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07-26-01 Town Council Packet �C � Kfi � , a � - a � 0 ltc".�o SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL /1� SPECIAL MEETING AGENDA r 07-26-2001 CALL TO ORDER AT 8:30 A.M. Item No. 1: ROLL CALL Item No. 2: DISCUSSION ROLE OF STAFF AND COUNCIL MEMBERS Item No. 3: EXECUTIVE SESSION PERSONNEL ISSUES Colorado revised Statues 24-6-4-2 (3) (a) Snowmass Village Municipal Code Chapter 2, Article III, Section 2-45 (b) (7) Executive Sessions. Item No. 4: ADJOURNMENT NOTE: ALL ITEMS AND TIMES ARE TENTATIVE AND SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT FURTHER NOTICE. PLEASE CALL THE OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK AT 923-3777 ON THE DAY OF THE MEETING FOR ANY AGENDA CHANGES. P4 cater r SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL REGULAR MEETING AGENDA JULY 23, 2001 CALL TO ORDER AT 2:00 P.M. Item No. 1: ROLL CALL DISCUSSION AGENDA— 2:00 P.M. Item No. 2 2:00 — 2:30 PRELIMINARY BUDGET DISCUSSION -- Marianne Rakowski.............Page 1 (Tab A) Item No. 3: 2:30 — 2:45 OWL CREEK TRAILHEAD PARKING LOT UPDATE -- Craig Thompson/Hunt Walker.Page 10 (Tab B) Item No. 4: 2:45 — 3:30 SNOWMELT ROAD CONCEPTUAL PLAN Hunt Walker........................Page 14 (Tab C) Item No. 5: 3:30 -- 3:50 NOISE REGULATIONS - DISCUSSION Art Smythe .........................Page 17 (Tab D) Item No. 6: 3:50 —4:00 BREAK REGULAR AGENDA—4:00 P.M. Item No. 7: PUBLIC NON-AGENDA ITEMS (5-Minute Time Limit) Item No. 8: FIRST READING — ORDINANCE NO. 18, SERIES OF 2001 CONSIDERATION OF AN ORDINANCE AMENDING SECTION 2-235 OF THE MUNICIPAL CODE REDEFINING THE DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE FINANCIAL ADVISORY BOARD. -- Steve Connor ................................................... Page 25 (Tab E) Item No. 9: DISCUSSION COMMITTEE REPORTS/COUNCIL COMMENTS/STATUS REPORT............................................................... Page 29 (Tab F) Item No. 10: CALENDARS........................................................ Page 31 (Tab G) 07-23-01tc Page 2 of 2 Item No. 11: ADJOURNMENT NOTE: ALL ITEMS AND TIMES ARE TENTATIVE AND SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT FURTHER NOTICE. PLEASE CALL THE OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK AT 923-3777 ON THE DAY OF THE MEETING FOR ANY AGENDA CHANGES. TOWN COUNCIL COMMUNIQUE Meet ni g aD te: July 23, 2001 i Agenda Item: Budget Discussion-Revenue Assumptions/Potential Revenue Sources Presented By: Gary Suiter, Town Manager Marianne Rakowski, Finance Director Core Issues: Review and discuss revenue assumptions Provide direction for staff to proceed or not with individual potential revenue sources General Information: Prior to the development of the revenue budget, staff is requesting feedback from the Town Council with regards to sales tax projections and the Aspen Skiing Company mitigation fee. Staff has also developed a list of other potential revenue sources that the Town Council may want to consider. Any of these revenue sources that the Town Council approves of, staff will put into our budget. Council Options: Discuss and provide feedback Staff Provide staff with general thoughts for budgeting sales tax Recommendation: revenues and skier visits. Provide staff with direction to implement or not to implement individual potential revenue sources. awn- r A TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE HISTORICAL SUMMARY TORN SALES TAX � 2001 1001 2001 2001 MONTH GENERATED 1998 1999 2000 2001 VARIANCE VARIANCE 2001 2001 VARIANCE VARIANCE � PEO GENERAL LEDGER ACTUAL ACTUAL ACTUAL REVISED s °l. BUD GET REVISED E % - _..__ _. ___.. _... __._ _._. _. _...... _... _.. _ _........ ve'elft,P.;w Yea S - S E - 0.00% S O.LO% laruary S 197.379.96 3 189.844.09 S 175.93564 S 150,07146 3 (25.864.18) 14.70% $ 185,611.00 S 150.07146 S (35.539.54) 19.15% Febuary S 231,765.31 S 224.107.65 8 219.443.02 S 224.563.81 $ 5.120.79 2.33% E 231,512.00 S 224,363.81 S (6.948.19) 3.00% March $ 247,641.58 $ 240,037.26 S 243.733.47 S 241.237.54 $ (2,495.93) .1.02% E 257.138.00 S 241,237.54 $ (15.900.46) 6.18% April $ 72.211.13 S 65,559.95 S 54.302.44 $ 57,05471 S 2,752.27 5.07% 3 57.289.00 S 57.054.71 E (234.29) 0.41% May $ 12,307.13 S 12.529.33 $ 18,063.21 $ 13,370.99 S (46^2.22) 25.98% S 19,056.00 $ 13.370.99 $ (5.685.01 -29.89% June $ 47.095.67 E 37.145.17 $ 42.722.80 S 42.722.80 $ 0.00% $ 45,073.00 $ 42.722.80 S (2,350.20) 5.21% July $ 74.834.57 $ 60.857.55 S 57,707.86 S 57.707.86 $ - 0.00% $ 61446.00 $ 57,707.86 $ (3,738.14) .6.08% August 3 66.129.62 S 61,685.41 S 59.546.72 $ 59.546.72 S 0.00% $ 62.822.00 $ 59,546.72 $ (3.275.28) 5.21% Septembe, S 3775142 S 38.213.50 E 37,222.61 $ 37,222.61 S 0-DD% S 39.270.00 S 37,222.61 S (2.047.39) 5.21% OctR $ 19.273.33 S 18.753.48 S 18,204.85 $ 18,204.85 3 - 0.00% S 19,205.00 S 18,204.85 E (3.000.15) -5.21% November E 23.583.65 $ 18.922.37 $ 23,216.14 S 23.216.14 $ 0.00% $ 24.523.00 S 23.216.14 S (1,306.96) -5.33% December $ 159.879.39 S 129,129.27 S 130.123.03 E 130.12303 E - ODD% E 137.467.00 $ 130.12303 $ (7.343.97) 5.34% . ...... . ___ _..__.......... ..............._.. ............._I... ... .. _..... .. . _. _.._ ___.._. . ............ ._. _.............. _._. . . _._... _._.._.. SubTPsals S I.IR9R5376 S 1.0 .785.03 S 100n,221.79 E 1056142.52 S (25.1'^.27) 1337 S I.IA1.412nn S 1055^425(7 S ras 19 49) .749% SesVamru31 VeIMO(Fee F,m;ttances $ 26,635.02 S .2..5.....4..6..7...04 $ 24.604 26 S 24.604 26 $ 0. 00% $ 25 389 00 E 26 604.26 $ (592.74) 309% From P.Mm Cry E 1...2. X E 10514.00 3 10.52000 . 10.520.00 8 0.00% 8 1..1 . .. .. 10520.00 E (592.00) 5.33% TlXals S 1226.99978 $ 1112.7+6.07 E 1,115,34606 S 1049,16678 3 (25.179 27) 2.76% S 1.17691726 S ].0491667R S (R674922) -7377 COUNTY SAUM TA% 2001 2001 VARIANCE VARIANCE MONTN 1998 1999 2000 1001 VARIANCE VARIANCE 2001 2001 VAg1ANCE VARIANCE i GENERATED ACTUAL AMAL ACTUAL REVISED s % BUDGET REVISED s % .. .............. .._ .. ...............-_. .............. .............. ._. ......... ..._.__........... ....... ...... .... _.. '-..__..... _._........ _._. ........._. . ........ De ,ber.Pr,or Year S S $ 0.00% S O.W% January S 356.909.32 S 375,230.16 $ 349,980.78 $ 322.495.81 $ (27,484.97) 7.85% S 360.480.00 S 322.495.81 $ (37,984.19) 40.54% February S 418,315.90 S 413,466.48 S 409.553.61 S 410,383.76 S 1,830.15 0.45% S 420,810.00 S 410,383.76 E (10.426.24) 2.48% March $ 442.537.08 $ 447,930.07 S 417,662.28 E 422.855.68 S 5.193.40 1.24% S 430.192.00 S 422,855.68 $ (7,336.32) 1.71% April $ 192.944.15 $ 154.610.02 S 153,925.06 $ 162.193.77 $ 8.268.71 5.37% $ 158.542.00 $ 162,193.77 $ 3,651.77 2.3D% May S 98.692.46 S 82.433.46 $ 98.337.25 S 71.269.74 S (27.067.51) 27.53% $ 101.287.00 $ 71,269.74 S (30.017.26) 29.64% Jute S 142.542.59 $ 140,358.66 S 165,523.78 S 165,523.78 $ O.OD% S 170.490.00 $ 165,523.78 $ (4,96622) 2.91% July S 213,842.13 $ 209.145.06 S 194.496.91 $ 194,496.91 S 0.00% S 200.330.00 S 194496.91 $ (5,833.09) 2.91% August $ 201,589.31 S 197.467.11 S 216.976.48 S 216,976.48 $ 0.00% $ 223.485.00 $ 216,976.48 $ (6.508.52) 2.91% Seglmlber $ 131.283.33 $ 148.932.84 S 144.457.21 $ 1",457.21 $ 0.00% $ 148,791.00 S 144.457.21 E (4,333.79) 2.91% October S 85.098.29 $ 96,121.94 $ 94.489.05 S 94.489.05 S O.OD% S 97,097.00 $ 94.489.05 S (2.607.95) 2.69% NalertTa $ 95.23041 $ 87,781.00 $ 103.541.11 S 103.541.11 $ DoD% S 106.399.00 $ 103.541.11 S (2.857.89) 2.69% Dec..- er S 329.278.03 S 291.752.74 $ 303.128.58 $ 303.128.58 $ 0.00% S 311.539.00 $ 303.128.58 S (8,410.42) .2.70% ...................._......... ....... .._.................... ..........._...................................................................._............................__............ ......................... ..............................._...................._._................... TOTALS E 2.708,263.00 S 2.645,229.54 S 2,651.072.10 S 2,611811.88 S (39.26022) 148% S 2,729.442.00 S 2.611,e11.RR E (117,630.12) 4.31% Note: As of packet time,there was no information available from the City of Aspen,Pitkin County or SVRA regarding their tax projections Aspen Skiing Company Contribution Based on skier visits: Season Skier Visits 1993-94 757,890 1994-95 731,682 1995-96 657,633 1996-97 766,245 1997-98 753,537 1998-99 726,996 1999-00 663,758 2000-01 693,411 2001-2002 ??? Note: Left message with Doug McKenzie... have not heard back from by packet time 3 � POTENTIAL REVENUE SOURCES Type: Elimination of Building Permit and Plan Check Fee Waivers Approximate $: In 2000, $19,609 in fees were waived In 2001, $47,749 fees waived y-t-d Benefits: Additional revenue to the general fund No additional costs or staff to administer fee schedule Costs: (Political) Non-profit organizations may object to the payment of permit and plan check fees. Staff Recommendation: Implement, while honoring existing written agree- ments e.g. Water and Sanitation District Type: Capturing add'l sales taxes on single family vacation rentals Approximate $: $1,125 per year Benefits: Additional revenue to the general fund Makes the playing field more equitable to those properties that are correctly collecting sales taxes Homeowners would be in compliance with the Municipal Code Town would have a more accurate number of businesses located in Snowmass Village Costs: Cost to the Town would be minimal Council and staff may receive complaints from those homeowners who are not currently collecting/paying sales tax Staff Recommendation: Implement Type: Ballot issue to expand allowable RETT uses Approximate $: No new $ generated Benefits: Expands uses for other public purposes by expanding the allowable uses to include operations or add- ing language for regional transportation funding Allows for shifting financial burdens from the General Fund to the RETT fund OW Y- Potential Revenue Sources Page 2 Costs: May shift funds from currently funded projects to newly approved uses If the RETT isn't changed to a tax in perpetuity, then how are these expenses funded in the future? Requires an election Staff Recommendation: Implement in 2001 or 2002 Type: Ballot issue to extend term of the RETT Approximate $: Continued annual revenue of approximately $2,000,000 beyond 2006 Benefits: Provides perpetual source of funds for Transportation capital, landscaping and major roads Continues to assess new purchasers of property within Town limits for past and future improvements in the village Once the tax expires, the Town cannot institute a new RETT Costs: Original intention was that ibis had a finite term (10 year) that has since been extended Could be seen as a deterrent to purchase property within the Town limits Requires an election Staff Recommendation: Implement in 2001 or 2002 Type: Require contractors to feet a business license Approximate $: $1,650 from approximately 22 contractors _ 5 _ Potential Revenue Sources Page 3 Benefits: Additional revenue to the General Fund Town would have a more accurate number of businesses located Snowmass Village Contractors would be in compliance with Municipal Code Costs: Additional postage and supplies for mailings to the Contractors of $88/yr Additional staff time: Approx 1 1 hours/yr Council may receive complaints from contractors Staff Recommendation: Implement Type: Increasing Building Permit Fees Approximate $: Based on a review of Aspen/Pitkin County building permit fees, the Towns are lower for valuations up to and including $lm, but for valuations higher than $1 m, our fees are higher. Assuming we only adjust the fees for valuations under $1 m, the additional revenue collected = $64,247 Benefits: Additional revenue to the general fund No additional costs or staff to administer revised fee schedule Costs: Contractors may object to higher fees Staff Recommendation: Opposed until a detailed cost allocated recovery analysis can be performed Type: Increase Property Taxes Approximate $: Based on the 2000 assessed valuation: 1 mill generates $282,445 2 mills generates $564,890 3 mills generates $847,335 Benefits: Provides additional funding for general fund operations i V O Potential Revenue Sources Page 4 Creates a more balanced and diversified revenue picture for the future May maintain or enhance service to the community May offset downturns in sales tax revenue Costs: Property owners may oppose paying more tax dollars for existing services Increasing the mill levy for operations may discourage voters from approving an additional mill levy for special projects i.e. Water Park Requires election Staff Recommendation: In order to implement, staff believes specific services should be identified to support increase These services could be determined during budget Type: Allocate costs to administer accounting, shop and road work to the Housing Funds Approximate $: $18,300 Benefits: Additional revenue to the General Fund Allocates costs to correct funds Costs: May impact employee housing rents if amount cannot be absorbed in the Housing budgets Staff Recommendation: Implement Type: Determine wag to collect sales tax on natural gas that is run through the gas valve located outside Town limits either through annexation of the site or renegotiation of the franchise agreement Approximate $: Needs further research Benefits: Additional revenue to the General Fund Minimal work by staff to renegotiate franchise agreement (which comes up in 2003) 7i Potential Revenue Sources Page 5 Costs: There may be other ways such as annexation or working out a legal agreement with the providers in order to meet the same goal, which may have costs associated with them such as attorney fees Staff Recommendation: Implement Type: Reduce grants and donations, particularly to well funded non pro its Approximate $: $44,000 (per Linda Sandels the Town should consider one line for all grants. The Board feels the Town should only fund essential human services (with a few ex- ceptions) and encourage non-profit agencies to seek other funding sources Benefits: Reduction in the General Fund grants and donation line items Costs: Potential social costs to non-profit agencies Council may receive complaints Staff Recommendation: Implement Type: Charge for donated bus service to SRA conference services and the Suzuki Music School Approximate $: $17.000/yr (there are a number of other organizations that receive donated bus service) Benefits: Additional general fund revenues Costs: Could possibly lose conference business Staff Recommendation: Implement Type: Bill JAZZ Aspen/Snowmass for General Fund expenditures related to their events Approximate $: $32,871 (approximate) 000, S ® Potential Revenue Sources Page 6 Benefits: Additional General Fund revenues to offset General Fund expenditures Costs: Could affect concert prices Staff Recommendation: Implement Type: Increase rates for solid waste fees Approximate $: 57,585 Benefits: Increase in revenues will help offset the costs to the General Fund Costs: Some customers may complain over the increase in trash fees Staff Recommendation: Implement Type: Fund transfer from the RETT Fund to the General Fund Approximate $: $155,000 Benefits: Offset General Fund expenditures Costs: Reduce ability for the RETT fund to fund other projects If the RETT fund did not get extended, these costs would need to be picked up by the General Fund again Staff Recommendation: Implement on a year-to-year basis beginning with the 2002 budget. This would need to be evaluated each year as the Town looks at economic changes as well as the possibility of implementing an additional mill levy and extending the Real Estate Transfer Tax. 60 - q ap� TOWN COUNCIL COMMUNIQUE Meeting Date: July 23, 2001 _ Presented By: Craig Thompson Hunt Walker Subject: Owl Creek Trailhead Parking - Update Overview: At the July 16 Council meeting, staff presented a proposal for trailhead parking located on Parcel F, Lot 3 (owl creek trailhead — see attached map). The following issues were discussed: 1 . Location and design of proposed parking lot; 2. Parking at this location is not a permitted use by right according to the East Village PUD; 3. The proposed parking lot is within an identified elk migration corridor. Council directed the town's Wildlife Specialist (Larry Green) to conduct a review and analysis of potential wildlife impacts associated with the proposed parking lot. Larry Green's memo is attached. Council Options: 1. Proceed with the proposed parking lot as identified on the attached map. The next step would then be an amendment to the East I Village (parcel F, Lot 3) PUD. 2. Not proceed any further with the proposed parking lot and direct staff to identify an alternative location. An alternative location is mentioned in Larry Green's memo. recommendation: Staff recommends Option #1 with the condition that the parking lot is closed during the Elk migration period. T®P® G1 AP PART OF PARCEL F, LOT TOWN OF SNO WMA SS VILLAGE, cl �f QwL c� / \ 6—j, m! e IIL/!!Wf LT LMC4 H 4 A 4 �� — �•'(YY _ _ .N.SAY � �� {Y S is E GRAPHIC SCAIE LuYfr TA- CUYYI MD/ID' L[MLTY )AN6LM CYOM BLAYIYL I YYLTA f � � C/ I>O.RD N.II /Tl1 N.N - Q IT0.m , //0.R1 rIIlI n uo.00 r/e.N (b.01 T I Y!•. b R T■5] r�,,,,m,,.,,,,.,., SC HMUFSFR GORDON MEYER p..,. -. 1111. 5urrt200 C�81601 Maintanence Perkir, 4970)845.5946 E . 'Z:..0✓r..nw.r,we.. SCNMUESER I GORDON MEYER A, 928 9727 fn. is SUR VEY 3, EAST VILLAGE P. U.D. PITKIN COUNTY, COLORADO SBA-e�•�•� ne.ee' EK ROAD `��\ I/p/vtlID•V C 4Nbe�\ I/e � ..... .pp lm•Y 4 1 Lne \ ribl•.Ppflr 4 / 6ur.eJ./i C1rYlwY: •a9;p ; .cTLYxd,Y L LNILRS, ee/y•d4Ylenl 4ntl bune/or/a IL. sla. u/oM/•e•. tle e.naJ ru4 1!N O4 m•/ M •1ma w.,erv.n• ..•pnprel y me wd nnem m/ / .eplr.,.,w //.m •s• N m! a m a q ender nv '\ wprn.uen a le.i b0 ur•v .• Vue ms � n.i .s ...� ... dm. M'61uw1r/var•I l.. Nm k fnN n ��,�� rummer rnl/ "le: rill Inpepn/e/mm c N1w n10 N•Ywd Yq ecrur•V s4ae•N•/n 1nN✓r m•M. ebn rlecldd ➢ef e/po/n4 veeu/f M ./114 //r fee rmleur/oleo•! •atl ne//eeenee peY4 l . M IYIIM ./Wn I//0'N IAVY Vne pw/Wa. M1Ml duya •ISUN!e M.eI u/sn .Pee rLUVwe, p/un wn4N rNmuenr LeNm Y•pr. /nc. // LI/•pel •Y..Yu 4/vm•Va•. dvle.' pliwe PU•llm of Pw PNI e/dui ri/1•re. .non J . N m •1/. M w ,a I.—a n Mr;)Jlpe. Me IN MM /o/•rmN U Oe ureysr a MN N 0Y - enccw as K m rY DIATM—e0 � d..v b. QqV Existing Conditions n TOP O GRA P-h PART OF PARCEL F, LOT TOWN OF SNO WMASS VILLAGE, s u raT \ c, \ o yVL ;cF ..... AA4.. \ t • b ti 4 : s..,.:. r•. .. i 1 CRAPHX SCAIE rur r rues w.oJU JJ,rnx r.awa I a Q •ra ///.// //a! r 1 I IOI I Q •/aao I //a« 1 //J.lr •a 5Y ." R •�•�• r•- /\ SCHMUESER GORDON MEYER w•�.�rwZ L�� � �. w f�. �,r/n. su�rt lOC �"•��'�`�� V Meintenence Perkin f �+.r:..�•r.fir...�ii.Zw..�r SCHMUESER GORWN MEYER A 02"7[7 rrtee • eue...eee [w: IC SURVEY 31 EAST VILLA GE P. U.D. PI TKIN COUNTY, COLORADO P9PlQ' EK AOAD' \ y,1.4.m cW411w "I I . P, .......z„: .._ ryas - \ a h4,1W11mmM1 LNIJftIO NnywY[v4/414 R A =TL'Ppld l LtlI[if. Mly.M/4YM 4eI b.fwJw Y Y. dYY M Crenll. W 1my n/tW WI W mY M / .)I/4Y fw0i4W. PnpM y m1 .M WM y ,� .uPfrvrxe 4qm ��m./f I(f . /M WIa y nP.f.xxd I Y.1 by Y/•Y%rRYJ, sI m.P of Yw Wtl MN W n1 MI t-Y-O/. •.`. IBC ' ,:' Po•/,MVreIn4. Mer�f4 !nY Ys Semr f!•U / A* sk el M,hN .. M/f: !1r IlYnP4t mV.ImI11m -/Y M4W.I b1I - nf4nV DYPI.fY W 4Pyt-Nk mlPw /1N relelN WI r PIYY Js-1I N -l116 1/L Y,mlbv Ylrw/ WI -W af6el/IW4 WW M,/nIW ./116 !/JO Y Y14 Yn Pr/ym. MUI.I I.WI .1.IY b Mw�Y,W WIp1 Irm4w, PrM n14[I IMr 6rlm Mpf. bd. N Yb�Ydl WwYY lehYMlyd. %i mfa6 Y.Ye .n Dr k .9 PW Ibl II lul YYIy-PI®, nl ar b . a II Pys N m nnPYM e W Mr aaw. Mr rYI Mm r Plriwmll 4 W..nyer m,u1 ✓114 Idnll. Plm� OIR R M b. i ow" EIl&ZJI� a•,s O�fI 1 ; Conditions �.. a 1 n MEMORANDUM DATE: July 19, 2001 TO: Craig Thompson, Hunt Walker FROM: Larry L. Green, TOSV Wildlife Specialist RE: Review of Parcel F Parking Lot Impacts Overview: The public is expressing renewed interest for a parking lot on Owl Creek to access the Tom Blake Trail. On July 17. 2001, Hunt Walker, Bernadette Barthelenghi and 1 met at the site to review the parking lot drawings on Parcel F, Lot 3 as presented in the July 16, 2001 Town Council agenda packet. Discussion: Attached is a memorandum 1 wrote on December 11, 2000. No information that I have learned since December would lead me to change the opinion 1 offered then. The proposed parking lot is still located in a mapped elk and deer migration corridor. However, if Council feels it is appropriate to approve a parking lot in this area, I have several recommendations, which if implemented in total, would reduce wildlife impacts: 1. Move the lot to the west as far as practical (approx. 60 feet). This would not remove it from the mapped migration corridor, but it would move it closer to the west edge of the migration corridor. Approximately half of the lot would be located on Parcel F, Lot 3 zoned open space and half on Parcel F, Lot 2 zoned Mixed Use PUD. 2. Moving the lot to the west would also place it at or near the bottom of a fairly steep and treeless cut bank which is not as usable (but does not preclude its use) as a migration corridor. 3. Keep the lot as close to Owl Creek Road as possible. Traffic use of Owl Creek Road already has a negative impact on the habitat adjacent to the road. 4. Revegetate the old parking lot on Parcel F, Lot 3. Adding a grove of Douglas fir and aspen u ees in the old parking lot would facilitate wildlife movement across the road but not be so close to the Owl Creek road that deer and elk could jump out in front of oncoming traffic without first being observed by motorists. 5. Close the parking lot during the trail closure(April 25 to June 20). r 12. 00P MEMORANDUM DATE: December 21, 2000 TO: Bernadette Barthelenghi FROM: Larry L. Green, TOSV Wildlife Specialist RE: Parcel "F" Parking Lot Wildlife Impacts Overview: The Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan maps shows that parcel F is designated as a mule deer and elk migration corridor. Parcel F is located immediately adjacent to elk severe winter range and mule deer winter range. These designations are supported in varying degrees by past correspondence from biologists Randy Cote, Kevin Wright, Dan Baharav, Jonathan Lowsky and Dawn Keating. It appears that Parcel F was deeded to the Town of Snowmass Village to be held as a "conservation corridor" for the purpose of access for deer and elk to winter ranges. The survival of elk and deer in the Roaring Fork Valley is dependent upon access to and abundance of winter range and especially, severe winter range. While percentages may be in question, it has been suggested that as much as 90 percent of the migration corridor for the Maroon Bells - Snowmass Wilderness has been lost. The biologists listed above also seem to agree that the migration corridor may have shifted easterly due to increased development and disturbance, but not to the exclusion of use of parcel F. There is also agreement that potential for development to the east of parcel F where the majority of the migration is taking place, may shift migration patterns west toward parcel F. Recommendation: While several studies, one recently in done in Pitkin County, show that development creates negative impacts to wildlife, it would be difficult to show that leaving a small parking lot on parcel F would have a major negative impact to wildlife or wildlife migration. However, all biologists are in agreement that parcel F has some varying degree of wildlife value, with a potential for increased value if development should occur to the east. Parcel F is already impacted by Owl Creek Road on the north and Sinclair Road easement on the south, and by Nordic, equestrian and summer trail easements. Further uses of parcel F could eventually cumulate to such a point as to seriously degrade the wildlife value of this land. ... t3Av- TOWN COUNCIL COMMUNIQUE �9eetin Date: Jul 23, 2001 g Y I Agenda item: Snowmelt Road Conceptual Plan j Presented By: Hunt Walker, Dean Gordon. and Mark Gould Core issues: • Scope of Work: Upper Snowmelt Rd., TOV Snowmelt, Elbert Lane Extension. • Funding—Road Fund or Road Fund and Rett • Schedule—Fall 01 and Spring 02 General Info: Per Council's request, staff investigated the advantages of constructing the TOV Snowmelt along with Upper Snowmelt Road. Staff recommends adding the TOV Snowmelt for three reasons: 1. Economies of scale - only need to mobilize once for the job. 2. Less cost - eliminate construction cost inflation. 3. Disrupt the resort only once, not twice. On Monday, staff will present Council with a conceptual plan for Upper Snowmelt Road, and the TOV Snowmelt. After reviewing the project, staff concluded that the cross section established for the lower road, which was constructed in 1997, has performed satisfactorily and is appropriate for Snowmelt Road (see attached). The cross section includes a 6' sidewalk on the lodge side of the road, 2' curb and gutter on both sides of the road, a 20' road, and a 4' sidewalk on the parking lot side of the road. Funding: To fund the approximately $5,000,000 ($3.2 m for Upper Snowmelt Road, and $1.8 m TOV Snowmelt) needed to do both Upper Snowmelt Rd. and TOV Snowmelt, staff recommends Council consider two options: 1. Pay for 100% of the project using the Road Fund by continuing to assess five mills. Since it will take until 2005 to collect the additional $1.8 m for the TOV section of Snowmelt, borrow the necessary dollars from the Rett Fund. 2. Fund Upper Snowmelt Road through the Road Fund, and the TOV Snowmelt from the Rett Fund. (At the end of the year 2000, the Rett Fund had an undesignated reserve balance of $2,689,596. /y. Schedule: Starting on September 4, 2001, the day after Labor Day, Gould Construction will construct the storm drain system, and install the necessary utilities. Using traffic control one lane of traffic will be open for access to the upper village during this time. November 1, 2001 is the estimated time of completion of the fall work. Beginning on April 16, 2002, the day after the lifts close, demolition and reconstruction of Upper Snowmelt Rd. will commence. Similar to the schedule in 1997, the goal will be to have one lane of traffic open by June 1, 2002 and both lanes open by June 15. Construction of the sidewalks and the aprons to the side roads and parking lots will continue until the job is complete. Upper Village Ramps/Elbert Lane Extension: The upper village ramps and adjacent retaining wall holding up Lot 7-are probably in worse shape then either Upper Snowmelt Rd. or the TOV Snowmelt. Staff feels that replacement of the ramps and retaining wall should be included in the project. Although the ramps could be replaced in their current location, it makes sense to extend Elbert Lane to Brush Creek Rd. as outlined in Alternative Q of the latest Transit Plaza plans. Staff is continuing to investigate the horizontal and vertical alignment of the Elbert Lane extension, and should have a plan available for your review by the end of August. Council Options: 1. Build Upper Snowmelt Road only. 2. Build Upper Snowmelt Road and TOV Snowmelt. 3. Build Upper Snowmelt Road, TOV Snowmelt, and the Elbert Lane Extension. Staff Option 43 with the cross section as shown on the attached sheet. Recommendation: Staff recommends the project be funded through the Road Fund by borrowing money from the Rett Fund in the short term. .MW fss - 1 6' WIDE SIDEWALK 4' WIDE SIDEWALK `t7 �Ak ON LODGE SID£. 2'-1- 10'-0" 10'-0" 2"-1" PARKING LOT SIDE VA MAX 3: 1 4 2R CROWN 4 ZA CROWN 114 Fr 3:1 CURB & GUITER CURB & GUMP SECT/ON SECTION ROAD SECTION N.TS. TOWN COUNCIL COMMUNIQUE Meeting Date: July 23, 2001 Agenda Item: Noise Regulations Discussion: At Town Council's request, a discussion of noise regulations has been scheduled for today's meeting. Presented By: Art Smythe, Chief of Police Core Issues: ➢ Do the regulations currently found in the Municipal Code and State Statutes sufficiently address the noise problems occurring in the Village today? General Info: ➢ Staff recognizes that noise can be a significant source of environmental pollution and can have an adverse effect on quality of life in the Village. Consequently, we have always been responsive to noise complaints and have tried to mitigate problems before they occur through our land use process. ➢ The Town does not currently have a real noise ordinance. However, there are various regulations in the Municipal Code and State Statutes that we use to address and prevent specific problems. ➢ I have attached a list of noise sources and the corresponding regulations that we now use to deal with their impacts. ➢ I have also included a copy of the State noise law for your information. Noise ordinances from other municipalities are available upon request. Council Options: ➢ Direct staff to draft an ordinance amending the Town Code to include additional noise regulations. ➢ Find that current regulations are adequate. Recommend changes in current enforcement efforts. Staff Recommendation: Staff believes that current regulations are adequate. We will continue to adjust our public education and enforcement efforts to address specific problems. During budget discussions, we will be recommending the purchase of a decibel meter so that we can check noise sources for compliance with State Law. an- / 07 o NOISE SOURCE REGULATION General Noise/Noisy Activity Municipal Code Sec. 10-101 Unreasonable Noise Prohibits anyone from making any unreasonable noise and empowers the Police Department to make a prima facie determination as to whether a noise is unreasonable. Municipal Code Sec. 10-41 Disorderly Conduct A person can be charged under this section if they"disturb or lend to disturb the peace of others by violent, tumultuous or offensive conduct, or by loud or unusual noise." This section is commonly used to quiet loud parties. Municipal Code Sec. 7-1 Prohibition Against Nuisances A noisy activity which would "substantially annoy, injure or endanger the comfort, health, repose or safety of the Public", could be declared a public nuisance. Construction Noise Municipal Code Sec. 18-3 Limitation On Construction Times And Noise Under this section, construction projects which produce excessive noise or vehicle activity, are only permitted between the hours of 7:00am and 6:00pm, Monday through Saturday. Animals - Municipal Code Sec. 7-98 Animals Disturbing The Peace And Quie t Owners can be cited under this section if they allow their animals to disturb the neighborhood by the loud and persistent emission of noise. POW NOISE SOURCE REGULATION Special Events - Municipal Code Sec. 16A-5-260 Temporary Uses The mitigation of impacts related to special events including noise generation, are addressed during the permitting process required by this section of the Municipal Code. Vehicles - Colorado Revised Statutes 42-4-225 Mufflers— Prevention of Noise This State Statute is used to prevent the operation of noisy vehicles. It also contains a section specific to engine compression (Jake) brakes. If these devices are in compliance with this law, they do not generate excessive noise. Model Traffic Code Sec. 12-2 Standing Or Parking Regulations In areas where idling trucks have been a problem, we have erected official signs preventing this activity. Statute 25-12-101 Page 1 of 1 State Noise Law Search Result 13 of 30 Home Edit Search Ncw Search Back to List Previous Next 25-12-101 - Legislative declaration. The general assembly finds and declares that noise is a major source of environmental pollution which represents a threat to the serenity and quality of life in the slate of Colorado. Excess noise often has an adverse physiological and psychological effect on human beings, thus contributing to an economic loss to the community. Accordingly, it is the policy of the general assembly to establish statewide standards for r level limits for various time periods and areas. Noise in excess of the limits provided in this article constitutes a public nuisance. Source: L. 71: p. 647, § 1. C.R.S. 1963: § 66-35-1. Applied in City of Lakewood v. DeRoos, 631 P.2d 1140 (Colo. App. 1981). Home Edit Search Ncw Search Back to List Previous Next Search Result 13 of 30 I� d AV http://6.../statdspp.exe?W&srch=%27noise°/u27&s=25030&ct=13&t=10&i=0&cat=FFFFFFFFFFF80 5/24/01 Statute 25-12-102 Page ] of2 Search Result 14 of 30 Home Edit Search New Search Back to List Previous Next S 25-12-102 - Definitions. As used in this article, unless the context otherwise requires: (1) "Commercial zone" means: (a) An area where offices, clinics, and the facilities needed to serve them are located; (b) An area with local shopping and service establishments located within walking distances of the residents served; (c) A tourist-oriented area where hotels, motels, and gasoline stations are located; (d) A large integrated regional shopping center; (e) A business strip along a main street containing offices, retail businesses, and commercial enterprises; (f) A central business district; or (g) A commercially dominated area with multiple-unit dwellings. (2) "db(A)" means sound levels in decibels measured on the "A" scale of a standard sound level meter having characteristics defined by the American national standards institute, publication S1. 4 - 1971. (3) "Decibel" is a unit used to express the magnitude of a change in sound level. The difference in decibels between two sound pressure levels is twenty times the common logarithm of their ratio. in sound pressure measurements sound levels are defined as twenty times the common logarithm of the ratio of that sound pressure level to a reference level of 2 x 10-5 N/m2 (Newton's/meter squared). As an example of the effect of the formula, a three-decibel change is a one hundred percent increase or decrease in the sound level, and a ten-decibel change is a one thousand percent increase or decrease in the sound level. (4) "Industrial zone" means an area in which not<c restrictions on industry are necessary to protect the value of adjacent properties for other economic activity but shall not include agricultural operations. (5) "Light industrial and commercial zone" means: (a) An area containing clean and quiet research laboratories; (b) An area containing light industrial activities which are clean and quiet; (c) An area containing warehousing; or t2 r momp (d) An area in which other activities are conducted where the general environment is free from concentrated industrial activity. (6) "Residential zone" means an area of single-family or multifamily dwellings where businesses may or may not be conducted in such dwellings. The zone includes areas where multiple-unit http://6.../slat dspp.exe?W&srch=%27noise%27&s=25030&cr=l4&r=10&i=0&cat=FFFFFFFFFFF80 5/24/01 Statute 25-12-102 Page 2 of dwellings, high-rise apartment districts, and redevelopment districts are located. A residential zone may include areas containing accommodations for transients such as motels and hotels and residential areas with limited office development, but it may not include retail shopping facilities. "Residential zone" includes hospitals, nursing homes, and similar institutional facilities. Source: L. 71: p. 647, § 1. C.R.S. 1963: § 66-35-2. L. 73: p. 1406, § 47. L. 86: (2) amended, p. 501, § 121, effective July 1. Home Edit Search New Search Back to LU Previous Next Search Result 14 of 30 OW / http://6.../staidspp.exe?W&srch=%27noise°/"27&s=25030&cr-14&r=]0&i=0&cat=FFFFFFFFFFF80 5/24/01 Statute 25-12-103 Page ] oft Search Result 15 of 30 Home Edit Search New Search Back to List Previous Next 25-12-103 - Maximum permissible noise levels. (1) Every activity to which this article is applicable shall be conducted in a manner so that any noise produced is not objectionable due to intermittence, beat frequency, or shrillness. Sound levels of noise radiating from a property line at a distance of twenty-five feet or more therefrom in excess of the db(A) established for the following time periods and zones shall constitute prima facie evidence that such is a public nuisance: 7:00 a.m. to 7:00 P.M. to Zone next 7:00 p.m. next 7:00 a.m. Residential 55 db(A) 50 db(A) Commercial 60 db(A) 55 db(A) Light industrial 70 db(A) 65 db(A) Industrial 60 db(A) 75 db(A) (2) In the hours between 7:00 a.m. and the next 7:00 p.m., the noise levels permitted in subsection (1) of this section may be increased by ten db(A) for a period of not to exceed fifteen minutes in any one-hour period. (3) Periodic, impulsive, or shrill n<J r> shall be considered a public nuisance when such noises are at a sound level of five db(A) less than those listed in subsection (1) of this section. (4) This article is not intended to apply to the operation of aircraft or to other activities which are subject to federal law with respect to a cv control. (5) Construction projects shall be subject to the maximum permissible noise levels specified for industrial zones for the period within which construction is to be completed pursuant to any applicable construction permit issued by proper authority or, if no time limitation is imposed, for a reasonable period of time for completion of project. (6) All railroad rights-of-way shall be considered as industrial zones for the purposes of this article, and the operation of trains shall be subject to the maximum permissible noise levels specified for such zone. (7) This article is not applicable to the use of property for purposes of conducting speed or endurance events involving motor or other vehicles, but such exception is effective only during the specific period of time within which such use of the property is authorized by the political subdivision or governmental agency having lawful jurisdiction to authorize such use. (8) For the purposes of this article, measurements with sound level meters shall be made when the wind velocity at the time and place of such measurement is not more than five miles per hour. (9) In all sound level measurements, consideration shall be given to the effect of the ambient noise level created by the encompassing nois,: of the environment from all sources at the time and place of such sound level measurement. r A a i htip://6.../statdspp.exe?W&srch=%27noise°/u27&s=25030&cr=15&r—]0&i=0&cat=FFFFFFFFFFF80 5/24/01 Statute 25-12-103 Page 2 of (10) This article is not applicable to the use of property for the purpose of manufacturing, maintaining, or grooming machine-made snow. This subsection (10) shall not be construed to preempt or limit the authority of any political subdivision having jurisdiction to regulate noise abatement. (11) This article is not applicable to the use of property by this state, any political subdivision of this state, or any other entity not organized for profit, including, but not limited to, nonprofit corporations, or any of their lessees, licensees, or permittees, for the purpose of promoting,producing, or holding cultural, entertainment, athletic, or patriotic events, including, but not limited to, concerts, music festivals, and fireworks displays. This subsection (11) shall not be construed to preempt or limit the authority of any political subdivision having jurisdiction to regulate noise abatement. Source: L. 71: p. 648, § 1. C.R.S. 1963: § 66-35-3. L. 82: (10) added,p. 424, § 1, effective March 11. L. 87: (11) added, p. 1154, § 1, effective May 20. Am. Jur.2d. See 61A Am. Jur.2d, Pollution Control, § 267. Residential development of property is not precluded when noise emanating onto property exceeds limits set forth in this section. Einarsen v. City of Wheat Ridge, 43 Colo. App. 232, 604 P.2d 691 (1979). Trier of fact to determine mode to use in measuring noise. Davis v. ]zaak Walton League of America, 717 P.2d 984 (Colo. App. 1985). Applied in City of Lakewood v. DeRoos, 631 P.2d 1140 (Colo. App. 1981). Home Edit Search New Search Rack to List 1'revious Next Search Result 15 of 30 http://6.../staidspp.exe?W&srch=%27noise°/u27&s=25030&cr-15&r—]0&i=0&cat=FFFFFFFFFFF80 5/24/01 TOWN COUNCIL COMMUNIQUE Meeting Date: July 23, 2001 Presented By: Stephen R. Connor, Town Attorney Subject: ORDINANCE No. 18, SERIES OF 2001 AN ORDINANCE AMENDING SECTION 2-235 OF THE MUNICIPAL CODE REDEFINING THE DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE FINANCIAL ADVISORY BOARD Overview: Currently, the Financial Advisory Board has been delegated the following powers and responsibilities: Sec. 2-235. Powers and responsibilities. The Financial Advisory Board shall have the following powers and responsibilities. (1) To review the annual budget and capital program of the Town. (2) To make recommendations to the Town Manager and to the Town Council prior to the adoption of the budget and capital program for the Town. (3) To submit written recommendations to the Town Manager prior to the public hearing held for the purpose of adopting the Town budget and capital program. The time for submission shall be determined annually by the Town Council (4) The Town Manager shall provide the Financial Advisory Board with copies of the proposed budget for each ensuing fiscal year, together with other information relating to the current and past income and expenditures of the Town and any other information relating to Town finance, which may be requested by the Financial Advisory Board. The chairman of the Financial Advisory Board shall make all requests for such information only and directly to the Town Manager. 5 To render such other recommendations or &*� a5 ♦ h� advice as the Town Council may, from time to time, request. As the membership of the Financial Advisory Board is currently nonexistent it is not possible for the timetable for recommendations that are required by Section 2- 235 to be timely given. Accordingly, the Ordinance modifies the duties of the Financial Advisory Board to preclude a potential flaw in the adoption of the Town's 2002 fiscal year budget. Recommendation: Adopt the Ordinance on first reading. op� 00 2 Ord.01-18 Page 1 of 2 TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL ORDINANCE No. 18 SERIES OF 2001 AN ORDINANCE AMENDING SECTION 2-235 OF THE MUNICIPAL CODE REDEFINING THE DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE FINANCIAL ADVISORY BOARD. WHEREAS, the Financial Advisory Board is a permanent board of the Town as designated by Section 8.1 of the Home Rule Charter; and WHEREAS, the Town Council desires to amend the powers and responsibilities of the Financial Advisory Board as stated in Section 2-235 of the Municipal Code; and WHEREAS, the Town Council finds that the adoption of this Ordinance is necessary for the immediate preservation of the public health, safety and welfare. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED, by the Town Council of the Town of Snowmass Village, as follows: 1. Section 2-235 Duties and responsibilities. The provisions of Section 2-235 of the Municipal Code are hereby amended and restated, as follows: Sec. 2-235. Duties and responsibilities. The Financial Advisory Board shall have the following duties and responsibilities. (1) To make recommendations, as requested, to the Town Council prior to the adoption of the budget and capital program for the Town. (2) To render such other recommendations or advice as the Town Council may, from time to time, request. 2. Severabilitv. If any provision of this Ordinance or application hereof to any person or circumstance is held invalid, the invalidity shall not affect any other provision or application of this Ordinance which can be given effect without the invalid provision or application, and, to this end, the provisions of this Ordinance are severable. _ AI0 Ord. 01/18 Page 2 of 2 READ, APPROVED AND ADOPTED by the Town Council of the Town of Snowmass Village on First Reading on July 23, 2001 upon a motion by Council Member , the second of Council Member and upon a vote of _ in favor and _ against. Council Member Mordkin absent. READ, APPROVED AND ADOPTED by the Town Council of the Town of Snowmass Village on Second Reading on August 6, 2001 upon a motion by Council Member , the second of Council Member and upon a vote of in favor and _ against. TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE T. Michael Manchester, Mayor ATTEST: Trudi Worline, Town Clerk 023 PLEASE TURN IN YOUR STATUS REPORT UPDATES TO DONNA BY 5:00 P.M. AUGUST 1, 2001 STATUS REPORT July 23, 2001 Town Council/Town Manager VLF/Forward Plan ■ Next meeting 7126 to complete commercial core Gary Suitor discussion and begin mobility discussion. Specific Objectives ■ Scheduled for discussion with Town Council. Gary S&ftr Mall Activities ■ Booking bands at ticket pavilion. Looking at Carey shanks complementing existing events and researching new activities. Pool ■ Tabled for 2-3 weeks. Gary SufterCraig Thompson SVRA Issues ■ Lease payment made. Board Meeting on Gary Suiter/rown Council August 31". Public Works Snowmelt Road ■ Will present concept to Council late July. Hunt Welker Summer Road Project ■ Bid opening 7-19-01. Bids will be reviewed this Hunt Welker week. Housin Daly Townhomes ■ Construction proceeding. Joe Coble Housing Committee ■ Meets regularly on Tuesdays at 5:30 P.M. Finance 2001/2002 Budget ■ Preparing report for discussion with Town Mananne Rekowski Council. Public Safety Noise Regulations Discussion ■ Scheduled for Work Session July 23 . An Sm lie Town Clerk 2001 Election ■ Filed election notice with County Clerk. Twdi Wod ne PLEASE TURN IN YOUR STATUS REPORT UPDATES TO DONNA BY 5:00 P.M. AUGUST 1, 2001 Communit Develo merit De artm nt Entryway n g SI ■ Application will come before the B.O.C.C.on Cmia Thorrpson August 8' . Pitkin County GIS ■ Preparing updated street map for Welcome Craig rho son Center. Sign Code Review ■ Town Council to discuss sign policy issues at Chris CooredUim WehistromRohen Vo' t August 6 meeting. Code— Building Height ■ Anticipate Planning Commission discussion on Chris Conrad July 25 . Malor Develo ment Review Update Snowmass Center Expansion Sketch 0 Began P.C. review on June 20"',subsequent Plan meetings on July 11 and 181h. Jim Wehlstrom Snowmass Club— Phase II ■ Application determined complete 7-2-01 with Preliminary Plan some loose ends to tie up. Comments to be ry given to applicant by July 30. Tentative P.C. Chris ConreMJim Wahistrom Meeting on August 81". Minor Develo ment Review U date NEW Snowmass Chapel Sketch Plan 0 P.C. Meeting August V(tentative). Jim Wahlstrom Aspen Skiing Company—Vehicle ■ Administrative,Temporary Use Permit issued Maintenance Facility At The Divide ■ Rescheduled for P.C. review on July 251". Minor PUD Amendment Jim Wahistrom Community Enhancement Pro'ects Brush Creek—Seasons 4 ■ Cnstruction underway. Bemadefle Barthelenghl Parcel F — Parking Lot ■ Working on concepts and alternatives per Town Bemedetle BarthelanghVLarry GreerVHunt Welker Council's direction. Brush Creek Trail ■ Bernadette reviewed the 1041 Review Packet Crain Thom son"unt Walker for staff comments from Pitkin County. Project Update Coordination-Gary Suiter 923-3777 ext.206 Public Works-Hunt Welker 923-5110 ext.201 Housing-Joe Coffey 923-2360 ext. 10 Community Development—Craig Thompson 923-5524 ext.247 Town Clerk -Trudi Wodine 923-3777 ext.202 Finance-Marianne Rakowski 923-3796 ext.241 Police Chlef-Art Smythe 923-5330 ext.217 30 ' 2 Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 HOLIDAY 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 2:00 p.m. T.C. Mtg. 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 2:00 p.m. 4:00 P.M. T.C. Mtg. EOTC @ Snowmass Village Town Council Chambers 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 2:00 p.m. 8:30 A.M. T.C. Mtg. T.C. W.S. W/Jose VLF P.M 29 30 31 ^ 31 zi August Packet Calendar Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 2:00 P.M. P.M. T.C. Mtg. BOCC Hearing For Sign 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 2:00 P.M. T.C. Mtg 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 2:00 P.M. T.C. Mtg 26 27 28 29 30 31 ; i i w p 1 //.P 4 �k. �b by oil . ♦ � I: �� sir r � + ♦ 1 � 1 c a`C � �. �`•�11.1 MIIR .�IY� J �� �.j �. MWIP SHADOW COVER SM � ti - � �";�-�, =.•a ��a`►iii iii o' 1• IM I NO miff _�► �rh1R►i1t11FAIN r . .. Fez. F rIr �J .J 5 777 111 ; F N.. F F F ..... : / s / .... a ` ............ t X ry) r / / r I : I , I I I I / � a 0+00 100 2.W 3+00 PRELIMINARY SCHMUESER GORDON MEYER NOT 6 W. Err S�ET. oLo Z°° Upper SnoWmelt R FOR Ore w000$PRiMC9, DOLOMDO B 1601 1970)945-1004 FAX(0 0)945.5948 k CONSTRUCTION 5CHMUESER I GORDON MEYER ASPEM. COLOM (070)925-6727 F_ �girwb c_mT \ i 0 !�_A. mss:• \ >I '.Fj . vto ........ \\ GRAPHIC SCALE •� ' for 0Y M w O a invnv art r gd Pofe Elbert Plan & .� C5 Y a Lane of j