3,000 lung cancer deaths annually among adult nonsmokers. 3. In 1997, the California EPA concluded that ETS causes coronary heart disease and death in nonsmokers. Scientific studies have estimated that ETS accounts for as many as 62,000 deaths from coronary heart disease annually in the United States. `#7• Ordinance No.5, Series of 2001 Page 2 4. The 1992 EPA report also concluded that ETS causes serious respiratory problems in children, such as greater number and severity of asthma attacks and lower respiratory tract infections. ETS exposure increases children's risk for sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and middle ear infections as well. 5. Each year ETS causes 150,000-300,000 lower respiratory tract infections, such as pneumonia and bronchitis, in children. 6. In a large U.S. study, maternal exposure during pregnancy and postnatal exposure of the newborn to ETS increased the risk for SIDS. 7. Comparative risk studies performed by the EPA have consistently found ETS to be a risk to public health. ETS is classified as a group A carcinogen (known to cause cancer in humans)under the EPA's carcinogen assessment guidelines. 8. Several studies have documented the widespread exposure of ETS among nonsmoking adults and children in the United States. Testing nonsmokers' blood for the presence of cotinine, a chemical produced when the body metabolizes nicotine, shows that nearly 9 out of 10 nonsmoking Americans (88%) are exposed to ETS. 9. A 1988 National Health Interview Survey reported that an estimated 37% of the 79.2 million nonsmoking U.S. workers were employed in places that permitted smoking in designated areas, and that 59% of these workers experienced moderate or great discomfort from ETS exposure in the workplace. 10. The federal government has instituted increasingly stringent regulations on smoking in its own facilities. On August 9, 1997, an Executive Order was issued declaring that Executive Branch federal worksites be smoke-free, there-by protecting nonsmoking federal employees and thousands of citizens who visit federal facilities from the dangers of ETS. 11. Only the state of California meets the nation's Healthy People 2010 objective to eliminate exposure to ETS by either banning indoor smoking or limiting it to separately ventilated areas. 4C600 Ordinance No.5, Series of 2001 Page 3 12. Thirty-one states have laws that regulate smoking in restaurants; of these, only Utah and Vermont completely prohibit smoking in restaurants. California requires either a no smoking area or separate ventilation for smoking areas; and WHEREAS, a finding in the 2000 report Reducing Tobacco Use: A Report of the Surgeon General concerning Clean Indoor Air Regulation, states as follows: Unlike the regulation of tobacco products per se and of their advertising and promotion, regulation of exposure to ETS has encountered less resistance. This course is probably the result of (1) long-standing grassroots efforts to diminish exposure to ambient tobacco smoke and (2) consistent epidemiologic evidence of adverse health effects of ETS. Since 1971, a series of rules, regulations,and laws have created smoke-free environments in an increasing number of settings: government offices, public places, eating establishments, worksites, military establishments, and domestic airline flights. As of December 31, 1999, smoking was restricted in public places in 45 states and the District of Columbia. Currently, some 820 local ordinances, encompassing a variety of enforcement mechanisms, are in place. The effectiveness of clean indoor air restrictions is under intensive study. Most studies have concluded that even among smokers, support for smoking restrictions and smoke-free environments is high. Research has alsoverffied that the institution of smoke-free workplaces effectively reduces nonsmokers'exposure to ETS.Although smoke-free environments have not reduced smoking prevalence in most studies, such environments have been shown to decrease daily tobacco consumption among smokers and to increase smoking cessation; and WHEREAS, a further finding in the report Reducing Tobacco Use:A Report of the Surgeon General concerning environmental tobacco smoke states as follows: ETS contains more than 4,000 chemicals; of these, at least 43 are known carcinogens (Environmental Protection Agency. Respiratory Health Effects of Passive Smoking: Lung Cancer and Other Disorders. Washington: Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, Office of Air and Radiation, 1992. Publication No. EPA/600/6-90/006F). Exposure to ETS has serious health effects (US Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, 2000. US Department of Health a, Jqf 000 Ordinance No.5, Series of 2001 Page 4 and Human Services. Healthy People 2000: National Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Objectives. Washington: US Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, 1991. DHHS Publication No. (PHS) 91-50212). Despite this documented risk, research has demonstrated that more than 88 percent of nonsmokers in this country aged 4 years and older had detectable levels of serum cotinine, a marker for exposure to ETS (Pirkle JL, Flegal KM, Bernert JT, Brody DJ, Etzel RA, Maurer KR. Exposure of the US population to environmental tobacco smoke: the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1988 to 1991. Journal of the American Medical Association 1996; 275 (16):1233-40.). The research reviewed in this report indicates that smoking bans are the most effective method for reducing ETS exposure. Four Healthy People 2010 objectives address this issue and seek optimal protection of non-smokers through policies, regulations, and laws requiring smoke-free environments in all schools, worksites, and public places; and WHEREAS, a conclusion of Chapter 5 Regulatory Efforts regarding Clean Indoor Air Regulation of the report Reducing Tobacco Use: A Report of the Surgeon General states as follows: Although population-based data show declining environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure in the workplace over time, ETS exposure remains a common public health hazard that is entirely prevent-able. Most state and local laws for clean indoor air reduce but do not eliminate nonsmokers' exposure to ETS; smoking bans are the most effective method for reducing ETS exposure. Beyond eliminating ETS exposure among nonsmokers, smoking bans have additional benefits, including reduced smoking intensity and potential cost savings to employers. Optimal protection of nonsmokers and smokers requires a smoke-free environment; and WHEREAS, the Surgeon General states in the report Reducing Tobacco Use: A Report of the Surgeon General that: Tobacco use will remain the leading cause of preventable illness and death in this nation and a growing number of other countries until tobacco prevention and control efforts are commensurate with the harm caused by tobacco use; and Ordinance No.5, Series of 2001 Page 5 WHEREAS,the Town Council hereby incorporates by reference Reducing Tobacco Use:A Report of the Surgeon General as referred to above; and WHEREAS, the Town Council received and considered comment from concerned employees of bars in which smoking is permitted, the owner of a businesses in which smoking is permitted and the public at a work session occurring on February 5, 2001, and comment given by the public during the consideration of this Ordinance; and WHEREAS, the Town Council finds that the hazards caused by environmental tobacco smoke are an unnecessary health hazard for employees as well as patrons of public areas including restaurants and bars; and WHEREAS, the Town Council finds that smoking is not a right, but a privilege and that the exercise of such privilege to smoke in public places is harmful to the health of the public; and WHEREAS, the Town Council finds that it is in the interest of public health that the existing prohibition on smoking be extended to all enclosed public places and areas immediately adjacent thereto; and WHEREAS,the Town Council finds that the adoption of this Ordinance is necessary for the immediate preservation of the public health, safety and welfare. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED, by the Town Council of the Town of Snowmass Village, as follows: 1. Smoking Prohibition in Public Places. The provisions of Chapter 10 Article V Smoking Regulation of the Municipal Code are amended and restated as follows: Sec. 10-81 Declaration of Policy. Smoking and environmental tobacco smoke have been established to be Group A carcinogens that cause cancer in humans. It is the express policy of the Town Council that abstention from smoking occur in public places. As a public policy objective, the Town Council desires that smoking not occur in public places and that the public effectuate this policy to the greatest extent practicable. Sec. 10-82. Definitions. As used in this Article, the following words shall be construed to have the meanings defined below. Ordinance No.5, Series of 2001 Page 6 (1) Public place means any area where the public is invited or permitted. (2) Smoking means the combustion of any cigar, cigarette, pipe or similar article, using any form of tobacco or other combustible substance in any form. Sec. 10-83. Smoking Prohibited. Smoking is prohibited in and immediately adjacent to all enclosed public places. Sec. 10-84. Signs. All enclosed public places shall be posted with signs that clearly and conspicuously recite the phrase "No Smoking" or use the international no-smoking symbol. The signs shall be of sufficient number and placed in prominent locations to convey the message that smoking is prohibited to the public clearly and legibly. Sec. 10-85. Violation and penalty. The following acts constitute violations of this Article: (1) Smoking in and immediately adjacent to an enclosed public place; (2) Failing to post signs as required by this Article; (3) Willfully destructing or defacing signs required to be posted by this Article. 2. Effective Date. The provisions of this Ordinance shall become effective and shall be enforceable commencing at 2:00 o'clock a.m. on March 7, 2001. 3. Severabilitv. If any provision of this Ordinance or application hereof to any person or circumstance is held invalid, the invalidity shall not affect any other provision or application of this Ordinance which can be given effect without the invalid provision or application, and, to this end, the provisions of this Ordinance are severable. READ,APPROVED AND ADOPTED by the Town Council of the Town of Snowmass Village on First Reading on February 12, 2001 upon a motion by Council Member ^`� Ordinance No.5, Series of 2001 Page 7 the second of Council Member and upon a vote of_in favor and _ against, Council Member Mercatoris recused. READ,APPROVED AND ADOPTED by the Town Council of the Town of Snowmass Village on Second Reading on February 19, 2001 upon a motion by Council Member , the second of Council Member , and upon a vote of_in favor and _against, Council Member Mercatoris recused. TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE T. Michael Manchester, Mayor ATTEST: Trudi Worline, Town Clerk TOV Meeting Date: Febr �0Vo l Agenda Item: Not Presented By: Jim 1 Core Issues: The I ly focuses upon trans / VVV it applies to Base Villac these items: D C d recommendations D 1 >,which dictate �h zing areas I zin D F I red, including ski li 11hich will dictate li ➢ Parking allocations, both public and private,at the Base Village site and elsewhere around the Town Traffic, access and circulation around the Base Village site and its impacts upon roadway capacity limits Roadway improvements needed View corridors and/or entry statements desired as it relates to locations of parcels/land uses, transit facilities, and roadway improvements General Info: Staff will begin the session by presenting a summary of Comprehensive Plan policies and recommendations. Staff will also describe the desired elements within the Comprehensively Planned Area which applies to the Base Village site. Further discussion will subsequently commence following the attached agenda, prepared by the Aspen Skiing Company in conjunction with Town staff. Below are items that have been attached and/or distributed separately for Town Council's and Planning Commission's information and review: .• Pre-Sketch Meeting Agenda (attached 2-pages) See separate hand-out, which includes the following items: Letter of description dated January 31, 2001 from the Aspen Skiing Company (3 pages) r Proof-of-ownership (1 page) Pre-Sketch Development Plan identifying proposed parcel locations and land use descriptions Existing Conditions map :• Slope Analysis map Site Survey map Council Options: 1. Provide direction and list of concerns for applicant and staff to proceed to next stage of Pre-Sketch Plan discussion 2. Reschedule meeting to further discuss the items outlined in the current agenda or additional items as needed Staff Provide the applicant and staff with a list of issues and concerns Recommendation: regarding the proposed pre-sketch plan following the above noted options TOWN COUNCIL COMMUNIQUE Meeting Date: February 15, 2001 Agenda Item: Not applicable Presented By: Jim Wahlstrom, Senior Planner Core Issues: The pre-sketch plan submitted for this meeting primarily focuses upon transit, parking, traffic, and roadway Improvements as it applies to Base Village. The following Items are core issues related to these Items: D Consistency with Comprehensive Plan policies and recommendations The appropriate locations of parcels and land uses,which dictate locations of transit centers, routes, and public parking areas Transit related components and connectivity desired ➢ Pedestrian related elements and connectivity desired, Including ski lifts, pedestrian plaza locations and orientations,which will dictate locations of transit and parking facilities ➢ Parking allocations, both public and private, at the Base Village site and elsewhere around the Town ➢ Traffic,access and circulation around the Base Village site and its impacts upon roadway capacity limits ➢ Roadway improvements needed ➢ View corridors and/or entry statements desired as it relates to locations of parcels/land uses,transit facilities, and roadway improvements General Info: Staff will begin the session by presenting a summary of Comprehensive Plan policies and recommendations. Staff will also describe the desired elements within the Comprehensively Planned Area which applies to the Base Village site. Further discussion will subsequently commence following the attached agenda, prepared by the Aspen Skiing Company in conjunction with Town staff. Below are items that have been attached and/or distributed separately for Town Council's and Planning Commission's information and review: ❖ Pre-Sketch Meeting Agenda (attached 2-pages) See separate hand-out, which includes the following items: Letter of description dated January 31,2001 from the Aspen Skiing Company (3 pages) r Proof-of-ownership (1 page) • Pre-Sketch Development Plan identifying proposed parcel locations and land use descriptions :• Existing Conditions map A Slope Analysis map :• Site Survey map Council Options: 1. Provide direction and list of concerns for applicant and staff to proceed to next stage of Pre-Sketch Plan discussion 2. Reschedule meeting to further discuss the items outlined in the current agenda or additional items as needed Staff Provide the applicant and staff with a list of issues and concerns Recommendation: regarding the proposed pre-sketch plan following the above noted options Town of Snowmass Village February 15,2001 Base Village Transportation Issues 5:30—7:30, TOSV Chambers BASE VILLAGE PRE-SKETCH MEETING AGENDA I. Review of TOSV Comprehensive Plan and other relevant documents (TOSV) H. Transit A. Overview(presentation by ASC) 1. TOSV and ASC are both dependant on transit as a means of delivering guests and skiers without reliance on the automobile. 2. Description of existing conditions and patterns 3. Goal: design towards an intuitive circulation system- no thinking required for a first time visitor. B. TOSV Transit (presentation by TOSV) C. Regional Transit(presentation by Mike Davis,RFTA) D. Mall and Rodeo Connectors—short term and long term possibilities E. Day Skier Arrival and Departure Scenarios(presentation by ASC) 1. all buses to/from Mall 2. all buses to/from Base Village 3. split flow(demand-oriented scheduling, multiple stops or other methods) F. Discussion G. Feedback: we would like to receive feedback from Council,Planning Commission and the public on the following issues: 1. Prostcons of the various transit scenarios—how should skier shuttles be routed? 2. Desired Base Village transit components—what should be accommodated? 3. Compatibility between Base Village and Mall transit centers III. Parking(presented by ASC except where noted) A. Comprehensive Plan policies and consistency (presented by Hunt Walker, TOSV) 1. Day skier spaces allowed in Town core 2. Net new spaces programmed for transit plaza 3. Day skier spaces"allowed" in Base Village vs. the number of spaces desired for Base Village B. Day skier parking at Base Village— current capacity vs. desired future capacity C. Rodeo Lot parking- transfer of existing Lot A-E parking capacity D. Employee parking 02/15/01 E. Need for Base Village parking(lodge, residential, retail, service, Code requirements) in addition to day skier parking, and the concept of shared uses for parking. F. Use of arterial network to provide parking supply(on-street parking) G. Discussion H. Feedback desired: 1. comments on desired amount of day skier parking for Base Village 2. role of Rodeo lot parking area- can it be counted on long-term to provide day skier and/or employee parking? IV. Traffic(presentation by TOSV) A. Existing traffic levels already exceed maximum standards during the holiday periods B. It will be very difficult to approve Base Village given the current traffic levels and capacity limits outlined in the Comprehensive Plan C. Feedback desired: 1. is the TC/PC going to be amenable to mitigating traffic impacts via policy changes or makingthelping with road and intersection changes? V. Roadway Improvements(presentation by ASC) A. Roads - existing B. Intersections—existing C. Improvements/changes to both roads and intersections may be forthcoming as part of development proposal and as a means of mitigating traffic volume increases. D. The Comprehensive Plan recommends construction of a roundabout at the Brush Creek Road/Wood Road intersection as a means of maintaining LOS "C"on Brush Creek Road. Early studies indicate that a roundabout may not work at this location. E. Discussion F. Feedback desired: 1. is the TC/PC open to evaluating road and intersection changes as one means of mitigating the impacts of existing and future traffic levels? 2. Is the TC/PC amenable to intersection solutions other than the roundabout suggested in the plan? i 02/05/01 �e A S P E N S K I I N G COMPANY January 31, 2001 Chris Conrad Planning Director Town of Snowmass Village PO Box 5010 Snowmass Village, CO 81615 RE: BASE VILLAGE PRE-SKETCH APPLICATION Dear Chris: This application is being submitted to the Town of Snowmass Village in order to meet the requirements of a Pre-Sketch Plan Application. It is hoped that the Pre-Sketch process will be useful in facilitating discussion between the applicant, Aspen Skiing Company, and the Town of Snowmass Village regarding long-range community planning and transportation policies as they affect the Base Village subject property. The Base Village proposal will be for a mixed-use development that will encompass the following: • Public accommodations • Multi family condominiums • Attached single family units • Ski day lodge • Children's Center • Retail • Meeting space Post Offve Bar 1248•Aspen,CO 81612 970.925.1220•Fas 970.923.4875 u .jkiatpen.mns Ar�.e.a m tw.,e.a rtio. • Public recreation amenities • Reorganize ski lifts • Plazas • Ski trails • Parking • Transportation facilities The actual use count and density is still unresolved. The attached bubble diagram reflects the potential development sites on the property. The agenda for the first Pre-Sketch Plan meeting has been prepared in cooperation with the Town Planning and Transportation staff. The meeting is scheduled for February 15, 2001. The principal purpose for the meeting is to have discussion on the appropriate roles for Base Village in the overall transportation plan for the community. Bob Felsburg of Felsburg, Holt & Ullevig and Richard Shaw of Design Workshop will assist us in the discussion. The advantages and disadvantages for transit arrival at the Snowmass Mall vs. Base Village will be discussed. Several scenarios will be presented instead of making a specific proposal on transit arrival/departure. A second major topic for this meeting will be long-term resolution of parking. The Town Comprehensive Plan calls for 200 additional parking spaces total in the village core. We are aware that some of these are projected for expanded parking at the Mall as part of the Transit Center project and we are concerned that the ability to provide public parking at Base Village might be precluded given the current policies in the Comprehensive Plan. At this point in the planning process we would like to preserve the option of constructing day skier parking spaces at Base Village and would like feedback from the Town regarding the parking issues. Likewise, the Rodeo Lot parking situation should be addressed as it has been identified in the Comprehensive Plan as being an integral component of the Town Core parking reduction goals even though its ownership and future remain in question. This meeting is intended to receive policy direction and will not focus on many site- specific details. However, because we are talking about one specific property, we believe it is appropriate to conduct this meeting under the Pre-Sketch guidelines. We look forward to beginning the Base Village dialogue with the Town on February 15, 2001. Please call me at 923-8751 if you have any questions regarding this application or the upcoming Pre-Sketch meeting. Sincerely, \ �4+ elo� &19� Bill Kane J Vice-President, Planning & Development ;' - j OPERATING AGREEMENT OF BRUSH CREEK LAND COMPANY, LLC 'this Open,ling Agreement(the "Agreement"),dated as of December 15, 1999, is entered into by surd between Bell Mountain Partners Limited Partnership, an Illinois limited partnership, as the Mimaging Member, and Areljay, L.P., an Illinois limited partnership,as the non-managing Member. i The parties hereto agree as follows: Article I Organization 1.1 Formation. The Members hereby form a limited liability company pursuant to the Colorado Limited Liability Company Act(the "Act") and the terms of this Agreement, 1.2 Name. The business of the Company shall be conducted under the namo "Brush Creek Land Company, LLC" or under such other name as the Manager may select in accordance adtlt the Act. - 1.3 Term. 71ie Company iball continue until December 31, 2050, unless sooner terminated as herein provided in Article 7. Article 2 Principal Place of Business The principal place.of business of the Company shall beat 601:East Dean Street, Aspen, Colorado, 81611 or such other location as the Manager may determine. The Company may have t such additional places of business in or outside of the State of Illinois as the Manager may determine. Article 3 Purpose 'Chu purposes of the Company shall be to acquire, develop, own, manage, operate, lease, mortgage, pledge, hold and otherwise use, sell and dispose of the land described on Exhibit A attached to this Agreement (the "Land") and improvements now existing or hereafter constructed thereon, and to engage in all other activities permitted under the Act and to carry out all other activities necessary or incidental to the foregoing purposes.The Manager shall cause the Company to do all things necessary and appropriate to carry out the foregoing purposes,and to do any and all I other acts and things which may be necessary,incidental or convenient to carry on the Company's business as contemplated by this Agreement. i Article 4 Capital Contributions 4.1 Initial Capital Contributions of the Members. The Members have each contributed to the capital of the Company the amounts set forth opposite their respective names on Exhibit B. i n -- N ' - -4� � E r 11 Ar- Ali \2'contours\SMbase I ft REV.dgn 02/01/200103:37:44 PM i� r4• o � o O YC D� r a m "`t t � S • 3 L.ot 'A ` ' Snowmass Base Village 11 Pre-Sketch Development Plan '•+ 12 1 Building Pmreei Description I Children's Center 2 Day Lodge 3 Main Lodge S 4 Smaller Condominiums S Village Condominiums E W 6 Village Condominiums 7 Village Condominlmma g Townhoues g 9 Village Condominiums 10 Townhomes an 11 Live/Work ap 12 Open Space Sole: 1•-300• /4 � � � '•� � / ,'� '� III I,� 'ry� 9 ' b��!' �Y I, � I� � I , �• i r� l `1 C� � J__J AA „ T 1 wIIL II�JT I�II� �I'�I ','I I'll ``,.�I�I ' Ct' I/��'� I��IID` -III{I {l� ` �' I � � y//II I � �•I 1 . 1\ 'mfi G` i'\_ c ' Il \ I� l I i I •. c � I �.L 1 �, I , �� �'S+1 � I , '1 k ,�,, �, r `-/I, l II •- � , !� I jl� lij ( l�j r � II{ „�� I� � i � '��- I 1 �+� � � t1+. :,: �,I,��i�/ I; /IJJI 'I I �� %' •,— ��'`, (jl i. , _— F.��� .. �,� r ,i 1. `l lollI' � I �I , � r; ffl ' `III , VIII � ..3 I �T• I t.�' r , . � Ill :��� �! I I I�•rl I 1 � Iq , �1{' 1 I , V h r. • r " r I it lll !r;�I } it � /I �i. •• ' �-�� � ''7^l/ \yG�� / i ' � r ,1 O m ? Ul m'' / 9 1� ullll r/ !� ••/ r ' �'��I � / y i it / / � i , ' 1 / � a e�R � I I' • r/y) � i lei.° �I,I r I A � • � / i'�I T 1111 I II, � � ��I''Ju � ,�1 r ,' - I , - � I O � _ �.3 �•� ��\ � il�� - � �'1.'� �1� I�I r�.��r , d���. e��l rll � ii. . ��5 .�! Nmo �:�� t v �_ 1,1i II1s� --. 1 / 1 ,• � Ctl ' yrrb.'Pr. I � _ � I� � I' ,��IS��`_ Jj . 1 /i [I l, l ��': w � � �pi 1l �� 1' ,`'�1 r . � �; _ � �• �.� � ����v�l����g 1l/ I t.:t• . 1 ��� °�1 ' I \ � � <' 1 �I�. A�� �I A V� JJ11 1 I� ( I O A Cs I �L t .p'` t .� ?• III I // ' � �: i1W I� I 77 Jl '_ ll'/'li r i•I/7 a. 1�, ��� I jl ( I III I I ( 'r � _; L L� 1 •! ,4 / I / '.'rill m . f� il 1� Id 1` �\ I�d � I .j. �>- y � �. ,rr r I i � '� f �� � 1i ' � I 1 ' ) lr�• � �.,� c� •. I I� ._� . ,I , II II,,I�11,1 /,,111 I�� /,���I �I ���, iI 11 ���� �����',r ',�,�C�,), ,�',���,fl)I,y ) • �` F; .� \'�I s / � 1 I,.� I I�I I U\� I I- (1 (� � � I ( i! \ I I I �I 1\.. \.�I� 1!'I •I O � .`�; E`•�• i\I J, .-�-�-� \\�\ I'�r �F( •,' 11� {� 11 , tl I� � �I � 'IJ �' t � r �� I I' I� � h � Ii ti I y I �_`�� I(♦ liil�`." ;v <i,=...1�� � ,��§l / �I f��fl ,;r/n ii� ' +� �/!I�I 1 il' I/� li�i I ij ,; IS"f{ I 1 4 � I� II�I1. Al�� + � DliA' � ��t �l� �I I "° f I I l 1 I !/ �I r, II" �- ; \111 I�r/) �� i' ,• lI! rf/jV)P IIi F'`l ' / r r a \\I !r � Ial I I !/� r � I I '/�i�( /� Ii�li� l��ll I !!/'i`I II III' I+II II• � �IIII �i ' �\ � i fl � � ..L':': •.O� , '1) ! / /( t rV J _ ( �I r/)i II�l� I �I�I�I t\ jll� I�'f��l) II Its` 1 ,II' i A, o � / '1 / 1 •/ Ili ! r � / 'i1 Ali )111111111 fir. `I� \.`"'�� �'O� � I� _i' r_ � ��I. All •p _ r ��� � 1 �//./ ,,.� �I /;�� � �' � /�r II�1 '/ 11 '� ,,-1 ' cj/ i I !1 /1 ov I m 1„ O. yt'� II� I I y/ [ � G�� � � ��I I•� I V�1 - �/%� � I,���.1�� 1�< ���I, (l ®�� • .. � ! \I III ` i.' C � r1 , 1} d l)LLL 1. r 1J II J 1 ��t � � � :I '• :: 1 l � �'`II }�� /,�"j.T �,�y� /� I11I�II'��I I' � � Off` ' I"�'U 1 r D nr .•r� ✓ .j i , �'�E _". � : Ili 111 r r / �� r. iil�q� i - 0 c �m f' //t " � r Ill �l, 111 �_ ! �.J �/ �I �!�'�J�ti !�(� r1� �1 r �y '•% 'Y 1 I ..'1`111/ i d �� "�•�s � 'j.,,, --� �� gEa �� �4��° �°I� 111 �� �1 r j i � Y 1�� q a� , ,. •! 'Wig g I FF ✓ / 9 t � ,L\ W1\ VP •v a , i � � yY . r� If9 :`� . , �i7� �1) efl �pX R`2� R � �!�1 � �9 i .' I 411 v. s �1 � a �`� '� � �� � as �$ �� �� t• R�313 .@§• gQ•87p � \ �a',oR.w ! ` f�� •�_*t, "• ` yi �d A4 7qe !'1��:? 7��97n]AA �Fi�"ei9g ' • 1 ` t '.. 1' a a a r ,pp 6 // �� !`I 1 �• � '' a �5 Za7 sp apa gy7 of 1 �q9g 4: gB Hg '�il'j ` aa99 f9 oiY7 g g . 51 �' iB6• sj A r 'FIN Ig �� i� g7 a 7 Ageg6 3 Bi 9 s§ 6 � •. ._•+� �` � .•. ✓' e� 16 !�� ps leg •i � 9 $f f° 1111 Y�g� p�p�� S� CIiE GAi� !�l 8�a� S7?� 875 8ds 75� 8b5 1. , Etg , � ao ro o w o0 or . •,r�� mao N � � S11yTy! NQJp / •� —.. //pJ n �w"wa arwr r. PARCEL Fe. MR Pte, f �^ I >r — .i _ -�_�_ PARCEL � I I Norooroo4 /''/ ��_ '✓wrraom'a —.. "—"� /,9% 4 J mraomt Aria• ° �.n• F�- '°saw 14—x, / nod I/ /� 1}71LLT (O®s0!) IMCI r� osOU110.T. ' � / I// — -- •° \ V M®6l0®!^-1�6 irAl wm�iil�.R M �v wq S -I � 11°� i sp^ p®1 Oul rPIP O7my'�n�YIY1R I HM'91'OT1 .TEa 111 fl w Aa.dame ru .o .O 10 Hrwlm m 4 r0lwv'nbOii(b M4 .i ALTA/AS E AND AND SURVEY OF PARCELS E AND F AND A PORTION VILLAGE Of v arcuoarn v...^JFa-ai.cu a PARCELS B. C AND D. BASE ATL .roam w w so e..a rams SUBDMSIpO AND THE COURT E ALPINE a..Iwan.era.v a Isao w w °Y v ab..m ru.a.aum a.•s n.a TR.CND- LOCATED IN PART OF SECT � I .WYI)m 11u1.A M OI O In OG.IN YD ot7. v rut v M ernn man)am a lava aTI BONG A PART DF SECTIONS I ..aaac ev.o a ire.lo.a na1®1 b AND 2 SN RlSW OF LA BTN P.W.. OF PI IO SSTATE F COLORADO. COUNTY mew�p°.en.o:ao�rioisa mcln°a mlv`b n OF : TION. STALE OF COMPANY n iam ma"D�6x+YOV alwl°AO o�lool°n iwp o FOR: SNOMLA55 LAND CpIPANY cuw lord g a cP I�inT- SNOWMASS CHAPEL Snowmass Village, Colorado January 25, 2001 COTTLE GRAYBEAL YAW architects SNOWMASS CHAPEL Town of Snowmass Village Pre —Sketch Plan Review Package Submitted on Behalf of Snowmass Chapel and Community Center SCCC BOARD OF TRUSTEES: SANCTUARY 1 Bob Beasley Rod & Barbara Bu Harwood (Woody) Beville Jim & Diane Light Bill Boineau Truxtun & Adrienr Bill Burwell Guy & Linda Rutla Art Cerre Tom & Lois Sando John Donnell Jim & Sally Toffey Joe Farrell Nancy Ferguson Lisa May Howard Jim Light Margo Lykins Guy Rutland Lois Sando Rick Stephens Julie Wood OUNCIL MEMBERS: BY DESIGN TEAM: ell Cottle Graybeal Yaw Architects Morrison OTAK Rock Creek Studio, d Landscape Architect / Planner r January 23, 2001 Mr. Chris Conrad Director of Planning Town of Snowmass Village PO Box 5010 Snowmass Village, CO 81615 Re: New Snowmass Chapel Sanctuary Pre-Sketch Plan Review Dear Mr. Conrad: On behalf of the Snowmass Chapel and Community Center (SCCC), we are pleased to submit our conceptual architectural design for Pre-Sketch Plan Review of the new Sanctuary. The Board of Trustees and Sanctuary Council of the Snowmass Chapel are, in addition to addressing the needs of expanding worship attendance, keenly aware of the importance and potential of the proposed new structure as an asset to the community at large. We appreciate the opportunity of an open and informal dialogue with the planning staff, Snowmass Village Town Council and Planning Commission members as a basis for further development of the design and site planning. It is our intention to initiate construction of the project in the summer of 2001. following the pre-sketch plan review, we will submit the appropriate documents to initiate the formal community approval process. The intention of this letter, along with the attached concept graphics, is to illustrate the design and to clarify issues that have led to the architecture and planning being proposed for your support and that of the community. General The core purpose for the new Sanctuary is that of a worship space to accommodate the expanding church attendance of the communi- ty. The Sanctuary and its liturgical support spaces will be designed to accommodate 300 persons in fixed pew seating with additional overflow capacity of approximately 50 persons for high attendance services and community cultural events. The footprint of the pro. posed structure is approximately 7,400 square feet. Upon completion of the new Sanctuary, the existing worship space will become a much needed "community hall' for large gatherings and meetings and will fulfill the original master plan concept of the SCCC. Of equal importance, the new Sanctuary will allow SCCC "campus" to expand its community service and meeting spaces and, by virtue of the space will add a significant cultural component with opportunities to house a wide range of community events. In addition to ecumenical liturgical services and special services such as weddings and memorials, it is envisioned that the new Sanctuary will host ongoing programs including a musical and choral recital series, international organ symposia, the Snowmass concert series, church music work shops, and lectures. 1 A centerpiece of both worship services and music events will be a Fisk Pipe Organ recently donated by a Snowmass Village family. The best of its kind, the Fisk Organ is a hand made instrument custom designed for the Snowmass Chapel. Over a hundred years old, the C.B. Fisk Company makes only three instruments each year, the Snowmass Sanctuary Organ being commissioned last year. Fisk Organs are found in prestigious churches and symphony halls throughout the world. The architectural concept physically connects the new Sanctuary with the existing Community Center building to maximize the joint use of existing space, to minimize redundancy and the expense of duplicate Sanctuary support spaces. A lower level (mostly subgrade) space is planned below the new Sanctuary space. Initially unfinished, this space will be used to accommodate expansion for future needs of the SCCC. In addition to mechanical support space and toilets, the lower level is envi- sioned to include meeting rooms, church school rooms, counseling spaces and choral practice space. These functions may be accessed from the community center, Sanctuary or separately from the required fire access road at the northerly perimeter of the site. Along with the vacated space of the current worship space, the campus has been designed to fulfill community service and space needs over the foreseeable future. The architectural and land use planning has been conceived to address three issues of scale: community scale; campus scale; and worship scale. Community Scale Borrowing from the tradition of European mountain village prototypes where the village church is a prominent focal point, source of civic pride and community identity, the Snowmass Chapel is designed to translate those qualities, architecturally expressed to capture the heritage, history and unique sense of place that is Snowmass Village. The site of the existing chapel and community center campus provides a unique set of natural opportunities for a Chapel structure, expressive of landmark quality and community identity. The landscaped open space of the Snowmass golf course provides a verdant foreground setting as viewed from Brush Creek Road, while the backdrop of the ski mountain and East Snowmass Creek ridges keep the landmark scale of the Chapel from being overly assertive, thus of compatible valley scale. The positioning of the Sanctuary site relative to Brush Creek Road and the natural topography rising to the shale bluffs to the west provide a natural "gateway" quality to those arriving at Snowmass Village. It is our hope that the Sanctuary in this location will signal that Snowmass Village is about "community", more than just a resort. Campus Scale While a landmark quality is important from the standpoint of approach and community image, it is equally important that the architec- tural massing of the Sanctuary relate to the "campus" scale and establish a friendly scale of pedestrian entry along with the existing buildings which front the central green space of the campus side. For this reason, the architecture of the Sanctuary is designed as a series of stepped down gable roof forms (similar to the Norwegian Stave churchesl to create an artful transition from landmark scale to the pedestrian scale of entry to the Sanctuary and Community Center. An important element of the pedestrian approach to the campus from the existing parking area will be a new stone bridge, replacing the existing footbridge. Envisioned as an important pedestrian arrival "threshold" between parking and the landscaped environs of the Sanctuary and campus, the bridge will also provide required fire access to this area of the site. Referring to the architectural drawings, the bell steeple is connected to the south entry side of the Sanctuary and is approximately 12 feet square in plan dimension with the steeple spire rising to approximately 68 feet. Similarly measured from the entry side, the high- est of the stepped roof forms terminates at approximately 62 feet, then dropping an additional 10.12 feet as the gradient to the north slopes to the golf course level. By comparison, the steeple of the Prince of Peace Chapel is of similar height, however, its prominent embankment-top setting thrusts the structure and steeple into the skyline. The Snowmass Chapel will distinguish itself from that building, providing an identity unique to Snowmass Village. Worship Scale The final and perhaps most important scale of design concern is that of the worship Sanctuary itself. This will result from a balance between the intimacy required of a mountain village chapel and the acoustic volume required to enhance the pipe organ, which will play both worship and classical music. As currently envisioned, the interior of the Sanctuary will be characterized by stone, heavy timber and natural light. Architectural Character The design of the new Sanctuary was guided by the wish to create a building clearly expressive of its core purpose as a house of wor- ship, to establish a sense of enduring permanence, to reflect the architectural traditions and character of its majestic mountain environ- ment and to create a distinguished landmark identity for Snowmass Village. The translation of these objectives to architectural form results in a "grounding" of the building by the use of natural stone walls sur- mounted by the steep pitch of protective roof forms. In addition to a response to scale criteria, the gable roof "steps" permit natural south light to illuminate the interior of the Sanctuary space. Viewed as a Sanctuary of human construct within the greater "Sanctuary" of nature's domain, a direct visual connection to the land- scape and seasonal expression of nature became an important design factor. To accomplish this "connection" the sides of the Sanctuary at the ground level have been opened with glass portals to visually bring "nature" into the sanctuary space. A vertical stained glass element on the north fayade of the chapel will also bring natural light into the alter end of the sanctuary and will exter. nalize a "glow" at night, softly symbolizing the building as the community Chapel of Snowmass Village. The actual entry to the narthex and Sanctuary is formed by the lowest of the stepped gable roofs, which overhangs to form a porch for weather and sun protection. Heavy timber elements and glass form a traditional gothic arch within this roof form. The walls form- ing the narthex (vestibule) are envisioned as glass walls to create transparency and thus a visual connection between the sanctuary and the chapel campus green space, and beyond to the riparian environment of Brush Creek. Site Planning Issues The site plan is a response to several practical, aesthetic and regulatory issues. From an aesthetic viewpoint, the Sanctuary struc- ture is angled off the rectangular "grid" of the existing "campus" buildings to distinguish the landmark fagade facing Brush Creek Road, thus creating a somewhat separated identity from the lower scale of the existing buildings. The Sanctuary structure is more closely connected on the entry side to create a defined edge to the campus "green". A bell steeple element has been designed at this location to create both identity from the uphill village direction and to more strongly define entry to the Sanctuary. The steeple element has been designed of stone with a partial glass surround so the approaching worshiper may both hear and see the church bells. The ground level of the steeple is left open and accessible as a protected contemplation space in connection with a ground plane labyrinth. Fire equipment access has been addressed by the enlarged pedestrian bridge and by a reconfigured culvert crossing as well as access along the east side of the Sanctuary connecting to the existing golf cart path. This will also provide handicap access to the lower level community functions and double as maintenance access to the existing (or re-located) golf course toilet structure. Meetings with the Snowmass Fire Marshall have resulted in the fire access points shown on the site plan. As indicated on the site plan, a land swap between the Aspen Skiing Company (golf course) and the SCCC will benefit both the play of the golf course and the land use requirements of the SCCC and its required fire access. Discussions have commenced with the ASC, which will result in a formal agreement prior to building permit submission. In 1997, when the Community Center building was constructed, a parking lot agreement was approved along with a newly designed parking lot. The number of parking spaces was increased in anticipation of this new Sanctuary to provide a ratio of one parking space for every three seats in the Sanctuary. The only part of this agreement remaining uncompleted is the construction of a parking lot for use by the fire department. A sewer,which currently traverses a portion of the Sanctuary site, will also have to be realigned,with appropriate agreements and engineering criteria prior to actual construction. Building construction and site development will respond to the established Brush Creek Riparian setback and criteria established by the Army Corps of engineers. There are many factors that shape the design concept: community, religious, regulatory, landform. We appreciate the opportunity to discuss them with you and to benefit from your comments and those of the Board of Trustees and Planning Commission as we move the project forward. Sincerely, Larry Yaw, FAIA Principal erl'a '70, / / Y � V �, c x / � �` SNOlYMASS /// y I CHAPEL r GRAPHIC SCALE r rt a 1 loch MET) 50' cr o' lrnvr ro.t a+q. Legend I I, �I ;f Indlcafes Aspen Tress T \ Indicates Spruce Tress /I 1i 1 l�Oi6, H6`R \y indicates Edge of Aspen Grow Q Indicates Landscape Boulder i o- Notes: _ -- -� 1. THIS PRO W IS SO9.ECr To RESMVAIIDNS,RESTRICTIONS, i COVENANTS AND EASWMTS OF RECORD OR N PLACE. 2 CONTOVO NTERVAL EQUALS TWO(1)MT. J. R ATONS SHQMN r RASED OV M E AT011 Or 9179.7E j ON S.41L CONTROL PMT'SHOW CPS* - A. DATE Or SMVEY WAS NOVEMBER 1999 — .NNUMY 9000. i / f i �� GOLF COI/f�SE R/DV ad Cw LS O.407 ACRES - , &TAW Lt i OT 2A SNOWMASS CHAPEL - SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO EX. CONDITIONS Otak/Rock Creek Studio Planners/Landscape Architects January 25, 2001 Survey Source: Bookcliff Survey Services Inc. h �(• GOM Q� w � sNown,gsl• . G h•+tPEL •O . Z � i ovroeoR a! w6voinr� 6RRDg?y S c ex. v6e. y, N /x z erg t N 6 90' o iG' To 1 ^•s- • REAL/GN�v • • ti 6aLf cA`Rr PHT_� 604P cpaORr 2s. WKLAND Q• .. •F--.WB'fbhND 60VNOtAy ' p�, PRpr LiN6 % T FrR6 III 'H4MA4VRHeAD' �� PRoPeaBD PRePe 14M& TvrYM>?M' Ng A•N / (o.rg Rc) i d•gNCTYARD _�• � �- PRpPOSeG �ABYar � •'i, 125' . � Ek. VEe. RA NGk REAL/GN� BRIDB� � O �- SNOWMASS CHAPEL - SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO SITE PLAN Otak/Rock Creek Studio Planners/Landscape Architects January 25, 2001 r '+ ; `" I-' r 11w-. I I F`•. ' , fr{ '.•"l I".y.MN'jY'�r fil � t r `i.t �r .:(. �J.�s+�i► it � 1 I L xe; a If r, >ye .. I t fl : , 4111�n9fe. , . 73a4�Ut I .. r1 I•. i ' Y 11' t l4 t1 I -. i rl r.�ii" 'I�,{{ �.�.+ R " K . �1' 4 � f• {� �'{ I(` ! � t��l"�I+ 7 ' I�i •' r�-.�4„f'�.�1'T4 L'.'i� a �r ,Ir:_' .f'✓ 2 �yx•�'l y� �� rl �/ � (yvi.+�� � J •�.I r.� 1 r 1.i� �• a -r -,-.old � rim y. ., ot `��raa!:I TT��"�����'tjr � _y r 'La `a{ 5•. •�, y w i• y. 0 I' y S I�k�(I�;. eCK ,1 j'.,ye ,1�r, i+. 4 1 ,'.-, ,�• 11 • 1 , a 1 5R -�l'•.• � (,.yn�el O'�;�`C4 {, , ' , �. y F gedV��•t\�'. Fig IIP ;,�•yll^GI�i�6 ktfd�� �1. 3 r G� 'Y � y�,,• I , y' y. 1 t F '°r:7' ' Y, ", E�• �lv vR�� � !y 4\� ,y.. +•. ,f tae 4 yti...k:. ."�. ,l „v"- , iF�® �a•¢".i'1 S�•tiiww x i'3y�. +`s -ril��'�t Ir r'ik' t in ��-.. a`• a �� dM�P •L�a .is" "�:i��f.®�{¢�1y.�,� 7 �. .1"4 r "t f i , S I "G 1 tom.-. u_ ✓s ��.-, lti'y(�4!�,�R.�,3i9 Goo +., �Jtii �W�°+:1 Y��' i�::„�.l hrr w,.: >;y �1.,},yt�.yvc:l ... _ „rp sra f/' irr� 'r.,-�?� :1 •ra ,in' .>�r5.`'s�y.c.'. . �,, �1:c fi Fl�'ai rrr� • it \1 � v � 011101 V.- y'.� '�• ^..e+'�..:�J§ .�, T+ 4Y'PV,wa nM1A 1P,I;.,� I f 4 'a r..�>>4. 1 A.a... r l r t t f i v 7 Ff� ,� � x u6� 6-tn2>':�f rt• h tii r I :ti .1 r I Il � � I F d 7 (`A i r F s � 7 f f ✓ h a Y l4I X4Pa"�`� 4� a�""� �1x�9�r<I 'i��,!� � 111`11 >� (I } �. 4 s '�f 1 �� r \T�f"'3+q al vi �i n7 1:1� � � I k`1• 4���P �, V t t iy� r ^eti � i^( � ♦�� r 1 � it iu rY ! I f w -� a\ f f )ti4tl x lkf,' ` r'n, i �' h74✓ i,YI<,{ 6� C ' f� �: ) a ,t acs �tt� mm �' y4 .r1"✓�.uluv'v-w ' 1�.G..0-..._._,,._.....a._ �_ ._»-a c]v�, a1�.. � n .�_ �� SNOWMASS CHAPEL - SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO MODEL PHOTOS Cottle Graybeal Yaw Architects January 25, 2001 .; ;t: . _ � r, � . _ - ; . � ,a �' • r �, . � E • �d �� I . F •. � �� i • � . ` j ,.�f.� � . 'moo'' . (��. �� .� ,1 t '__ ' . / ❑ f' \ \ \ SNOWA Cottle Gra ' C3 .' o .' rased rases saes in o JL Lomm .n A o ° u cz) 0 0 ama awa a� ams 0 ° o !e I ems b ° arms 0 I I I I I I I I I I ,NS CHAPEL - SNOWMASS VILLAGE COLORADO LOWER LEVEL FLOOR PLAN peal Yaw Architects January 25, 2001 . . . \, • % , , < /\ & { 2 \ « . & - . t t . � i i i f k R :NOWMASS CHAPEL - SNOWMASS VILLAGE COLORADO ELEVATIONS :ottle Graybeal Yaw Architects January 25, 2001 7 j LS ✓� F>� x r 21 4' C t L r 5 \ \ t.A ":� •LC�.c: c: .Lt U L L� �C3 s L �L9s` ' 4OWMASS CHAPEL - SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO ELEVATION Atle Graybeal Yaw Architects January 25, 2001 � � III I Ii ili I liliii it I ` Rif cl 2' r � I I II I SNOWMASS CHAPEL - SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO ELEVATION Cottle Graybeal Yaw Architects January 25, 2001 - �, �,, 8��va Ib' 1 k 7 ( r R (. L 1 SNOWMASS CHAPEL - SNOWMA_S_S VILLAGE, COLORADO BUILDING SECTIONS Cottle Graybeal Yaw Architects January 25, 2001 SNOWMASS CHAPEL SANCTUARY SPACE PROGRAM Space Name MAIN LEVEL Sanctuary Balcony Narthax Coat Room Chaplain/Groom Chaplain Toilet Vestments C Rin Bridal Room Bridal Tollet Storage#1 Storage#2 Men's Toilet Women's Toilet— Sacristy Organ Platform Nursery Blower Room Subtotal Net-Gross Ratio MAIN LEVEL GROSS AREA BASEMENT LEVEL Mechanical Room Organ Blower Room Bldg. Maint. Office Counseling Rm#1 Counseling Rm#2 Counseling Rm#3 Clothing storage Choir/Groom's Rm. General Storage Men's Room Women's Room Kitchennette Meeting Room#1 Meeting Room#2 Subtotal Net-Gross Ratio BASEMENT LEVEL GROSS AREA TuTAL BUILDING GROSS AREA Current Design Per 01/15/01 dwgs. Dims. jArea- SF I Notes 80 x 60 4638 Seating 250 wl Chancel Platform In Current Pro ram 0 Was to Seat 60- Deleted in favor of overflow seatin on main floor 1004 Current Pro ram Includes Gatherin S ace 224 Included in Narthex 0 Use Choir room. or Comm. Center 0 Use Comm. Center or Basement R. Rms. 0 Use Choir room. or Comm. Center 0 Deleted,use Narthex 0 Use Comm. Center meeting room 0 Use Comm. Center R. Rm. 0 In Basement 0 In Basement 0 Accessible R.Rm. in Comm. He in Basement 0 Accessible R.Rm. in Comm. Hall, rest in Basement 119 Added behind Organ Platform in current Ian 240 Or an Re uirement 450 With toilet. Added at connector to Comm. Center 0 Or an Requirement, located In Basement 6,675 767 Circulation, stairs, walls, etc. Actual, from plans 11% 7442 380 138 135 120 120 120 162 804 649 sf room, 180 sf storage 242 240 240 129 493 30 persons 15 sf each 740 50 persons a 15 sf each 4063 2,104 Circulation, stairs, walls, etc. Actual, from plans 34% 6,167 27% 13,609 Overall Net to Gross Factor 3NOWMASS CHAPEL - SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO SPACE PROGRAM :ottle Graybeal Yaw Architects January 25, 2001 --- - -------------- ---------- c�J X^ cLlA—�/� No then seated Town Councilperson may appear at or before any Town Board, Commission, Council or Authority, either in person, by written means, or in any other manner, for the purpose of espousing a position for or against any matter then pending before said Board, Commission, Council or Authority. The appearance of a parent, grandparent, spouse, sibling, child or grandchild of a member of any Town Board, Commission, Council, or Authority, before said Town Board, Commission, Council, or Authority, either in person, in writing, or in any other manner, for the purpose of espousing a positron for or against any matter then pending before said Town Board, Commission, Council, or Authority, is to be strongly discouraged. Should any such person appear, in any manner, before any such Town Board, Commission, Council, or Authority, then the member whose above stated relative so appears, should strongly consider recuseing himself or herself from further proceedings concerning said matter. I COTTLE GRAYBEAL YAW nrcbilecls February 9, 2001 Mr. Jim Wahistrom Community Development Town of Snowmass Village PO Box 5010 Snowmass Village, CO 81615 Re: New Snowmass Chapel Sanctuary Pre-Sketch Plan Review Dear Mr. Wahistrom: In our submission for this project we described some of the acoustic parameters driving the building configuration. Attached is a letter from the acoustical consultant for the project, Mr. Larry Kirkegaard. which elaborates further on these parameters. In addition to his many other qualifications, Mr. Kirkeeaard was responsible for the acoustical design of the new music festival tent in Aspen, which has been very highly praised and is probably familiar to many residents of the Town of Snowmass Village. This letter is provided for your information and for distribution to others in the town administration who will be involved in reviewing our submittal. Please call if you have any questions or comments on this matter. Sincerely, Bob Schiller Senior Associate Enclosure ASPEN Post Office Bo,529 Basalt.C081621 w .cgyamhiteas.com .el 970.927.4925 fax 91092%.85'8 email.aspemECgyaahitects.com / ASPEN TELLURIDE VAIL r \� KIRKE,GAARD & ASSOCIATES consultants in architectural acoustics 7 February 2001 Chris Conrad Town of Snowmass Village c/o Cottle Graybeal Yaw 228 Midland Avenue P.O. Box 529 Basalt, CO 81621 phone: 970 927 4925 fax: 970 927 8578 Re: Height of Sanctuary Snowmass Chapel in Snowmass Village,CO, Project No. 1929 Dear Mr.Conrad: We understand that the issue of acoustics-required height for the Sanctuary may come into question during the Pre-Sketch Plan Review and believe it would be helpful for us to describe the acoustic character of the space in relation to its height and volume. We have participated in the acoustics design of several hundred new and remodeled churches over the past 30 years, many of which place great importance on music in their liturgy. For the Snowmass Chapel, music in the liturgy and for performances has significance that is most clearly expressed in the purchase of a new C.B.Fisk organ for the space. The character of sound desired for a major instrument of this type has defined an acoustic character that requires generous height and volume within the space. ACOUSTICS CHARACTERISTICS FOR ORGAN Few people forget the extraordinary thrill of hearing the soaring, uplifting sound of choir or organ in a reverberant cathedral setting. The recent popularity of recordings of monastic chants in reverberant spaces gives indirect testimony to the power such music has in communicating to the human spirit. Although the Chapel will always be a welcoming and intimate space as characterized by the name, a similar uplifting acoustics character is a fundamental goal for this church. Long reverberation for periods of 4 seconds or more describes the acoustic quality that most people identify with "cathedral sound" and, indeed,that is true. The balance of organ and other music liturgy and performance with the intrinsic acoustic nature of a chapel should not strive for a "cathedral" sound, but it should be strongly supportive of an appropriate range of music repertoire. We have identified a reverberation time of 2.25 seconds with full congregation present as the minimum goal for this project. It is a modest goal that seeks to balance acoustic character, design intent, construction budget, and the varied worship, performance and community uses of the Chapel. 801 west adams street eighth floor chicago, illinois 60607 312-441-1980 fax 312-441-1981 www.kirkegaard.com KIRKEGAAIRD&ASSOCIATE$ consultants in architectural acoustics Snowmass Chapel in Snowmass Village,CO 7 February 2001 Page 2 In a technical sense, reverberation time can be predicted based upon contained volume and extent of sound- absorbing material in the space. In order to maximize reverberation within a given volume, all construction and finish materials must be as solid and sound reflective as possible. With these conditions established,the maximum reverberation time is dependent upon the minimum amount of sound absorption represented in the space, e.g. the clothing of the people present, the absorption of the myriad of surface finishes, and the absorption of the organ. Our calculations indicate a need for at least 40 feet average interior height to achieve this criterion. With the pitched roof and stepped configuration of that roof, an interior height of 60 to 65 feet at the peak of the high volume will be needed. The current design is based on that criterion. Clarity is the other principal acoustic design goal—the intelligibility of both the sung word and the spoken word. This clarity in the presence of strong reverberation needs to be achieved as subtly and naturally as possible. Historically older churches achieved this desired clarity in the presence of reverberation because they were tall, narrow, and long and constructed of heavy materials. These are precisely the descriptors of the design approach we have recommended for the project. The specifics of height, width, length, and mass will be refined by acoustic analyses as the project progresses, but the basic principles have already been established by historic precedent. The architects' design for the Snowmass Chapel responds very favorably to these acoustic design goals. In recent memory, we have built too few structures whose purpose has been to inspire,to celebrate, and to contribute to the religious and public life in our communities. We have been privileged to participate in the initial design as well as the restoration, refurbishment, and refinement of many churches that similarly serve universal needs and are glad to be involved in this project for Snowmass Village. We welcome any questions and would be glad to speak with members of the community about any issues Ithis ief letter has not addre ssed. g rd Dawn Schuette chiiwq�u.nuxv,vm,we�y�iroi We 0e 3eooc