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07-09-01 Town Council Packet 0000G � � 1 00000) IRAWAF4 SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL Pic t ef REGULAR MEETING AGENDA JULY 9, 2001 CALL TO ORDER AT 3:00 P.M. I Item No. 1: ROLL CALL DISCUSSION AGENDA— 3:00 P.M, Item No. 2 3:00 — 3:15 FAMILY AQUATIC CENTER -- Gary Suiter. . . . . . . . . . . . Page 1 (Tab A) Item No. 3: 3:15 — 3:30 EXCISE TAX\DUPLEX UNITS - DISCUSSION -- Peggy Russell. . . . . . . . . Page 11 (Tab B) Item No. 4: 3:30 —3:55 WILDLIFE ENHANCEMENT MANAGEMENT PLAN REPORT -- Larry Green. . . . . . . . . .. . Page 14 (Tab C) Item No. 5: 3:55 — 4:00 BREAK REGULAR AGENDA—4:00 P.M. Item No. 6: PUBLIC NON-AGENDA ITEMS (5-Minute Time Limit) Item No. 7: APPROVAL OF 06-11-01 COUNCIL MEETING MINUTES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 21 (tab D) Item No. 8 : RESOLUTION NO. 32, SERIES OF 2001 A RESOLUTION EXPRESSING APPRECIATION TO THE SNOWMASS LAND COMPANY FOR THEIR DEDICATION TO ENHANCE LOCAL WILDLIFE POPULATIONS THROUGH THE DEVELOPMENT, IMPLEMENTATION AND COMPLETION OF TWO CREEKS/THE PINES WILDLIFE ENHANCEMENT & MANAGEMENT PLAN - Larry Green. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 34 (Tab E) 07-09-01 tc Page 2 Item No. 9: PUBLIC HEARING AND ACTION — RESOLUTION NO. 31, SERIES OF 2001 TO RECEIVE PUBLIC COMMENT AND COUNCIL CONSIDERATION OF A RESOLUTION CONCERNING AN ANNUAL TEMPORARY USE PERMIT FOR THE ASPEN SKIING COMPANY TO ALLOW DIRT STORAGE AND GRADING ACTIVITIES ON LOT 44, DIVIDE SUBDIVISION -- Chris Conrad.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 36 (Tab F) Item No. 10: RESOLUTION M NO.24. SERIES OF 2001 CONSIDERATION OF A RESOLUTION AUTHORIZING EXPENDITURE OF A PORTION OF THE ECONOMIC RESERVE FOR THE TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE GENERAL FUND -- Gary Suiter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . .Page 44 (Tab G) Item No. 11: SECOND READING — ORDINANCE NO. 13, SERIES OF 2001 CONSIDERATION OF SECOND READING OF AN ORDINANCE AMENDING CHAPTER 18 OF THE MUNICIPAL CODE BY THE ENACTMENT OF REGULATIONS CONCERNING THE REPAIR, REHABILITATION, DEMOLITION OR REMOVAL OF UNSAFE BUILDINGS -- Steve Connor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 47 (Tab H) Item No. 12: FIRST READING — ORDINANCE NO. 15, SERIES OF 2001 AN ORDINANCE AMENDING AND RESTATING SECTION 2-45 OF THE MUNICIPAL CODE CONCERNING EXECUTIVE SESSIONS -- Steve Connor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 51 (Tab 1) Item No. 13: FIRST READING — ORDINANCE NO. 17, SERIES OF 2001 AN ORDINANCE AMENDING SECTION 2-71 OF THE MUNICIPAL CODE DESIGNATING THE COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT AS THE DEPARTMENT RESPONSIBLE FOR BUILDING AND PLANNING ACTIVITIES WITHIN THE TOWN -- Steve Connor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 56 (Tab J) Item No. 14: MANAGER'S REPORT -- Gary Suiter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 59 (Tab K) 07-09-01 tc Page 3 Item No. 15: DISCUSSION COMMITTEE REPORTS/COUNCIL COMMENTS/STATUS REPORT. . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 60 (Page L) Item No. 16: CALENDARS . . . . . . .. .. Page 62 (Page M) Item No. 17: ADJOURNMENT NOTE: ALL ITEMS AND TIMES ARE TENTATIVE AND SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT FURTHER NOTICE. PLEASE CALL THE OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK AT 923-3777 ON THE DAY OF THE MEETING FOR ANY AGENDA CHANGES. TOWN COUNCIL COMMUNIQUE Meeting Date: July 9, 2001 A enda Item: Family Aquatic Center Presented By: Gary Suiter, Town Manager Core Issues: • Location (Commercial Core or Remote) • Site Availability • Customer Mix (Locals, Visitors or Both) • Cash Flow (Level of Subsidy) • Public/Private Venture • Stand Alone or Combined Facility • Timing General Info: Since my last report, I have continued contacting other municipal facilities and private-sector companies. Here is the additional information. Before we can proceed, several key questions need to be answered. The first thing we need to decide is why we are building this facility. What's our objective? Will we be serving a tourist market or local clientele? We also need to decide whether the facility will be for competition, recreation or therapy. All have different needs and expectations (See attachment Fast Fun or Fitness?). Once these issues are decided we can begin developing schematic options (examples of five schematic options are attached). After the options are narrowed, we will develop financial models based on accurate local economic and demographic data. Regarding financial models, there are companies that specialize in developing feasibility models for aquatic centers. There is very little information, however, on stand-alone aquatic centers. All of them are combined with either a community/recreation center or a resort facility/hotel. The exceptions are the full-blown water theme parks. I have made several requests for financial models and expect them this week. I have also been in contact with the folks overseeing the new Aspen facility. They are building an extensive ($17 M+) recreation facility and aquatic center designed by the same person who did the Whistler complex. We can learn a lot from them, as they have been 2 years in the design process. We need to stay on top of what Aspen is doing, so as not to duplicate efforts and/or dilute a potential market. We still have other key issues to work through such as location and partnering. I am coordinating with Steve Connor regarding the location issue, as he has been in contact with various landowners. Partnering will require some patience and additional research before that picture develops. Craig Thompson is assisting in that area. Craig is also planning a field trip to the Denver Metro area where he will talk to the pool operators, gather information and take photos. Regarding the process, here is what I suggest: Outcome —the outcome of this effort will be the evaluation of the financial feasibility of a family-oriented aquatic center. This effort will narrow the possibilities regarding location, cost, subsidy, indoor/outdoor facility, customer mix, public/private partnership possibilities, etc. By examining available options, we can decide whether to go forward with the voter-approved community pool concept or build a family aquatic center. Next Steps -At this point, staff has assembled a variety of data that has helped clarify the issues. We now need to formalize the process by obtaining outside consulting services that can assist with process management, develop some schematic designs, correlate the relevant information and help us narrow the options. They can also provide expertise in financial modeling. Second, it is vital that we solicit public input during this process. The voters who approved the ballot issue are expecting something to be happening soon. A series of public meetings or a Citizen's Committee is recommended so that the public can see movement on the project. Timeline— I anticipate that we could hire a consultant, generate sufficient data, consider several options, and make key decisions within 60-70 days. This would include limited public involvement, perhaps a couple of public meetings. More public involvement would mean more time. Council Discuss and provide feedback to staff. Options: Staff See Next Steps above. Recommends: Pant 1A0`0 . . Fast,fun or fitness? Because form must follow function, you'll need to know the exact user groups who will most likely frequent your facility. Users generally fall into one of three categories -- competition, recreation and fitness/therapy -- and all three have different needs and expectations. Competition swimmers are always first off the blocks --competitive swimming is probably stronger and more organized in the United States than anywhere else in the world. The roots of its strength can be found in the commitment to athletics in the U.S. educational system,beginning in elementary school and extending through collegiate sports. Because they are organized, competitive swimmers will always be a vocal and influential force in public debate regarding new aquatic facilities. They are also faithful users of training and competition facilities and are typically willing to pay higher fees for that use. But, as previously mentioned, natatoriums --particularly those designed with spectator seating and support spaces for major competitions -- are costly to maintain. Competition facilities also typically include a lot of deep water,which is difficult to program for activities other than fitness lap swimming and competition. For these reasons, it's important to get a feel for the level of need and commitment of your competitive swimmers. You must decide whether your community can and will support a full-fledged competition venue or whether a facility supplying a number of training lanes will satisfy the competitive swimmers in your area. Although they represent the majority of potential users in a community, leisure users have traditionally been left out of the debate over aquatic center design. While not as frequent or as faithful as the competition contingent,their large numbers are the reason most new leisure aquatic centers --with lots of shallow water,play amenities and expansive deck areas-- experience break- even or surplus revenue. i , Pool, /ALPO /NDOOl� oR Ov i DooR .? ---. For example, should you build an indoor or an outdoor pool?Typically, outdoor leisure pools generate positive cash flow, while indoor leisure pools fall more in the break-even category. Indoor competition pools--particularly those designed with seating and other amenities for large competitions-- generally require greater levels of subsidy. One reason for this variance is the increased operational costs of indoor aquatic facilities. Natatoriums require heating and ventilation, resulting not only in increased construction costs,but in significant operational expenses. In fact, as much as one-third of an indoor aquatic center's operational budget can go toward utilities. Indoor and outdoor facilities also have different usage patterns. In the summer,people naturally prefer outdoor aquatic facilities. Even indoor family aquatic centers with retractable roof and wall panels won't generate the same summer attendance levels as a similar outdoor facility. And though it seems reasonable that an indoor facility will recoup any difference in summer attendance by being open year-round, the reality is that most summer recreational pool users don't frequent these facilities as much during the winter months --school is in session and other after-school activities occupy their time. This is not to say that all indoor,year-round aquatic centers are money pits. Creative and aggressive marketing can sometimes buck this trend. Groups that you can target during school days include seniors, childcare providers, and school districts that offer physical education and special education classes. As the primary users of indoor competitive facilities, swim teams are increasingly being asked to provide a greater portion of a facility's revenue. In the past, swim teams typically received pool time free or at nominal cost; now,they are often charged market-level rentals of$5 to$12 per lane per hour, and even more at some universities. Of course, if you charge higher fees, you have to meet the teams' higher expectations-- showers, lockers,plenty of lanes, starting blocks, and so on. y- �ooc. /A/ Know your community When preparing your initial budget,you'll need to know about the people in your community. And although as a park and recreation professional you probably have a pretty good handle on the demographics of your constituents, it's helpful to quantify that information. *Population density. When analyzing a population, it's important not only to know the overall totals,but to understand where population densities occur. According to a World Waterpark Association and William L. Haralson & Associates survey, most leisure facilities derive the bulk of their attendance from within 10 miles of their location (1996 Waterpark Survey, Slash, May/June 1997,pp. 40-43). Industry experience has shown that distance is generally less of an issue for competitive and fitness swimmers. *Age demographics. Knowing the age demographics within your population can help you determine which type of aquatic facility is most appropriate for your community. Recreation and competition facilities are ideal if you have a predominance of youths younger than 18,while a large senior population would suggest a need for an indoor,warm-water pool for fitness and therapy. Baby boomers are avid users of fitness lap-swimming facilities,but might also support a leisure concept for their families. *Income statistics. Per capita and median household incomes will reflect the amount of discretionary income available for recreational activities. Additionally,this can be an indication of potential attendance, which can help you design the appropriate size of your facility. Median incomes can also affect your department's subsidization policy and help establish fee schedules appropriate for the community. w. 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CAQUW ROM MAN _ v.s.....s� ... mftm mu•ut� aJR1]ICS@ )IAm09 511ENG fH]lIM) �A�•3 rwrwc xFgxeu )m5r,.tS fSTMAT�ttnN UMaMM[M LOST f)AmA• NOIS rUf PIQINF LV A K(JU6•IOn LASR! ANl6MlM) 01PN1NFA9B3 4mnrcnrof•nPm •„�)d� lST4.NllUllvfMlF ))2i,IRIT043I31A wR•[Kt nmirnro-xm.rm sa® WEST LINN AQUATIC CENTER CONCEPT FOUR k t, 3 �_ rY1TRI.� .111\taMOW11{R �� B 0 CDT.Nf wlll.• H I 0 1 .wR�l � wm mn ••• kf GROLL94D BOOR PLAN mrlts�rm MTe a, las."..v - USFASONAL OUTDOOR FAQLLlY) wmor+c9rz fans n{rw 1.n.Fr srrt uen Wlma> tncros vnnr.c elQurtu irs�ncrs fS1MttfV TOTN Of\4QMlMf RET {S]Tfm - !UOES Mll KtUUF i.wo�CCU6rt[>+(t'KRt N@S4YQG�11�6!dtAWQQ gTw*tu nlengs t'�n.emrotTm.lm y' gTMfT104NM.4 f]TpTTOfEN.I�!� OIeRRK[ 111U.TAT cv6TrrtcoNn• ims.n l+S ® , WEST LINN AQUATIC CENTER CONCEPT FIVE TOWN COUNCIL COMMUNIQUE Meeting Date: July 9, 2001 Agenda Item: Discussion: Excise Tax for Duplex Units Presented By: Peggy Russell, Lot 3, Ridge Run Unit 1 (35 North Ridge Ln) Core Issues: Peggy Russell requested the opportunity to speak with the Town Council concerning the current Excise Tax provisions as they exclude duplex units from being afforded the opportunity to acquire additional floor area in the same manner as the other residences within the Fox Run and Ridge Run subdivisions. Specifically, she is requesting that a ballot proposal be added in November to enable the sixteen (16) duplex lots along North Ridge Lane to, in some manner, be able to acquire additional floor area for their properties. The ballot question approved by voters November 2, 1999 was specific to "detached single family residential areas only" and the implementing ordinance specifically excludes "any area zoned DU"within the Ridge Run subdivisions. 1) Should staff be directed to prepare ballot language to enable owners of DU — Duplex zoned lots to apply for excise tax floor area? 2) If so, it is recommended that special review criteria be included within the Land Use Code to evaluate parking, mass, scale and adverse impacts upon surrounding properties. On-site parking would be a problem for some of the lots along North Ridge Lane and some lots may not be able to use excise tax floor area to enlarge their current duplexes. Should staff prepare a report for further council consideration of this request? General Info: The DU — Duplex zone has a set floor area limit of 4,500 sq. ft. for each lot regardless of lot size. Fox Run (zoned PUD) and the balance of the Ridge Run subdivisions (zoned SF-30) have a sliding scale formula that determines the floor area limit in proportion to lot size. Twelve (12) of the sixteen (16) duplex zoned lots along North Ridge Lane have a limit that is within one percent (1%) of what their floor area limit would have been were those lots zoned SF-30. The average floor area amount which the duplex zoned lots are able to exceed what would have been their limit if zoned SF-30 is 188 sq. ft. or four percent (4%). Council Options: Direct staff to analyze the potential ramifications and prepare a report for further council consideration OR determine not to pursue this issue as a ballot proposal at this time. Staff Direct staff to prepare a report analyzing the issue for further Recommendation: discussion. P:\user\cconrad\MS word Docs\TC July 9 2001 Excise Tax Duplex Issue TC Comments 0I.doc DU Zone Floor Area Percentage DUPLEX ZONED LOTS - RIDGE RUN UNIT I Maximum Limit If Benefit Of Floor Area Zoned Being DU Subdivision Lot No. Address Zone Lot Size Limit SF-30 Difference vs. SF-30 Ridge Run 1 1 19 North Ridge Lane DU 34278 4500 4456 44 1.0% Ridge Run 1 2 27 North Ridge Lane DU 38123 4500 4500 0 0.0% Ridge Run 1 3 35 North Ridge Lane DU 34300 4500 4459 41 0.9% Ridge Run 1 4 53 North Ridge Lane DU 31766 4500 4130 370 9.0% Ridge Run 1 5 71 North Ridge Lane DU 36933 4500 4500 0 0.0% Ridge Run 1 6 81 North Ridge Lane DU 32334 4500 4203 297 7.1% t Ridge Run 1 7 99 North Ridge Lane DU 36620 4500 4500 0 0.0% Ridge Run 1 8 117 North Ridge Lane DU 38196 4500 4500 0 0.0% Ridge Run 1 9 135 North Ridge Lane DU 42976 4500 4500 0 0.0% Ridge Run 1 10 143 North Ridge Lane DU 43691 4500 4500 0 0.0% t Ridge Run 1 11 126 North Ridge Lane DU 34489 4500 4484 16 0.4% Ridge Run 1 12 108 North Ridge Lane DU 32529 4500 4229 271 6.4% Ridge Run 1 13 190 North Ridge Lane DU 31526 4500 4089 411 10.1% Ridge Run 1 14 162 North Ridge Lane DU 37478 4500 4500 0 0.0% Ridge Run I 15 44 North Ridge Lane DU 35473 4500 4500 0 0.0% Ridge Run I 16 47 Valley View Road DU 34196 4500 4445 55 1.2% TOTAL: 1505 1)8 lots have higher floor area limits being zoned DU than if zoned SF-30 Detached Single Family. 2)They exceed that amount by an average of 188 s.f. (1,505 s.f.divided by 8 lots= 188 s.f.). 3)The 8 lots exceed the floor area limit that would apply if zoned SF-30 by an average of 4.4% (1,505/34,495) 11 IN r • r• . • , S r L •e , r • •t, 1• r • i • 1 � . r • r . n1, I I � r � � .� • r 1 ' r • r��'il' f 1� � �.`y1 J-i.� • ,y.��-�X'95M� �L��f �} �� 9r-��� ^ Tl �' !• � a tit �'' r r Y yW1' r r� TOWN COUNCIL COMMUNIQUE Meeting Date: July 9, 2001 Presented By: Larry Green, Wildlife Specialist Subject: Review of Aspen Skiing Company and Snowmass Land Company Wildlife Enhancement and Management Plan Accomplishments Overview: Background: When Two Creeks/The Pines and the Snowmass Ski Area Master Plans were approved in 1994,both included Wildlife Enhancement and Management Plans (WEMP). The intent of both WEMP's was to mitigate development impacts to wildlife. The role of Snowmass Village was to monitor and encourage compliance. An annual report to the Snowmass Village Town Council is required. Aspen Skiing Company (ASC) Report Review: Wildlife enhancement goals for the summer of 2000 that were accomplished include: • Construction of wildlife habitats in tree islands using cut deadfall • Revegetation of several areas • Distribution of bear resistant trash cans • Employee wildlife education class • Distribution of dog leashes • Continued wildlife monitoring Planned accomplishments for 2000 that are ongoing include: • Wildlife signs on the Village Bound Trail (some erected) • Removal of barbed wire(ongoing as wire is found) • Installation of signs on summer hiking trails promoting low-impact uses Thousands of acres of wildlife habitat nationwide are being taken over by unpalatable weeds. Staff recommended that more weed control efforts be undertaken during the summer of 2000. ASC implemented a thistle control management plan for the entire mountain. Staff recommends that weed control remain a high priority for ASC. Staff intends to meet with ASC soon. The discussion will be a review of wildlife enhancement projects that could be instituted, augmented or eliminated. Staff compliments ASC for their cooperation, diligence and commitment in implementing the Wildlife Enhancement and Management Plan. _) y 0 Snowmass Land Company (SLC) Report Review: The year 2000 was the final year for implementation and monitoring of the Snowmass Land Company WEMP. Accomplishments included: • Completion of drainage improvements and sediment basins • Additional planting within Parcel H in The Pines • Adjustments to some drainage channels within The Pines • Servicing of storm water detention ponds in The Pines • Monitoring willow growth along the East Fork of Brush Creek • Distribution of the Homeowner's Environmental Stewardship video to new lot owners • Monitoring wildlife One portion of the plan was determined not be completed. SLC had originally planned to plant five spruce, eight aspen, 30 willow and five chokecherry in plan area d. (Plan area d is located on parcel F at the originally proposed site of the Nature Center.) When the Snowmass Nature Center was proposed on this site, a decision was made to plant in conjunction with the Nature Center construction. SLC is still willing to fulfill the obligation. However, it is recommended that staff and SLC do a site review. This area may not be suitable habitat for willow plantings. The Army Corps of Engineers (ACE) was contacted. The ACE reported that they knew of no currently unresolved outstanding 404 permit issues with the SLC permit, however, once the permit is issued SLC must continue to comply. The ACE authorized the discharge of fill material into waters of the U.S. associated with the East Village P.U.D. project under Nationwide permits 26 and 12 on July 27, 1994. SLC has mitigated discharge material by constructing 1.17 acres of wetland creation and 0.03 acres of wetland restoration (Aquatics and Wetlands Company, 1997). Staff evaluation of SLC WEMP effectiveness: 1. An increase of bird and mammal species occurred between 1996 and 2000 (attached graph). It is likely that the same species existed in 1996 as 2000 but were not monitored. While the information is not available concerning whether individual species population size is increasing or decreasing, the information does indicate that the same compliment of species currently exists as were recorded in 1996. This indicates that the WEMP goal of wildlife sustainability is being accomplished in the short term. 2. Observed Deer and elk numbers increased between 1996 and 2000 (attached graph). Division of Wildlife population management objectives during those years was to decrease elk populations and increase deer populations. Deer and elk may have habituated do the sounds of development and eventually am Awk is learned to use the fringes of the development as a"safe harbor." 3. While there are many examples of white-tailed deer populations thriving in urban environments, few examples exist of mule deer and elk showing those adaptive traits. The SLC WEMP summarizes, "No elk were seen in areas lower than the Sinclair-The Pines lines, or close to Owl Creek Road. Also, no elk were seen within the lower areas of Two Creeks below Pond J (Baharav, 2001)." Roughly 2/3's or more of the development exists below Pond J, which successfully eliminates this acreage as viable elk habitat. (It was not the goal of the WEMP to protect this acreage as elk habitat.) 4. The WEMP reports that 52% of the number of birds observed were in riparian and ponds/willow habitat. The water catchments developed by SLC are very important to most wildlife species and should be vigorously maintained. 5. The Snowmass Land Company effectively developed a wildlife plan, implemented that approved plan and has completed the monitoring and implementation, as required. The short-term outcome appears to have accomplished the desired wildlife goals. The Snowmass Land Company should be commended for their accomplishment. Recommendation: 1. Staff recommends that Aspen Skiing Company's Wildlife Management and Enhancement report be accepted and approved. 2. Staff Recommends that Snowmass Land Company's Wildlife Management and Enhancement report be accepted and approved. Staff also recommends that Snowmass Land Company be given a Resolution of Appreciation for their excellent commitment in developing, implementing and completing their plan. Snowmass Ski Area Memo 70: Dan Baharav,Wildlife Consultant Frorm Joey Woltemath, Mountain Wildllte Specialist CC: Doug Mackenzie, Rob Baxter,Gary Schuh Data: 04/17/01 Re: Narrative of Summer Wildlife Enhancements Projects The summer of 2000 was yet another summer of catch-up. We did not have many major projects, and only three capitol improvement projects. We used our time too clean up, maintain, reveg and start other projects we had planned. In June, instollaiion of our new 3000-foot snowmaking system on Funnel and Lower Coffeepot began. We worked on cleaning up the massive blow down over 1,000 trees on the ground between Longshoi and Campground trails. The clean up was long and hard, and it managed to reduce the fire hazard a:c.:nd the mountain. With the slash, we built several wildlife habitats 4'x4'x4' in dimension. On June 22nd, 40 people from the Snowmass Administration Building, Trail Crew, Lift Maintenance, Summer Rangers and Lift Operations picked up trash from Sams Knob to the Admin. Building. They also attended a wildlife educational talk by Kevin Wright from the Colorado Division of Wildlife. To help enforce the leash requirements at Snowmoss Ski Area, we put 21 dog leashes in our company trucks and made them available at the bottom of all the lifts. We distributed 15 bear proof trash cans around the mountain and outside the Administration Building. In order to further prevent bear/trash problems we installed a metal guard over our dumpsters at the Administration Building. In July, we began construction of the Scooper Cabin and Race Arena. A 700-foot Ski School Platter lift and a 930 square foot Picnic Cabin was constructed on the lower part of the Scooper trail. We also started our Mountain Weed control, brushing and mowing program, which included a vigorous thistle removal management-plan for the entire mountain. Finally, our mountain roads where treated with Magnesium-Chloride in an effort to limit particulate matter. r_ 0� e Page i --------------------------- In August, we continued construction of the 5cooper Race Area. As well as some other small gloding projects at the bottom of the Wall Area. We built several wildlife habitats in that area and continued with the blow-down clean up over on the Long Shot trail. The clearing for the new trail near Turkey Trot was also started. There were several other small revegitation projects throughout the mountain. Please see the attached chart for pounds per acre etc. Also attached are the ingredients for the seed mix. Revegitation efforts maintain the following guidelines: seed is distributed at 50-100 pounds per acre, depending on the type of seed mix. Forest Service certified hay covers disturbed areas at a rate of 5000 pounds per acre. •Page 2 AREA ACRES # HAY # SEED # BIOSOL COMMENTS Scooper Race Area d aces 20,000 lbs 200 Ibs 0 Ibs Little Max Park to 25 acres 125,000 Ibs 1,250 Ibs 0 Ibs B-19 (snowmaking) B-8 to Funnel 5 acres 25,000 Ibs 250 Ibs 0 Ibs Turkey Smoot 6 acres 30,000 Ibs 300 Ibs 0 Ibs f f ---------------------- 2000-2001 Wildlife Enhancemeni and Monogement Plan- Snowmass Ski Area ✓ Installed 3000 feet of snowmaking systems on Funnel and Lower CoffeePot. ✓ Installed 700 foot Ski School Platter lift on Lower Scooper. ✓ Built 930 square f oat Children's Picnic Building at Lower Scooper. ✓ We cleaned up trees f rom the blow-down in June, and constructed many 4'x4'x4' wildlife habitats. ✓ Cut a new trail near Turkey Trot. ✓ Began a rigorous Weed control and brushing project. ✓ Finished Village Bound Trail. ✓ All employee wildlife education class. ✓ Spring and fall trail closures ✓ Gloding projects. ✓ Dust suppression program for mountain roads. ✓ Reveg in several areas. ✓ 15 Bear Proof trash cans were dispersed around the mountain. ✓ Added 25 chairs to the Elk Camp lift to increase lift capacity. ✓ Summer Ski Company employees furnished dog leashes to visitors. ✓ The Wildlife Center at the top of the Elk Camp Lift was open again this winter, staffed by USF5, paid by Ski Co. ao SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL REGULAR MEETING MINUTES JUNE 11, 2001 Mayor Manchester called to order the Regular Meeting of the Snowmass Village Town Council on Monday, June 11, 2001 at 2:08 P.M. 1:00 — 2:00 P.M. SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL SITE TOUR (OPTIONAL) TRANSPORTATION VAN WILL LEAVE FROM COUNCIL CHAMBERS AT 1:05 P.M. Manchester commented that Council met with Gracie Oliphant and a couple of the Nature Center's architects on the proposed Town land site adjacent to the Hidden Valley Cemetery Property and familiarized themselves with the particulars to be discussed during Item No. 3. CALL TO ORDER AT 2:08P.M. Item No. 1: ROLL CALL COUNCIL MEMBERS PRESENT: Mayor T. Michael Manchester, Richard Virtue, Douglas Mercatoris, Arnold Mordkin COUNCIL MEMBERS ABSENT: Council Member Robert Purvis was absent STAFF PRESENT: Gary Suiter, Town Manager; Carey Shanks, Assistant to the Town Manager; Art Smythe, Chief of Police; Trudi Worline, Town Clerk; Craig Thompson, Community Development Director; Larry Green, Wildlife Specialist; Hunt Walker, Public Works Director; Jim Wahlstrom, Senior Planner; Chris Conrad, Planning Director; Steve Connor, Town Attorney; Robert Voigt, Senior Planner; Dean Stahman, Planning Technician; Dave Peckler, Transit Manager; and Donna J. Garcia, Secretary/Records Clerk PLANNING COMMISSION Jim Benson, Doug Faurer, Bob PRESENT: Fridstein, Jim Gustafson, and Bill Boineau PUBLIC PRESENT: Larry Ladin, Gracie Oliphant, Mark Fuller, Nick Coates, Jonathan Rex, Brent Gardner- "Cat 06-11-01 tc Page 2 of 13 Smith, Bernie Grauer, Madeleine Osberger, Richard Shaw, Suzanne Richman, Dave Reinbeck, Gary Soucie DISCUSSION AGENDA Item No. 2: T.V. PROMOTION FOR ASPEN/SNOWMASS Larry Ladin gave a brief background and history of his qualifications and has been producing a program called Aspen Profiles for a year. Ladin discussed positive TV promotion of Snowmass Village/Aspen and recommended advertising on the Travel, Lifetime, P.B.S., and Resorts Sports Network channels and commented that Rocky Mountain Public Broadcasting expressed an interest. Ladin explained return rate of tourists and suggested targeting the young executive/professionals with a half hour hosted tour of the Music Festival, free concerts, Aspen Institute, Rodeo, Anderson Ranch Arts Center, Fishing, or a trail ride as a means of getting them here. Ladin commented on costs of $50,000 per program for TV production and stated that he received a $1,000 pledge from Anderson Ranch. Aspen Community Resort Association (ACRA) will be the primary funder. The budgeting would be ACRA donating $70,000 for two separate programs and $30,000 from other sources. Ladin commented that monies from Bed Taxes are questionable and asked for a pledge of$5,000 from the Town of Snowmass Village. He is requesting a letter of commitment intent conditional upon the $50,000 being raised in case insufficient funds are raised, the Town would not be stuck with the expense. Mercatoris clarified that there would be two different programs offered one in the summer and one in the winter each a half hour in length. Manchester commented that for the summer program, an ad would probably run in September or August and another in November or December for the winter program. Virtue requested that any organization featured should be a contributor. Mercatoris and Manchester suggested that Chris Nolen of ACRA be contacted regarding stock film to include the Jazz Aspen and Labor Day Festivals. Manchester commented that Council would be happy to write a letter of interest. Council explained that the Town does not have the money to pledge at this time, due to budget constraints. Council suggested that Ladin write a letter of proposal submitted to Town Council and start the process by approaching SVRA for marketing. Ladin explained that Jim France of the SVRA expressed that he can't participate at this time due to financial difficulties. 06-11-01 tc Page 3 of 13 Item No. 3: NATURE CENTER PRELIMINARY DISCUSSION For the Record, Manchester clarified that today's meeting is to consider use of Town land as part of a Land Use Application without predisposing, as property owners, Town Council in the future and expressed the importance of Council neutrality. Gracie Oliphant, representing the Nature Center discussed a prototype self- sustaining Nature Center and requested feedback from Council and approval of use of Town land as part of a submission for a Land Use Application with the Town. Council commented that they are in favor of the site, the educational value is wonderful and that it is an appropriate use of Town land. Council Member Purvis was absent and will express his opinion when he is present. The Community Development Director commented that rezoning would require a public discussion. He discussed process and mentioned that assuming Council, as property owners, gives permission to the Nature Center to proceed with the Land Use Application, the next step is for the Town to approach the Snowmass Land Company by letter to obtain a Use Restriction Release as part of the Special Warranty Deed, which would allow this type of development. After approval, the Nature Center would then proceed with the Land Use Application. Manchester and Oliphant discussed proceeding with the Nature Center as a shared opportunity between the community, Town Council and the Nature Center. He agrees with the scale for the site, education and reconstruction and expressed concern regarding open space use and approval by the community. Mercatoris requested that more details of ownership and maintenance be worked out and that Oliphant approach the Snowmass Land Company with her request to obtain a letter releasing the Land Use Restrictions. A motion was made by Mordkin that the Snowmass Nature Center proceeds to Land Use Application for a future site on the Town owned property adjacent to the Hidden Valley Cemetery Property seconded by Virtue. A vote of 4 in favor and 0 opposed. Council Member Purvis was absent. Item No. 4: TRAIL MONITORING WORK GROUP RECOMMENDATIONS Larry Green, Wildlife Specialist updated Town Council with the organized Trail Monitoring Working Group (TMWG)findings. Their agenda is to define the problem of monitoring wildlife removing fall trail closure dates, determine the type of monitoring needed to address the issue, determine the funding source, and present the findings to Town Council. The TMWG evaluated three elk monitoring methodologies. These were radio- collaring elk, deploying an infrared monitoring system, and observation by a person 06-11-01 tc Page 4 of 13 with binoculars. The estimated costs for two years of monitoring are $10,000 for Radio Collaring, $2,925 for Infrared Monitoring, and $7,200 for a person with binoculars. Green's recommendation is the Radio Collaring for $10,000. In response to a question by Mercatoris, Green commented that there is roughly $185,000 remaining in the Wildlife Mitigation Fund. Green commented that most of the cost will be born by the Wildlife Mitigation Fund and that the Colorado Division of Wildlife (CDOW) is providing some funding. CDOW has agreed to provide elk traps and a person to help trap and provide some Radio Collars for half price if available. The major cost to the Mitigation Fund will be to employ a person to monitor during October and November when elk are moving through Snowmass Village near the open trails. Green explained that duration of the Radio Collars is approximately two years due to battery power loss. Suiter commented that there are values to be gained by failed tests as well and that these studies will benefit the existing trails as well as planning the future trails. What is important is to establish where the migration corridors are. Council had concerns with budget implications, trauma towards animals and monitoring costs. Council directed staff to make a request to Aspen Skiing Company for funding. A motion was made by Virtue, to approve staffs recommendation to make a request to the Aspen Skiing Company for the $10,000 for Radio Collaring, seconded by Mordkin. A vote of 4 in favor to 0 opposed. Council Member Purvis was absent. Item No. 5: ROAD FUND —SUMMER PROJECTS The Public Works Director explained that every two years staff surveys the roads and evaluates them on a scale of 1 to 10 based on an evaluation system developed by the University of Wisconsin. The last survey done was in 1999. They developed a project list for 2001 last fall and reviewed the roads this spring. Walker recommended approval of the following project list: REVENUES 2001 REVISED 2000 Carryover $1,244,632 Real Estate Revenues — Snowmelt Road Reserve $1,003,992 Real Estate Revenues, projects $408,273 Occupancy Assessment $50,000 Interest Income $61,490 Total Revenue $2.768.387 EXPENSES 2001 District Master Location Location Name Job Revised Ridge Run Antler Ridge Lane Faraway Rd. to end Asphalt Overlay $23,059 Ridge Run Ridge Road 1 Faraway Rd. to Deer Ln.Asphalt Overlay$42,230 Q4 don 06-11-01 tc Page 5 of 13 Ridge Run Ridge Road 2 Deer Ln to Faraway Rd.Asphalt Overlay $34,872 Wood Run Wood Road 6 Forest Ln. to Pine LnAsphalt Overlay $45,766 Melton RanchLemond Place Sinclair Rd. to end Asphalt Overlay $74,000 Melton RanchMeadow Lane Meadow Rd. to end Asphalt Overlay $8,800 Various Roads Patching $21,273 Parcel N New Road $160,000 Collection fee $28,245 Engineering $10,000 Total Expenses $448,245 ENDING BALANCE $2.320,142 Walker suggested delaying replacement of the water and sewer lines at Water and Sanitation due to a five-year replacement plan. Manchester discussed an incremental cost incurred by the Town when putting in asphalt overlay versus reverting back to road base. Walker commented that last year they put two inches underneath the pavement, which is not in as good a condition as putting in two inches of new asphalt. Walker stated that the only other cost that they assumed was okay, was the ten percent (10%) added in by the general contractor to cover supervising costs. Mordkin commented that waiting is not a problem as long as Water and Sanitation does the work relatively quickly, and that residents should not have to drive on roads with potholes during this time period. Walker commented that if by delaying one year doesn't change the project from asphalt overlay to a reconstruction project things should go smoothly and that the taxpayers shouldn't incur extra costs. Walker stated that this is a cooperative and fair deal between the Public Works Department and Water and Sanitation. Manchester requested that the settlement on Two Creeks drive be cleaned up. Walker commented that the Town Attorney and himself are discussing this very issue and will bring additional information back to Council. Item No. 6: REUDI WATER AND POWER UPDATE Mark Fuller provided a brief history of Reudi Water and Power Authority's (RWAPA) foundation and an update on the pending revision of RWAPA's Intergovernmental Agreement (IGA) and funding structure. Fuller stated that an agreement was reached between the Bureau of Reclamation, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the State of Colorado, and local and regional water users regarding water commitments to endangered fish species. This agreement enables RWAPA to contribute 20,000 acres draw per year toward endangered species and provides some protection to future flows into the Fryingpan and Ruedi Reservoir levels. 06-11-0 1 tc Page 6 of 13 Fuller commented that RWAPA is looking for new projects that will be of service to their members and would like to expand as an educational and liaison information source on local water issues. RWAPA Board has endorsed an equal-shared funding formula which would obligate each member to contribute $3,750 annually to make up the projected $30,000 annual budget and would like to introduce this matter to members recommending that they include it in their budgets for 2002 as an unfounded line-item with the objective of funding the contribution beginning in 2003 when Aspen's funding will end. Mercatoris commented that he disagrees with RWAPA's budget process in that it isn't fair for the smaller communities to contribute as much as Glenwood Springs and Aspen, whose budgets and tax revenues are much larger. Suiter questioned the difference between a member and a contract user? Fuller explained that contract users are entities on the Western Slope contracted for use of Reudi water, ranging from Exxon, the Reservoir, Parachute, Silt, and a couple of the ski areas for snow making. In response to a question by Suiter, Fuller stated that the primary benefits for Snowmass Village are regional and benefit everyone in a particular region. Suiter questioned why the Water and Sanitation District as the owner, manager and distributor of water in this community is not a member. Fuller stated that the original basis for forming the Authority was to develop the hydroplane and at that point the only people who could hold licenses from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission were local governments, since then its evolved as a lobbying group. Council agreed with RWAPA's recommendation to include in the Town's budget for 2002 a zero balance line item. Item No. 7: 3:50 —4:00 BREAK CONSENT AGENDA Item No. 8: APPROVAL OF MEETING MINUTES FOR 05-14-01 Mordkin requested that on Page 9, third paragraph from the top of the page, Town Clean-Up Day topic, first sentence be amended by adding . . .and Council Member Mordkin noted they would be. . . Mercatoris made a motion to approve the Meeting Minutes as amended. Manchester seconded the motion. The motion was approved by a vote of 4 in favor to 0 opposed. Council Member Purvis was absent. AD so 06-11-01tc Page 7 of 13 REGULAR AGENDA Item No. 9: PUBLIC NON-AGENDA ITEMS Mayor Manchester requested that the Town Manager call CDOT to investigate cleaning up the construction debris on the Owl Creek bike trail and post a better detour sign. Item No. 10: JOINT MEETING WITH PLANNING COMMISSION SNOWMASS CENTER REDEVELOPMENT SKETCH PLAN REVIEW Jim Wahlstrom, the Senior Planner, presented a brief summary of the proposal with a handout report addressing the Code criteria for Sketch Plans. He commented that the applicant would like to increase the size of the grocery store and post office, reduce the amount of office areas by 2,851 square feet, add 59 residential units including the eight single-family lots to the northeast of the center, change the architectural design, provide 3,200 square feet in the west building for a people mover link to the new Base Village, reconfigure and construct new parking lots above and below the Center building, complete 202 office and retail parking spaces and 104 underground and surface parking spaces for the residential units, reconfigure service and loading for delivery trucks on the northeast side, widen the road and rearrange parking in front of the Center, reconfigure the landscaping at the entryway off of Brush Creek road, and construct a new access road from the northeast portion of the Center, maintained at 8% grade, to the single-family lots behind the Woodridge condominiums. Richard Shaw and Suzanne Richman representing Design Workshop, presented a proposed plan to include the undeveloped lands of the Faraway North PUD, as per the Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan of the Faraway North Comprehensively Planned area. The application includes the Snowmass Center Parcel and Parcels A, B and F, designated for mixed-use development. It also includes Parcels H and H-1, proposed for residential development. Parcels G and I are included as undeveloped parcels and to accommodate drainage requirements. Shaw submitted a modified application based on redevelopment of the existing 53,000 square foot Snowmass Center, multi-family residential development, improved circulation, service and parking will be provided on the Snowmass Center and adjacent Parcels, and single-family residential development Bob Fridstein of the Planning Commission questioned whether the Town Offices and Police Department would be accommodated, how the reconfiguration would be done while the Town offices function and if this application included the development of the residential space within the present Center general area, plus the outlying areas including the single-family lots? Shaw explained that the currently occupied Town areas would be redeveloped into residential space in the plan, that the Town would be able to be a consumer of the other 18,500 square feet and that 17790 06-11-01 tc Page 8 of 13 construction would be done in sections as one application. Shaw stated that the future intent is that Town Hall will be at another location. Bill Boineau of the Planning Commission suggested that consideration be given to the width of the roadways for proper turning circulation of delivery trucks. In response to a question by Boineau, Shaw explained that the new plan suggests that parking be confined to one side of the roadway system moving people from the lower levels to the upper levels. The Transit system will remain in the present location along with a loop system for loading circulation in the proposed back of the building. Doug Faurer of the Planning Commission commented that he is pleased with the site plan and the economical support to Base Village. Faurer commented on concerns with construction parking, staging areas while present operations occur, impacts on the tenants, landscaping plans for the periphery area, a need for improvements to a pedestrian bridge connection and parking, Base Village/Retail and Bed Count, and preparations for office space availability. Manchester requested that the Planning Commission pay special attention to issues outside of the Snowmass Center property line, which include the adjacent properties such as access to the Draw, Conoco site redevelopment plan, increased capacity relative to the Wood Run/Brush Creek intersection circulation and how it will accommodate other needs in adjacent Parcels. Mordkin thanked Shaw for his in-depth vision for the Center and recommended that the Planning Commission address the 30% Slope issue in the Land Use Code book, Sec. 16A-4-50, Geologic hazard areas, steep slopes and ridgeline protection areas language and review the language therein. Virtue commented on his concerns with integration of this project, the Transit system and the financial commitments involved. Mercatoris commented on his concerns with the parking lot, people mover, related expenses, pedestrian movement to the new project and considerations with the Conoco intersection, ownership and neighbors across the street, the residential use in the apartment Townhome section of the plans and requested that the Planning Commission investigate having Employee Housing and Hot Beds. Nick Coates clarified that the Post Office space is inadequate in size and that they have a proposed budget for expansion in the year 2002. For the Record, Manchester disagreed with a representation made earlier, that the Comprehensive Plan indicated potential development zones in the draws to go up to the vegetation limit. He stated that the development has not been extended beyond where Council thinks it's appropriate. WIA go 06-11-01 tc Page 9 of 13 Manchester commented on concerns with the Gondola and pedestrian bridge connection stating that the site plan for the Gondola is very good and needs to a secure alignment with connection to Base Village. He stated that the Code has a redevelopment incentive built-in to exempt out Employee Housing and there are several community benefit issues as part of this application. He requested that the Planning Commission investigate height line opportunity, whether parking considerations of 300 square feet per parking space are necessary and allow for no exclusions or restrictions to be set for rental ability and suggested that perhaps a code change is necessary. Shaw commented that there is adequate mitigation for application of Employee Housing for the project. Gary Soucie.of Wood Bridge Condominiums questioned the existing grade on the 30% variance presented on the proposed road at the existing Post Office from the Center to the housing units, height of the retaining wall, type of construction and materials to be used, aesthetic appearance, how snow removal deposits will be dealt with, and type of landscaping. Soucie further questioned the length of the proposed road, if there has been consideration given to the water and flood problem at the housing units and commented on a potential lighting problem to the residents. Council requested that the Planning Commission continue discussion on the above issues at the next Planning Commission Meeting of June 20th and return to Council for further discussion. Item No. 11: EMERGENCY ORDINANCE NO. 11. SERIES OF 2001 CONSIDERATION OF AN EMERGENCY ORDINANCE AMENDING CHAPTER 18 OF THE MUNICIPAL CODE BY THE ENACTMENT OF REGULATIONS CONCERNING THE ABATEMENT OF DANGEROUS BUILDINGS, AND THE DECLARATION OF AN EMERGENCY. The Town Attorney, Steve Connor, explained that a provision in the Uniform Building Code had been overlooked, which needs to be adopted. A motion was made by Mercatoris to approve Ordinance No. 11, Series of 2001 seconded by Virtue. A roll call vote was taken and the motion was approved by a vote of 4 in favor to 0 opposed. Robert Purvis was absent. Item No. 12: DISCUSSION DALY TOWNHOME UPDATE Joe Coffey, the Housing Manager, gave an update on progress of the Daly Townhomes construction and the Change Order for the remainder of the project. Coffey stated that the wall construction is on schedule and the bike path is scheduled to open on June 15th •� d1b 06-11-01tc Page 10 of 13 Coffey commented that the guaranteed maximum price on Change Order No. 1 is $4,921,026 and stated that all the bids are not in for all the categories and believes there may be potential future construction savings. He stated that Weitz-Norris, Scott Smith and himself have reviewed the construction budget and have made a preliminary Gross Maximum Price number if the final bids come in lower with a deductive Change Order. He explained that an agreement on a price needs to be settled on today in an effort to keep some of the contractors from seeking work else where and that the project could be built today for the $4,921,026. In response to a question from Mordkin, Coffey explained that some costs were lowered by changing wrapping stone work to the back of the building, obtaining better concrete and framing bids, as well as numerous low prices in other categories. Coffey stated that the lumber needs to be put under contract immediately, due to an increase in lumber costs proposed to go up within the next month by approximately 25%. Coffey commented that the dewatering costs are approximately $40,000 and the site is continuing to dry out as the groundwater goes deeper. The soils have been compactable and this has saved large amounts of contingency money. Mercatoris questioned why the stand of Aspen trees adjacent to Brush Creek road weren't protected as discussed at prior Town Council Meetings. Coffey commented that he was not aware there was going to be as wide a cut through that stand of trees and that the water line and sewer come through there and are separated by a few feet, which required that the trees be taken out. He has budgeted money in the amount of$7,000 to put Aspen trees back into that area. Connor stated that the financing is projected to close mid-July. Council directed the Town Manager to sign the Change Order. Item No. 13: DISCUSSION 2001 SPECIFIC OBJECTIVES Suiter commented that this is the third layer of the three-layer process, which went from Job description, on-going performance standards to specific annual objectives. The goals set are intended to establish organizational performance standards for continuous improvement. In response to a request by Virtue, Suiter stated that he provided Purvis with a copy of the 2001 Specific Objectives on Friday and that Purvis will get back to him if he has anything to comment on. Manchester commented that the 2001 Specific Objectives do not list the VLF, the Rodeo or SRA. Suiter stated that it was difficult to quantify or benchmark those complex projects. He stated there are a lot of things that are beyond his control and *�30 d 06-11-01te Page 11 of 13 that best efforts will be made to meet Council expectations. Manchester suggested that perhaps Suiter could label those things that can't be controlled Council Projects and noted in italics. Manchester commented that the dates for the Community Pool are unacceptable and need a different time line. He also stated that perhaps some other Aquatics Facility could be researched. Mercatoris commented that he assumes that the Pool project will be breaking ground as soon as the snow melts in April. Manchester requested that Suiter shoot for springtime to break ground and that an analysis and feasibility be done on a possible Aquatic Center. Council agreed. Suiter clarified Council's direction that he add to the 2001 Specific Objectives VLF, SRA issues, Rodeo, and change the dates for the Community Pool. Item No. 14: DISCUSSION COMMITTEE REPORTS/COUNCIL COMMENTS - AND— Item No. 15: CALENDARS REALESTATE OPEN HOUSE AND MALL SIGNAGE In response to a question by Suiter, Manchester stated that the amnesty on the Real estate Open House and Mall signage should continue as long as the retail and mall community are working on a solution. The Community Development Director stated that the Mall Partners are participating ASPEN SKIING COMPANY Virtue commented that the Aspen Skiing Company Advisory Council met last week and discussed the following issues: 1) They put one-hundred hours of advertising money into prime time TV to promote the "X" Games. The hardwiring requirements dictated that it be done at Buttermilk, which would be Buttermilk, Aspen and Snowmass. According to Virtue, Pat Harris stated that she feels there's a 90% chance that the Aspen central residential area and the properties in Snowmass Village will find some common ground. According to Virtue, Harris stated some concern with how much was spent marketing Aspen and expressed that she is satisfied to market Aspen/Snowmass as a package beginning July 18t. Virtue stated that Jim France left that meeting expressing he is in favor of something like this; and 2) The Employee Housing meeting was well attended and copies of the comments from that meeting will be distributed to Town Council on June 12th. The next Committee Meeting will be the evening of June 12th to begin the process of shifting through those comments. Virtue stated that he would be present at that meeting only to remind the Committee of their responsibility to remain neutral and keep the discussion confidential, he will then leave the meeting. mat M 06-11-01 tc Page 12 of 13 MERCATORIS LEAVING TOWN Mercatoris commented that he will be leaving town on Friday, June 15th and will be gone until June 28th. SVRA Mercatoris stated that he is curious as to what direction Council is heading regarding the SVRA, Sales Tax and Civic Assessment replacement. Manchester stated that Council is waiting for SVRA refinancing. Virtue commented that Council's priority is to make sure that SVRA is a vibrant marketing entity that markets this community. Mercatoris suggested that Council schedule a meeting for SVRA's next Board Meeting, which is August 31St. Salary Range Manchester thanked Suiter for the charts he presented and requested that he assign salary range and pay raises associated with management and higher-level positions. Virtue requested that future information of this type be put into sealed envelopes when presented to Council Members. Town Council Packet on CD-Rom Manchester commented that Greenwood Village receives their Town Council packet on CD-Rom and suggested this as a possible way for Snowmass Village Council Members to receive their information. Wood Run Dumpster Connor commented that he would be meeting with the Public Works Director and the appraiser on Thursday to appraise the Wood Run Dumpster sites for fee and easement. Connor stated that he would need the appraisal back from Town Council within a month. Entryway Recommendation Thompson provided Council with a memo distributed last week regarding the Entryway landscaping plan. Council agreed with the recommendation. Public Workshop Thompson mentioned that the Landscape Architect would be holding a Planning and Design Workshop for the Lower Benedict Greenway Trail effort at the Snowmass Chapel on Thursday, June 14th, at 7:00 p.m. Merchants/VLF Meeting Mordkin mentioned that there will be a Merchants/VLF Meeting Wednesday, June 13, at the Fairway Center from 9:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. and arrangements for lunch have been made. amb woo 06-11-0 1 tc Page 13 of 13 Item No. 16: ADJOURNMENT There being no further business, Mercatoris made a motion to adjourn the Meeting, seconded by Virtue. The motion was approved by a vote of 4 in favor to 0 opposed. Robert Purvis was absent. The Meeting adjourned at 6:40 p.m. Submitted By: Donna J. Garcia, Secretary/Records Clerk TOWN COUNCIL COMMUNIQUE Meeting Date: July 9, 2001 Agenda Item: RESOLUTION NO. 32, SERIES 2001 A RESOLUTION EXPRESSING APPRECIATION TO THE LAND COMPANY FOR THEIR DEDICATION TO ENHANCE LOCAL WILDLIFE POPULATIONS THROUGH THE DEVELOPMENT, IMPLEMENTATION AND COMPLETION OF TWO CREEKS./THE PINES WILDLIFE ENHANCEMENT & MANAGEMENT PLAN Presented By: Lag Green Core Issues: General Info: Larry Green will be at the meeting to address any comments and to answer questions. Council Options: Staff Recommendation: APPROVAL _3y- SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL RESOLUTION NO. 32 SERIES OF 2001 A RESOLUTION EXPRESSING APPRECIATION TO THE SNOWMASS LAND COMPANY FOR THEIR DEDICATION TO ENHANCE LOCAL WILDLIFE POPULATIONS THROUGH THE DEVELOPMENT, IMPLEMENTATION AND COMPLETION OF TWO CREEKS/THE PINES WILDLIFE ENHANCEMENT 6 MANAGEMENT PLAN WHEREAS,Snowmass Land Company developed a wildlife enhancement and management plan in 1994; and WHEREAS, Snowmass Land Company implemented this plan by: • Closing trails during spring and fall for fawning,calving,nesting and migration. • Contributing$10,000 toward the development of the Brush Creek Field Guide, • Conveying 200 acres in Hidden Valley deed restricted from any development. • Developing a 2G minute video distributed to lot owners concerning wildlife habitat. • Creating wildlife water catchments, • Revegetating stream banks. • Enhancing wetlands with vegetative plantings, • Removing old fencing dangerous to wildlife in migration corridors • Limiting manicured landscaping • Implemented noxious weed control • Monitoring wildlife populations;and WHEREAS,Snowmass Land Company successfully completed monitoring and implementation on December 31,2000. NOW,THEREFORE,BE IT RESOLVED by the Town Council of the Town of Snowmass Village, Colorado: The Citizens of Snowmass Village,the Snowmass Village Town Council and the entire Town Staff hereby express sincere gratitude and appreciation to the Snowmass Land Company for its dedication,loyalty and excellence in its efforts to enhance existing wildlife habitats, maintain critical wildlife migration corridors and educate homeowners and visitors on the ecology of Snowmass Village area. INTRODUCED,READ AND ADOPTED By the Town Council of the Town of Snowmass Village, Colorado on the 91"day of July.2001 with a motion made by Mayor Pro Tern Mercatoris and seconded by Council Member Purvis by a vote of 4 in favor to 0 opposed. Mayor Manchester was absent. ATTEST: TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE TRUDI WORLINE,Town Clerk DOUGLAS MERCATORIS, Mayor Pro Tern r TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL PUBLIC HEARING WHEN: July 9, 2001 WHERE: Snowmass Village Town Council Chambers 2nd Floor, Snowmass Center 0016 Kearns Road, Snowmass Village WHY: TO RECEIVE PUBLIC COMMENT ON: RESOLUTION NO. 31, SERIES OF 2001, A RESOLUTION CONCERNING AN ANNUAL TEMPORARY USE PERMIT FOR THE ASPEN SKIING COMPANY TO ALLOW DIRT STORAGE AND GRADING ACTIVITIES ON LOT 44, DIVIDE SUBDIVISION. TIME: AT A MEETING WHICH BEGINS AT 4:00 P.M. THE EXACT TIME OF THE HEARING WILL BE DETERMINED BY THE AGENDA. CODE: This application will be processed as an Annual Temporary Use Permit application, pursuant to Section 16A-5-260 of the Snowmass Village Municipal Code. INFO: A copy of the proposed amendments is on file and available for review in the Snowmass Village Community Development Department at the above address. For further information call 923-5524. Rhonda B. Coxon, Deputy Town Clerk Posted and Published in the Snowmass Sun on June 20, 2001 clerk(otosv.com http:/www.tosv.com _39row TOWN COUNCIL COMMUNIQUE Meeting Date: July 9, 2001 Agenda Item: Public Hearing and Action: Resolution No. 31, Series of 2001, a resolution concerning an Annual Temporary Use Permit for the Aspen Skiing Company to allow dirt storage and grading activities on Lot 44, Divide Subdivision Presented By: Chris Conrad, Planning Director Core Issues: The Aspen Skiing Company ("ASC) has recently submitted a Minor PUD amendment for proposed changes to a Vehicle Maintenance Facility ("VMF") that had been originally approved at the time of the original Divide PUD. The Town Council is tentatively scheduled to consider 1st reading for the new proposal on August 6. They plan to commence construction of the new facility in spring, 2002 and are requesting approval at this time to undertake earthmoving activities on the site, as shown in Exhibit "A", in preparation for construction next summer. The building site for the Divide Lot VMF will require imported fill to prepare the site and this application involves granting approval to commence hauling structural fill to the Divide VMF site prior to their development approval. 1) Building height for the new VMF will be calculated relative to the existing grade. The term of this permit could be limited to September 1 in order to limit the amount of dirt located on site should the Minor PUD amendment be denied. Continued dirt hauling could then be authorized within the ordinance granted in August. Staff recommends that this option be considered. 2) In lieu of limiting the term of this permit, Condition No. 10 of the resolution states that all future development applications will be evaluated using the current topography. This could require that some of the dirt being hauled may need to be removed if the final approved VMF proposal requires finished grading different than what is currently proposed and too much fill has been P:\user\cconrad\MS Word Docs\TC OI-31 ATUP ASC L44 Divide TC Comments Ol.doc am placed on the site. General Info: The site has been estimated to require up to 10,000 yards of structural fill. The preliminary earthwork will be completed with natural looking contours that blend into the existing topography of the site. Topsoil will be stripped, stockpiled and contoured in a natural way. The overall drainage of the site will not change significantly from the existing drainage characteristics. ASC will utilize Sediment and Runoff Control Best Management Practices to prevent sediment laden waters from draining from the site. The applicant had submitted this same application in November, 2000, but withdrew the application shortly prior to the November 20, 2000 Town Council meeting. Victor Gerdin (ASC — Planning) has met with the Divide Homeowners Association representative (Diedre Boineau), the owner of Krabloonik Kennel and Restaurant (Dan MacEachen) and the Town Planning staff. Concerns regarding drainage and erosion control, ski-in access to Krabloonik, use of Parking Lot "E" and maintenance of the paved section of Divide Road have been addressed and are incorporated as conditions within the enclosed resolution. Victor Gerdin with the ASC will be available at the Public Hearing to address any concerns. Council Options: Approve the enclosed resolution as written, approve it as may be amended during the meeting to limit the term of the permit, or deny the application. Staff Staff recommends approval of the enclosed resolution Recommendation: with an amendment limiting the term of the permit. Pluserl000nrac!WS Word Doc5\TC 01-31 ATUP ASC Lot 44 Divide TC Comments 01.doc TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL RESOLUTION NO. 31 SERIES OF 2001 A RESOLUTION CONCERNING AN ANNUAL TEMPORARY USE PERMIT FOR THE ASPEN SKIING COMPANY TO ALLOW DIRT STORAGE AND GRADING ACTIVITIES ON LOT 44, DIVIDE SUBDIVISION. WHEREAS, the Aspen Skiing Company ("Applicant") has land use and site development approval to construct a Vehicle Maintenance Facility ("VMF") on Divide Subdivision Lot 44 (the "Site"), and WHEREAS, imported fill must be placed on the Site in order to adequately prepare it for the VMF as shown in Exhibit "A", and WHEREAS, the Community Development Department is currently processing a Minor PUD application which amends the original PUD approval for the VMF facility; and WHEREAS, the Applicant would like to receive Annual Temporary Use Permit approval in order to commence moving dirt to the site in anticipation of receiving final zoning and building permit approval to construct the new facility, and WHEREAS,the Applicant has contacted the Divide Homeowners Association and the owner of neighboring Lot 45 (Dan MacEachan—Krabloonik)to receive their input and have their concerns addressed within the provisions of this permit, and WHEREAS,the Planning Commission reviewed the application on June 20, 2001 and unanimously recommended approval subject to the conditions contained within this resolution; and WHEREAS, in accordance with published and mailed notice,a public hearing was held before the Town Council on July 9, 2001 to receive public comment on the Applicant's proposal; and WHEREAS,the Town Council reviewed the application on July 9, 2001 and heard the recommendations of the Town Staff; and WHEREAS, the Town Council finds that the adoption of this Resolution is necessary for the immediate protection of the public health, safety and welfare. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED by the Town Council of the Town of Snowmass Village, Colorado: Section One: Findings. Based upon the information submitted and testimony in the record, the Town Council finds as follows: 1. The application has been submitted in accordance with the provisions of 0020 d TC Reso 01-31 Page 2 Section 16A-5-260 of the Town of Snowmass Village Land Use and Development Code (the "Municipal Code"). 2. The Applicant has sufficiently demonstrated that the proposed grading activities will comply with the Review Standards for approving an Annual Temporary Use Permit contained in Section 16A-5-260(d)of the Municipal Code. Section Two: Approval. The Town Council hereby authorizes the issuance of an Annual Temporary Use Permit to the Aspen Skiing Company to allow the transport of up to 10,0000 cubic yards of clean fill dirt material to Divide Lot 44 and to allow grading activities to occur, as shown in Exhibit"A", in order to prepare the site for the future Vehicle Maintenance Facility. Said approval should be subject to satisfying the following conditions. Section Three: Conditions of Permit Approval. The authorization of the Annual Temporary Use Permit shall be subject to the following conditions: 1. The term of this permit shall be for one (1) year from the effective date of this resolution. The hours of operation shall be from 7:00 a.m. —6:00 p.m., Monday through Saturday (excluding legal holidays). No work shall be performed on legal holidays. 2. No noise-producing construction or excessive vehicle activity, as defined in Section 18-3 of the Municipal Code, shall be permitted during Sunday or legal holidays. 3. The Applicant will utilize sediment and runoff control best management practices to prevent sediment laden waters from draining from the Site. These include, but are not limited to, a sediment pond and silt fencing. The Town may amend the sediment and runoff control plan at any time as necessary. 4. The Applicant must prevent soils from being tracked onto the paved section of Divide Road, and cleanse the area by the end of the days work, should it become soiled. This may include upper portions of the Divide Road where dirt may spill out along the curves. A mud rack (short stretch of clean gravel fill) placed prior to where the trucks would enter the paved portion of Divide may be required by the Town Planning Director to aid in removing mud if the dirt cleaning or prevention activities by the Applicant prove to be insufficient or ineffective. 5. In the event the Applicant receives any complaint arising from this operation, they shall exhibit due diligence in attempting to resolve the problem. Since this program is being conducted under the sole supervision and control of the Applicant,certain refinements, modifications, r LO ' TC Reso 01-31 Page 3 or amendments to the operational plan may be necessary in response to impacts, complaints or concerns which were not apparent at the time application was made. Any such changes may be authorized by the Planning Director, or designee, provided they are not in conflict with the findings and Review Standards relative to this Annual Temporary Use Permit. 6 All requirements of the Snowmass-Wildcat Fire District Chief and Town Police Chief, or designees,whether imposed prior to or during the term of this permit, must be satisfied and shall be considered conditions of this permit. 7. The Applicant shall promptly notify the Snowmass Village Planning Office of any additions, modifications, or amendments to this permit or proposed use of the subject property. Any such changes should not be in conflict with the findings and Review Standards relative to this Annual Temporary Use Permit and may be permitted with written approval of the Town Manager or referred by him to the Town Council for review. 8. At the request of the Town Police Chief or his designee, the Applicant will provide a "flagger' at the intersection of Divide Road and Brush Creek Road when Roaring Fork Transit Authority buses are staging for afternoon peak travel. 9. The Applicant will not utilize Town Parking Lot "E" as a staging area for operations or as an overnight storage area for vehicles and equipment. 10. During the ski season, the Applicant will maintain ski-in/out access from the Snowmass Ski Area (Slot Run) to Krabloonik Kennel and Restaurant and Town Parking Lot E (Divide Parking Lot). INTRODUCED, READ AND ADOPTED this 9th day of July,2001,on the motion of Council Member and the second of Council Member by a vote of_ in favor and _against. TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE T. Michael Manchester, Mayor ATTEST: Trudi Worline, Town Clerk ago DIVIDE LOT ¢¢ and surrounding areas EXHIBIT "A" • TC Resolution No.31,Series of 2001 /^•� , (Page t of 2) LE kn ' ' Ru A164 I.OT 46 V. ♦ X.0/ACRE$ COM104 OP4M SPACE • ll7T 4S ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ SEOiM6�IT POND 2.854 Arlo \ \ LOr 43 0 "` W A � LaT 45 l.717ACAEY CKrrwPwealk) loA QA 1 p,y�� 'r►a DoT So Lor 4z 0.474 Acm ---IrII--------------- V III V Ae EXHIBIT "A" � 11 TC Resolution No. 31,Series of 2001 S�PU.50, - I I (Page 2 of 2) aD.60' IIIJ 1 1 i� , I h J3 � � II J/f 11111 A. 1� IO7,B2' i6 ' C � I � � l � e ef7�F yM1 d9 �� /• • i sd' �.� �'�; i - f . T ' - 1 F ' i .6 I � N23'38' Z'w t y�. 1 ASW TOWN COUNCIL COMMUNIQUE Meeting Date: July 9, 2001 Agenda Item: RESOLUTION NO. 24, 2001, A RESOLUTION AUTHORIZING EXPENDITURE OF A PORTION OF THE ECONOMIC RESERVE FOR THE TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE GENERAL FUND Presented By: Gary Suiter/Marianne Rakowski Core Issues: . Decline in Sales tax revenues • Consistency with Resolution No. 96, Series of 1989 • Balancing the Budget General Info: This Resolution authorizes expenditure of the Economic Reserve up to $113,500, which is approximately one-half of the projected sales tax revenue shortfall for 2001. The money will be used to offset General Fund expenses. Approval of this Resolution requires a two-thirds majority vote of the Town Council. Council Options: Approve, amend or deny. Staff Recommendation: Approval. owl yt� SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL RESOLUTION NO. 24 SERIES OF 2001 A RESOLUTION AUTHORIZING EXPENDITURE OF A PORTION OF THE ECONOMIC RESERVE FOR THE TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE GENERAL FUND WHEREAS, In accordance with Section 9.8 of the Home Rule Charter, the Town of Snowmass Village Town Council adopted the 2001 Proposed Budget with the approval of Resolution No. 42, Series of 2000; and WHEREAS, The Town of Snowmass Village is dependent upon sales tax as a primary revenue source; and WHEREAS, The Town Staff has reported that sales tax revenues are expected to be less than projected for this fiscal year; and WHEREAS, A combination of low snow years, declining numbers of visitors and increased competition have caused revenue shortfalls in sales tax revenues and other categories; and WHEREAS, Resolution No. 96, Series of 1989, established an emergency contingency for the Town of Snowmass Village General Fund and; WHEREAS, The emergency contingency was established for the purpose of meeting "unexpected costs due to low or no snow years and/or natural disasters"; and WHEREAS, The Economic Reserve was established as a part of the emergency contingency for the purposes of meeting TABOR requirements; and WHEREAS, The emergency contingency maybe used only by a two-thirds vote of the Town Council; and WHEREAS, There is currently $378,912 budgeted in the Economic Reserve and this authorization will offset approximately %Z of the anticipated sales tax revenue shortfall; and WHEREAS, This action is necessary for the health, safety and welfare of the Town of Snowmass Village and its residents. 05%4s Resolution 01-24 Page 2 NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED by the Town Council of the Town of Snowmass Village, Colorado: Section One: Authorization for Expenditure of the Economic Reserve. The Town of Snowmass Village Town Council hereby authorizes and appropriates expenditure of up to $113,500 of the Economic Reserve for General Fund expenses. INTRODUCED, READ AND ADOPTED by the Town Council of the Town of Snowmass Village, Colorado on this 9th day of July, 2001 with a motion made by seconded by , and a vote of_ in favor to_ opposed. TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE T. MICHAEL MANCHESTER, Mayor ATTEST: TRUDI WORLINE, Town Clerk 46- TOWN COUNCIL COMMUNIQUE Meeting Date: July 9, 2001 Presented By: Stephen R. Connor, Town Attorney Craig Thompson, Community Development Director Subject: ORDINANCE No. 13, SERIES OF 2001 AN ORDINANCE AMENDING CHAPTER 18 OF THE MUNICIPAL CODE BY THE ENACTMENT OF REGULATIONS CONCERNING THE REPAIR, REHABILITATION, DEMOLITION OR REMOVAL OF UNSAFE BUILDINGS Overview: At first reading the ordinance was adopted without amendment. By adoption of this Ordinance, the failure to timely obtain a building permit to repair or demolish the building will result in a general Municipal Code violation which is a maximum of $1000.00 and up to one year in jail for each day that the offense continues. Under the provisions of the expanded jurisdiction of the Town Municipal Court, a complaint can be filed for a mandatory injunction requiring the owner to obtain a building permit or for a penalty as a misdemeanor, at the option of the Town. As additional remedies, the Town can still pursue the demolition of the building by nuisance or under the Uniform Code for Abatement of Dangerous Buildings. Recommendation: Adopt the Ordinance on second reading. go TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL ORDINANCE No. 13 SERIES OF 2001 AN ORDINANCE AMENDING CHAPTER 18 OF THE MUNICIPAL CODE BY THE ENACTMENT OF REGULATIONS CONCERNING THE REPAIR, REHABILITATION, DEMOLITION OR REMOVAL OF UNSAFE BUILDINGS. WHEREAS, the Town Council has determined that the expeditious repair or demolition of damaged buildings that are determined to be unsafe benefits the public health, safety and welfare; and WHEREAS, when a building is damaged by fire or other casualty, it becomes a hazard to public health, safety and welfare and a visual nuisance; and WHEREAS, the Town Council desires to put the owners of property on notice that unsafe buildings must be repaired or demolished; and WHEREAS, the Town Council believes that the owners of property should bear the primary obligation for the repair or demolition of unsafe buildings; and WHEREAS, the Town Council finds that the adoption of this Ordinance is necessary for the immediate preservation of the public health, safety and welfare. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED, by the Town Council of the Town of Snowmass Village, as follows: 1. Chapter 18 Addition. Chapter 18 of the Municipal Code is hereby amended by the addition of the following provisions: a. Notice of Unsafe Building. Upon the declaration by the Building Official that a building is an unsafe building within the meaning of Section 203 of the 1991 Uniform Building Code as adopted pursuant to Section 18-41 of this Code, the Building Official will provide the Owner according to the records in the Office of the Assessor of Pitkin County, Colorado with a notice of such declaration by United States Mail, postage prepaid. so r4 b. Content of Notice. The notice shall inform the Owner that a building permit must be obtained from the Building Official to repair, rehabilitate, demolish or remove the unsafe building within thirty (30) days and the penalty for failure to timely obtain a building permit. c. Permit Condition. The repair or rehabilitation of the unsafe building to conform to the applicable provisions of Chapter 18 must be commenced withing thirty (30) days of the issuance of the building permit. The demolition or removal of the unsafe building must be completed within thirty (30) days of issuance of the building permit and the Lot shall be restored to the condition that existed prior to the issuance of the original building permit for the construction of the building. 2. Severabilitv. If any provision of this Ordinance or application hereof to any person or circumstance is held invalid, the invalidity shall not affect any other provision or application of this Ordinance which can be given effect without the invalid provision or application, and, to this end, the provisions of this Ordinance are severable. READ, APPROVED AND ADOPTED by the Town Council of the Town of Snowmass Village on First Reading on June 25, 2001 upon a motion by Council Member Virtue, the second of Council Member Mordkin, and upon a vote of 3 in favor and 0 against; Council Members Mercatoris and Purvis absent. READ, APPROVED AND ADOPTED by the Town Council of the Town of Snowmass Village on Second Reading on July 9, 2001 upon a motion by Council Member , the second of Council Member and upon a vote of in favor and _ against. TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE T. Michael Manchester, Mayor ATTEST: 00 r Trudi Worline, Town Clerk i TOWN COUNCIL COMMUNIQUE Meeting Date: July 9, 2001 Presented By: Stephen R. Connor, Town Attorney Subject: ORDINANCE No. 15, SERIES OF 2001 AN ORDINANCE AMENDING AND RESTATING SECTION 2- 45 OF THE MUNICIPAL CODE CONCERNING EXECUTIVE SESSIONS Overview: HB 01-1359 amended the Open Meetings Law by changing the manner in which executive sessions can be convened and becomes effective on August 8, 2001. After reviewing the amendments to the Open Meetings Law and the provisions of the Municipal Code, I determined that the Municipal Code provisions should be amended and restated. Ordinance 01-15 amends the Municipal Code so that it is not in conflict with the Open Meetings Law. Upon reviewing the Ordinance you will see that the procedure to convene an executive session now requires an announcement of the topic of the executive session in reasonable detail and the citation of the section of the Open Meetings Law and the Municipal Code that authorize the executive session. Once convened, a record of the executive session must be maintained. HB 01-1359 allows an electronic record or written minutes. For simplicity, I have chosen to require an electronic record in the Ordinance as the procedural requirements for written minutes are cumbersome. The record must be maintained for 90 days and is subject to review by a Court upon application by an interested party. At the end of the 90 day period, the record will be destroyed. I have chosen the Town Attorney to be the custodian of the record of executive sessions to insure the confidentiality of the record. Recommendation: Adopt the Ordinance on first reading. TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL ORDINANCE No. 15 SERIES OF 2001 AN ORDINANCE AMENDING AND RESTATING SECTION 2-45 OF THE MUNICIPAL CODE CONCERNING EXECUTIVE SESSIONS. WHEREAS, the express position of the Town Council is that the formation of public policy is public business and may not be conducted in secret; and WHEREAS, House Bill 01-1359 which amended the provisions of the Open Meetings Law, Section 24-6-401 et seq., C.R.S. was approved by the Governor on June 5, 2001; and WHEREAS, the amendments to the Open Meetings Law modify the manner in which executive sessions may be conducted; and WHEREAS, the Town Council has determined that the pertinent provisions of House Bill 01-1359 be codified in the Municipal Code; and WHEREAS, the Town Council desires to restate the current Municipal Code provisions concerning executive sessions to provide for a comprehensive statement of the manner in which executive session may be conducted; and WHEREAS, the Town Council finds that the adoption of this Ordinance is necessary for the immediate preservation of the public health, safety and welfare. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED, by the Town Council of the Town of Snowmass Village, as follows: 1. Section 2-45 Executive Sessions. The provisions of Section 2-45 of the Municipal Code are hereby amended and restated as follows: (a) The policy of the Town is that the formation of public policy is public business and may not be conducted in secret. There are specific topics of discussion that must be conducted without the public for the efficient operation of the Town government. Executive sessions shall be governed by the provisions of the Open 0!6�a� Meetings Law, Section 24-6-401 et. seg., C.R.S., and the provisions of this Section. In the event of a conflict between the provisions of the Open Meetings Law and this Section, the more restrictive shall apply. (b) The members of the Town Council, Planning Commission or other permanent board or commission of the Town may hold an executive session only at a regular or special meeting. An executive session may be convened only upon approval of a motion by a two-thirds (2/3) vote of the quorum present stating the particular topic for discussion in as much detail as possible without compromising the purpose of the executive session and citing the specific citation to the section of the Open Meetings Law and the Municipal Code authorizing the executive session. During the executive session, no adoption of any proposed policy, position, resolution, rule, regulation, or formal action shall occur and discussion may only occur on the particular topic for which the executive session was convened. (c) The sole topics for consideration at an executive session are: (1) The purchase, acquisition, lease, transfer, or sale of any real, personal, or other property interest. (2) Conferences with the Town Attorney or special counsel for the Town for the purposes of receiving legal advice on specific legal questions. (3) Matters required to be kept confidential by federal or state law or rules and regulations provided that the specific citation of the statutes or rules that are the basis for such confidentiality are announced before holding the executive session. (4) Specialized details of security arrangements or investigations. (5) Determining positions relative to matters that may be subject to negotiations; developing strategy for negotiations; instructing negotiators. (6) Personnel matters except if the employee who is the subject of the session has requested an open meeting, or if the personnel matter involves more than one employee, all of the employees have requested an open meeting. (7) Consideration of any documents protected by the mandatory nondisclosure provisions of the Open Records Act; except that all consideration of documents or records that are work product as defined in section 24-72-202 (6.5) or that are subject to @�!Z J the governmental or deliberative process privilege shall occur in a public meeting unless an executive session is otherwise allowed. (d) Upon the commencement of an executive session a record will be maintained by an audio recording. The record shall recite the specific citation to section of the Open Meetings Law and the Municipal Code authorizing the executive session and the actual contents of the discussion. Provided, however, if in the opinion of the Town Attorney or special counsel for the Town in attendance at the executive session that all or a portion of the discussion constitutes a privileged attorney-client communication then no record of that portion of the executive session need be maintained. In such event, the Town Attorney or special counsel for the Town shall state for the record that no record of the discussion will be maintained because the discussion constitutes a privileged attorney-client communication. At the conclusion of the privileged attorney-client communication the maintenance of the record shall be recommenced. (e) The record of an executive session shall be retained by the Town Attorney and shall not be open for public inspection except as approved by the Town Council by Resolution, or as provided in the Open Meetings Law. The Town Attorney shall destroy the record of the executive session on the ninety first (91' ) day following the conclusion of the executive session. 2. Effective Date. This Ordinance shall become effective upon the effective date of House Bill 01-1359 on August 8, 2001. 3. Severabilitv. If any provision of this Ordinance or application hereof to any person or circumstance is held invalid, the invalidity shall not affect any other provision or application of this Ordinance which can be given effect without the invalid provision or application, and, to this end, the provisions of this Ordinance are severable. READ, APPROVED AND ADOPTED by the Town Council of the Town of Snowmass Village on First Reading on July 9, 2001 upon a motion by Council Member , the second of Council Member and upon a vote of_ in favor and _ against. READ, APPROVED AND ADOPTED by the Town Council of the Town of Snowmass Village on Second Reading on July 16, 2001 upon a motion by Council Member , the second of Council Member and upon a vote of _ in favor and _ against. S%( TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE T. Michael Manchester, Mayor ATTEST: Trudi Worline, Town Clerk Mo. SS 000 TOWN COUNCIL COMMUNIQUE Meeting Date: July 9, 2001 Presented By: Stephen R. Connor, Town Attorney Craig Thompson, Community Development Director Subject: ORDINANCE No. 17, SERIES OF 2001 AN ORDINANCE AMENDING SECTION 2-71 OF THE MUNICIPAL CODE DESIGNATING THE COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT AS THE DEPARTMENT RESPONSIBLE FOR BUILDING AND PLANNING ACTIVITIES WITHIN THE TOWN. Overview: The Municipal Code erroneously designates the Building and Planning Department as the department responsible for building and planning activities within the Town. Ordinance 01-17 corrects the error by designating the Community Development Department as the department responsible for building and planning activities within the Town. Recommendation: Adopt the Ordinance on first reading. TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL ORDINANCE No. 17 SERIES OF 2001 AN ORDINANCE AMENDING SECTION 2-71 OF THE MUNICIPAL CODE DESIGNATING THE COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT AS THE DEPARTMENT RESPONSIBLE FOR BUILDING AND PLANNING ACTIVITIES WITHIN THE TOWN. WHEREAS, the Building and Planning Department is now referred to as the Community Development Department; and WHEREAS, the Community Development Department designation is inconsistent with the provisions of Section 2-71 (2) of the Municipal Code; and WHEREAS, for consistency, Section 2-71 (2) of the Municipal Code must be amended to recognize the Community Development Department; and WHEREAS, the Town Council desires to designate the Community Development Department as the department responsible for building and planning activities within the Town; and WHEREAS, the Town Council finds that the adoption of this Ordinance is necessary for the immediate preservation of the public health, safety and welfare. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED, by the Town Council of the Town of Snowmass Village, as follows: 1. Section 2-71 Establishment of departments. The provisions of Section 2- 71(2) of the Municipal Code are hereby amended by the insertion of the words "Community Development Department" for Building and Planning Department' within such subsection. 2. Severability. If any provision of this Ordinance or application hereof to any person or circumstance is held invalid, the invalidity shall not affect any other provision or application of this Ordinance which can be given effect without the invalid provision or application, and, to this end, the provisions of this Ordinance are severable. 0...S • READ, APPROVED AND ADOPTED by the Town Council of the Town of Snowmass Village on First Reading on July 9, 2001 upon a motion by Council Member the second of Council Member and upon a vote of_ in favor and _ against. READ, APPROVED AND ADOPTED by the Town Council of the Town of Snowmass Village on Second Reading on July 16, 2001 upon a motion by Council Member , the second of Council Member and upon a vote of in favor and _ against. TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE T. Michael Manchester, Mayor ATTEST: Trudi Worline, Town Clerk I� � TO: SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL FROM: GARY SUITER, TOWN MANAGER RE: MANAGER'S REPORT DATE: JULY 5, 2001 WOODRUN V SUIT The Town Clerk was recently served with a "quiet title" suit, filed by the Woodrun V Townhouse Corporation. They claim title to and interest in the existing dumpster site. The Town is required to respond to the Complaint within twenty days after service, or by July 23, 2001. `EOTC MEETING For your information, the next EOTC Meeting is scheduled for Thursday, July 19th, 2001 at 4:00 p.m. in Snowmass Village. The meeting will end by 6:00 p.m. so attendees can enjoy the free concert. Does this work for Town Council? STATUS REPORT You will notice that I have changed the content of the Status Report to reflect those projects and issues that are most important to the Town Council. This has reduced the report to a couple of pages so as to make it more useful and save resources. Please let me know if you have comments or suggestions for improvement. 'BUDGET MEETING As we approach budget season, staff would like two hours of Council's time to discuss the upcoming budget process. At this meeting we would provide the reports requested by Town Council, obtain Council feedback on revenue assumptions and begin discussion on policy issues that could affect the 2002 budget. We would like to do this separate from a regular Town Council Meeting so as to avoid time constraints and maintain focus on the budget. Please let me know what works for you. VACATION For your information I plan on taking some vacation time from July 23 through August 3, 2001. Please let me know if you have any concerns. `Response requested �Jslmop PLEASE TURN IN YOUR STATUS REPORT UPDATES TO DONNA BY JULY 18, 2001 AT 5:00 P.M. STATUS REPORT July 9, 2001 Town Council/Town Manager rr ri VLF/Forward Plan ■ Next meeting 7/26(tentative). Galy Suker Speclfic Objectives ■ Final draft completed. Gary Sutter Mall Activities ■ Bands being scheduled;other activities being Corev Shanks researched for ticket pavilion. Pool ■ Reporting to Council July 9'. Gary SueeoCra Thompson SVRA Issues ■ Examining Options Gary Sulfer?oxn CounNl Public Works Brush Creek Trail ■ Meeting with Pilco on 07-5-01 to coordinate Hunt Walker with Roundabout. Snowmelt Road ■ Will present concept to Council late July. Hunt Walker Summer Road Project ■ Out to bid. Hunt Welker Housing i Daly Townhomes ■ A construction update will be presented to the Council on July 16 . Finance 2001/2002 Budget ■ Assembling reports for mld-July Budget Marianne Rakowski Meeting with Town Council. Public Safe Noise Ordinance ■ Collecting Information from other municipalities. Arf Sm Town Clerk 2001 Election ■ Will file notice to County Clerk by July 13 . 7nMi Worena 1 PLEASE TURN IN YOUR STATUS REPORT UPDATES TO DONNA BY July 18, 2001 P.M. Community Development De artment 0 Entryway Sign ■ Application Is before the B.O.C.C. Craig Thorrkosm Pitkln County GIS ■ Preparing updated street map for Welcome craig Thompson Center,scheduled for 7-11-01. Sign Code Review ■ Town Council Should receive the P.C. Chds CwmcWim wahlswm recommendation on Jul 16th. Code— Building Height ■ Contacting local architects for their comments. Chris Conrad ■ Review Committee may be formed. ■ Anticipate Planning Commission Review on July 11Lh. Major Develo ment Review Update Snowmass Center Expansion Sketch ■ Began P.C.review on June 20 ,subsequent Plan meeting on July 1 11h. Jim wehlsimm Snowmass Club— Phase II ■ Application determined complete 7-2-01 with Preliminary Plan some loose ends to tie up. Comments to be ry given to applicant by July 300'. Tentative P.C. Meeting on August 8h. Minor Develo ment Review Update 9GUMIF1,09 p Snowmass Chapel Sketch Plan ■ P.C. Meeting August 1 (tentative). Jim wehrsaom Aspen Skiing Company—Vehicle ■ Administrative,Temporary Use Permit Issued for work 7/2—7/9. Maintenance Facility At The Divide ■ Tentatively scheduled for P.C.review on July Minor PUD Amendment 18'",subject to applicant resubmitting by July Jim wehlsaom 9'h. Community Enhancement Proj ects IM Brush Creek—Seasons 4 ■ July 2 starting pre-construction Bemedette Bedhele 1 Park Shelter ■ Completed. Bemadehe BeHhelenght Project Update Coordination-Gary Sulter 923-3777 ext.206 Public Works-Hunt Walker 923-5110 Housing-Joe Coffey 923-2360 Community Development—Thompson/Stahman/Michel/Mcin6re 923-5524 Town Clerk -Trudl Wodine 923-3777 Finance-Marianne Rakowski 923-3796 Police Chief-Art Smythe 923-5330 WWW so* 2 Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 HOLIDAY 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 2:00 P.M. T.C. Mtg. 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 2:00 P.M. 4:00 P.M. T.C. Mtg. EOTC @ Snowmass Village Town Council Chambers 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 2:00 P.M. VLF in A.M. T.C. Mtg. (Tentative) 29 30 31 le Auffust Packet Ca;ndar X[Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 2:00 P.M. T.C. 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ES1RNi[U @VEWE fl](U.IXn iOfl�i(IM U6RRfliF �Iro�rolD�Irolnl w�ou GROUND FLOOR PLAN colt.KC W% 41xi091% ® WEST E INN AQUATIC CENTER CONCEPT TWO i LT w--T r- frLf''�� � � � too GROUND FLOOR PLAN �.ruu rpv[vrixa¢E>.if WRpx+F:nQ 7B SE PM RE UEEEU IKYFS PAY TEVTMk IiO]I'Kf] �1■ ESfY.LAT E C UFYFLq'rIfM COST 41 LiM.MT - �UOES NOi ixQUUF W+U KQU6rtgx COSl51 ••••�l'OPm.�p1 FSTNNlFU p14N5F5 f&UfM TO tNO.11T OWFEREFU 4VfM1Lf 1fii0}Yb TOf)fO,Oryl cm RNCf �1 i(I,io TO SO1AIff] JWP Cpl YLCO+E¢Y% 91Y i0]@L wow ® WEST L.INN AQUATIC CENTER CONCEPT THREE R.em ,y feiCO•e L.�LL 1�4 ! • J Fai lip I GROUND FLOOR PLAN ' d S G�16P11e slnu WQ J ms em UUn w'uno ,..tRes r.V TWL OT& Im srKFS 6fRMT [.0 UfY5f TIMCOSR UWONC lDOfs uOl Iwa UDF LwUKW 6rtnry COSl9 A.iti QER.nO}6 a w fSTW/JEOFA4NY5 "Mm TOfemf eNirIQ4TL M.TEDIg WE ssnmlOfil"a,(m D FMf f �IS "'0�lm}Im CMRECCh % 7iA O7I WEST LINN AQUATIC CENTER CONCEPT FOUR w w� 0 I 0 -- w m r,A, R� � 0 .uwsl qq � .ua TwF OQ6000 /t/� now.u� w O fr s GROUND FLOOR PLAN CQYFIIFN[d A O11°1°1° (A SEASONAL OUTDOOR FACILITY) wlt" 9a v.00n>i WTM llol s[ 9iT. mCl... rNt�+c xtgnwEU Its s•,sas FSNMTf uenfa++[Fn EW C osT t3zm.nm IUOES NOTINQUIIF LW UACQU6np'<OST9 d- M.TFUEYI4 k flTarlTOf]N.LM :1 E FMTFUGHWF f,O:1 UrtFfMEKF nT Tom -- COST 0.KCA'FRY% IfM iO V} M tVYYY w.�pp� ® „� WEST LINN AQUATIC CENTER CONCEPT FIVE • ' �Q cam Memorandum DATE: July 3, 2001 TO: Mayor T. Michael Manchester, Douglas Mercatoris, Robert Purvis, Richard Virtue and Arnold Mordkin FROM: Larry Green, Wildlife Specialist RE: Snowmass Ski Area and Snowmass Land Company Wildlife Enhancement & Management Plans Attached are Wildlife Enhancement and Management plans for the year 2000 submitted to staff by Snowmass Land Company and Snowmass Ski Area. These are distributed early for your review. Staff will present the annual review at the July 9, 2001 ]own Council meeting. Picase be aware that 1 am preparing a Resolution of Appreciation for Snowmass Land Company for enhancing wildlife habitat through the successful completion of their plan. Snowmass Ski Area Memo TO: Dan Baharav,Wildlife Consultant Fronr Joey Woftemath, Mountain Wildlife Specialist CC: Doug Mackenzie, Rob Baxter,Gary Schultz Data 04 117/01 Re: Narrative of Summer Wildlife Enhancements Projects The summer of 2000 was yet another summer of catch-up. We did not have many major projects, and only three capitol improvement projects. We used our time too clean up, maintain, reveg and start other projects we had planned. In June, installation of our new 3000-foot snowmaking system on Funnel and Lower Coffee Pot began. We worked on cleaning up the massive blow down over 1,000 trees on the ground between Longshot and Campground trails. The clean up was long and hard, and it managed to reduce the fire hazard around the mountain. With the slash, we built several wildlife habitats 4'x4'x4' in dimension. On June 2e, 40 people from the Snowmass Administration Building, Trail Crew, Lift Maintenance, Summer Rangers and Lift Operations picked up trash from Sam's Knob to the Admin. Building. They also attended a wildlife educational talk by Kevin Wright from the Colorado Division of Wildlife. To help enforce the leash requirements at Snowmass Ski Area, we put 21 dog leashes in our company trucks and made them available at the bottom of all the lifts. We distributed 15 bear proof trash cans around the mountain and outside the Administration Building, In order to further prevent bear/trash problems we installed a metal guard over our dumpsters at the Administration Building. In July, we began construction of the Scooper Cabin and Race Arena A 700-foot Ski School Platter lift and a 930 square foot Picnic Cabin was constructed on the lower part of the Scooper trail. We also started our Mountain Weed control, brushing and mowing program, which included a vigorous thistle removal management-plan for the entire mountain. Finally, our mountain roads where treated with Magnesium-Chloride in an effort to limit particulate matter. 9 Page 1 In August, we continued construction of the Scooper Race Area. As well as some other small glading projects at the bottom of the Wall Area We built several wildlife habitats in that area and continued with the blow-down clean up over on the Long Shot trail. The clearing for the new trail near Turkey Trot was also started. There were several other small revegitation projects throughout the mountain. Please see the attached chart for pounds per acre etc. Also attached are the ingredients for the seed mix. Revegitation efforts maintain the following guidelines: seed is distributed at 50-100 pounds per acre, depending on the type of seed mix. Forest Service certified hay covers disturbed areas at a rate of 5000 pounds per acre. •Page 2 AREA ACRES # HAY # SEED # BIOSOL COMMENTS Scooper Race Area 4 acres 20,000 Ibs 200 Ibs 0 Ibs Little Max Park to 25 acres 125,000 Ibs 1,250 Ibs 0 Ibs B-19 (snowmaking) B-8 to Funnel 5 acres 25,000 Ibs 250 Ibs 0 Ibs Turkey Snoot 6 acres 30,000 Ibs 300 Ibs 0 Ibs 2000-2001 Wildlife Enhancement and Management Plan- Snowmass Ski Area ✓ Installed 3000 feet of snowmaking systems on Funnel and Lower CoffeePot. ✓ Installed 700 foot Ski School Platter lift on Lower Scooper. ✓ Built 930 square foot Children's Picnic Building at Lower Scooper. ✓ We cleaned up trees from the blow-down in June, and constructed many 4'x4'x4' wildlife habitats. ✓ Cut a new trail near Turkey Trot. ✓ Began a rigorous Weed control and brushing project. ✓ Finished Village Bound Trail. ✓ All employee wildlife education class. ✓ Spring and fall trail closures ✓ 6lading projects. ✓ Dust suppression program for mountain roads. ✓ Reveg in several areas. ✓ 15 Bear Proof trash cans were dispersed around the mountain. ✓ Added 25 chairs to the Elk Camp lift to increase lift capacity. ✓ Summer Ski Company employees furnished dog leashes to visitors. ✓ The Wildlife Center at the top of the Elk Camp Lift was open again this winter, staffed by USFS, paid by Ski Co. BEC Two Creeks and The Pines Final Report,2000 RECEIVED MAY 2 2 2001 TWO CREEKS AND THE PINES sramme"Village Commumlty Development Snowmass Laud Company Snowmass Village, Colorado MONITORING WILDLIFE Final Report,2000 By Dr. Dan Baharav Baharav Environmental Consulting March,2001 Snowmass Land Company 1 BEC Two Creeks and The Pines Final Report,2000 TWO CREEKS AND THE PINES Monitoring Wildlife Final Report,2000 By Dr. Dan Baharav Baharav Environmental Consulting INTENT The objective of this report is to summarize the 5th year's implementation and monitoring of the Wildlife Enhancement and Management Plan(WENT) of the Snowmass Land Company's(SLC) Two Creeks and The Pines (TCP) project. The year 2000 marked the last year for monitoring the WEMP. The primary goal of the WENT is to maintain the habitat continuity and wildlife sustainability of the existing TCP within the context of the regional ecological system around the town of Snowmass Village, Colorado. Three ecological concepts guided the WENT: (1)canopy continuum, (2) diversified foliage configuration, and (3) continuity of the riparian habitats. The multi-year monitoring plan includes gathering quantifiable data on a regular basis, from January through December, in order to evaluate the effectiveness of the WENT and its planned actions. The year 2000 was the last year for monitoring wildlife by the Snowmass Land company as was required by The Town Of Snowmass Village. This report then is also a summary of the 5 years monitoring. 2 BEC Two Creeks and The Pines Final Report, 2000 METHODS To execute the WENT, a monitoring program has been developed utilizing a customized methodology (Cooperider et al, 1986; Wilson et al, 1996) in order to respond to the specific needs of the WEMP. The strength of the monitoring program and its methodology is in its immediate response to the subdivision construction projects as they unfold. Thus data that were collected during the preparation of the WENT are used as baseline for comparison with the data collected through the various phases of the monitoring program. The methods include gathering both qualitative and quantitative data on a regular basis, monthly and seasonally. The WENT identified three Management Zones within the development area. These zones provide varying degrees of buffetings from human use and activity through employing specific controls and restrictions (Fig. 1). Management Zone A includes the Snowmass Land Company (SLC)property at the upper, southernmost sections of Two Creeks and The Pines boundary and represents the most restrictive control over human use and activity because it is closest to sensitive habitat. Management Zone B provides a seasonal level of buffer within the eastern and western sides of the development area. Management Zone C controls the reminder of Two Creeks and The Pines development area. The wildlife monitoring program includes the following(Fig. 2): Two Creeks A. Two Creeks Road -west side -Management Zone A,tree canopy, and riparian. -Riparian area along the west side of road. -Ponding and foliage height diversity(FHD), Pond A. -Pond A analysis(2nd year) - Water catchments and vegetation improvement, B,C,D E,G. - Vegetation Enhancement around new homes. B. Two Creeks Road -east side - Riparian areas along the east side of road. - Vegetation enhancement and canopy continuum at new homes. 3 BEC Two Creeks and The Pines Final Report, 2000 -Ponding and FHD,pond H. C. Upper meadow- east of ski lift - Riparian areas east and west of ski lift. - Riparian areas within the upper meadow. - Ponding I analysis (2nd year) -FHD at pond I area A Lower East Brush Creek area -Riparian habitats east of ski lift. - Vegetation improvements site area c. - Pre pond construction, ponds KN. - Pre-water catchment construction,J K,L. The Pines A.The Pines - Management Zone A. - Canopy continuum from management Zone A to East Brush Creek. -Riparian areas, lower and upper. Within these areas 15 Line Transacts were defined(Fig. 3). One to three observers walked these lines during early mornings or late afternoons. During each visit 2-3 Line Transacts were walked and data were collected on: species identification, number, behavior, nesting activities, vegetation condition, vegetation structure(FHD), erosion, trampling, riparian habitat FHD,snags, dead fall materials, edge areas, and human activities. During the Fall, the public area south and east to the subdivision boundary was observed for elk activities. The area was walked early in the morning and signs of elk activities were searched for. Throughout each observation period, elk location,number, sex and age, feeding behavior, fecal material, and denning sites were recorded. 4 ANALYSIS Birds Table 2 summarizes the occurrence of bird species within Two Creeks and The Pines during 2000. Seventy nine(79)bird species have been observed. Of the 79 species identified, 58 (73%) species were confirmed breeders (nests, pair behavior, adults carrying nesting materials, and adults carrying food). During the monitoring in the year 2000, 27 neotropical migrant species were seen within Two Creeks and The Pines of which 19 were confirmed breeders (Table 2). Neotropical migrants are birds that migrate to winter in Central and South America, south of the Tropic of Cancer, and return back to the East Brush Creek habitats in the spring. In recent years, special attention has been given to these species by ecologists, since both their winter and summer habitats are being constantly disturbed or destroyed (Hagan and Johnston, 1992;Hutto et al, 1993; Kingery, 1998). The neotropical migrant species were mostly observed within the upper areas of Two creeks, within the riparian hahitarc of Zone A,n The Pines, and within onds These areas are relatively undisturbed and are part of the habitat continuum system of the Snowmass Ski Area and US Forest Service areas. Since 1996, the first year of the monitoring program, a total of 35 neotropical migrant species have been identified within the Two Creeks and The Pines habitats, with 24 species nesting there (Table 3). These high numbers of neotrouical species are a str of the upper areas of Zone A and the habitats along the USFS line to the maintenance of a habitat continuum. The USFS forested habitats above 8,600' elevation maintain good core for these bird species, and together with the maturation of Pond H system (water holding and vegetation configuration) habitat continuum is maintained whereby more neotropical bird species can find suitable sites for feeding and nesting. Fourteen(14)bird species were found to be winter residents within Two Creeks and The Pines(Table 2): Black-billed Magpie, Black-capped Chickadee, Black Rosy Finch, Blue Grouse, Clark's Nutcracker, Common Raven, Dipper, Gray Jay, Gray-crowned Rosy Finch,Hairy Woodpecker, Junco, Mallard, Mountain Chickadee, and Red-tailed Hawk. Bird abundance within Two Creeks and The Pines is shown in Table 2. Most of the n F s species observed were seen almost on every observation . There were 19 Common '• s ecies. The most abundant birds within the monitoring area are: American Robin,Black- J billed Magpie, Black-capped Chickadee, Broad-tailed Hummingbird, Dark-eyed Junco, Mountain Chickadee,Northern Flicker(red), Pine Siskin, and Red-tailed Hawk (Table BEC Two Creeks and The Pines Final Report,2000 species. The most abundant birds within the monitoring area are: American Robin, Black-billed Magpie,Black-capped Chickadee, Broad-tailed Hummingbird, Dark-eyed Junco, Mountain Chickadee, Northern Flicker (red), Pine Siskin, and Red-tailed Hawk (Table 2). As was the case in 1999, high numbers of birds were seen in the riparian habitat type (47%), 22%were observed in aspen vegetation type, 13%were seen in coniferous habitats, 13 % species were seen in oak woodland habitats, and 5% within ponds and willow habitats (Table 2). Overall,species richness and occurrence was highest in dense wooded habitats like those found in Management Zone A, within East Fork Creek,the upper areas of Management Zone B, within the dense shrub vegetation at the ski lift ridge, and within Pond H system. In these habitats foliage height diversity (FHD) is most extensive,creating ample sources of food, cover, and nesting. Landscaping within the new building sites,with extensive vegetation configuration contributed significantly to bird activity within the monitoring area. This vegetation configuration created buffers between building structures and the open space and also helped maintain the habitat continuum through canopy and understory complexes resulting in good cover and nesting sites available to the moving birds. American Robin, Black-billed Magpie, Black-capped Chickadee, Broad-tailed Hummingbird, Common Raven, Junco,Mountain Chickadee,Northern Flicker(red), Pine Siskin, and Red-tailed Hawk were observed in all habitat types. Observations of Brown-headed Cowbird were at the ski lift ridge area and Pond H system. This species uses other songbirds' nests to incubate their eggs and raise their young (nest parasites), particularly nests of neotropical migrant species. This species had been seen here only within the "edge" habitat west to the ski lift ridge within Two Creeks. These birds, if established in open areas, can cause a significant decline in songbird abundance. The number of cowbirds seen in Two Creeks since 1996 was minimal and does not call for alarm. Nine (9) raptor species were seen here during 2000 (Table 2 ). These were: American Kestrel, Cooper's Hawk, Golden Eagle, Great Horned Owl,Northern Herrier, Pygmy Owl,Red-tailed Hawk, Saw-wet Owl, and Turkey Vulture. Of these species, only 3 breed within the project area: American Kestrel was mostly active within oak brush habitat type, Pygmy Owl was seen commonly in aspen vegetation type, and Red-tailed Hawk nests were seen in aspen areas. A total of 10 raptor species were observed during the 5 year monitoring (Table 4). In summary, a total of 93 bird species were observed in Two Creeks and the Pines during the 5 years monitoring, of which 68 species were confirmed breeders, 15 species were year round residents, 35 neotropical migrant species, and 10 were raptor species (Table 3). 6 BEC Two Creeks and The Pines Final Report,2000 Mammals Twenty one ( 21) mammal species were observed within Two Creeks and The Pines during 2000 (Table 5). There were 13 species of herbivores, 7 carnivore species, and one omnivore. During the five year monitoring (1996-2000), a total of 24 mammal species was seen in Two Creeks and The Pines area ( Table 6). These mammals were identified by sight, sound, scats, burrows,tracks, and prey remains. Mammals were sighted more often within the oak brush habitat type and in the ecotone of oakbrush and aspen habitats (Table 5). Mammal movements and activities within the project area dNng were similar to those of 1999. Since 1997 construction in both areas was nte�ack and carnivores were frequenting building sites more often.. Fresh signs of Bear, Raccoon, Badger, Red Fox, and Striped Skunk were common on the subdivision roads. Bobcats and coyotes were more shy and tracks or scats were found mostly within wooded or riparian areas away from construction sites. Red Fox sightings were numerous in 2000, especially at the Pines and within Pond H system. Herbivores were evenly distributed but more individuals were seen in riparian wooded locations. During 2000 increased signs of elk activity were noticeable within the project area boundaries. Individuals, fresh fecal material and tracks were seen at the upper meadow just north to the Two Creeks boundary and within the water catchments I and A areas. Elk were seen there all through August, as long as some water was st available in the water catchments. Increased elk activities were seen along the lower portions of the Long Shot ski run just as it crosses the upper meadows by the USFS boundary and The Pines. These elk activities were intense especially during the Spring and Fall migrations. During 2000 elk were using the water catchments intensively. These water catchments were used both for drinking and salt licking. These elk activities were first noticed in 1998 and increased during 1999 and 2000. Elk were often observed close to the southeast area of Management Zone A within the Sinclair property and The Pines. During 2000, more elk were seen active in this location than had been seen in 1996 , 1997, 1998, and 1999. The elk were using the aspen vegetation type in the vicinity of the southeast area of The Pines, especially during the summer. During Fall migration, some elk were seen crossing the south portion of The Pines moving toward the Sinclair and Guber areas. All this was happening while construction at the south portions of The Pines and Two Creeks was intense, indicating that the topography and the dense vegetation along Management Zone A are of vital importance as an ecological buffer. October of 2000 was marked with early intense snow fall. Areas above 8300' were in deep snow. The elk coming from the Elk Camp area within the Snoa7nass Ski Area were using Spring Creek as the most 7 BEC Two Creeks and The Pines Final Report,2000 direct route to the lower elevations in Guber's area. The terrain and dense vegetation within Spring Creek -Management Zone A were also a popular cover for the elk moving away from hunters during the October-November hunting season within both sides of the Government Trail. As long as Spring Creek-Management Zone A habitats will remain closed to human activities during the Fall and Spring elk movements,the trend seen during the last 5 years will continue, where elk favor these areas. No elk were seen in areas lower than the Sinclair-The Pines lines, or close to Owl Creek Road. Also, no elk were seen within the lower areas of Two Creeks below Pond J. During 2000, as in 1996 , 1997, 1998, and 1999, Mule Deer were active within Two Creeks and The Pines at various locations. Deer were common at the south boundary and in Management Zone A east and less frequent in areas within the construction zones. Some deer were crossing Owl Creek Road into the Hidden Valley area and back at all seasons. Human activities During 2000 home construction as well as landscaping continued throughout the Two Creeks area. Work included: -Revegetation and landscaping within completed construction sites. -Drainage work throughout the property. -Home construction on several lots across the project area. Human activities during the day within the project area were high due to massive home construction at both Two Creeks and The Pines. As was seen in 1999, animal signs were common, close to or within construction sites. Apparently, animals were visiting these sites when workers were absent during off hours. In general, the more elaborate the vegetation structure around the home site, the more animal signs were seen there. These were seen especially at the east and south boundaries and close to running water habitats. Landscaping around and between homes, in both Two Creeks and The Pines,is in good ecological shape. The vegetation configuration designed in the landscaping is up to the WEMP scope and is showing trends of increased mammal and bird use. This is all in line with the habitat and canopy continuum attributes predicted in the WEMP. The observations indicate the importance of good landscaping practices required at the completion of building a house. Elaborate foliage height diversity (FI III) within the home site is mandatory. As of now,many of the homeowners are implementing in their 8 BEC Two Creeks and The Pines Final Report, 2000 properties extensive landscaping with planting of trees, shrubs, and in some sites the construction of small ponds. This shows a good attitude towards the enhancement goals. During 2000 massive build up was seen in The Pines section of the project area. Within The Pines work included: -Completion of drainage improvements as well as sediment basins. -Additional planting within Parcel H in The Pines. - Adjustments to some of the drainage channels within The Pines. - Servicing of some storm water detention ponds in The Pines. During the day, when work was extensive, elk and deer were observed just east of Management Zone A Here too,topographic features and elaborate natural FHD buffered between wildlife activities and human movement and noise. The young willows along pond L are growing well and slowly are increasing in size. The area under and around the bridge is taking shape but still is below the FHD level expected . The foliage height diversity along the roads and within the construction sites need more time to reach the level of cover expected. The area between TR9 and TR 12 need more vegetation coverage to ensure greater canopy connectivity between The Pines and Two Creeks. Water Catchments Water catchments(ponds) A, C,D, E, I, and J were observed from snow melt through the summer. Water catchment A was holding water until the 1st week of August. Willows have spread well alongside the banks, creating good FHD configuration with the surrounding aspen. The connection section from the water channel (ditch)to the water catchments should be maintained on a regular basis to facilitate and ensure water flow into it. Water catchments C,D, and E are small but hold water all summer long. They are great in stabilizing the water channel (creek) during the spring runoff. More stabilization work is needed at Ponds I and J. It is mandatory that these water catchments hold water through August for birds and mammals to use them during late nesting and breeding activities. These ponds need more time in establishing good plant cover and bank stabilization. The FED in ponds M and N need i rop vement. More willows are needed there together with a few aspen and conifer trees. It is a difficult area to maintain because of its marshy 9 BEC Two Creeks and The Pines Final Report, 2000 condition and more planning is required. This area needs more plant cover around the marshy habitat in order to maintain good FHD and to create the conditions for habitat continuity. During 1999_vegetation improvements were implemented in The Pines. Drainage channels were installed and stabilization achieved through the use of riprap and erosion netting. Also, storm water detention ponds were constructed in several areas throughout The Pines along with storm water catchment boxes as well as erosion control netting placed on all steep slopes. All of these have to be maintained regularly. Land stabilization is a critical issue at The Pines. . Education " Distributing the Homeowner's Environmental Stewardship Video to new homeowners continued during 2000. Videos have been sent to owners within Two Creeks as well as to owners of Owl Creek homes. Developing a field guide for homeowners about the Hots and fauna of Two Creeks and The Pines environment is in progress. This field guide is an important contribution to the area and to the total stewardship of the areas around the TOSS. It is stressed here that the completion of the field guide should be no later than 2002. During 2000 the Snowmass Nature Center proposal was not approved by the Town Council. This was a huge defeat to an important contribution to this area and to the town of Snowmass Village in particular. Habitat Continuum The primary goal of the WENT in Two Creeks and The Pines was to maintain habitat continuity and wildlife sustainability within the context of the regional ecological system around the town of Snowmass Village, Colorado. Although construction within the project area is still ongoing, and five years of monitoring is not a sufficient period on a local ecological time scale, the monitoring data indicate a complex vegetation structure forming a positive habitat continuity both on the ground and at canopy level. During the five years of monitoring Management Zones A and B were kept undisturbed from human activities - a fact which contributed greatly to the continuity of the ecological core elements outside the project area. It was the intention of the WENT goals to keep Management Zone A and management Zone B undisturbed in perpetuity. 10 BEC Two Creeks and The Pines Final Report,2000 LITERATURE CITED Baharav, D. 1994. Two Creeks And The Pines: Wildlife Enhancement and Management Plan. Snowmass Land Company. 28 pp. Baharav, D. 1997a. Snowmass Ski Area: monitoring wildlife, 1996. Final Report, March 1997. 36 pp. Baharav, D. 1997b. Two Creeks and The Pines: monitoring wildlife, 1996. Final Report, March, 1997. 39 pp. Baharav,D. 1998. Snowmass Ski.Area: monitoring wildlife, 1997. Final Report,February 1998. 41 pp. Baharav, D. 1999. Two Creeks and The Pines: monitoring wildlife, 1998. Final Report, May, 1999. 41 pp. Cooperider, A.Y.,.Boyd,R.J., and E.R. Stuart. 1986. Inventory and monitoring of wildlife habitat. US Dept. Inter.,Bur. Land Manage. Service Center. Denver, CO. 858 pp. Hagan, J.M. and W.D. Johnston. 1992. Ecology and conservation of neotropical migrant landbirds. Smithsonian Institution Press,Washington D.C. 609 pp. Hutto,R.L., Hejl, C.R., and D.M. Finch. 1993. Effects of silvicultural treatments on forest birds in the Rocky Mountains: implications and management recommendations. In: Finch, D.M. and P.W. Stangel eds., Status and management of neotrpical migratory birds. USFS,RMFRES, 422 pp. p 386-391. Kingery, H.E. (ed.) 1998. Colorado breeding bird atlas. Published by Colorado Bird Atlas Partnership. 636 pp. Wilson, D.E., Cole,F.R.,Nichols, SJ.D., Rudran, R., and M.S. Foster. 1996. Measuring and monitoring biological diversity: standard methods for mammals. Smithsonian Inst. Press, Washington D.C. 409 pp. 11 tic 1 : DeaclopMc.c: uI«/ nndnaytM...; ..` � / / �';..� l'• • � '\ 1 . . ^I&I •�r 1, .vknaecmeni ` �• l '. '�• r 1 f �'' w - - G': Managemem -� - Rageyn£ r`r i/ .r •if ;' ot� '; V r r Zone w =. V-3 �Y��' a l�Mlam e(f�eV��I�Iy tr r �.`�".i'�_ �+ C, •� ��' "i.``t i•� ` 11.1, G~ TJ 1'9 r'�1, - �„� I !� Y�('�i yp/f .r. � Cl / � r• may. i I•t0 � ? 1 4 c). r,[FKT�rham I/ tRFrj p Managemcnr �, \ t ` � � Zo,.e w ,•;•�� ','•_:: ,. ' J !y �• / CL - % Mfr: ' u Wildlife Enhancement and /•.r �i ;3`'„' 'i, 1;7 j Management Plan �;, •� � �` � ` ":,N TWO CREEKS THE PIN] .•�•W.�+r+•....� \ � �.,'o / )� a .. 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"r'`'t` :i, 1R7 ��k /}c .ire-. -•` ji It - _ �' �:1l{rK5 .i i�W` ir..l/ f.� /pyl t•`'s• �I; i� _ j . — �I'•. - :` „ � }'I I 'i r Wildlife Enhancement and ” :„ ;;' `• •,;'l Management Plan -- ti• �. /o;• ` ;; l TWO CltF. EKS / THE PIN ..,—.—r ` '�• .� Em Vdrge ND Su.•fi4ts.( ka p! w.r.�..—..�.._ — \�//c.' 1 :• • I —.ems , Two Creeks and the Pines 2000 DATE SPECIES NAME AREA HABITAIIUMBE NOTES 1/7100 Nuttall's Cottontail TR7 Ob,AS Few Tracks all over new snow 117100 Naltall's Cottontail TR9 WIo,As 3 Tracks 1/7/00 Snowshoe Hare TR9 As 2 tracks on new snow 117100 Coyote TR7 Ob,As 1 moving,searching 117/00 Red Fox TR9 Wlo 2 tracks, fresh fecal 1/7/00 Gray jay TR7 As 3 move low 117/00 Common Raven TR9 As,wlo 2 move low 1/7100 Clark's Nutcracker TR9 As 4 move low 177100 Mountain Chickadee TR9 Wlo 3 move high 1/7/00 Red breasted Nuthatch TR7 As 2 move high 117100 Gray-crowned Rosy Finch TR9 Wlo 9 perch and noisy 117/00 Junco TR9 Wlo,As 6 feed on snow 117/00 Junco TR7 Ob 4 feed on snow 1121/00 Black-billed Magpie TR6 Ob,Wlo 4 move 1/21/00 Black-billed Magpie TR11 Open 6 move 1121/00 Common Raven TR6 open 2 soar low 121/00 Mountain Chickadee TR6 Wlo 4 move 121100 Junco TR11 Wlo 6 move 121100 Naltall's Cottontail TR6 open few all over 121/00 Red Fox TR6 open 2 tracks 1121/00 Bobcat TR6 open 1 fresh tracks 2113100 Snowshoe Hare TR2 As few all over 2/13100 Snowshoe Hare TR8 As few all over 2/13/00 Coyote TR8 open 1 fresh tracks 2/13/00 Red Fox TR2 As 2 tracks 2113/00 Red Fox TR8 open 2 tracks, fecal 2/13100 Bobcat TR8 As 1 fresh tracks 2/13100 Mountain Chickadee TR2 As 4 move 2113/00 Junco TR2 As 8 on the ground 228/00 Red-tailed Hawk TR3 As 2 soar med 2/28/00 Gray Jay TR10 Wlo 4 move low 2/28/00 Common Raven TR10 open 3 soar low 2/28/00 Black-billed Magpie TR10 wlo 2 move DAU SPECIES NAME Aug HABITATIUMBE NOTES 2/28810 Mountain Chickadee TR3 As 6 move 2/28/00 Gray-crowned Rosy Finch TR3 As 4 perch 228100 Black Rosy Finch TR3 As 6 perch 2/28!00 Junco TR10 open 5 on the ground 3/14/00 Canada Goose TR6 open 3 on the ground 3114/00 Mallard TR6 pond 2 feed 3/14/00 Blue-winged Teal TR6 pond 2 feed 3114/00 Ring-necked Duck TR6 pond 4 feed 3114100 Red-tailed Hawk TR15 As,Sp 1 soar low 3114/00 American Kestrel TR6 As 1 perch 3/14/00 Common Snipe TR6 pond 3 feed 3114100 Great Homed Owl TR15 Sp,As 1 perch low 3/14100 Northern Flicker(red) TR6 open 4 move low 3/14100 Gray Jay TR15 Sp 2 perch 3/14100 Steller's Jay TR6 open 2 move 3114100 Black-billed Magpie TR6 open 4 move 3114/00 Clark's Witcracker TR6 As 2 move 3114/00 Black-capped Chickadee TR6 As 4 feed 3114100 Mountain Chickadee TR6 Wlo 2 feed 3114/00 Jurmo TR6 open 6 on the ground 3114100 Red Squirrel TR15 Sp 3 move 3/14100 Coyote TR6 open 1 feed 3/14100 Red Fox TR15 Sp 1 move 3114100 Raccoon TR6 pond 1 fecal 3/14/00 Long-tailed Weasel TR6 open 1 move 3114100 Badger TR6 pond 3 move 3/29100 Nuttall's Cottontail TR2 As 2 move 3/29/00 Least Chipmunk TR2 As 1 move 3/29/00 Red Squirrel TR12 As 4 move on trees 3129100 Red Squirrel TR2 As 2 move 3129100 Meadow vole TR2 As 1 move slow 3/29/00 Montain Vole TR12 As,Sp 3 move 3129/00 Coyote TR2 open,As 1 move 3/29100 Red Fox TR12 Road 1 walk slowly 329100 Mule Deer TR2 As 5 feed 3129/00 Red-tailed Hawk TR12 As 2 soar high DATE SPECIES NAME 1HM HABITAIIUMBE NOTES 4/12/00 Junco TR6 open 4 move 4/12100 Chipping Sparrow TR6 Wlo 2 sing 4112100 Song Sparrow TR13 As 1 perch 4/12/00 Least Chipmunk TR13 As 2 move 4112/00 Least Chipmunk TR6 open 1 move 4/12/00 Yellow-bellied Marmot TR6 open 1 move 4/12/00 Red Fox TR13 road 1 move 4112/00 Black Bear TR6 pond 1 fresh tracks 4/12/00 Raccoon TR6 Wlo 1 tracks,fecal 4/12/00 Mule Deer TR13 As 2 feed 4/28/00 Least Chipmunk TR9 Wlo 2 move 4128/00 Red Squirrel TR9 Sp,As 1 move 4/28/00 Porcupine TR7 Ob 1 feed 4/28/00 Mule Deer TR7 open,As 2 feed 4/28/00 Red-tailed Hawk TR9 As 2 soar low 4/28/00 Northern Harrier TR7 open,Ob 1 soar low 4/28/00 Hairy Wgodpecker TR9 Sp i perch 4128/00 Downy Woodpecker TR9 As 1 feed 4/28/00 American Robin TR7 Open 3 feed 4/28/00 Mountain Bluebird TR7 Open 2 move 4/28/00 Brown-headed Cowbird TR9 AS 3 move 4128/00 Violet-green Swallow TR7 Open 5 move 4/28100 Tree Swallow TR7 As 4 move 4/28/00 Common Raven TR7 Open 2 move 4/28/00 Mountain Chickadee TR9 As 4 feed 4/28/00 Junco TR7 Open 6 feed 5119/00 Canada Goose TR6 open 2 High low 5119/00 Red-tailed Hawk TR14 As 2 soar high 5/19/00 Golden Eagle TR12 As 2 soar high 5119/00 American Kestrel TR6 Wlo 1 perch,move 5/19/00 Blue grouse TR14 As,Sp 3 move 5/19/00 Killdeer TR6 open 2 move,yell 5/19/00 Common Snipe TR6 pond 2 feed _ 5/19100 Spotted Sandpiper TR6 pond 1 move 5119100 Mourning Dove TR6 open 2 feed 5/19100 Broad-tailed Hummingbird TR6 open 3 fligh over area DATE SPECIES NAME AR HABITATIUMBE NOTES 5/19/00 Northern Flicker(red) TR6 Wlo 2 prove low 5/19100 Red-naped Sapsucker TR14 Sp 1 move low 5/19/00 Downy Woodpecker TR6 As 1 perch 5/19/DO Tree Swallow TR6 pond 5 move low 5119/00 Steller's Jay TR6 Wlo 1 perch 5/19/00 Black-billed Magpie TR6 open 3 move on ground 5/19/00 Gammon Raven TR6 open 5 move 5/19/00 Black-capped CNc adee TR6 Wlo 2 feed 5119/00 Mountain Chickadee TR14 As 4 feed 5119/00 House Wren TR6 W10 2 move low 5/19/D0 American Robin TR6 open 5 feed on ground 5119/00 Hermit Thtash TR14 As 2 on the ground feeding 5119100 Townsend's Solitaire TR6 Wlo 1 sing 5119/00 American Pipil TR6 pond 5 move 5119/00 Yellow-romped Warbler TR6 Wlo 2 move,sing 5119/00 MacGillivray's Warbler TR6 Wlo 2 move 5119100 Red-winged Blackbird TR6 pord,Wlc 3 perch,sing 5119/00 Green-tailed Towhee TR6 As 1 sing 5119/00 Chipping Sparrow TR6 Wlo 2 sing 5/19/00 Least Chipmunk TR12 As 3 move 5/19100 Least Chipmunk TR6 open 1 move 5119/00 Coyote TR6 open 1 fresh fecal 5119/00 Elk TR12 As 4 feed 519100 Mule Deer TR12 As 2 feed 6000 Nut(all's Cottontail TR8 open 2 move 618/00 Least Chipmunk TR7 Ob 1 move 618/0() Colorado Chipmunk TR8 open 2 feed 618/00 Richardson G Squirrel TR7 open 5 feed 618/00 Red Squirrel TR8 As 1 move,noisy 6/8/00 Meadow Vole TR8 open 5 move 618100 Coyote TR8 Open 1 fresh tracks and fecal 6000 Badger TR8 open,As 3 move together 6/8/00 Elk TR8 As 3 move, males 6/8100 Mule Deer TR8 As 1 feed 6/8100 Red-tailed Haw) TR8 As 2 soar low 618100 Killdeer TR8 open 2 voice, move DATE SPECIES NAME AREA HABITAIIUMBE NOTES 618/00 Broad-tailed Hummingbird TR8 As 4 move 6/8100 House Wren TR7 Ob 2 move 6/8/00 American Robin TR7,8 Ob,As 9 move,perch 6/8100 Yellow-rumped Warbler TR8 Wlo 2 move 6/8/00 Wilson's Warbler TR7 Ob 5 move 618100 Pine Siskin TR8 As 2 move 6000 Rufous-sided Towhee TR7 Ob 1 sing 6/8/00 Junco TR7,8 Ob,As 8 feed on the ground 6000 Chipping Sparrow TR7 Ob 1 sing 6124/00 Canada Goose TR6 pond 5 feed,rest 6/24100 Mallard TR6 pond 2 feed 6/24/00 Turkey Vulture TR2 As 1 soar high 6/24/00 Red-tailed Hawk TR14 As 1 perch 624/00 Killdeer TR6 open 2 move 6/24/00 Mourning Dove TR2 open,As 2 feed on ground 6/24/00 Pygmy Owl TR2 As 1 perch 6124100 Broad-tailed Hummingbird TR2,6 As 5 move 6!24100 Northern Flicker(red) TR2 As 2 move low 6124/00 Hairy Woodpecker TR14,2 AS 3 feed 6/24/00 Ash-throated Flycatcher TR6 Wlo 1 sing 6124/00 Western Flycatcher TR2,6 As,Wlo 2 sing 6124/00 Olive-sided Flycatcher TR14 As,Sp 1 sing 6/24/00 Violet-green Swallow TR6 pond 5 move,feed 6/24/00 Tree Swallow TR2 As 2 nesting 6124100 Stellees Jay TR2,6 Wlo,As 3 move 6/24100 Scrub Jay TR6 Wlo 2 move 6/24/00 Black-tailed Magpie TR6,2 open,As 6 move 6/24100 Black-capped Chickadee TR6 Wlo 3 move 6/24/00 Mountain Chickadee TR14,2 As 6 move 6/24/00 Plain Titmouse TR6 As,Wlo 2 move 624100 Dipper TR2 As,Cr 2 feed in water 624/00 House Wren TR2,6 As,Wlo 4 move 624/00 American Robin TR14,6 As 7 move 6/24/00 Hermit Thrash TR2 As 2 move 6124100 Blue-gray Gnalcatcher TR2 As,Ob 2 feed 624/00 Ruby-crowned Kinglet TR6 AS,Wlo 2 move DATE SPECIES NAME AUA HABrMUMBE NOTES 6/24/00 Warbling Vireo TR6 Wlo 1 sing 6/24/00 Yellow Warbler TR2,6 Wlo 3 move 624/DU Yellow-rumped Warbler TR6 Wlo 2 move 624100 MacGillivray's Warbler TR2 As,Wlo 2 move 624/00 Common Yellowthroat TR6 Wlo 1 move 6/24100 Wilson Warbler TR2 Wlo 2 move 624/00 Red winged Blackbird TR6 pond 3 move 624100 Western Tanager TR2 As 1 perch 6/24/00 Evening Grosbeak TR6 W10 4 move 624/00 Pine Siskin TR2 As 1 perch 6124/00 Red Crossbill TR14 Sp 1 perch 624/00 Junco TR6 open 4 move 6/24/00 While-crowned Sparrow TR6 Wio 3 move 624/00 Lincoln's Sparrow TR2 As 1 perch 624/00 Least Squirrel TR2 open 1 move 6/24/00 Red Squirrel TR14 Sp 2 move 624100 Coyote TR14 As 1 fresh fecal 624100 Red Fox TR2 As 1 move near water 6/24/00 Black Bear TR2 As 1 tracks,fecal 624100 Long-failed Weasel TR2 As 1 fecal 624/00 Bobcat TR14 AS,Sp 1 fecal 6/24/00 Mule Deer TR2 As 3 feed 7/11/00 Nultairs Cottontail TR8 open 1 move 7111/00 Least Chipmunk TR8 open 1 move 7/11/00 Richardson G Squirrel TR8 open 3 feed 7111100 Golden-mantled G Squirrel TR8 Ob,As 1 move on Ob 7/11100 Red Squirrel TR8 As 2 move 7/11/00 Meadow Vote TR8 open 3 move 7/11/00 Raccoon TR7 Ob 1 fecal 7111/00 Mule Deer TR8 As 2 feed 7/11/00 Red-tailed Hawk TR8 As 2 soar low 7111/00 Northern Harrier TR7 Ob 1 soar low 7/11/00 American Kestrel TR7 Ob 1 perch 7/11100 Killdeer TR8 open 2 move 7/11/00 Broad-tailed Hummingbird TR8 As 2 move 7/11/00 Downy Woodpecker TR8 As 1 nest DATE SPECIES NAME AM HABtTAIIUMBE NOTES 7/11/00 Western Flycatcher TR8 As 2 sing 7/11/00 Olive-sided Flycatcher TR8 As 1 sing 7/11/00 Tree Swallow TR8 As 2 nest 7111/00 Steller's Jay TR8,7 As,Ob 2 move 7/11/00 Comon Raven TR7 Ob 5 High low 7111100 House Wren TR7,8 Ob,As 4 move 7/11/00 American Robin TR7 Ob 4 move 7/11/00 Mountain Bluebird TR8 Open,As 3 move 7/11/00 Ruby-crowned Kinglet TR7 Ob,As 1 move 7/11/00 Pine Siskin TR8 As 1 move 7/11/00 Chipping Sparrow TR7 Ob 1 perch 7/11/00 Junco TR7 open 5 move 7/11/00 White-crowned Sparrow TR8 WIo,As 2 move 7/29/00 Mallard TR6 pond 1 feed 7/29/00 Northern Harrier TR6 open 1 soar low 7129/00 Golden Eagle TR9 As 1 soar high 7/29/00 Blue Grouse TR9 As,Wlo 1 move 7/29100 Mourning Dove TR6 open 2 feed 7129100 Great Horned Owl TR9 As 1 perch low 7/29100 Saw-wet Owl TR6 Wlo 1 perch close to the ground 729/00 Common Night Hawk TR6 open 2 on the ground 7/29100 Broad-tailed Hummingbird TR6,9 open As 3 move 729/00 Northern Flicker(red) TR9 As 2 move low 729100 Red-naped Sapsucker TR9 As,Sp 1 perch,move 729100 Hairy Woodpecker TR6 As 1 move 729100 Downy Woodpecker TR9 As 1 move 7/29/00 Dusky Flycatcher TR6 Wlo 1 perch 729/00 Western Flycatcher TR6,9 As,Wlo 2 perch 729/00 Olive-sided Flycatcher TR9 As,Sp 1 can 729/00 Violet-green Swallow TR6 pond 4 feed 729/00 Tree Swallow TR9 open 5 move 729/00 Common Raven TR6 open 2 move on the ground 7129/00 Black-capped Chickadee TR9 As 2 feed 729100 Mountain Chickadee TR9 As 2 move 729/00 While-breasted Nuthatch TR9 As,Ob 1 move 7/29/00 House Wren TR6,9 As,open 4 move DATE SPECIES NAME AREA HABrrAIUMBE NOTES 729/00 American Robin TR6 open 3 move 7129100 Mountain Bluebird TR6,9 open 4 move low 729100 Starling TR6 open 6 move 729/00 Yellow Warbler TR6 Wlo 2 move 729100 Common Yellowthroat TR6 Wlo,As 2 move 729100 Junco TR6,9 open 7 on the ground 729/00 Song Sparrow TR6 As 1 move 729100 Least Chipmunk TR9 open 2 move 7129/00 Golden-mantled G Squirrel TR9 open,Ob 2 move 7129/00 Coyote TR6 open 1 tracks,fecal 7/29/00 Red Fox TR9 open 1 fecal 7129100 Black Bear TR9 open,As 2 Iracks,fecal 7129100 Mule Deer TR9 As 1 feed 819100 Nutlall's Cottontail TR7 Ob 1 run 819100 Least Chipmunk TR7 Ob,As 3 move 8/9/00 Golden-mantled G Squirrel TR7 Ob 1 move 819/00 Red Squirrel TR13 As 2 move,noise 8/9/DD Porcupine TR7 Ob 1 feed 819100 Elk TR13 As 2 females,feed 8/9100 Red-tailed Hawk TR13 As 2 perch 819/00 Cooper's Hawk TR7 Ob,As 1 perch on oak 8/9100 Blue Grouse TR13 As 4 move 819100 Mourning Dove TR7 Ob 2 move on ground 8000 Broad-tailed Hummingbird TR7 Ob 2 move 819/00 Broad-tailed Hummingbird TR13 As 1 move 819/00 Western Flycatcher TR13 As 1 perch 819100 Olive-sided Flycatcher TR13 As 1 cad 8/9/00 Tree Swallow TR7 Ob 2 move 819/00 Steller's Jay TR7 Ob 1 perch 819/00 Scrub Jay TR7 Ob 2 move 819/00 Black-billed Magpie TR7 Ob,As 3 move 819/00 Common Raven . TR13 As 5 soar high 819/00 Clark's Nutcracker TR13 As 2 move,call 819/00 Black-capped Chickadee TR7 Ob 4 feed 8/9100 Mountain Chickadee TR13,7 As 3 feed 819100 House Wren TR7 Ob 1 move PME SPECIES NAME AREA HABITATIUMBE NOTES 8/9/00 American Robin TR7 Ob,As 7 perch,call 8/9100 MacGillivray's Warbler TR7 Ob 1 move 8/9/00 Wilson's Warbler TR7 Ob,As 4 move 819/00 Northam Oriole TR7 Ob,As 1 perch 819/00 Chipping Sparrow TR7 Ob 1 call 9/14/00 Canada Goose TR6 open 7 feed 9114/00 Mallard TR6 open 3 move 9/14/00 Red-tailed Hawk TR2 As 1 soar high 9/14100 Golden Eagle TR2 As 1 soar high 9114100 American Kestrel TR6 Wlo 1 perch 9/14/00 Mourning Dove TR6 open 4 feed 9/14/00 Band-tailed pigeon TR6 open 3 feed on the ground 9/14/00 American Robin TR6,2 As 8 move 9/14/00 Mountain Bluebird TR6 open 2 move 9/14/00 Townsend s Solilair TR2 Ob,As 1 cap 9114100 Pine Siskin TR2 open 9 move on nthe ground 9/14100 Evening Grosbeak TR2 Ob,As 6 perch,move 9/14100 While-crowned Sparrow TR6 Wlo 8 move 9/14100 Junco TR6,2 Ob,open 13 move 9114100 Least Chipmunk TR2,6 As,open 3 move 9/14/00 Red Squirrel TR2 As,Sp 2 move 9/14/00 Red Fox TR6 open 1 fecal 9/14/00 Mule Deer TR2 As 5 feed 9/14/00 Elk TR2 As,Sp 2 young males,feed 9/30/00 Least Chipmunk TR8 open 2 move 9/30/00 Red Squirrel TR8,9 Sp 5 move 9130/00 Black Bear TR8 As 2 fresh tracks,fecal 9/30100 Mule Deer TR8 As 3 feed 9/30/00 Elk TR8 As 4 young females, feed 9130100 Mallard TR8 open 2 fly low 9/30100 Golden Eagle TR9 As 1 soar high 9/30/00 Mourning Dove TR8 open 5 feed 9/30/00 Northern Flicker(red) TR8 open 4 move low 9130/00 Hairy Woodpecker TR9 As 1 perch 9/30100 Gray Jay TR9 Sp 2 move 9/30/00 Black-billed Mag pie TR9 As 4 move low Two Creeks and the Pines 2000 9/30100 Mallard TR8 open 2 fly low 9/30100 Golden Eagle TR9 As 1 soar high 9/30/00 Mourning Dove TR8 open 5 feed 9130100 Northern Flicker(red) TR8 open 4 move low 9/30100 Hairy Woodpecker TR9 As 1 perch 9MQW Gray Jay TR9 Sp 2 move 9/30100 Black-billed Mag pie TR9 As 4 move low 9/30100 Common Raven TR8 open 3 move 9/30/00 Mountain Chickadee TR8 As 6 feed 9/30100 American Robin TR8 open 9 move 9130100 Pine Siskin TR8 open 17 feed 9130/00 Junco TR8 open 9 feed 10/14100 Canada Goose TR6 open 7 fly low 10114100 Northern Flicker(red) TR11 open 4 move low 10114/00 Steller's Jay TR11 open 2 move 10/14/00 Black-billed Magpie TR6 open 4 move on the snow 10/14100 Common Raven TR11 open 3 fly low 10114100 Mountain Chickadee TR11 Sp 2 feed 10114100 Mountain Chickadee TR6 As 2 feed 10114/00 Black-capped Chickadee TR6 As 2 feed 10114/00 Brown-capped Rosy Finch TR11 Sp 9 perch,noisy 10114100 Junco TR11,6 open 13 feed on the ground 10/14/00 Nultall's Cottontail TR11 open 3 tracks 10/14/00 Least Chipmunk TR6 Wlo 1 move 10/14/00 Red Squirrel TR6 As 2 move 10/14100 Mtge Deer TR11 open 3 fresh tracks 10114100 Elk TR12 As,Sp 2 move in deep snow 10/14100 Elk TR13 As,Ob 4 move toward east in snow 10130100 Snowshoe Hare TR13 As,Sp 4 fresh tracks in snow(deep snow) 10130/00 Red Squirrel TR73,12 As,Sp 3 tracks and move 10/30100 Red Fox TR12 As 1 move 10/30/00 American Marten TR12 Sp,As 1 climbed low on As,tracks 10130/00 Mule Deer TR13,12 As 4 fresh tracks 10130100 Elk TR12 As 9 females, at 8600',deep snow 11/18/00 Snowshoe Hare TR15 As 2 fresh tracks in deep snow 11/18/00 Snowshoe Hare TR8 As,open 3 fresh tracks 11/18/00 Red Squirrel TR15 Sp 1 tracks 11/18100 Coyote TR8 open 1 move, dig in snow 11/18/00 Bobcat TR15 As 1 fresh tracks,fecal Baharav Environmental Consulting DATE SPECIES NAME 0@A HABITATUMBE NOTES 1 U18/00 Juno TR8 open 7 move on snow 11/29/00 Gray Jay TR12 As,Sp 2 move low 1129100 Steller's Jay TR12 As 1 perch,move 1129/00 Mountain Chickadee TR12 As 3 move 1129/00 Black-capped Chickadee TR12 As 2 move 1129/00 Junco TR12 As,Sp 6 on the ground,snow 1129100 Snowshoe Hare TR12 As 3 fresh track on deep snow 1129100 Elk TR12 As 4 move in deep snow in Zone A 1222100 Snowshoe Hare TR15 As 3 tracks 1222/00 Red Squirrel TR15 Sp 2 tracks 12/22100 Porcupine TR7 Ob,open 1 move in deep snow 12/22/00 Coyote TR7 open 1 tracks 1222/00 Red Fox TR7 open,Ob 1 move, fecal 12/22100 Black-billed Magpie TR7 open 5 move low 1222/00 Common Raven TR7 open,As 3 My low 1222/00 Mountain Chickadee TR7,6 As 4 feed 1222100 Junco TR6 open 7 move Table 2. Birds observed during 2000 monitoring, Two Creeks and the Pines. BirdeSLC97.wdb-Birds,twoCrtlO Spticiea Name Habitat Tvoe Abundance )met Neotpl. Miart Winter Res, American Kestrel Ob,Willow Common yes no no American Pipit Willow,Rip Occasional no no no American Robin Ob,As,Df,Sp Abundant yes no no American wigeon Pond Rare no yes no Ash-throated Flycatcher Wlo,Ob Occasional yes yes no Banded-tailed Pigeon Ob Rare no yes no Black-billed Magpie Ob,Open,As Abundant yes no yes Black-capped Chickadee As,Ob,Sp Abundant yes no yes Black-Rosy Finch As,Open Occasional yes no yes Blue-gray Gnatcatcher Ob Occasional yes yes no Blue Grouse As,Sp Common yes no yes ' Blue-winged Teal Pond Occasional no yes no Broad-tailed Hummingbird As,open,Sp Abundant yes yes no Brown Creeper Wlo Occasional yes no no Brown-capped Rosy Finch As,open,Willow Occasional yes no no Brown-headed Cowbird Ob Occasional yes no no Canada Goose open,Pond Occasional no no no Chipping Sparrow Willow,Ob,As Fairly Common yes no no Clark's Nutcracker As Common yes no yes Common Nighthawk open Common yes yes no Common Raven As,open,Willow Common yes no yes Common Snipe pond,open Rare no yes no Common Yellowthroal Sp,open Occasional yes yes no Cooper's Hawk As,Ob Occasional no yes no Dipper Sp,Rip Occasional yes no yes Downy Woodpecker As,Sp Common yes no no Dusky Flycatcher Ob,AS,Wilkhw Occasional yes no no Evening Grosbeak Wiliow,As,Sp Fairly Common yes no no Fox Sparrow As,Willow Fairly Common yes no no Golden Eagle open Common no no no Golden-crowned Kinglet Sp,As,Ob Occasional yes yes no Gray Jay Sp,As Common yes no yes Gray-crowned Rosy Finch Ob Occasional no no yes Great Homed Owl As,open Occasional no no no Table 2. Birds observed during 2000 monitoring, Two Creeks and the Pines. Srecles Name Habitat Tvoe Abundance @Y et Neotol. Mtart Winter Res, Green-tailed Towhee Willow,Ob Fairly Common yes no no Hairy Woodpecker As,Sp Common yes no yes Hermit Thrush As Fairly Common yes yes no House Wren open,Ob,As Fairly Common yes no no Junoo Ob,Rip,As,Sp Abundant yes no yes Killdeer open,As Occasional yes yes no Lincoln's Sparrow Pond,Wlo,As Occasional yes yes no MacGlllivray's Warbler Ob,As,Sp,Willo Fairly Common yes no no Mallard Pond,open Occasional no no yes Mountain Bluebird Willow,open,As Common yes no no Mountain Chickadee Sp,As,Ob Abundant yes no yes Mourning Dove open,pond,As Common yes no no Northern Flicker(red) Sp,open,As,Ob Abundant yes no no Northern Herier open,As Rare no yes no Northern Oriole Ob,Wlo Occasional yes no no Olive-sided Flycatcher Sp,As Fairly Common yes yes no Pine Grosbeak Sp Occasional yes no no Pine Siskin As,Sp,open Abundant yes no no Plain Titmouse Ob,Wlo Occasional yes no no Pygmy Owl As Occasional no no no Red-breasted Nuthatch Sp,As Common yes no no Red Crossbill Sp Common yes no no Red-raped Sapsucker As Occasional yes yes no Red-tailed Hawk As,Ob,open Common yes no yes Red-winged Blackbird Ob,pond Occasional no no no Ring-necked Duck Pond Rare no no no Ruby-crowned Kinglet Ob Fairly Common yes yes no Rufous-sided Towhee Ob Occasional yes no no Saw-wet Owl Wlo,As Occasional no no no Scrub Jay Ob Common yes no no Song Sparrow willow,Sp Fairly Common yes no no Spotted Sandpiper Pond Occasional no yes no Starling Ob,pond,open Occasional no no no Slelws Jay As,Ob,Sp Common yes no no Townsend's Solitaire As,Ob, Fairly Common yes no no Tree Swallow As,pond Common yes yes no Table 2. Birds observed dying 2000 monitoring, Two Creeks and the Pines. Species Name Habitat Tvice Abundance Broods Neotol, Miart llYinter Res. Turkey Vulture Open Occasional no yes no Violet-green Swallow Open,willow Common yes yes no Warbling Vireo As Fairly Cortvnon yes yes no Western Flycatcher As,Ob Fairly Cornrtron yes yes no While-breasted Nuthatch Ob,wiilow Occasional yes no no White-crowned Sparrow Wilkaw,open Fairly Conwran no no no Wilson's Warbler As,willow fFairy Common no yes no Yellow Warbler Willow Fairly Common yes yes no Yellow-rumped Warbler Willow,pond Common yes yes no TOTAL Species Name: 0 COUNT OF Species Name: 79 Table 3. Birds observed during 7966-2000 monitoring, Two Creeks and the Pines. BlydsSLC97.wdb Birds,twoCr00 Species No Habitat Tvhne Abundance Breecle Neo . Miart Winter Res, American Kestrel Ob,Willow Common yes no no American Pipit Willow,Rip Occasional no no no American Robin Ob,As,Df,Sp Abundant yes no no American wigeon Pond Rare no yes no Ash-throated Flycatcher Wlo,Ob Occasional yes yes no Banded-failed Pigeon Ob Rare no yes no Barn Swallow Open,Ob Occasional yes yes no Belled Kingfisher Rip,Open Rare no yes no Black-billed Magpie Ob,Open,As Abundant yes no yes Black-capped Chickadee As,Ob,Sp Abundant yes no yes Black-Rosy Finch As,Open Occasional yes no yes Blue-gray Gnatcatcher Ob Occasional yes yes no Blue Grouse As,Sp Common yes no yes Blue-winged Teal Pond Occasional no yes no Brewer's Blackbird Ob,Ponds Occasional no no no Broad-tailed Hummingbird As,open,Sp Abundant yes yes no Brown Creeper Wlo Occasional yes no no Brown-capped Rosy Finch As,open,Willow Occasional yes no no Brown-headed Cowbird Ob Occasional yes no no Canada Goose open,Pond Occasional no no no Cassin's Finch Sp,Df,Rip Occasional yes no no Chipping Sparrow Willow,Ob,As Fairly Common yes no no Clark's Nutcracker As Common yes no yes Common Nighthawk open Common yes yes no Common Raven As,open,Willow Common yes no yes Common Snipe pond,open Rare no yes no Common Yellowthroat Sp,open Occasional yes yes no Cooper's Hawk As,Ob Occasional no yes no Dipper Sp,Rtp Occasional yes no yes Downy Woodpecker As,Sp Common yes no no Dusky Flycatcher Ob,As,Willow Occasional yes no no Evening Grosbeak Willow,As,Sp Fairly Common yes no no Fox Sparrow As,Willow Fairly.Common yes no no Golden Eagle open Common no no no Table 3. Birds observed during 1966-2000 monitoring, Two Creeks and the Pines. Soeeles Name Habitat Tvoa Abundance Neotol. Miart Winter Res- Golden-crowned Kinglet Sp,As,Ob Occasional yes yes no Gray Jay . Sp,As Common yes no yes Gray-crowned Rosy Finch Ob Occasional no no yes Great Homed Owl As,open Occasional no no no Green-tailed Towhee Willow,Ob Fairly Common yes no no Hairy Woodpecker As,Sp Common yes no yes Hermit Thrush As Fairly Common yes yes no House Sparrow Ob,Rip,Open. Fairly Common yes no yes House Wren open,Ob,As Fairly Common yes no no Junco Ob,Rip,As,Sp Abundant yes no yes Killdeer open,As Occasional yes yes no Lincoln's Sparrow Pond,Wlo,As Occasional yes yes no• MacGillivray's Warbler Ob,As,Sp,Willo Fairly Common yes no no Mallard Pond,open Occasional no no yes Mountain Bluebird Willow,open,As Common yes no no Mountain Chickadee Sp,As,Ob Abundant yes no yes Mourning Dove open,pond,As Common yes no no Northern Flicker(red) Sp,open,As,Ob Abundant yes no no Northem Harrier open,As Rare no yes no Northam Oriole Ob,Wlo Occasional yes no no Olive-sided Flycatcher Sp,As Fairly Common yes yes no Pine Grosbeak Sp Occasional yes no no Pine Siskin As,Sp,open Abundant yes no no PlainTitinouse Ob,Wlo Occasional yes no no Pygmy Owl As Occasional no no no Red-breasted Nuthatch Sp,As Common yes no no Red Crossbill Sp Common yes no no Red-naped Sapsucker As Occasional yes yes no Red-tailed Hawk As,Ob,open Common yes no yes Red-winged Blackbird Ob,pond Occasional no no no Ring-necked Duck Pond Rare no no no Ruby-crowned Kinglet Ob Fairly Common yes yes no Rufous-sided Towhee Ob Occasional yes no no Saw-wet Owl Wlo,As Occasional no no no Says Phoebe Ob Occasional no no no Scrub Jay Ob Common yes no no Table 5. Mammals observed during 1966-2000 monitoring, Two Creeks and the Pines. MemmalSLC97.Wdb-MammlTwcr00 Species Name Mammal Tvpe Habitat Abundance American Marten Carnivore Df,Sp Occasional Badger Carnivore Rip,Ob Occasional Black Bear Omnivore Ob,Rip Occasional Bobcat Carnivore Rip,Ob Common Colorado Chipmunk Herbivore As, Sp Fairly Common Coyote Carnivore Ob,Rip Common Elk Herbivore As,Df,open Occasional Golden-mentled G Squirrel Herbivore Ob Common Least Chipmunk Herbivore Ob,As,Rip Abundant Long-tailed Vole Herbivore Df,Ob Fairly Common Long-tailed Weasel Carnivore Rip,Ob Fairly Common Meadow Vole Herbivore As,Ob,open Common Montain Vole Herbivore As,Sp Common Mule Deer Herbivore As,Ob,Df Common Nuttall's Cottontail Herbivore Ob Common Porcupine Herbivore Ob,Rip Common Raccoon Carnivore Rip Fairly Common Red Fox Carnivore Rip,open Common Red Squirrel Herbivore Df,Rip Common Richardson's G Squirrel Herbivore Meadow Fairly Common Snowshoe Hare Herbivore Df,Rip,As Common Striped Skunk Camivore-InseciRip Common Unite Chipmunk Herbivore Df,Rip Fairly Common Yellow-bellied Marmot Herbivore open Occasional TOTAL Species Name: 0 COUNT OF Species Name: 24 ------------------------------------ Table 4. Raptor species observed in Two Creeks and the Pines during1996-2000 (5 years) monitoring. Species Name Habitat Type American Kestrel Ob Cooper's Hawk Ob,As Golden Eagle Open Great Homed Owl As Northern Harrier Open,ponds Pygmy Owl As Red-tailed Hawk As,Sp Saw-wet Owl Mo,As Sharp-shinned Hawk Ob,As Turkey Vulture Open BEC 1 SSA Final Report,2000 SNOWMASS SIG AREA Monitoring Wildlife Final Report. 2000 By Dr. Dan Baharav Baharav Environmental Consulting April 20,2001 BEC 2 SSA Final Report ,2000 SNOWMASS SIQ AREA Monitoring Wildlife Final Report. 2000 RX Dr. Dan Babarav Baharav Environmental Consulting INTENT This report summarizes the fifth year's implementation and monitoring of the Wildlife Enhancement and Management Plan (WENT)of the Snowmass Ski Area(SSA). The Primary goal of the WEMP is to maintain the habitat continuity and wildlife sustainability of the existing SSA within the context of the regional ecological system around Snowmass Village, Colorado. Four ecological concepts guided the WEMP: (1)forest canopy continuum (2) diversified foliage height configuration(3)diversified ecotones(4)heterogeneity and continuity of riparian habitats.The multi-year monitoring plan includes gathering quantifiable data on a regular basis, from January through December, in order to evaluate the effectiveness of the WEMP and its planned actions. Five years of observations and data analysis is too short a period for drawing final conclusions, but there are conspicuous trends that can be commented on regarding the SSA wildlife enhancement goals and its ecological system, and they are outlined below. BEC 3 SSA Final Report,2000 METHODS To execute the WEMP, a monitoring program has been developed utilizing a customized methodology(Cooperider et al, 1986;Wilson et al, 1996 )to respond to the specific needs of WEMP. The strength of the monitoring program and its methodology is in its immediate response to the mountain ski maintenance tasks and to the development projects as they unfold. Thus, data that were collected during the preparation of the WEMP are compared to those collected through the execution of the monitoring program. The methods include gathering both qualitative and quantitative data on a regular basis,monthly and seasonally. The Wildlife Enhancement and Management Plan identifies and defines three zones of ecological significance within the Snowmass Ski Area(Fig. 1.). These zones have a higher or lower ecological significance depending on how well they can support wildlife on a continuous basis (Baharav, 1994a). Zones A and B have a high level of ecological significance while Zone C has low ecological significance (Baharav, 1994x, pp. 92-93, Fig. 1, 2 and Table 2). Through continuous observations within the three zones at least twice each month information was collected on: elk and deer area use, neotropical migrant bird nesting,North American birds(residents and short distance migrants), raptor habitats, small, medium and large size mammal area use, white-tailed ptarmigan area use, foliage height diversity (FHD), riparian areas, and human activities. One to three observers traversed these three zones during early mornings or late afternoons on foot or in a vehicle, using SSA topographical maps sectioned into small coordinates (Fig. 2). During each visit 5-7 coordinate cells of this map were walked for line transacts or driven for drive counts and data were collected on: species identification,number, behavior,nesting activities, feeding activities, movements, reproductive activities, vegetation condition,vegetation structure(FHD), soil erosion,trampling,riparian habitat FHD, snags, dead fall materials, vegetation condition on ski runs, edge area structure,and human activities. During the late summer and fall months observation on elk movement and behavior was more frequent. Elk were observed from vantage points within Elk Camp,Burnt Mountain,the Big Bum area,High Alpine area,Mid-Station area(Cafe Suzanne), and Kelly Park (Fig. 2). Elk Fall migration movements and late summer activities within the Willow Creek range and West Buttermilk-Burnt Mountain area were recorded. Throughout each observation period, location, number, age and sex of individuals,movement and feeding patterns,behavior and influence of human activities were recorded. Observations on elk migration were extended to the Owl Creek-Brush Creek corridor. Here, observations were taken from vantage points at the East Owl Creek BEC 4 SSA Final Report ,2000 subdivision, Cory Point ridge, Hidden Valley, and Sinclair Road(Baharav, 1992-94 Spring and Fall migration study reports, Aspen Skiing Company). Data on human activities within the SSA were taken from construction sites, ski area maintenance tasks,and recreation. ANALYSIS Elk and Deer Area Use Elk distribution within the SSA is indicated in figure 3. This is based on actual sightings of individuals, and on fresh fecal materials and tracks. In general,area use by elk in 2000 resembled the pattern in 1999(Baharav, 2000). During the Spring of 2000 a total of 317 elk have been crossing Owl Creek Road moving into Guber's ,Hines',Pfifer's,and Sinclair's properties and then into the Snowmass Ski Area via blocks A14,B14 (Fig. 3). Groups of 3 to 41 elk were seen moving slowly up the slopes feeding according to the availability of forage and snow cover. Although most of these elk continued on into Willow Creek via the saddle area between Burnt Mountain and West Buttermilk Ski Area about 115 elk were crossing the Snowmass Ski Area above Mid-Station(Cafe Suzanne) moving slowly toward the Elk Camp-West Willow Creek habitats. Calving females restricted their area use to the habitats in blocks A8 and A9 (Fig.3). After calving ended (in mid June) nursing females and newborn calves moved directly into Willow Creek via the saddle east of Burnt Mountain. Another group of elk was moving during the Spring within the Snowmass Creek drainage area entering the Snowmass Ski Area from the west into blocks P13 and 013 within the Campground ski runs(Fig. 3). An estimated number of 85 elk were using this route. Similar to 1999, after the third week of July no elk was seen within the SSA below 11,600 feet or west of Big Bum area. A group of 44-50 elk was seen regularly within the West Willow Creek saddle area during the summer months. The highest count in this area during the Summer was 47 individuals. As in 1999, a group of 40-50 elk were seen regularly north and south of Government Trail in the vicinity of Whites Lake. These elk were never seen above 10.800 ft.,but individuals were seen active south and north of the Government Trail and near Cafe Suzanne between BEC 5 SSA Final Report ,2000 elevation of 9,200 ft. to 10,600 ft. This observation was consistent every year from 1996 through 2000. The summer range condition within the SSA during 2000 was excellent. The range was green all throughout the summer and was especially attractive for the elk during Fall migration. During the summer the elk preferred to use areas above 12,000 ft., and the upper Willow Creek drainage which are all found outside the SSA boundaries. Continuing snow fall during the last part of October and all of November together with hunting activities at the USFS areas within the Government Trail habitats caused the elk to move fast within the Snowmass Ski Area. Deep snow forced the elk to move single file into the protercted habitats at Guber's and Sinclair's properties by October 23. The elk were crossing the Government Trail via two locations: (1) At White's Lake just south of Guber's and (2)at about 100 yards east of Kelly's Park just south of Sinclair's property using the Spring Creek drainage as their main route. On November 1, the largest elk group was seen at Guber's meadows(elevation 8100'-8250')counting 346 individuals. Together with 28 more elk that had been seen on that date at Hine's property, and an estimated number of 45 individuals moving via the Snowmass Creek drainage a total of 419 elk were crossing the Snowmass Ski Area during the Fall migration of 2000. In summary,an estimated number of 402 elk moved through the Snowmass Ski Area during the Spring migration of 2000 and an estimated 419 elk moved through the ski area during 2000 Fall migration. This is higher from 1999 estimate (Baharav,2000). Mule Deer sightings were common almost everywhere within SSA (Table 1,Fig. 3). The deer were usually active in small groups of 2-5 individuals. During the summer deer could be seen frequently above 10,700 Ft. These observations were consistent from 1996 through the current year(Baharav, 2000). Birds Table 2 summarizes the occurrence of bird species within the SSA during the 2000 monitoring period. Ninety bird species were observed. This is similar to last year's total bird species identified within the SSA. Of the 90 species identified,69 species(77%) were confirmed breeders(nesting, pair behavior, adults carrying nesting materials, and adults carrying food). Thirty two neotropical migrant species were observed within the SSA of which 24 were confirmed breeders(Table 2). Neotropical migrants are birds that migrate in winter to Central and South America(south of the Tropic of Cancer), and return back to the ski area habitats in the spring. In recent years, special attention has been given to the neotropical migrant birds by ecologists, since both their winter and BEC 6 SSA Final Report ,2000 summer habitats are being constantly disturbed and reduced in size Hahan and Johnston, 1992). In 2000,fifteen species were found to be winter residents within the SSA: Black Rosy Finch,Black-billed magpie,Black-capped Chickadee,Blue Grouse,Canada Goose, Clark's Nutcracker,Common Raven, Gray Jay, Gray-crowned Rosy Finch, Hairy woodpecker,House Finch,Mountain Chickadee,Pine Grosbeak,Pygmy Owl and White-tailed Ptarmigan. Bird species were using extensively coniferous habitats(19% ), riparian habitats(22%),and aspen habitats(25%). Other habitats were also used: oakbrush (15%), open (11%),and willow(8%). Since 1996 species richness and occurrence were highest in ecotone habitats,especially within ski runs at elevations 9,200 ft. to 10,500 ft. and in areas between Hanging Valley and the Cirque. American Robin, Black-capped Chickadee,Blue Grouse,Broad-tailed Hummingbird,Common Raven, Junco,Mountain Bluebird,Mountain Chickadee, and Pine Siskin,were found in all vegetation types. The largest number of nest predator species like Black-billed Magpie, Clark's Nutcracker, Common Raven, Gray Jay, Scrub Jay, and Steller's Jay was seen in areas of low FHD,open terrain, and within large"edge"areas,especially within Big Bum , Sam's Knob,Campground,and within the lower portions of Long Shot run within the Burnt Mountain side. It should be noted here that due to the enhancement program,the FHD is improving in this area, leading to better canopy continuum between the ski runs. This, in turn, is expected to reduce preferred habitats for predator bird species. Raptor Habitats During the 2000 monitoring, 11 raptor species were observed within the SSA: American Kestrel,Cooper's Hawk, Golden Eagle,Northern Hamer,Peregrine Falcon,Prairie Falcon, Red-tailed Hawk, Sharp-shinned Hawk,Turkey Vulture,Great Homed Owl, and Pygmy Owl. Of these,Turkey Vulture,Northern Hamer,Cooper's Hawk,Sharp-shinned Hawk, Golden Eagle,Peregrine Falcon, and Great Homed Owl were not seen to nest within the SSA. Only adult Prairie Falcon were seen at the cliffs of Burnt Mountain, using the cliffs all summer. Pygmy Owl was observed at different altitudes and habitat types, although this species was mostly observed in the aspen vegetation type. Red-tailed Hawk were seen in almost every observation trip during Spring and Summer. This species was seen soaring at high and low altitudes during all of December and the first week of January. Areas like the Hanging Valley cliffs, Burnt Mountain cliffs, the Cirque BEC 7 SSA Final Report,2000 and the open habitats between Sam's Knob and Big Bum received most of the raptors visits. The ecotone habitats of aspen and oak within the Two Creeks area were used often by Cooper's Hawk and Sharp-shinned Hawk, especially where more open areas were found. Raptors stay away from humans. They are shy birds, difficult to observe, and move fast. It is believed that for now,because of continued construction activities in the SSA and its vicinity, raptor activities within this large area are,and will continue to be limited. Even though 11 raptor species have been seen in the SSA during the year 2000, it is still too early in the monitoring program to specify areas of concern regarding raptor activities. There are some good potential habitats for raptor nesting activities within the SSA, such as Hanging Valley,the top of Big Burn,Burnt Mountain cliffs,west Elk Camp area, parts within the Government Trail area,and the riparian habitats found at Two Creeks. Improving FHD and more observation time are needed in order to develop decisions concerning concerning raptor ecology and its relation to human activities. White-tailed Ptarmjgan Area Use White-tailed Ptarmigan, in small groups and singles,were often seen within the SSA, mostly in the vicinity of willow vegetation. The area use of this species was similar throughout the last five years of monitoring. During 2000 more ptarmigans were seen overall. During March ptarmigans were seen in open and forested habitats at elevations 10,600 ft. to 10,800 ft., in the vicinity of the Cirque(Fig 4). On March 15, a group of three ptarmigans was seen landing east of Elk Camp within a Spruce Fir habitat. In April ptarmigans were seen in areas above 10,900 ft.. However on 4/12/00 a small group of three was seen close to the Government Trail at elevation 9,200 ft. From May on the majority of the observations were above 11,800 ft. During the summer ptarmigans were confined to the areas above 11,800 ft., and were often seen flying from the areas with willow vegetation type to open areas below or above that elevation,all the way to the ski boundary and the ridge at 12,700 ft. All these observations were confined to the boggy willow areas close to the SSA boundary. These observations were very similar to those of BEC 8 SSA Final Report,2000 1999. In 2000, the highest number of ptarmigans that was seen on a single observation or day was seven with two to three at a time being the most common. Both in 1999and in 2000 young chicks were seen during the month of August: this may confirm a July nesting period for this species within the SSA. During the winter and early spring months the ptarmigans were seen active more within the dense coniferous habitats as far down as 9,000 ft. but also above the top of the Cirque Lift area. During the summer ptarmigans were very common in areas of the East Snowmass Creek drainage just off the SSA boundary. The five years of observations show that the ptarmigan population within the SSA is small but some indication of population increase is apparent . This population is distributed all over the Snowmass Ski Area. Mammals Area Use Mammals were identified by sight, sound, scats, burrows, tracks, and prey remains.No live traps were used during the 2000 monitoring, so information on shrews and rodent species richness is incomplete. In the EIS report of Pague and Rufenacht(1993)for the Snowmass Ski Area Improvements, no significant differences were found between developed and undeveloped areas with respect to rodent species richness or abundance. During the 2000 monitoring 23 species of mammals were identified or observed within the SSA (Table 3). This is one more than last year. Of these species, there were 16 herbivores, 1 omnivore, and 6 carnivores(Table 3). All of these species had been observed within the SSA before(Baharav, 1991, 1994x, 1994b, 1999,Pague and Rufenacht, 1993). Bighorn Sheep are common within the upper East Snowmass Creek area, and within the Willow Creek drainage but this year marked the first time individuals of this species were sighted within the SSA boundaries. Two rams and 3 females were observed feeding just south of Big Bum lift. As previously noted, the most common carnivores were:Red Fox, Coyote,Long-tailed Weasel, and Raccoon. Red Fox used the most diverse habitats within the SSA. This species was found almost everywhere within the monitoring area. Coyotes and bobcats were seen in diverse habitats within the SSA. Both species were seen also in areas above 12,000 ft. during the winter or summer. Similar to all previous monitoring findings,the ecotone areas between 9,200 ft. and 10,600 ft. revealed the highest species richness. The ecotone habitats of Oakbrush -Aspen-Douglas Fir,especially in areas south to the Government 13EC 9 SSA Final Report ,2000 Trail, indicated more mammal signs than any other habitat type. Other ecotone habitats that were popular with mammals were between the Douglas Fir, Spruce Fir, the cliffs and open runs all within the upper and lower Cirque areas, as well as ecotone areas between Douglas Fir, Spruce Fir and open runs between the High Alpine Lift and the Elk Camp Lift at elevations 10,500 ft. to 10,700 ft. The three small water holes created between the High Alpine lift and the Cirque in October 1998 were used often by various mammal species from June through early August of 2000. This year the species that most frequented these water holes were deer, foxes,and coyotes. These species were after water and minerals and most likely prey. The lowest number of species was recorded in the Lodgepole Pine vegetation type. In general, mammals are shy animals and will detect human movement at ease. Most species will move into dense cover at the first signs of disturbance, leaving only tracks or some other limited signs of evidence for their presence. Leaving dead fall on the ground and constructing wood piles in open and vegetated areas will enhance mammal activities within the SSA. So far into the implementation program the Ski Company is active in securing habitats that are safe for mammal activities and reducing human-mammal conflicts. Human Activities For the past two years maintenance work within the SSA took place from snow melt to the beginning of the 2000-2001 ski season. For the summer of 2000 the skico did not have any major projects or capital improvements. The Ski Area tasks were general clean up, lift maintenance and revegetation projects. On June 22nd, forty people from the Snowmass Administration Building,the Trail crew, lift Maintenance, Summer Rangers and Lift operations picked up trash from Sam's Knob to the Adminstration Building. They also attended a wildlife educational talk given by Kevin Wright from CDOW. In June installation began of the Ski Area 3000 feet snowmaking system on Funnel and Lower Coffee Pot. In July,the mountain crew worked on cleaning up the massive blow down of over 1000 trees on the ground between Longshot and Campground trails. The removal of the fallen trees managed to reduce the fire hazard on the mountain. With the wooded material, several wildlife habitatas,4'x4'x4' in dimension were built. BEC 10 SSA Final Report,2000 During the summer of 2000, a new trail close to Turkey Trot was constructed. This trail was hand cut and several small mammal covers from the cut wood were created. Another project was the construction of the 700 foot Ski School Platter lift on Lower Scooper together with the construction of a 930 square feet Children's Picnic Building. Similar to 1999,human recreational use of the SSA was extensive immediately following snowmelt and peaked during mid summer. A number of lifts were open bringing more visitors to the mountain. Mountain biking activities were similar to those in 1999. Biking is becoming very popular among recreationists within the SSA. During the summer of 2000 there was an increase in use of the areas around Blunt Mountain, West Willow Creek and Baldy Mountain. Hikers and bikers were seen regularly at the top of Sam's Knob,Elk Camp, and within the High Alpine Lift area. Twenty one dog leashes were available to hikers at the bottom of all the lifts. As in previous years,during the elk and deer hunting season(October-November)a number of hunters were active between Elk Camp and the Government Trail habitats. Because of deep snow early in the season, hunting pressure was light. However, hunters, in their pursuit for game, were creating constant disturbance within this small and narrow migratory corridor. The elk and deer usually found immediate safe cover within the private lands nearby. There was also some hunting disturbance along the west side of the SSA boundary, and around the East Snowmass and Snowmass creeks. Implementation -Action Taken Revegetation: Table 4 shows the areas within the SSA that were revegetated during the summer of 2000. Four ski trails and open areas were treated with materials shown in the table. Again,Joey Woltemath deserves full credit for the success of the Ski Co revegetation program and documentation. Revegetation efforts maintain USFS guidelines(Baharav, 1998). In July, eight aspen trees, two cottonwood trees, and 10 willows were planted near Pond H at the base of the Two Creeks lift. Weed Control: In July, a weed control program at the SSA WAS beguan. This was brushing and mowing, which included vigorous thistle removal. Small animal Habitat Construction: Several wildlife habitat piles were built from cut or fallen wood between Longshot and Campground trails and close to Turkey Trot Trail during the summer. BEC 1 ] SSA Final Report,2000 Roads: The entire mountain road system was treated with Magnesium-Chloride, an environmentally friendly dust suppressant in an effort to limit particulate matter. Trail Closure: Spring and Fall trail closures during elk migration movements were continued. Pets: Twenty one dog leashes were available to visitors using the SSA trails. There are signs posted by the town of Snowmass Village enforcing a leash requirement on pets. Bears: Fifteen(15)bear proof trash cans were dispersed around the Ski Area and outside the Administration Building. Education: On June 22, forty Trail Crew,Lift Maintenance, Summer Rangers, and lift Operation members attended CDOW wildlife talk given by Kevin Wright. The Wildlife Center atop Elk Camp was open during the ski season, staffed by USFS and paid by the Ski Company. Complimentary coffee and hot chocolate were available at the warmed up place. This Wildlife Center became a very popular warning event for skiers. Action Journal and Vegetation Assessment During the 2000 monitoring program,an Action Item Journal was used. The results can be seen in Table 6. The components that were itemized in the table follow the original objectives set up in the WEMP. This type of record notes is helping follow the implementation process for the coming monitoring years. Table 6 describes the vegetation status within the ski runs and their immediate vicinities. The vegetation assessment included results and some notes on foliage height diversity(FED),the edge structure of each transition habitat (ecotones)within each ski run, the range quality for each ski run if it is used mainly by large herbivorous animals,the vegetation structure of the habitat in terms of grass, forbes, and herb plant material, and enhancement activities taken. As can be seen from Table 7,most of the ski run habitats are in good condition. Vegetation structure, revegetation success, and range quality are all a function of slope exposure,slope grade,and water availability (rain),especially during the growing season, which is short in duration in the SSA. Prompt and timely supplementation of nutrients can help immensely,particularly in lift areas like the Funnel, upper Elk Camp,Coney Glade, and Fanny Eill and also at the Max Park area. BEC 12 SSA Final Report,2000 MONITORING PROGRAM - 2001 Area to be covered: From West Buttermilk to East Snowmass Creek. Sites of Observations • Zone of ecological significance A( Elk Camp,Hanging Valley, High Alpine). • Zone of ecological significance B (top of Big Bum,east slopes of East Snowmass Creek,top of the Cirque). • Burnt Mountain -all areas,plus the new run Long Shot Trail. • Two Creeks to 10,400 fl. Monitoring Objectives a. Elk and Deer area use. b. Bighorn Sheep,Elk,and White-tailed Ptarmigan area use above the Cirque. c. Neotropical migrant birds. d. Raptor area use. e. White-tailed Ptarmigan area use. E Human-wildlife interaction in the following areas: The tundra above the Cirque and High Alpine,lower Cirque,Hanging Valley,Two Creeks above 8,600 ft. g. Ski run vegetation. BEC 13 SSA Final Report ,2000 LITERATURE CITED Baharav,D. 1991. Pitkin County Wildlife Study. Pitkin County, CO Task Force,Final Report. 72 pp. Baharav,D. 1994a. Snowmass Ski Area: Wildlife Enhancement and Management Plan. Aspen Skiing Company. 31 pp. Baharav,D. 1994b. Two Creeks and the Pines: Wildlife Enhancement and Management Plan. Snowmass Land Company. 28 pp. Baharav,D. 1997. Snowmass Ski Area: monitoring wildlife, 1996. Final Report, March 1997. 36 pp. Baharav,D. 1998. Snowmass Ski Area Monitoring Wildlife, 1997. Final Report, Feb. 1998. Baharav,D. 1999. Snowmass Ski Area Monitoring Wildlife, 1998. Final Report, May 1999. Baharav,D. 2000. Snowmass Ski Area Monitoring Wildlife, 1999. Final Report,May 2000. Cooperider,A.Y.,Boyd,R.J., and E.R. Stuart. 1986. Inventory and monitoring of wildlife habitat. US Dept. Inter.,Bur. Land Manage. Service Center. Denver,CO. 858 pp. Hagan,J.M. and W.D. Johnson. 1992. Ecology and conservation of neotropical migrant landbirds. Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington D.C. 609 pp. Kingery, H.E. (ed.). 1998. Colorado breeding birds atlas. Publ. by Colorado Bird Atlas Partnership. 636 pp. Pague, C. and A. Ellingson. 1993. An analysis of the avian fauna of the Snowmass Permit Area. USFS,EIS, Snowmass Ski Area. 29pp. Pague, C. and B. Rufenacht. 1993. An analysis of the mammalian fauna of the BEC 14 SSA Final Report ,2000 Snowmass Permit Area. USFS,EIS, Snowmass Ski Area. 27 pp. Wilson,D.E., Cole,F.R.,Nichols,J.D.,Rudran,R., and M.S. Foster. 1996. Measuring and monitoring biological diversity: standard methods for mammals. Smithsonian Inst. Press, Washington D.C. 409 pp. �. 1 LEGEND Iyure Raptors White-tailed —•� snowYass sn ur[.r -�, ate,/; I Whlle•lallldtafMlgl 1 nmrr r r ..... //sl r •• t ,+- l Nesting Area /':i,�, `, ,<,y ,1� '� � � r`WN .-:.a,: ! _. r• N •� .. ti- Area Itlyd •Illgh BURNT / �� 1 • \ t Area U,e MOU14TA114 tl�l. l��x'cr �-�. '1` �„ �• - - - - Nesting Olrc ss -:=';r .,. l,li; _ /!, -�--�``•\.\`.�\\:- �_ Wit- .Hr's' ._.� \.• �; significant WWIA irnwuA _ •{ u /' -�•C�..-•1r- - '..y,,..'/�_ rte• . . -i-• I v ac[ I= ...�,�•;. _ -.�, :i -ri`rr\•vim:-..♦ \`lt 1 lows -•-- .`1! '.'.� -{ii ^: b-.rs.~iJ}1�a✓`!Vr\\�\1\%-""• ill.`7l .--/ill r,."-r t-` _ li I (Zone of Fco )glcnI . _ ._ JI \ t /r E• L ' r Sigrdlicentr I `'l• - dM • .r .0 Y/"I /-r---.t \@`&A Mil ti f \ ;: ." �.� �i •�•.. �/.��y.A=U♦V'\ 11 \i\� � �% fit. 'I -w n, � r1� i // )1 �t e♦ l•,. , It ./ \' r \\ �\t yr ♦`ti. of l -. // r \ - ` / .'( •' •-i-•,I�`.♦♦ ♦' ` I. r 'f _ _.>1C�-ter , v 41 > l ' IT • r `�'-♦ .� �/J:;;•'`� ins Ar r •.-..i{ !-__ \✓ I`l ^ tAMS jllkNO6 - �1— JI \ r• J T v t // \'' r • r i,,l�r 1 r r :..-:\>�\\�♦ Ir ./ ! �I�r \ t �, �i ���., / '�\ •'1. Id r_ - ill / 1ra.� •-- • -r _ --/ ••� \\v/• / it-%h/il ♦ �'i "� J -- ��- '(y�1l�- �/�,- ` • r/„���� .: Y S. . -�7 st• ,- �._I L / �r-1/r \ � .�: � '-�' lam_' •rL1 � - .mot ..�' .r -•!/ �\ 11 n `� J / •- try..,�/�/l / ! ,..•, J`1,' `-� _ :ter r�•�-%/•�/( �� ��-�i � u �t\:.`, .� `i. rnnr.rr mor[mr ` '. r , ,r-' rr\ �.� _ --_ -� {!-�,V•'\ ��\�. -� �--...�r ` r / ' i{�• ;L� V. RX `_ M111,11 '1`� _ :1•,I�' •.�`;_ \.-�_� \\_ 17 •/'��-_ nil / /if)_ r Z,i `\ . j, —I / -,.�_i : ((ice• \ 1;''`-_ =' . ;; ' �sit owMA3S•`f/ SNWMASS SKI -�•.�' 1 r'-- - - ��-%^ Birds-Existing and Signilicl•:t ' � !/f l if-../f .,L�•/:� ., - �--, a.,..wry c..t.Y.[ a•lpr wa.a.r..r..:. i IciEGEN Mp d Gt n access S — —_ PC l rlly A m •� _ _�-- �- . - Irtr adrr sca i t4s4 cted hm us access In Fall Urq, o=ed to rOdt: ts, - IGH ( •, :4• IG Or egos • [tl, •ss ,•,+• r,> '. ALPINE J UR o Are s r Pall, 1 MOU iTAIN i 1 J + , ztt' v Nat rsl SstTIC oil Zz TOWN ,aagam' , d,r -. .' ., : Y . . . , -,.,iil... .i 1 Yeg lative r • �.�� i' r�r• ' a t t Yj�l�`+�J • W% r Sc enin9 - C, �s J /, r' •gyp , •d£ . .. ! � . I '\ � !/ c tD• A'TION './1 ` `-9"/ �/�.•`••�' i!1 �� -� 71 / ,�.1 'l� ftj .�I l b6 y `,,. y •r- •� OrJ `, r• ` \, • n 1 .r + C` th on, r6ml PINtAlt i�� i C t�_7 �a'j \ ��� I /1 C N OUN 1 •.r rJ .I�t ell- .i.!': q`� J ,n .A` r C. �L ) ..1� : , 11,. 1 •(.\, )l,- fir- r rte. � .' � �I� �• SNOW LASS it iilat Enh ncemen Action r.len r N. I EAST • ,\li_['J� j — ��ss1' — '` VILLA E CO 0012 I A.•.4 a+•'+ I r,,,@,, .mar: ..[,..a .N. ` I I C., ,.Awl,.M rnrr - C 1 ALL=a �' � oro-Ova el-wo pp 4 J* r joloeoiii 4 raw r. MEND pod mv "0 p -0- 1 gcla W Is .0 �ad M Ulm OAF Va�PA k, r ` m ol!'004.0-A p ft -�, Vrm �% �� no EGEN F Ima edGe We Prl idly An ted n access Sr Flesh et ecces n all , imp ;;;d-in ttdit'' A. IG oral logo& a AI, ss Aaee ,'i. . Ufl Arej s nwta` 1 7 �^ F e n MOU ITA1N mail tal Sell ticks .,, r 1 TOWN Veg lellve Screening / I'•.t /� ,� � I_ \� MIS\. •/l �. / .. ! tl e ' \ S, i\ f : ` , Y:. \t �• 'e A'TION I ,� '�••.c? ,f�! - ` All �. 9y /IM•te etr fI • ` / . _ ` �A •�'[/ l� f - O V _rte 17 f7.n r` \ �t - - f__ _....-_ s:•- —'"C ! -� _ SNOW 1ASS jja that Enli ncemen Action Flan ' Q EAST . ,'�• . f .. s.e� w.y wq. �. VILLA E I a• • [wi�.ww,. atr as n[ 1 MIT A► n _ �'_ ' a IG � � u r f L A N 16 ! a Q Wmass Ski data00.wdb-S'mass Std 2111111 DAIE SPECIES NAME AREA HA NUMBER NOTES 117100 Snowshoe Hare E12 Ob,As 3 fresh tracks in the snow 117100 Red Squirrel E12 Sp,As 2 fresh tracks by the trees 117100 Coyote F12 As 1 fresh fecal 117100 Red Fox E12 Ob 1 fresh tracks 117/00 Long-tailed Weasle H8 As 1 move 117100 Gray Jay G9 As,Lp 2 move low 1/1/00 Clarks Nutcracker H8 As 4 move low 117/00 Mountain Chickadee E12 Ob 2 move 1!1100 Mountain Chickadee G8 As 2 move 1/7100 Junco H8 open 5 move on the ground 117/00 Junco E12 Ob 6 move low 1124100 Gray Jay 07 As 4 move 1124/00 Gray Jay L8 . As 2 move 1/24/00 Black-billed Magpie 07 As 3 move 1/24100 Common Raven 09 open,As 5 fly low 1/24/00 Mountain Chickadee 09 As 3 move 1/24100 Gray-crowned Rosy Finch 07 As 8 perch,call,move 1124100 Junco 07 As,open 5 move on the ground 1/24/00 Snowshoe Hare 09 As 3 tracks 124100 Snowshoe Hare L8 As 3 fresh tracks 124100 Red Fox O7,P7 As 1 fresh tracks,fecal 2116100 Snowshoe Hare F4 Sf-Sp 2 tracks 2116/00 Snowshoe Hare G6 Df 2 tracks 2/16/00 Red Squirrel G6 Df 1 tracks 2/16100 Coyote G5 Sp-Fr 2 fresh tracks 2/16/00 Red Fox G6 Df 1 tracks 2116/00 Red Fox H8 Df 1 fecal,fresh tracks 2116100 Gray Jay F4 Sp-Fr 4 fly kow,perch 2/16/00 Gray Jay G8 Open 2 fly low 2/16/00 Clark's Nutcracker F4 Sp-Fr 2 perch 2/16100 Red-breasted Nuthatch G8 Lp 1 perch 2/16100 Junco G8 Open 5 feed 228/00 Mountain Chickadee M10 As 4 feed 228/00 Mountain Chickadee K8 As 2 move DAIS SPECIES NAME AUA HABITAT NUMBER NOTES 2128M Black Rosy Finch M10 As 5 perch 228/00 Pine Grosbeak K8 Sp 1 perch 21211W Junco M11 As,open 5 feed 228100 Snowshoe Hare M10,M11As 4 tracks 228100 Red Squirrel K8 SP 2 fresh tracks 228/00 Red Fox M11 As 1 fresh tracks 228100 Bobcat M11 As,open 1 fresh tracks,fecal 3/15/00 Snowshoe Hare M4 Sp-Fr 4 fresh tracks 3115/00 Snowshoe Hare D5 Sp-Fr 5 fresh tracks 3/15/00 Pike D5 rock 1 call,move,snow on ground 3/15/00 Red Squirrel M4 Sp-Fr 2 tracks 3115/00 Coyote F5 Sp-Fr 1 fresh fecal,trac s 3115100 Red Fox E5 Sp-Fr 2 tracks 3115100 American Marten H6 Of 1 fresh tracks on snow 3/15/00 Long-tailed Weasel E5 rocks,Sp 1 move 3/15100 Hairy Woodpecker ES Sp-Fr 1 move 3115100 Gray Jay E5 Sp-Fr 2 fly low 3/15/00 Steller's Jay H6 Of 2 perch,move 3/15100 Black-billed Magpie F4 Sp-Fr 4 move on the ground 3/15/00 Common Raven F4 Sp-Fr 2 fly low 3/15/00 Clark's Nutcracker F4 Sp-Fr 2 move 3/15100 Mountain Chickadee G6 Sp-Fr 4 move 3115100 White-tailed Ptarmigan D5 Sp-Fr 3 fly low 3/15100 Junco D5 Sp-fr 6 feed on the ground 329100 Red-tailed Hawk K4 Sp-Fr 2 perch 329/00 Golden Eagle 13 open 1 soar high 329100 White-tailed Ptarmigan K3 WIo 7 fly low as one group landed in the Cirque 329/00 White-tailed Ptarmigan J5 Sp-Fr 2 move on the ground 329/00 Northern Flicker(red) J6 Sp-Fr 4 fly low 329/00 Hairy Woodpecker J6 Sp 1 move 329/00 Downy Woodpecker J4 Sp-Fr 1 move 329/00 Gray Jay K5 Sp-Fr 5 move 329/00 Common Raven K5 Open 3 soar low 329/00 Mountain Chickadee K5 Sp-Fr 5 move 3/29100 Red-breasted Nuthatch K5 Sp-Fr 2 move 329/00 Mountain Bluebird K5 Sp-Fr 4 fly low DAIE SPECIES NAPE AREA HABQAI NUMBER NOTES 3/19/00 Cassin's Finch K3 open 6 feed on the ground 3129100 Black Rosy Finch K3 open 9 feed on the ground 3/29/00 Brown capped Rosy Finch K3 open 5 feed on the ground 329/00 Homed Lark K3 open 9 feed on the ground 329100 Junco K4 open 12 feed on the ground 3/29100 Snow Bunting K3 open 11 feed on the ground 3/29/00 Snowshoe Hare J5 Sp-Fr 2 tracks 329/00 Coyote J6 Sp-Fr 1 tracks 329/00 Red Fox K6 open 1 tracks 329100 Bobcat K6 open 2 fresh trecks,feoal 4/12/00 Nuttall's Cottontail D13 Ob 3 tracks,fecal,move 4112/00 Snowshoe Hare D11 As 2 tracks 4/12/00 Red Squirrel D11 Sp,As 3 move 4/12100 Red Squirrel E10 Ob,Sp 1 move 4112/00 Porcupine D13 Ob 1 move 4112100 Coyote D14 Ob,open 1 move 4112/00 Red Fox D10 Ob,Sp 2 tracks,fecal 4/12/00 Mule Deer D13 Ob 1 move 4112100 Canada Goose E13 Ob,open 5 fly low 4112100 Red-tailed Hawk F10 As 2 perch 4/12100 Blue Grouse D11 Sp,Ob 4 move,females 4112100 White-tailed Ptarmigan C9 open,As 3 fly low, cross area east-west 4/12100 Great Homed Owl D13 Ob 1 perch 4112/00 Gray Jay Ell Sp,As 3 move low 4/12/00 Stallers Jay E14 Ob,pond 1 move 4/12/00 Black-billed Magpie E14 open 4 move on ground 4/12100 Mountain Chickadee D13 Ob 2 feed 4112/00 Dipper G13 Rip 2 feed in creek 4112100 Mountain Bluebird D13 open,Ob 2 move low 4/12/00 Junco G13 open 7 feed on ground 428100 Red-tailed Hawk P12 Ob,As 2 soar low 428100 Northern Harrier P12 Ob 1 fly low 428= Peregrine Falcon 012 Ob,Sp,As 2 perch an oak,fly low 428/00 White-tailed Ptarmigan 011 As,open 4 move on the ground,fly low up hill 428/00 Black-billed Magpie 012 open,ob 3 move on oak 428/00 Black-capped Chickadee 012 Ob 2 feed DATE SPECIES NAME MA H NUMBER NOTE$ 428100 Mountain Chickadee 011 As 4 move 4128/00 American Robin 013 Ob 5 move,perch 428100 Mountain Bluebird 012 open,Ob 2 move low 428100 Red-winged Blackbird 014 Rip 4 move,call 428/00 Brown-capped Rosy Finch 013 Ob 6 move,noisy 428/00 Junco 012 open,Ob 4 move 428100 Snowshoe Hare 012 Ob,As 2 tracks 428100 Coyote 012 Ob 1 tracks,fecal 428100 Red Fox P12 Ob,As 1 tracks 428/00 Elk 013 Ob,open 2 move,males 5/19/00 Snowshoe Hare B9 As,Df 4 tracks 5/19/00 Snowshoe Hare C10 As 1 tracks,fecal 5/19100 Least Chipmunk C70 As 1 move 5119100 Least Chipmunk B10 Rip 1 move 5/19100 Red Squirrel B10 Rip 2 move 5119100 Red Fox C10 As 1 nave 5119/00 Raccoon C12 Rip 1 tracks,fecal 5119/00 Elk All As,Lp 7 move,yearlings 5119100 Elk C10 As 2 move,adult females 5/19100 Elk C9 Of 5 move 5/19100 Red-tailed Hawk C11 As 2 perch hugh 5/19/00 Mountain Chickadee B9 As 4 move 5119100 American Robin C9 Rip 3 perch 5/19100 Pine Siskin C10 As 2 move 5119/00 Junco C9 rip 5 move 5/19/00 Chipping Sparrow C10 As,Rip 1 sing 529/00 Golden Eagle E8 As,open 1 soar high 529/00 Blue Grouse D8 As,Dh 2 move,females 529/00 Killdeer E8 open 2 move,call 529/00 Hairy Woodpecker E8 As 1 move 529100 Williamson's Sapsucker E8 As 1 move 5/29/00 Western Flycatcher E9 As 2 sing 529/00 Gray Jay E8 As 2 move 529/00 Steller's Jay E8 As 1 noisy 529/00 Mountain Chickadee E9 As 2 move low 529/00 House Wren E8 As 4 move low DAM SPECIES NAME AREA HA@IIAI NUMBER NOTES 529/00 American Robin E9 As 2 perch high 529/00 Mountain Bluebird D8 As 2 move 529100 Junco E9 As 5 on the ground 6110100 Red-Tailed Hawk B11 As,Lp 2 soar low 6/10100 Turkey Vulture A10 Ob,Sp 1 soar low 6/11100 Blue Grouse B12 Ob,As 3 females 6110/00 Northern Flicker(red) B12 Ob,As 5 move 6/10100 Western Flycatcher B12 As 2 move,perch 6110100 Tree Swallow 812 As 4 move 6/10/00 Scrub Jay B12 As 2 perch 6/10/00 Black-billed Made B12 Ob 5 move low 6110/00 American Robin Bt 1 As 4 on the ground 6/10/00 Warbling Vireo B12 Ob 2 perch 6110100 Virginia's Warbler Bit As,Ob 2 move low 6110/00 Pine Siskin 812 As 7 move 6/11100 Rufous-sided Towhee B12 Ob,As 2 perch 6/10/00 Green-tailed Towhee D12 Ob 1 sing 6110100 Junco D12 Ob 4 move low 6/10100 Chipping Sparrow E12 Ob 2 sing 6110100 Least Chipmunk D12 Ob 3 move 6/10/D0 Unite Chipmunk B12 Ob,As 2 move 6110100 Meadow Vole B12 Ob,open 3 move fast 6110/00 Red Fox Al2 Ob 1 fresh fecal 6/10100 Black Bear Al2 Ob,open 1 tracks 6110/00 Elk Al2 Ob,As 5 move, yearlings 623100 Pike D5 Cliff 2 move,call 6/23100 Snowshoe Hare E5 Sp,Fr 1 nave 623100 Least Chipmunk E5 Sp 2 move 623/00 Least Chipmunk F6 Df 3 nave 623100 Red Squirrel F6 Df 1 crave low 623/00 Coyote G6 Clif,Sp,Fr 2 call 623/00 Red Fox F5 Sp,Fr 3 move up the cliff 6/23100 Elk F4 Sp,Fr 4 fresh tracks and fecal 623/00 Mule Deer G7 Df,open 2 feed 623/00 Red-tailed Hawk E5 open 1 soar low 6123100 White-tailed Ptarmigan G5 open 3 fly low westward DATE SPECIES NAME AM HABITAT NUMBER NOTES 6123110 Killdeer G8 open 2 noisy 623100 Spotted Sandpiper G6 Df,Rip 2 feed 6123100 Common Snipe G8 Rip 1 feed,move 6123100 Mourning Dove G8 open 2 feed 623100 Broad-tailed Hummingbird G6 Sp 2 move 623100 Northern Flicker(red) G8 Df,open 4 move 623100 Willlamson's Sapsucker E5 Sp 1 move 623100 Dovmy Woodpecker F4 Sp,Fr 1 move 6/23100 Western Flycatcher G8 Sp As 2 sing,perch 623/00 Western Wood Pewee G7 As,Sp 1 perch,m ove 623100 Olive-sided Flycatcher F5 Sp,Fr 1 sing 623100 Tree Swallow G8 As,open 4 move 623/00 Gray Jay F4 Sp,Fr 2 move 6123100 Common Raven E4 Cliff 4 move,nolsy 623100 Mountain Chickadee F5 Sp,Fr 2 move 623100 Dipper G7 Rip 2 feed 623/00 American Robin G6 Df,Rip 3 move 623100 Ruby-crowned Kinglet G8 Df,As 2 move 6/23/00 Warbling Vireo G8 As 2 sing,move low 623100 Orange-crowned Warbler E5 Sp,Fr 2 sing,move 623100 Yellow Warbler GO As,open 2 move 623100 Wilson's Warbler F5 Sp,Fr 3 move 623100 Junco F5 Sp,Fr 6 move on the ground, low 623100 White-crowned Sparrow F5 Sp,Fr 3 move low 7/10/00 Canada goose all As,open 5 fly low 7/10100 Mallard Pit open 2 on the ground 7/10/00 Sharp-shinned Hawk Q12 Ob,As,Sp 1 perch on As 7110100 Red-tailed Hawk P11 As 2 soar low 7/10100 Northern Harrier 012 open,rip 1 soar low 7/10/00 Golden Eagle P9 Df,Sp 1 soar high 7/10/00 Blue Grouse P11 As,Sp 2 females on the ground 7/10/00 Band-tailed Pigeon all open 2 move low 7110/00 Rock Dove P12 open 4 move low into S'mass Cr 7/10100 Broad-tailed Hummingbird 011 As 3 move 7/10/00 Red-raped Sapsucker Q10 As,Sp 2 movelow 7/10/00 Western Kingbird P12 Ob,As 2 perch DAIE SPECIES NAME A@EA HA@QAI NUMBER NOTE 7110100 Says Phoebe P12 Rip,As 1 perch 7/10100 Dusky Flycatcher P12 Rip,willow 2 move 7/10100 Western Flycatcher 012 As 2 perch low 7 110100 Violet-green Swallow 013 Rip,bog 7 move,feed 7/10/00 Tree Swallow 012 As,rip 8 move 7/10100 Steller's Jay P12 As 1 move 7/10100 Black-billed Magpie P12 open 3 move 7/10100 Black-capped Chickadee Q11 As 2 feed 7/10/00 Mountain Chickadee P12 Rip 2 move 7110100 Mountain Chickadee 011 As,Sp 3 move 7/10/00 House Wren 013 Ob,rip 2 move 7/10/00 American Robin P11 As 4 parch high 7/10/00 Hermit Thrash R12 As 2 move on the ground 7/10100 Mountain Bluebird P12 Rip 2 move 7 110/00 Golden-crowned Kinglet 011 As,Sp 4 move,noisy 7/10/00 Ruby-crowned Kinglet P11 Df,Sp 2 move low 7/10/00 Townsend's Solitaire P10 Df 1 perch 7110100 Yellow Warbler P12 Rip 4 move 7110/00 Yellow-rumped Warbler 013 Willow 2 nave 7/10100 MacGillivrays Warbler Q13 willow 2 move 7110100 Western Tanager 013 Rip 1 move low 7110100 Red winged Blackbird R13 Rip,bog 4 perch,noisy 7/10100 Junco P12 Rip 5 move 7/10/00 Chipping Sparrow P12 Rip 2 sing 7/10100 Fox Sparrow P13 Rip 1 perch,move 7/10100 Least Chipmunk P12 As 2 move 7/10/00 Red Squirrel P12 As,Sp 3 high 7/12100 Raccoon Q13 Rip 1 fresh fecal 7110100 Mule Deer Q12 open 3 feed 7/22100 Pike L4 Cliff 4 move 7/22100 Snowshoe Hare M4 Sp,Fr 2 fecal 7/22100 Least Chipmunk M4 Sp,Fr 1 move 7/22/00 Least Chipmunk M5 Sp,Fr 2 move 7/22100 Yellow-bellied Marmot L3 Cliff 2 move 7/22/00 Montane Vole L2 willow 4 move 7/22/00 Red Fox K3 willow 1 move DATE SPECIES NAME AREA bA@Q9I NUMBER NOTES 722100 Bobcat L2 willow 1 fresh fecal 722100 Elk M2 open 3 feed 722/00 Mule beer N6 Df 5 feed 722/00 Golden Eagle L2 willow 2 soar high 722100 Turkey Vulture M2 open 1 soar low 722100 White-tailed Ptarmigan L3 willow 6 move low 722!00 Broad-tailed Hummingbird N4 Sp,Fr 3 move 722/00 Hairy Woodpecker N4 Sp,Fr 1 move 722100 Three-toed Woodpecker K4 Sp,Fr 2 move low 722/00 Northern Flicker(red) N5 Df,Sp 4 move 722/00 Willow Flycatcher K3 willow 2 move,call 722/00 Olive-sided Flycatcher K4 Sp,Fr 2 call,sing 722100 Cliff Swallow L4 Cliff 6 move,feed 7/22100 Gray Jay N4 Sp,Fr 2 move low 722100 Common Raven M3 open 7 feed on ground 7122100 Clark's Nutcracker N4 Sp,Fr 1 perch,noisy 722100 Mountain Chickadee N5 Sp 4 move 722/00 Red-breasted Nuthatch N4 Sp,Fr 2 move 722/00 American Robin N6 Df,Sp 3 perch high 722100 Wilson's Warbler L3 willow 5 move 722/00 Swainson's Thrush K5 Wilkow,Rip 2 move 722100 Junco L3 willow 4 move 722100 White-crowned Sparrow L3,M2 willow 6 feed,move 8000 Turkey Vulture 112 open 1 soar low 8/9/00 Red-tailed Hawk J11 open 1 soar high 8/9/00 Cooper's Hawk H12 Rip,As 1 perch 819100 American Kestrel 112 As 1 move 8/9/00 Blue Grouse G12 As,Sp 2 move,fly low 819/00 Band-tailed Pigeon G12 open,As 2 move 819100 Mourning Dove J11 open 2 feed 8/9/00 Great Homed Owl G11 Ob,As 1 perch 819100 Pygmy Owl H12 As 1 perch 8/9/00 Common Nighthawk 112 open 2 move low 8/9/00 Broad4ailed Hummingbird H12 As,open 3 move 8/9/00 Belted Kingfisher F13 pond,open 1 perch low 8/9/00 Northern Flicker(red) F13 pond,As 4 move DAIE SPECIES NAME ARM HABITAT NUM@Eg NOTES 8/9100 Haimtond's Flycatcher G12 Sp,Df 1 perch low 8000 Dusky Flycatcher F13 willow 2 move 819100 Violet-green Swallow F13 pond 9 feed 8/9100 Tree Swallow F13 pond,As 6 feed low 8/9100 Steller's Jay G12 Sp,Df 1 move 8/9/00 Black-billed Magpie 112 open 3 move on the ground 819100 Black-capped Chickadee F13 As,willow, 2 move 8/WOO Whit-breasted Nuthatch F13 As 2 move,call 819/00 Dipper F13 pond,rip 1 feed in water 8/9/00 House Wren G13 open,Ob 2 move 819100 American Robin F13 Rip 4 move,perch 8/9/00 Mountain Bluebird G13 open 2 move 8/9100 Warbling Vireo F13 Rip 2 move 819/00 Yellow-rumped Warbler F13 rip,willow 2 move 819/00 Brown-headed cowbird G13 Ob,open 5 move on brush 8/9100 Pine Siskin H12 As,open 4 move 8/9100 Junco F13 open,rip 8 move 8I9/OO White-crowned Sparrow F13 willow,rip 4 move 8000 Fox Sparrow F13 willow,rip 1 perch 8/9/00 Song Sparrow F13 rip 1 perch 8/9/00 Lincoln's Sparrow F13 As,rip 2 move 8/9100 Nuttall's Cottontail G13 open,Ob 1 move 8/9100 Least Chipmunk 112 As 3 move 819100 Richardson's G Squirrel G13 open 4 move 819100 Golden-mantled G Squirrel G12 Sp,As 2 move 8/9/00 Red Squirrel 111 As,Sp 1 call 8/9/00 Raccoon F13 Rip 1 fresh fecal,tracks 819/00 Mule Deer H11 open,As 5 feed 917/00 Pike E5 Cliff 4 move,call 917100 Least Chipmunk G5 Sp,Fr 3 move 917/00 Least Chipmunk G4 Sp,Fr,Df 4 move 917100 Red Squirrel G6 Df 2 move 917100 Red Squirrel H4 Sp,Fr 1 move 9!7100 Coyote G4 Df 1 move 9f7100 Coyote 14 Sp,Fr 1 call 917100 Red Fox E5 cliff,Fr 2 move BRIE SPECIES NAME AM HA@IIAI NUMBS NOTES 9I7I00 Elk 13 Df 17 West Willow Cr 917/00 Elk J2 open 23 saddle W Willow Cr, top 917100 Mule Deer F6 open,Df 3 feed 917100 Mule Deer M5 open 5 feed 9[7100 Mule Deer N6 open,Df 3 feed 9[7100 Boom Sheep N2 diff 5 at the south slope facing E S'mass Cr 9!7100 Northern Hamer M7 open,Df 1 soar low 917100 Golden Eagle J3 Willow 2 soar high 917/00 Prairie Falcon D4 Cliff 4 soaring low, Burnt Mtn 917100 White-tailed Ptarmigan J4 Sp,Fr, 2 move low 917100 White-tailed Ptarmigan K6 Sp,Fr,Df 3 move across the valley 917/00 Mourning Dove G6 Df 2 on the ground 917100 Great Homed Owl G8 Df 1 perch low 917100 Broad-tailed Hummingbird N6 open 2 move 9!7100 Northern Flicker(red) E5 Sp,Fr 4 move 917/00 Northern Flicker(red) K4 Sp,Fr 6 move 9!7100 Hairy Woodpecker F5 Sp 2 feed WNW Downy Woodpecker 34 Sp,Fr 1 move 917/00 Western Flycatcher M8 As,Sp 4 move W7100 Olive-sided Flycatcher M5 Sp,Fr,Df 2 call 917100 Olive-sided Flycatcher F5 Sp 1 call 9(7100 Gray Jay F4 Sp,Fr 2 move 9!7100 Gray Jay J4 Sp,Fr 2 move 917/00 Steller's Jay G6 Df 1 move 9!7/00 Common Raven F4 open 6 on the ground, soar low 9[7/00 Mountain Chickadee N4 Sp,Fr 2 move 917100 American Robin G6 Df,open 7 move 917/00 American Pipit L2 bog 9 move 97100 Starling M8 As,Sp 14 move WNW Brewer's Blackbird J2 Willow 9 feed as a group, 12,700'elev. 9[7/00 Brown-headed Cowbird M8 open 5 move WNW Brown-capped Rosy Finch L2 Willow 11 move, 12,800' 917/00 Brown-capped Rosy Finch D5 open 6 move, 11,100' 9[7100 Pine Siskin G6 Of 8 move on the ground 9[7/00 Junco L2 open 14 feed 9/7/00 Junco N5 open 5 feed DAIS SPECIES NAME AM HABITAT>NUM13ER NOTES 917/00 Junco E4 open,Fr 9 feed,move 917100 White-crowned Sparrow L3 willow 5 move 986/00 Red-failed Hawk D7 As,Sp 1 perch 9426100 American Kestere C11 Ob,As 1 move 926!00 Northern Flicker(red) D11 As 6 move 926100 Northern Flicker(red) 811 Sp,As 4 move low 9/26100 Red naped Sapsucker D11 As 2 move 9426100 W illiamson's Sapsucker C11 As,Sp 1 move 9/26100 Western Flycatcher D11 As 2 move 9/26100 Gray Jay C11 Sp,As 3 move 9/26100 Steller's Jay E10 Ob,As,Sp 2 move 926/00 Black-billed Magpie Ell As,open 4 move 9/26100 Mountain Chickadee D11 As 6 move 9/26100 American Robin C10 As,rip 8 move on the ground 9426100 Evening Grosbeak E10 Ob,As 13 move low 926100 Pine Siskin Dl l As 9 move high 9/26100 Junco Ell open,As 17 on the ground and low 926100 White-crowned Sparrow E12 Rip 5 move leer 926100 Snowshoe Hare Ell As,Open 2 move 926100 Red Fox D11 As 1 fresh fecal 926100 Black Bear Fl l Rip,As 2 fresh tracks,fecal 926/00 Black Bear D11 As,Sp 1 move, young 926100 Elk B11 As 7 move,feed 9!26100 Elk C10 As 8 move 9426100 Elk B12 As 12 move 926/00 Mute Deer E12 open,Rip 3 feed 1019100 Bobcat 810 As 1 fresh tracks,fecal 1019/00 Elk B10 As 23 move,teed 1019/00 Elk A13 As 17 move 10/9100 Elk C12 As 9 move 10/9100 Elk B13 As 11 move,feed 1019100 Mule Deer E12 Ob,rip,As 4 move,fead 1019100 Great Homed Owl C12 As 1 perch low 10191W Mountain Chickadee B12 As,ob 5 feed 1019/00 Red-Breasted Nuthatch C12 Sp,rip 2 move 1019100 Pine Grosbeak C12 Sp,Rip 1 perch QAIE SPECIES NAME Age HA )fig NOTE$ 1019100 Junco C12 Sp,Rip 6 move 10/18/00 Canada Goose J12 As,open 5 move low 10/18/00 Red-tailed Hawk K13 As,Ob 2 perch 10/18/00 Blue Grouse L13 Rip,Sp 4 move low 10118100 Gray Jay J12 As 2 move 10/18/00 Black-billed Magpie J13 open 3 move 10/18!00 Common Raven 312 open 5 move low 10/18100 Mountain Chickadee J13 Ob 4 feed 10/18/00 Junco J13 Ob,open 8 move 10118100 Red Fox J13 Ob 1 move 10118100 Mule Deer K13 Ob,As 3 move,feed 10/18/00 Mule Deer L13 Sp 1 move 10/30/00 Coyote C13 Open,As 1 move on snow 10130100 Red Fox A14 As 1 move 10130100 Elk B12 As 18 move 10/30/00 Elk A13 As 6 move 10/30/00 Elk B14 As,Ob 12 move 10130100 Mountain Chickadee C13 As 2 move 10/30/00 Junco 814 Ob 7 feed 1116100 Gray Jay F9 As,Lp 2 move 11/6100 Clark's Nutcracker G9 As,Df 2 move 11/6/00 Mountain Chickadee H11 As 2 move 1116/00 Elk E9 As,Df,Lp 8 move 11000 Elk D10 As 17 move 11/6100 Elk C11 As 23 move 11116/00 Elk A13 As 5 move, most elk crossed Owl Cr Rd. 11/16/00 Elk P13 As,rip 3 move, deep snow. 11/16/00 Mule Deer Q13 Rip,Ob 3 move 11/26/00 Elk D11 As 0 All elk moved north into Owl Cr Rd. area. 12/9/00 Red Squirrel B8 Df 3 move 1219100 Coyote E9 As,Df 1 move 12/9100 Red Fox F9 As,Lp 2 tracks,fecal in snow 12/9100 Long-tailed Weasel G10 As,rip 1 fresh fecal,tracks 12/9/00 Bobcat F11 Rip,As 1 fresh trac ks,fecal 12/9/00 Steller's Jay B8 Df 2 move low 1219!00 Mountain Chickadee D8 As,Df 2 move Elm SPECIES NAME AUA HA91I9I NUMBER NOTES 12/9100 Mountain Chickadee F11 As,Rip 2 move 12/9/00 Junco E9 As,open 5 move 12/22/00 White-tailed Ptarmigan 17 Df 2 hide,move 12/22/00 Gray Jay H5 Sp,Fr 4 move 12122/00 Gray Jay 16 Sp,Fr 2 move 12/22/00 Black4)illed Magpie K6 Df,As 2 move low 12/22100 Common Raven K6 open,Df 3 move 12/22100 Clark's Nutcracker J6 Sp,Fr 4 move 12/22100 Gray-crowned Rosy Finch J6 Sp,Fr 7 perch 12/22/00 Junco K6 open 4 move 12/22/00 Coyote J6 open 1 fresh tracks,fecal 1222100 Red Fox N8 open 2 tracks T 2. at Table Bird incidence SSA during 2000 Bi[tilyes Habitat Tvoe Abundance ) NNW. MIaR WVInter Res, American Kestrel Raptors Ob,As,Open Common yes no no American Pipit Ground Bird Open,Tund. Fairly Common yes no no American Robin Thrushes Ob,As,Sp,Df Abundant yes no no Band-tailed Pigeon Large ground bird open,As Occasional yes yes no Belted IGngfisher Kingfishers pond Rare no yes no Black Rosy Finch Finch-sparrow As,Ob,willow Occasional no no yes Black-billed Magpie Jays Ob,As,Open Abundant yes no yes Black-capped Chickadee Small Song Bird As,Dr,Ob Abundant yes no yes Blue Grouse Large Ground Bird Df,As,Ob Common yes no yes Brewer's Blackbird Thrushes Rip.,Ob occasional no no no Broad-tailed Hummingbird Hummingbirds Rip,As,Open Abundant yes yes no Brown capped Rosy Finch Finch-Sparrow Gress,Open Occasional yes no no Brown-headed Cowbird Thrushes As,Rip,edge Common yes no no Canada Goose Waterfowl Open Occasional no no yes Cassin's Finch Finch-Sparrow Df,Wir Occasional yes no no Chipping Sparrow Finch-Sparrow Rip.,As,Df Fairly Common yes no no Clark's Nutcracker Jays Sp-Fir,As,Df Common yes no yes Cliff Swallow Swallows Rip,Open Fairly Common yes yes no Common Nighthawk Ground Bird Open,Df,Ob Common yes yes no Common Raven Jays Ob,Open,Df,SpAbundant yes no yes Common Snipe Waterfowl Rip Occasional no no no Cooper's Hawk Raptors As,Ob, Rare no no no Dark-eyed Junco Finch-Sparrow Ob,As,Sp-Fr Abundant yes no no Dipper Small Song Birds Sp,Rip Fairly Common yes no no Downy Woodpecker Woodpeckers As,Df,Sp Fairly Common yes no no Dusky Flycatcher Flycatchers Rip,Willow Occasional yes no no Evening Grosbeak Finch-Sparrow Df,Sp-Fr,As fairly Qxrvnon yes no no Fox Sparrow Finch-Sparrow As,Rip,Sp-Fr fairly Common yes no no Golden Eagle Raptors Open,Sp•Fr Common yes no no Golden-crowned Kinglet Kinglets As,Sp Occasional yes yes no Gray Jay Jays Sp-Fr,Df,As Common yes no yes Gray-crowned Rosy Finch Finch-Sparrow As,Sp Occasional no yes yes Great Homed Owl Owls Rip,Ob Occasional no no no Green-tailed Towhee Finch-Sparrow Ob,Rip Fairly Common yes no no Table 2. Bird incidence at SSA during 2000 %mWs Name Bird Tvoe Habitat Tvoe Abundance N2 [Rcl• Miart Winter Res. Hairy Woodpecker Woodpeckers Df,As,Sp-Fr Common yes. no yes Hammond's Flycatcher Flycatchers Rip,Sp,Willow Occasional yes yes no Hermit Thrush Thrushes As,Rip Fairly Common yes yes no Homed Lark Ground Birds Open,Tund Fairly Common no yes no House Finch Finch-Sparrow Ob,As,Rip Fairly Common yes no yes House Wren Small Song Birds Ob,As Common yes no no Kilkleer Waterfowl Open Fairly Common yes yes no Lincoln's Sparrow Finch-Sparrow Ob,Willow Occasional yes yes no MacGillivray's Warbler Warblers Rip.,Sp,Willow Fairly Common yes no no Mallard Waterfowl Open, Rip Occasional no no no Mountain Bluebird Thrushes Ob,Rip,Open Common yes no no Mountain Chickadee Small Song Bird As,Df,Sp Abundant yes no yes Mourning Dove Large Ground Bird Ob,Rip,Open Common yes no no Northern Flicker( red ) Woodpeckers Rip.,As,Df Abundant yes no no Northern Harrier Raptors Open,Ob,As Rare no yes no Olive-sided Flycatcher Flycatchers Df,Sp Common yes yes no orange-crowned Warbler Warblers Sp,Fr,Rip Occasional yes yes no Peregrine Falcon Raptors Ob,Sp,As Occasional no yes no Pine Grosbeak Finds-Sparrow Lp,Df,Sp-Fr Fairly Common yes no yes Pine Siskin Finch-sparrow As,Ob,Df,Sp Abundant yes no no Prairie Falcon Raptors Cliff,Open Occasional no no no Pygmy Owl Owls As, Df,Lp,Ob Fairly Common yes no yes Red-breasted Nuthatch Nuthatches Df,Sp-Fr Common yes no no Red-raped Sapsucker Woodpeckers As,Df,Sp Occasional yes yes no Red-tailed Hawk Raptors As,Rip,Open Common yes no no Red-winged Blackbird Thrushes Rip,Ob Occasional no no no Ruby-crowned Kinglet Small Song Birds Ob,Df Fairly Common yes yes no Rufous-sided Towhee Finch-Sparrow Ob,As Fairly Gammon yes no no Says Phoebe Flycatcher Ob,Rip Occaional ? no no Scrub Jay Jays Ob,Rip Occasional yes no no Sharp-shirvhed Hawk Raptors Ob,As,Sp Occasional no yes no Snow Bunting Finch-Sparrow open,snow Fairly Common no no no Song Sparrow Finch-Sparrow Rip,As Fairly Common yes no no Spotted Sandpiper Waterfowl Rip Rare no yes no Starling Thrushes Ob,Opan Occasional no no no Steller's Jay Jays As,Df Common yes no no Table 2. Bird incidence at SSA during 2000 Soecles Name Blvd Tvoe Habitat Tvoe Abundance BI I HHepocl. Miart Miter Res, Sweinson's Thrush Thrushes Rip,Pond Occasional yes yes no Townsend's Solitaire Thrushes Spfr,Df,As Fairly Common yes no no Tree Swallow Swallows As,Rip Common yes yes no Tree-toed Woodpecker Woodpeckers Sp,Fr Occasional yes no 7 Turkey Vulture Raptors Open Occasional no yes no Violet-green Swallow Swallows Open,Sp-Fr Gorman yes yes no Vrginia's Warbler Warblers As,Ob fairly Common yes no no Warbling Yreo Warblers As Fairly Common yes yes no Western Flycatcher Flycatchers As,Ob Common yes yes no Western Kingbird Flycatchers Rip,Ob Rare no no no Western Tanager Finch-Sparrow Df,Sp-Fr,Rip Fairly Common yes yes no Western Wood-Pewee Flycatchers Rip,Ob,As occasional yes yes no White-breasted Nuthatch Nuthatches Df,As,Ob Occasional yes no no White-crowned Sparrow Finch-Sparrow Willow,Sp-Fr Common yes no no White-tailed Ptarmigan Large Ground Bird Willow,sp-Fr Common yes no yes Williamson's Sapsucker Woodpeckers As,Fr Fairly Common yes no no Willow Flycatcher Flycatchers Willow,Rip Fairly Common yes yes no Wilson's Warbler Warblers Willow,Rip Fairly Common yes yes no Yellow-romped Warbler Warblers Rip,Willow Common yes yes no Yellow Warbler Warblers Rip,Willow Common yes yes no Table 3. Martvrrals at S'mass Ski Area during 2000 Mammals Vnms Ski Area 2000 Spades Na mt Mammals Tvoe Habitat Elevadon Abunda 4 &RA American Marten Carnivore Df 10,700 Occasional E5 Bighorn Sheep Herbivore Cliff 12,500 Occasional N2 Black Bear Omnivore As,Df,open 8,200, 9,500,10,700 Common Al2,F11,D11 Bobcat Carnivore As,open,Rip,Sp-(r 8,300, 9,700, 10,300 Common B10,F71,K6,M11 Coyote Carnivore As,Df,open,Sp-Fr 8,400, 9500, 11,300 Abundant F12,G5,F5,J6,012 Deer Mouse Herbivore As,grass,Rip 8.400, 9,200 Cornmon 112 Elk Herbivore open,As,Df,Sp-Fr 8,200-12,000 Abundant O13,A11,C10,C9 Golden-rnentled G Squirrel Herbivore Ob,As 8,200-9,000 Common G12 Least Chipmunk Herbivore Ob,As,Df,Sp-Fr 8,400.11,000 Abundant C10,D10,D12,E5 Long-tailed Weasel Carnivore Rip,Roc k,Sp-Fr 8,400-10,500 Fairly Common H8,G10 Meadow Vole Herbivore Ob,As,open,Df 8,500-10,600 Common B12 Montane Vole Herbivore. Willow,open 11,000-11,800 Abundant L2 Mule Deer Herbivore Ob,open,Sp-Fr 8,000-11,300 Common 013,L13,K13,E12 Nuttall's Cottontail Herbivore Ob,As 8,200-9,500 Fairly Common G13,D13 Pike Herbivore Rock,Cliff 10,500.11,300 Abundant D5,L4,E5 Porcupine Herbivore Ob,As 8,400-9,300 Fairly Common D13, Raccoon Carnivore Rip,Sp-Fr,Ob 8,300-10,500 Common F13,Q13,C72 Red Fox Carnivore Rip,As,Df,Ob,Sp-Fr 8,200-12,000 Abundant E12,07,127,HB,G6 Red Squirrel Herbivore Df,Sp-Fr 9,400-11,200 Abundant E12,G6,M4,D11 Richardson's G Squirrel Herbivore open, grass 8,500-8,700 Occasional G13 Snowshoe Hare Herbivore As,Df,Sp-Fr 8,200.11,200 Abundant E12,09,L8,M4,D5 Unita Chipmunk Herbivore As,Ob,Rip 8,400$,800 Fairly Common B12 Yellow-bellied Marmot Herbivore Rock,Cliff,Df,open 10,100-11,200 Common L3 Table 4. Areas of Re-Vegetation, SSA 2000. Area of Re-Vegetation Acreage @iosol Seed-"neve' Ha Scooper Race Area 4 none 200 Ibs 20,000lbs Turkey Snoot 6 none 300 Ibs 30,000 Ibs Little Max Park to B-19 25 none 1,250 Ibs 125,000 Ibs B-S to Funnel 5 none 250 Ibs 25,000 Ibs Table 5. "nev/'seed mix for revegetation at Snowmass Ski Area. Plant Specie s Common Name % Pure %Germ Bulk Ibg Deschampsia cespitose Tuffed Hairgress 90.1 90 98.66 Poe alpine Alpine Bluegrass 97.45 94 21.83 Danthonia sp. Parry's Oatgrass 79.21 75 33.67 Elymus glaucus Blue Wild Rye 99.42 96 20.95 Festuce idehoensis Idaho Fescue 95.77 93 44.91 Poe ample Big Bluegrass 87.14 85 27 Bromus marginetus Mountain Brome 99.97 77 155.89 Bromus ported Nodding Brome 97.4 83 24.74 Agropyron dasystachyum Thickspike Wheatgress 97.92 96 63.83 Table 6. SSA Monitoring-Action, 2000. Planned Action Timm Locatoon 11mtr Results DEER and ELK Revegefation July-Aug. Turkey Snoot, Little Max Park seed,biosol,hay will be evaluated in 2001 Area dosing Spring Gov.Trail area closure,signs needs improvements in the Fall Vegetation FHD Summer mountain none FHD overall is taking shape Prohibit hunting no action no action no action no action Prohibit pets running loose Summer All Leash and signs OK getting better Other-Wildlife view summer Turkey Trot-Turkey Snoot Cut new trail hand cut, good. BIRDS maintain FHD Summer Longshot-Campground trails wood piles 4'x4x4' fallen trees into piles Increase plant production July-Aug. See Table 4 seed,Bisol,fed.,hay ample rain kept good growth water catchments Fall High Alpine&Cirque area (3) 10'x10' ponds water to the 1 st week of August drainage Summer SSA, erosion managementOK watch erosion during 2001 Human access restriction Summer running lifts brochures info.detailing care in the SSA envii Create cover Summer Longshot-Campground, Turkey SnootReveg.,log piles watch fo 2001 Other RAPTORS HABITATS Human activity restriction in Summer running lifts brochures info. detailing care in the Alpine er Hanging Valley cliffs in Sp& No other action. early Summer no action Conserve snags, dead fall Summer numerous leave on location OK Other WHITE TAILED PTARMIGAN Restrict human access Summer upper Cirque area no work during nest. OK prated above 12000' areas Protect willow stands no action no action no action No human diturb. above High Alp water holes summer High Alpine and Cirque areas 1 O'xl O' area each hold water for long period MAMMALS Table 6. SSA Monitoring-Action, 2000. Maintain FHD Summer Longshot-Campground reveg,narrow run,islagrest. watch for in 2001 Leave fallen logs, dead fall Summer numerous log piles great Add piles of dead fall Summer longshot-Campground, Turkey Snoot construct piles great. Watch for in 2001 Other EDUCATION Education activities Srm&Wint Elk Camp Visitor Center info. USFS very popular ASC employees programs Summer by CDOW seminar good Other Summer SSA into.tour popular MONITORING Monitoring, observation All year SSA transacts 5th year program Evaluation Winter ASC record analysis 5th year analysis Reports May 2000 Town of Snowmass Village 1999 annual report Submitted on time; approved Table 7. SSA Ski Trail Vegetation Assessment, 2000. Lift Area&Trail V2gdd W" Rana Qual. EM Euna Hill Funny Hill low grass none low none Re_Veg with hay. QM Glade Trestle low,road high,dense low none within shade area Green Cabin(lowerlow none med. none Banza med. none med. none Cabin coed. low high low ReVeg with hay Blue Grouse low to mod. med. high low Velvet Falls med. low low low Re-veg with hay. Hal's Hollow med good med. low Re-veg with hay. Dry spots in lower areas Scooper med. low cried. low green in center. needs work in edge areas Dawdler high good high mod good Lunchline low low low low not even growth Sam's Knob Sunny Side high med. high med, green by Fall Banzai Ridge high good high med. green by Fall Coney Glade med. low med. med. green by Fall but dry in spots Moonshine med. good mod. med. green by Fall Ute Chute med. good med. med. green by Fall Fast Draw med. good med. mod, not even growth, green by Fall Promenade high good high high green by Fall Zugspize high good high high green by Fall Slot(upper) high good med.to high mod. green by Fall GaWground Wildcat high good high high green by Fall Campground high good high high green by Fall Bearclaw high good high high green by Fall Powderhom high good high high green by Fall slot(lower) med. low to aced. med. med. Re-veg with hay. not even growth. Blg Bum Max Park med. low med low needs more work Table 7. SSA Ski Trail Vegetation Assessment, 2000. Whispering Jesse low to mod. good mad. high green by Fall, some dry spots Timberline mad. good med. high OK Wineskin med. good mad. high green by Fall with dry spots Dallas Freeway mad. low mad. mad. rat even growth, dry spots Mick s Gully low to mod. high mod. high not even growth, dry spots. Sr"ry's mod. to high high high high green by Fall Show Bilas Sheer Bliss high low high mad. green by Fall KT Gully high mod. high high green by Fell Rods Island high high high high green by Fall Camp 3 high high high high green by Fall Glissade high high high high green by Fall Free Fall high high high high green by Fall West Face high high high high green by Fall Garrett Gulch high high high high green by Fall AMF mad low low low green by Fall Gowdy's mad. low mod. low green by Fall High Alpine Dikes mod. mod. high mod. green by Fall Green Cabin(upperhigh high high high green by Fall Raider's med.to high high high high green by Fall Showcase high high high high green by Fall The Edge mod. to high high high high green by Fall Possible mad. low high low green by Fall Baby Ruth mod. to high high high high green by Fall Hanging Valley Gld high high high high green by Fall Robertds high mad. high high green by Fall Headwall road. high high med green by Fall Hanging Valley Walmed. high high high green by Fall Lower Ladder mad. to high high high mod. green by Fall Cassidy's high high high high green by Fall Willy's high high high high green by Fall Alpine Sprinas Granite high high high high green by Fall Coffe Pot high high high high green by Fall Table 7. SSA Sid Trail Vegetation Assessment,2000. Lun kerville high high high high green by Fall Lodgepole high high high high green by Fall Log Deck mad.to high high high high green by Fall Tom's Trace med.to high high high high green by Fall Naked Lady high mad. mad. high green by Fall. Slider(upper) mod.to high high high high green by Fall, dry in spots at lower areas Turkey Trot mod. to high high high high green by Fall Funnel Assay Hill low to mod. none low none Re-veg with hay. green by Fall Funnel Bypass low to mad. low low low greets by Fal;l with dry spots Funnel low to mad. mad. mad. mad. green by Fall Bottoms up mad. high mad. high green by Fall No Name med. to high mad. high high green by Fall Slider(lower) mad. to high high high high green by Fall Adam's Avenue mad. low mad. low green by Fall Two Creeks Cascade high mod. mod. high Re-veg at bottorn. green by Fat Creekside med. to high high mad. high green by Fall Eddy Out West Fork 14 B Elks Bull Run med mad. mad. mod. green by Fall Gray Wolf mod. to high high high high green by Fall Bear Bottom med.to high high high high green by Fall Gunner's View mad. to high high high high green by Fall Sandy Park mad. to high high high high green by Fall Bum(Mountain BM 1 BM2 BM3 BM4