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05-07-07 Town Council PacketSNOWMASS VILLAGE I REGULAR MEETING AGENDA MAY 7, 2007 c ^ PLEASE NOTE THAT ALL TIMES ARE APPROXIMATE—ITEMS COULD START e EARLIER OR LATER THAN THEIR STATED TIME CALL TO ORDER AT 4:00 P.M. Item No. 1: ROLL CALL Item No. 2: PUBLIC NON-AGENDA ITEMS 5-Minute Time Limit) Item No. 3: COUNCIL UPDATES Town Council Item No. 4: CONSTRUCTION UPDATE (Time: 5 Minutes) ACTION REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: TWO-WEEK LOOK AHEAD FOR CONSTRUCTION ACTIVITY Jason Haber......................................................................Page 1 (TAB A) Item No. 5: CIP, ENTRYWAY AND RETT FUND DISCUSSION (Time: 1 Hour) ACTION REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: APPROVE ADDITIONAL MONIES FOR ENTRYWAY PROJECTS AND GYM Hunt Walker, Marianne Rakowski, Leslie Bethel and Debbie Duley Page 7 (TAB B) Item No. 6: BASE VILLAGE HOTEL DISCUSSION (Time: 1 Hour) ACTION REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: MOTION TO APPROVE OR DENY APPLICANT'S PROPOSAL. Chris Conrad....................................................................Page 14 (TAB C) Item No. 7: FIRST READING —ORDINANCE NO. 04, SERIES OF 2007— COMPREHENSIVE SIGN PLAN FOR THE BASE VILLAGE PLANNED UNIT DEVELOPEMENT (Time: 45 Minutes): FIRST READING, CONSIDERATION OF AN ORDINANCE CONCERNING THE BASE VILLAGE PHASE 1-A COMPREHENSIVE SIGN PLAN. ACTION REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: ADOPT FIRST READING OF ORDINANCE AS RECOMMENDED; WITH MODIFICATIONS; OR DENY BY RESOLUTION. Bob Nevins......................................................................Page 34 (TAB D) Item No. 8: CONTINUATION OF PUBLIC HEARING AND DISCUSSION - CLUB COMMONS II EMPLOYEE HOUSING (Time: 30 Minutes): PRELIMINARY PLAN APPLICATION FOR THE PROPOSED CLUB COMMONS II EMPLOYEE HOUSING PROJECT ACTION REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: REVIEW OF REMAINING CORE ISSUES PREVIOUSLY INDENTIFIED BY COUNCIL TOGETHER WITH DIRECTIVES FOR PREPARING CERTAIN FINDINGS AND CONDITIONS RELATED TO THOSE CORE ISSUES. Jim Wahlstrom (Continued from April 16, 2007)........................Page 43 (TAB E) 05-07-07 T.C. Page 2 of 2 Item No. 9: RODEO PLACE HOMES SOLAR PANEL UPDATE & DISCUSSION Time: 30 Minutes): ACTION REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: DISCUSSION OF SOLAR PANELS AND POSSIBLE MANDATORY APPLICATION ON RODEO PLACE HOMES. INFORMATION FROM SOLAR CONTRACTOR AND SITE PLAN WITH ROOF ORIENTATION WILL BE PRESENTED. Joe Coffey........................................................................Page 88 (TAB F) Item No. 10: SECOND READING — ORDINANCE NO. 05, SERIES OF 2007 — TRAFFIC CODE (Time: 30 Minutes) SECOND READING OF AN ORDINANCE ADOPTING THE 2003 REVISION TO THE COLORADO MODEL TRAFFIC CODE BY REFERENCE FOR THE REGULATION OF TRAFFIC IN THE TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE BY AMENDING THE PROVISIONS OF CHAPTER 8 OF THE MUNICIPAL CODE OF THE TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE. John Dresser....................................................................Page 92 (TAB G) Item No. 11: FOLLOW-UP FROM COUNCIL RETREAT (Time: 15 Minutes) ACTION REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: Review summary of retreat and provide input of recommended next steps Russ Forrest.....................................................................Page 114 (TAB H) Item No. 12: 1998 COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AND WEST VILLAGE PLAN (Time: 30 Minutes ACTION REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: Review and comment on goals, outcomes and proposed public process to create a targeted update to the town's comprehensive plan. Group Presentation: Russ Forrest, Chris Conrad, Jason Haber, Kathleen Wanatowicz & David Peckler......................................Page 119 (TAB 1) Item No. 13: MANAGER'S REPORT..........................................................Page 126 (TAB J) Rodeo Storage and Ticket Booth Sheds Investigate the road problem at the Miller's house location (Horse Ranch) and determine what can be done Town Hall Floor Plan Item No. 14: COUNCIL COMMENTS/COMMITTEE REPORTS/CALENDARS.....Page 131 (TAB K) Item No. 15: ADJOURNMENT NOTE: ALL ITEMS AND TIMES ARE TENTATIVE AND SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT FURTHER NOTICE. PLEASE CALL THE OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK AT 923-3777 ON THE DAY OF THE MEETING FOR ANY AGENDA CHANGES. PLEASE JOIN TOWN COUNCIL FOR A SOCIAL AT TASTER'S AFTER TONIGHT'S MEETING. TOWN COUNCIL COMMUNIQUE Meeting Date: May 7, 2007 Agenda Item: Construction Update Presented By: Jason Haber, Economic Resource Director Core Issues:Staff is providing ongoing Construction Updates at each Council Meeting. General Info: Please refer to the attached Staff Memorandum. Council Options: Receive Construction Update, including: 1. Construction Coordinator's Weekly Report attached) 2. Two-Week Look-Ahead Schedule for Right of Way Impacts (attached) 3. Discussion of Wood Rd. / Brush Creek Rd. Intersection 4. Discussion of Dump Truck Identification System 5. Discussion of Entryway Detour Plan Staff 1. That Council receive the construction update and Recommendation: provide feedback to staff regarding related issues. MEMORANDUM TO: Snowmass Village Town Council FROM: Jason Haber, Economic Resource Director DATE: May 7, 2007 SUBJECT: CONSTRUCTION UPDATE I. PURPOSE AND ACTIONS REQUESTED OF COUNCIL A. Receive Construction Update,including: 1. Construction Coordinator's Weekly Report (attached) 2. Two-Week Look-Ahead Schedule for Right of Way Impacts (attached) 3. Discussion of Wood Rd. /Brush Creek Rd. Intersection 4. Discussion of Dump Truck Identification System 5. Discussion of Entryway Detour Plan II. DISCUSION ITEMS A. Wood Rd./Brush Creek Rd. Intersection Some concern has been raised in recent weeks regarding sight lines and safety issues involved with construction and traffic control at this intersection. The following strategies have been implemented in order to help alleviate this concern: 1. The intersection has been.re-striped to clearly delineate traffic lanes. 2. The STOP sign and a painted stop bar have been relocated closer to Brush Creek Rd. 3. Police presence has been increased during day and evening shifts in the area. 4. Reduced speed limits have been authorized for implementation during work hours. B. Dump Truck Identification System Dump trucks are often responsible for mud and other materials being tracked or dumped on Town roadways. However, these trucks are typically subcontracted from a handful of local trucking companies, and once they leave a project site, it is difficult to identify which project a particular truck is working for. In an effort to enable these trucks to be identified by project, colored magnetic discs have been distributed and are to be clearly displayed on the driver's side of the vehicle. Citizens noticing trucks operating in an unsafe manner, or causing mudding or dumping on Town roadways should report this activity along with the color of the magnetic disc in order to accurately identify which project the truck is associated with. C. Entryway Detours 1. Brush Creek Road - Below the Roundabout In order to maintain two-way traffic during the widening and reconstruction of Brush Creek Rd. below the Entryway Roundabout, a detour paralleling Brush Creek Road on the Seven Star Parcel will be in effect beginning Monday, May 7th. Aspen Earthmoving has indicated that they will have the detour built (with the exception of the roadway surface) by Friday, May 4`h. Removal of the existing Brush Creek Rd. road surface is to begin on Monday, May 7`h so that millings can be gathered for use as a durable hard surface on the new detour lanes. At the time the milling is occurring, there will be a series of traffic switches occurring between existing Brush Creek Road and the planned detour as follows: Step 1 — Switch one lane of traffic (likely inbound) onto the unpaved detour so that the inbound lane of Brush Creek Road can be milled. These millings will be placed on the outbound detour lane. Outbound traffic will be maintained on Brush Creek Road as this work occurs. Step 2—Move traffic currently on the detour lane (likely inbound) over one lane to where the millings have been placed in Step 1 and begin placing millings to finish the surface on the second lane of the detour. Outbound traffic will still be maintained on Brush Creek Road as this work occurs. Step 3—Move both lanes of traffic onto the finished detour lanes (inbound & outbound) for the duration of the widening work. With the exception of minor delays associated with lane switches and truck crossings, two- way traffic should be maintained at all times throughout this one (1) or two (2) day transition period. The detour is expected to be in place through June 15`h. 2. Brush Creek Road—Above the Roundabout In order to replace failing concrete crosswalks, and install landscaping and lighting, Brush Creek Rd. will be closed to through traffic between the Entryway Roundabout and Horse Ranch Drive from Monday, May 21" through Friday, June 8`h. Traffic on Brush Creek Rd. will be detoured onto Highline Rd. and Owl Creek Rd., similar to the detour during the Spring of 2006. As such, access to Horse Ranch Drive will only be provided from the west (uphill) side of the closure during this work. Access to the Recreation Center will be maintained by a dedicated route that will come off the Entryway Roundabout at the rodeo grounds back entrance. A two lane temporary road will be constructed parallel to Brush Creek Rd., connecting directly to the Rodeo Parking Lot entrance. III.NEXT STEPS Staff will continue to provide a Construction Update at each Council Meeting. CONSTRUCTION COORDINATION WEEKLY REPORT #7 Ending 04/28/07 Construction Activity Enqyway Brush Creek Road/ Seven Star They continued receiving material from the Town Hall site this week. Traffic control is in place. Stops have been short,just long enough to allow haul trucks on and off the site. Tracking pads are in place and are monitored for effectiveness. There were no complaints with regards to this site this week. Employee Housing Work has started at this site. They are exposing water lines and foundation drains that were installed last year. They have started extending the foundation drain in the alley. No complaints were received regarding this site. Town Hall Ongoing construction activity within project limits. Hauling to the visitor center site Continues. Tracking pads are in place and are monitored for effectiveness. The traffic control plan is in place for hauling material from town hall to the visitor center site. I did not receive any complaints regarding the site this week. I received complaints regarding muddy roads from mud being tracked onto upper Kearns and Brush Creek from this site. Steps have been taken by the contractor to control the mud from tracking on the road. Base Village Lower Carriage Way: Haul trucks and construction vehicles are the only traffic allowed in the area. Lower Carriage Way asphalt was milled up. I expect PCL/Gould will start working in the area soon. Wood Road: I received a complaints regarding mud tracked out onto Wood Road. The contractor has taken appropriate steps to keep the mud from tracking onto the roads. This will be monitored closely. Brush Creek Bridge: Anderson drilling is on site and continues to install caissons. Traffic control is in place. Stops are used to allow trucks on and off the site and when equipment or machinery is being delivered. I did not receive any complaints regarding this site. Crestwood No site visits. The work at the Crestwood's will be on site and not affecting ROW. Woodrun Place I drove Wood road past the site every day. They were hauling material off the site. The wash was broke down Tuesday and mud was tracked onto Wood Rd. I notified the project superintendent and the road was cleaned immediately and kept clean the rest of the week. SVWS / Gould The asphalt in front of the Tamaracks was milled this week. They have started to expose water lines. I have not received any complaints regarding this work this week. Traffic Control I am in contact with the TCS daily. No issues or complaints received regarding traffic control this week. Miscellaneous: The identification magnets were handed out to the contractors this week and they should be using them next week. I Two Week Look Ahead For All Projects Weak of May 6- Ma 12 Weeek of May 13- Ma 19 Days,Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday I Base Village LEGEND Wietz/ Ames: Lower Carriage Open Road Lower Wood Rd One Lane Closure 5 Minute Delays Upper Wood Rd Periodic one lane closures. Periodic one lane closures. Ocasional Stops with Flappers Upper Wood Rd 120 min. mad claS. UMS- MMOV81 07 bridge beams 6.. Q- 110: 0,13 P.M. Detour with two lane traffic PCIL lRoad Closed Wood Rd Total road closure for 20 Min. every 112 hr d, Lower Carriage E== Ames will be finishing up 2006 work( MSE Wall and some deep utilities.) Gould will Ota Other projects; he working on 2007 contract regarding snowmelt and final surfacing. F It Water& Sanitation C Carriage Way( Gap) Water line work will be in the gap section of Lower Carriage n Wood Run Piece/ Woe L) Wood Road Brush Creek Bridge/ Shaw Const. Brush Creek Rd Water line work on Brush Creek Rd. Lane closure will be avoided whenever possible Town Hall/ RIA Nelson Brush Creek Rd is Kearns Rd/( west) Entryway/ AEM Brush Creek Rd 7 Star Dolour through ias"" Star Pro" with two lens r rope J whh two Ism t Brush Creek Road will be reconstructed while detour isin place Entryway/ Landcape Workshop v. Brush Creek Rd li T. C. Packet 05- 07- 07 Page 6 of 132 TOWN COUNCIL COMMUNIQUE Meeting Date: May 7, 2007 Agenda Item: CIP, Entryway and RETT Fund Discussion Presented By: Hunt Walker, Marianne Rakowski, Leslie Bethel and Debbie Duley General Info: Please refer to attached memorandum. Council Options: 1) Fund the additional $650,000 worth of Entryway projects plus fund the additional $1,839,035 for the gym. 2) Fund the gym, but not the Entryway projects. 3) Appropriate no additional funding for either the gym or the Entryway projects. 4) Any combination of 1-3 Staff Staff recommends Option #1. Fund an additional $1,839,035 Recommendations: for the gym and move $650,000 worth of 2008 Entryway projects to 2007. If additional Rett funding becomes available this summer, staff will seek Council direction to fund additional projects. MEMORANDUM TO: Snowmass Village Town Council FROM: Public Works Department DATE: May 7, 2007 SUBJECT: CIP, Entryway and RETT Fund Discussion Staff: Hunt Walker, Marianne Rakowski, Leslie Bethel and Debbie Duley I.PURPOSE: Staff seeks Council approval to use available RETT Funds to include the Skateboard Park, Right of Way Landscaping, Park Landscaping, Signage, and Park furniture in the 2007 Entryway scope of work. In addition Staff seeks approval to appropriate an additional $1,839,035 to build the gym, which will cost approximately $3,257,315. II. BACKGROUND At the April 2, 2007 Council Meeting Council directed Staff to begin design of the gym pending a staff update on the CIP at the May 7, 2007 Council Meeting. Staff had indicated that there are surplus RETT dollars that could fund the gym as well as other RETT eligible projects, including, but not limited to, Entryway landscaping, Entryway signage, Brush Creek stream restoration, Fairway Drive landscaping, and Snowmass Villas (Blue Roof) landscaping. Staff has reviewed the 2006 year end actuals, the General Fund and the 2007 RETT Fund and is recommending changes to the 2007 CIP Budget based on that information (see the attached revised budgets). Marianne will be available at the meeting to review the budget numbers with you. The budgets show that there is $2,800,916 funds available in reserve in the RETT Fund and 3,310,727 funds available in reserve in the General Fund. Staff recommends moving $650,000 from the 2008 CIP Entryway Budget to 2007 to fund the following items: Skatepark 250,000 Right of Way Landscaping 107,408 Park Landscaping 92,592 Park Furniture 20,000 Entry Signage 180,000 650,000 This would leave $2,150,916 in funds available in reserve in the RETT Fund and leave the General Fund reserve at $3,310,727. If RETT revenues improve during the spring and summer, Staff recommends Council consider funding these additional items in 2007: Park Landscaping 100,000 Fencing 50,000 Two Additional tennis courts 120,000 Events arena Planning+ Design $100,000 Larger Skatepark 100,000 Fairway Drive Landscaping 40,000 Snowmass Villas Landscaping $60,000 Rodeo Place Underpass 0 370,000 III. OPTIONS 1) Fund the additional $650,000 worth of Entryway projects plus fund the additional $1,839,035 for the gym. 2) Fund the gym, but not the Entryway projects. 3) Appropriate no additional funding for either the gym or the Entryway projects. 4) Any combination of 1-3 IV. STAFF RECOMMENDATION: Staff recommends Option #1. Fund an additional $1,839,035 for the gym and move $650,000 worth of 2008 Entryway projects to 2007. If additional Rett funding becomes available this summer, staff will seek Council direction to fund additional projects. TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE GENERAL FUND - BUDGET SUMMARY 2005 2006 2007 2007 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 BUDGET SUMMARY Actual Actual PROPOSED REVISED VARIANCE PROPOSED PROPOSED PROPOSED PROPOSED BEGINNING CARRYOVER 4, 474, 467. 20 $ 5029, 926. 55 $ 4, 541, 468. 55 $ 5, 512, 912. 44 $ 971, 443. 89 $ 4, 439, 374. 44 $ 4, 457, 282. 44 $ 3, 616, 659. 44 $ 3, 560 405. 44 OPERATING REVENUES 9, 981, 992. 61 $ 11, 847, 509. 32 $ 11, 708, 342. 00 $ 11708, 342. 00 $ 12, 1B1, 75200 $ 12, 405, 378. 00 $ 12, 565229. 00 $ 13, 315, 29800 OPERATING EXPENDITURES 8, 743, 901. 07) $ ( 10, 212, 651. 63) $ ( 11, 416, 302. 00) $ ( 11416, 302. 00) $ 11, 940, 249. 00) $ ( 12, 021, 720. 00) $ ( 12265, 60700) $ ( 13, 015, 041. 00) Net Operating Rev' s/ Exp 1, 238, 091. 54 $ 1, 634, 857. 69 $ 292, 040. 00 $ 292, 040. 00 $ 241, 503 00 $ 383, 658. 00 $ 299, 622 00 $ 300, 257. 00 TOWN HALL IMPACTS Town Hall Revenues 40, 970. 00 $ 103 498. 00 $ 104, 318. 00 $ 104, 472D0 Town Hall Expenditures 274, 9850) $ 283, 254. 00 $ 291, 249. 00 $ 300, 042. 00 Town Hall- COP. 06 M Expenditures 335, 823. 00) $ ( 848 338. 00) $ ( 855, 062. 00) $ ( 856. 3z8. 00) Town Hall- Transfer Out- CIP( design 6 FFE) 595, 00000) $ ( 500, 000. 00) $ ( 500. 000. 00) $ ONE- TIME REVENUES ONE- TIME EXPENDITURES 545, 676. 16) $ ( 736, 871. 80) $ ( 691, 314. 00) $ ( 691, 314. 00) $ 3B4, 700. 00) $ ( 278, 000. 00) $ ( 259, 000. 00) $ ( 259, 000. 00) Cougar Canyon 180, 000. 00 $ 180, 000. 00 $ 180, 000. 00 $ 180, 000. 00 $ 180, 000. 00 $ 180000. 00 $ 180, 000. 00 OTHER EXPENDITURES: CAP EQUIP RESERVE 136, 956. 03) $ TRANSFER OUT- CAPITAL PROJECTS FUND $ 354, 264. 00) $ ( 354, 264. 00) $ 750. 000. 00) $ CAPITAL PROJECTS 0A M 49, 173. 00) $ ( 50, 648. 00) $ ( 52 168. 00) $ ( 53 733. 00) Base Village- Per FIA- Revenues 202, 838. 00 $ 535249. 00 $ 774, 74800 $ 1, 047, 301. 00 Base Village- Per FIA- Expenditures 152692. 00) $ ( 399, 296. 00) $ ( 539, 96100) $ ( 685, 18300) NET REVENUE/ EXPENDITURES $ ( 682, 632. 19) $ ( 1, 151, 871. 80) $ ( 101131400) $ ( 1, 365, 578. 00) $ ( 354264. 00) $ ( 223, 595. 00) $ ( 1, 224, 281. 00) $ ( 355, 876. 00) $ ( 222, 42900) ENDIN6 CARRYOVER 5, 029, 926. 55 $ 5, 512, 912. 44 $ 3, 822194. 55 $ 4, 439, 374. 44 $ 617179. 89 $ 4, 457, 28244 $ 3, 616, 659. 44 $ 3, 560, 405, 44 $ 3, 638, 23144 BUDGET APPROPRIATIONS 2005 2006 2007 2007 2007 20DB 2009 2010 2011 Actual Actual PROPOSED RreiS d VARIANCE PROPOSED PROPOSED PROPOSED PROPOSED DESIGNATIONS/ RESERVES: INVENTORY 130, 000. 00 $ 136, 463. 57 $ 130, 00000 $ 130, 00000 $ 130, 000. 00 $ 130, 000. 00 $ 130, 000. 00 $ 130, 000. 00 PREPAID EXPEN5E5 120, 000. 00 $ 149, 635. 70 $ 120, 000. 00 $ 120, 000. 00 $ 120, 00000 $ 120, 00000 $ 120, 000. 00 $ 120, 000. 00 EMERGENCY CONTINGENCY 214, 663. 11 $ 286114. 04 $ 214, 663. 11 $ 214, 66311 $ 214, 663. 11 $ 214, 663. 11 $ 214, 663. 11 $ 214, 663. 11 CAPITAL EQUIP RESERVE 331, 24020 $ 326, 246. 00 $ 303, 984. 00 $ 303, 984. 00 $ 303, 984. 00 $ 303, 984. 00 $ 303, 984. 00 $ 303, 9840) TOWN HALL COP- COUGAR CANYON $ 180. 000. 00 $ 360, 000. 00 $ 360, 000. 00 $ 540, 000. 00 $ 600, 000. 00 $ 660, 00000 $ 720, 000. 00 TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS: 795, 903. 31 $ 1, 078, 459. 31 $ 1, 128, 647. 11 $ 1, 128 647. 11 $ 1, 308, 647. 11 $ 1, 368, 647. 11 $ 1, 428, 647. 11 $ 1488, 647. 11 FUNDS AVAILABLE: 4, 234, 023. 24 $ 4, 434, 453. 13 $ 2, 693, 547. 44 $ 3, 310, 727. 33 $ 617, 179. 89 $ 3, 148, 635. 33 $ 2, 246, 012. 33 $ 2, 131, 75833 $ 2149, 586. 33 TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS B FUNDS AVAILABLE $ 5, 029, 926. 55 $ 5, 512, 912. 44 $ 3, 822, 194. 55 $ 4, 439, 374. 44 $ 617, 17989 $ 4, 457282. 44 $ 3, 616, 659. 44 1 ; 3, 560, 405. 44 § 3, 63823344 T. C. Packet 05- 07- 07 Page 10 of 132 TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLA6E REAL ESTATE TRANSFER TAX BUDGET SUMMARY 2005 2006 2007 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 DESCRIPTION ACTUA Actual PROPOSED REVISED VARIANCE PROPOSED PROPOSED PROPOSED PROPOSED CARRYOVER 8, 098, 579. 67 § 10, 764, 385. 00 § 6, 079, 765. 00 $ 7, 918, 482. 16 $ 1, 838, 717. 16 $ 4000, 527. 16 $ 4, 285, 790. 16 $ 5, 113, 801. 16 § 3. 100. 131. 16 Re..., 5. 716. 858. 73 $ 5, 311, 163. 37 $ 3. 292, 000. 00 $ 3, 292, 000. 00 0. 00 $ 2, 764, 050. 00 $ 2. 795, 471. W $ 2, 879, 336. 00 $ 3, 160, 715. 00 Base Village - Sale 0. 00 0. 00 0. 00 $ 1, 687, 500. 00 $ 1, 687, 500. 00 Expenditures 1. 772, 809. 31) ($ 1, 648, 183. 21) ($ 1. 803. 359. 00) ($ 1, 803. 359. 00) 0. 00 ($ 1, 625, 854. 00) ($ 1, 669, 257. 00) ($ 1, 538. 465. 00) ($ 1, 730, 815. 00) Tronsfer out- Capital Projects Fund ($ 1, 278. 244. 09) ($ 6, 508, 883. 00) ($ 4, 805, 357. 00) ($ 7, 094. 096. 00) ($ 2, 288. 739. 00) ($ 1, 738. 617. 00) ($ 2042. 686. 00) ($ 4, 209, 879. 00) ($ 960, 327. 00) Capital Projects Oat M 0. 00 0. 00 0. 00 0. 00 0. 00 ($ 142, 015. 00) ($ 192. 17500) ($ 198, 790. 00) ($ 204. 753. 70) Base Village - Per FIA --- Revemms 0. 00 0. 00 0. 00 0, w 0. 00 $ 1, 349. 058. 00 $ 1 936, 658. 00 $ 1, 054. 128. 00 $ 1, 078, 836. 00 Base Village - Per FIA--- Expenditures 0. 00 0. 00 0. 00 0. 00 0. 00 ($ 321, 359. 00) 0. 00 0. 00 ($ 321, 358. 00) YEAR END CARRYOVER 10, 764, 385. 00 $ 7, 918, 482. 16 $ 2, 763, 049. 00 $ 4, 000, 527. 16 $ 1, 237, 478. 16 $ 4, 285, 790. 16 $ 5, 113. 801. 16 $ 3. 100, 131. 16 $ 4. 122, 42& 46 Appropriation from 2005 2006 2007 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Year End Carrvaver ACTUA Actual PROPOSED REVISE D VARIANCE PROPOSED PROPOSED PROPOSED PROPOSED Capital Equipment Reserve 625, 795. 00 $ 574. 466. 00 $ 580. 529. 00 $ 580. 529. 00 0. 00 580, 529. 00 580, 529. 00 580, 529. 00 580, 529. 00 Project/ Maintenance Reserve 1o00, 000. 00 0. 00 0. 00 0. 00 0. 00 Woo 0. 00 0. 00 0. 00 Interfund Receivable 719, 082. 50 $ 669, 082. 58 $ 619, 082. 58 $ 619, 082. 58 0. 00 569, 082. 58 519, 082. 58 469. 082. 58 419, 082. 58 Funds Available 8, 419, 507. 42 $ 6, 674, 933. 58 $ 1, 563, 437. 42 $ 2, 800, 915. 58 $ 1. 237, 478. 16 $ 3. 136, 178. 58 $ 4, 014. 189. 58 $ 2, 050, 519. 58 $ 3. 122, 816. 88 Year End Appropriation 10, 764, 385. 00 $ 7, 918. 482. 16 $ 2, 763, 049. 00 $ 4, 000, 527. 16 $ 1, 237, 478. 16 $ 4, 285, 790. 16 $ 5, 113, 801. 16 $ 3. IW, 13lA6j $ 47122, 428. 46 T. C. Packet 05- 07- 07 Page 11 of 132 2004 TO 2011 CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM- Planned Expenditures rxiamw Legend i Budget Number Only- Program TEO 2 Budget based on Conceptual Plan 3 Budget revised to reflect detailed plans 4 Budget revised to reflect actual bids 5 Placeholder for possible future project Carryover from previous year It - 2, 40, 15 SLU6, 650 gT76b7$ a) O) SO) 0) Project Total PROJECT 2004 Actual 2005 Actual 2006 Actual thru 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 TOTAL Sources for 2006 Revised ENTRYWAY CIVIL 169, 638. 74_. 3, 039, 76354 3, 201 876, 172 100, 000 z 4, 185, 574 RFrt 3.3N. m: sLC3ss, Oaa; ep COSW. Wa: ROUNDABOUT ENTRY ROAD IMPROVEMENTS 4, 185, 574 INTERCEPT PARK AND RIDE 393, 31080. 7 464, 706. 13 858, 016. 13 10, 633 2 958, 649 Ran 9sa.ola 1, 022, 630] 0 1, 022, 1130. 70 1. 487, 336. 93 11501646. 5 ENTRY WELCOME CENTER 354, 264 i4- 750, 000 2 1, 104, 264 GenFsk' r' axa4 REC POOL/ FITNESSK1YM ADDITION 29, 512. 50 1, 839, 543. 197_ 1, 869, 05589 1, 869, 056 R aoaLmorka. eask," oe. aas em' eun2sae, fs. PrT, ea". POOL 2, 658. 03258 2, 658, 03258 2, 658, 033 FITNESS CENTER 2, 397, 54359 2, 397, 543. 59 2, 397, 55 RECREATION CENTER EXPANSION 3, 257, 315 2 3, 257, 315 Rx 9an 1si4. as8: RFrrfV4x. an 5, 055, 576. 17 6, 924, 631, 86 10. 181, 947 ENTRYWAY PARK IMPROVEMENTS 107, 611. 61 455, 331. 8114 649, 355. 26 1, 212, 298. 68 1, 431, 425 4 1, 684, 5190 4, 328, 243 RFTTpSa, esry braM lm. al Gen! FM 107,612 PARKSRRAILS 66, 119. 00 66, 11900 715, 474. 26 1, 98, 417. 5 4, 328, 243 EVENTS ARENA 5, 000 1 50, 000 0 100, 000 Rcrt 1, lmaoG ENTRYWAY EMP HER 45, 304. 5[ 4 856, 92282 902, 22755 2, 097,]] 2r.] 3, 000, 000 s.- I.., eA.W. EMPLOYEE HOUSING- Draw Site 20, 000 1 5.4K). Xc 520, 000 eaMissuaE, cLU Nrkl SEVEN STAR ACQUISITION 1C, 00080L 10, 000. 00 10, 000 SLC SeW, SN On5,X0 OTHER PROJECTS BRUSH CREEK ROAD/ OWL CREEK RD 2, 000, 000 1 2, 000, 000 RErt 2oaaak, TRAIL ADDITIONS 47, 02. 43 39, 480. 921141 82, 046. 10 15, 61945 5, 000 1 S0, 000 1 50, 000 , 50, 000 1 50, 000 1 419, 619 R6 kaa12 BUS STOP IMPROVEMENTS 102, 132. 85 11], 00]. 5 4 45, 59560 265, 735. 69 50, 000 1 315, 736 k,, ne.7. HIGHLINE ROAD TRAIL 300, 000 1 300, 000 RSTT aal BRUSH CREEK ROAD LANDSCAPING 19, 134. 18La 81, 590. 19 10,] 24.37 100, 724 Ii1 1W.ax4 UPPER LOT LANDSCAPING 55, 59500 5559500 55, 595 VE ss,5aa WOOD RD. ROUNDIBRIDGE 2, 000, 000 2 2, 00. 000 2m0. 0e0Rer1Q... srs mawwu BRUSH CREEK STREAM RESTORATION 1. 200, 000 2 1, 200, 00 ante N99oaoeki Rr, T.. COMMERCIAL CORE IMP r TOWN HALL- D esign and FF& E e 651, 573. 38 651, 93. 38 53, 427 1, 095, 000 1,6vs. 0m Gm 1. nsCotruction 570, 90. 76 570, 95] 6 ], 35],] 19 7, 929, 700 lnan. are oJV; PARKS/ TRAILS BUILDING 80, 00 1 85, 00 RSnaeO. 000 MALL TRANSIT- Planning 6 Design 1 79, 028. 72 79, 028. 72 170, 971 , 250, 000 Fln" 11ss, mrveoica004C IIWOXRCFrss. Oaa Transit Slat 1 22¢ 009 1 1 684, 06 1 3, 745, 659 1 2, 497, 106 7, 154, 900 rAS311sm. 0 , EOTCa. 5 ,p , Can( l.M=: fTAs l.x0. Re-rT 791 Parking Replacement 1 457, 652 1 61 1 4, 698, 855 1 3, 132, 571 8, 975, 556 Frk. 11 szo.eos, 5oic2u]. sal: Cwn, l. xsO. 000: FrASSw s,6e5. 0.tl: RER l. xaz,sss Road Realignment 1 125, 527 1 188, 291 1 1, 25, 59 1 859, 219 2, 461, 866 E....; Conn Al li Lee. Bus Barn 2 376928 1 563, 892 1 2, 251535 1 2, 191, 422 5, 372, 777 I.. 111, 000, 008Cam,, n,. 0006TASfO a., x,P, fTI, X, 1 Transfer out Debt SerVICB- TOwrl Hal( CAP I) 340, 072. 39 340, 072. 39 340, 072 Transfer ad Debt Service- Rec CV( OAP 1) 127, 577. 78 127, 57T78 127, 578 Transfer Alou SeMCaPod 29, 07500 29. 075. 00 29, 075 Perri Issuarce 57, 162. 0 57, 162. 0 57, 162 Rec Ctr- Band lesuarce 106. 771. 90 1007] 1.90 106,]] 2 Town Hall Band Issuame 281,] 61.08 281761. 08 281, 761 Bank Fees- Town Hell 162. 18 162. 18 162 I T. C. TOTAL COSTS 372, 5548 3, 15, 346. 11 13, 523, 233,] 0 17,04, 15. 29 19.66],] 0] 2,] 43, 626 4, 40, 65 19, 034, 879 8, 720, 318 5. 65, 958 1 Packets 05- 07- 07 Page 12 of 132 2004 TO 2011 CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM- Planned Expenditure 4rmnom Project Tout FUNDING SOURCES 2000 Actual 2005 2006 Actual thru 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 TOTAL RETr 149, 22528 1, 249, 498. 09 6, 469, 854. 00 7, 868, 5,4. 37 6, 740. 116 1, fie4, 519 1. 330, 000 2, 050, 000 50, 000 19, 703, 212 RETT- TRANSIT PLAZA 39, 02900 39, 02900 353, 980 74, 098 712, 686 2, 159, 879 910, 327 4, 249, 999 GENERALFUND 107, 611. 61 595, 000. 00 702, 611. 61 854, 264 750, 000 2, 306, 876 COP- TOWN HALL 8, 515, 000. 00 8, 515000. 00 8, 515, 000 EXCISE TAX FUND 45, 304. 83 856, 92282 902, 227. 65 2, 097, 72 31000, 000 BOND ISSUE- POOL It REC CENTER EXPANSION 2, 320, 00100 3, 145, 000. 00 5, 465 W1. 00 5, 465, 001 BOND ISSUHEXCISE TAX FUND 200, 000 5, 000, 000 5, 200, 000 BASE VILLAGE 1, 000, 000. 00 1, 000, 000. 00 800, 000 11800, 000 SKI COMPANY 355, 000. 00 355, 00000 355, 000 SNOWMASS LAND COMPANY 355, 000. 00 355, 00o0U 355, 000 FTA 5311 GRANT So' coo 160, 000 95. 000 2, 000, 000 2, 285, 000 EOTO 151000 222, 009 575, 000 2, 750, 000 2, 937, 991 6, 500. 000 CONTRIBUTIONS 40. 000. 00 40, 000. 00 503, 000 740, 000 2, 075. 000 2, 822, 000 6, 180, 000 FTA 5309 GRANT 3, 000, 000 2, 000, 000 5, 000, 000 LOTTERY 120, 000 120, 000 CORE GRANT 40, 000. 00 40, 000. 00 40, 000 Interest- Rec Center 551, 623. 31 51, 623. 31 51, 623 Interest- Rtness Center 344. 9 28, 672. 16 29, 016. 73 29, 017 interest COP- TO.vn Hell 35, 69569 35, 695. 69 35, 696 Interest Band Fund Pod 195, 93661 75, 66021 42, 55394 314, 150. 76 314, 151 Remeeti00 Center( 0cn0 premium) 103, 808. 12 103808. 12 103, 808 TOTAL SOURCES 2,, 42,, 4450 2, 370, 807. 70 20, 673, 159, 04 25, 816, 74124 10, 891, 132 2, 743, 626 4, 402, 686 19, 034, 879 & 720, 318 71, 609, 382 Ending Balance 2, 400, 18802 $ 1, 626, 649. 61 B, TrBS74. 95 80) So) 0) 0) W) 8, 776, 574. 95 Ending Balance Breakdown: Pool Funds 2, 400, 189. 02 $ 1. 540, 004. 04 Fitness Center 0.00 96, 645. 57 Entryway- Civil 39, 029. 00) Recreation Center 1, 514, 458 00 Town Hall 7, 301, 14590 00o 50.00 0.00 Seven Star- AIR BBC txlo am on S= 9.11 S= X109 52.60 Total 2, 400, 18& 02 $ 1, 626, 649 fit 8, 776, 574. 90 000 20.00 5000 0,00 0.00 T. C. Packet 05- 07- 07 Page 13 of 132 TOWN COUNCIL COMMUNIQUE Meeting Date: May 7, 2007 Agenda Item: Base Village Hotel Discussion Presented By: Chris Conrad General Info: The purpose of this meeting is to determine whether the proposal by Related WestPac to enter into an agreement with The KOR Group to operate Buildings 13A and 13B in Base Village ("Base Village Hotel") as a Viceroy Hotel satisfies the requirements of Condition No. 7 (see Section 2, Background, below for specific language) of Ordinance No. 21, Series of 2004 ("Ordinance 21"). MEMORANDUM TO: Snowmass Village Town Council FROM: Planning Department MTG DATE: May 7, 2007 SUBJECT: Base Village Hotel Discussion Applicant: Related WestPac/The KOR Group Planner: Chris Conrad, Planning Director 1. PURPOSE AND ACTIONS REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: The purpose of this meeting is to determine whether the proposal by Related WestPac to enter into an agreement with The KOR Group to operate Buildings 13A and 136 in Base Village Base Village Hotel") as a Viceroy Hotel satisfies the requirements of Condition No. 7 (see Section 2, Background, below for specific language) of Ordinance No. 21, Series of 2004 Ordinance 21"). Purpose: Following review of the initial agreement and additional information provided, the Town Council should first consider whether: 1) "Viceroy Hotel" or `The KOR Group" sufficiently qualify as a "nationally-recognized hotel chain" (such as a Westin, Hyatt or Hilton); and 2) the enclosed Viceroy Snowmass Agreement (see Attachment 1) adequately evidences that the Base Village Hotel will be operated by The KOR Group as a four diamond" hotel, as such standards are determined by the American Automobile Association" under such Viceroy chain's brand name. Action Requested: The Town Council should then determine, by simple majority vote, whether: 1) the proposal addresses the two (2) criteria specified above. If so, the motion should specify that the action constitutes acceptance of the proposal as satisfying the terms of Condition No. 7 subject to administrative review and approval of the final operational agreement between Related WestPac and The KOR Group; OR 2) the proposal does not satisfy the terms of Condition No. 7 and the Applicant should submit a Minor PUD amendment application to waive or modify the condition; OR 3) the proposal should be continued to a future meeting for final determination. The condition specifies that prior to the issuance of a building permit for Phase 2A (which includes the Base Village Hotel) or any subsequent phase of the Project, Related WestPac will provide to the Town evidence that they have "entered into an agreement" with The KOR Group. 2. BACKGROUND: Ordinance 21 granted Final PUD approval for the Base Village development. Condition No. 7 the "Condition") of the Ordinance concerned the Base Village Hotel as follows: Section Three. Conditions. As conditions of the final approvals granted herein, the Applicant will comply with the following: 7. Phase 2A Condition Precedent. Prior to the issuance of a building permit for Phase 2A or any subsequent phase of the Project, the Applicant will provide to the Town evidence that: a. the Applicant has entered into an agreement with a nationally- recognized hotel chain (such as a Westin, Hyatt or Hilton) that requires Buildings 13A and 13B to be operated as a "four diamond" hotel, as such standards are determined by the American Automobile Association, under such chain's brand name; and b. all residential two and three-bedroom units with bedrooms located on or having access to a main hallway in Buildings 13A and 13B have been converted to 14 additional lockoffs. This condition may only be waived or modified in accordance with the provisions of Section 16A-5-390 of the Municipal Code for a PUD amendment approved by at least 3/4 of the members of the Town Council present and voting. It should be noted that the Base Village Hotel is contained within Phase 2A of the Base Village project and that the condition needs to be fully satisfied prior to issuance of a building permit. Related WestPac is requesting a determination from the Town Council that The KOR Group operation of a Viceroy Hotel fully satisfies the requirements of the Condition or whether a Minor PUD Amendment should be submitted to modify the condition as may be needed to enable The KOR Group to operate the hotel. Staff has had great difficulty trying to find an "industry standard" definition for "nationally- recognized hotel chain" or even the term "nationally recognized". The American Automobile Association ("AAA") website did define "Chain" as: "any lodging operation with three or more separate outlets of the same name and concept, service level, and style of operation." As the term is not clearly defined, staff researched the minutes of 2004 Town Council meetings see Attachment 2) to assist with understanding the language contained within the Condition. The minutes prove to be quite helpful in understanding what the Town Council wanted to achieve. In reviewing the minutes, Town Council started out referencing the desire for a "flagship hotel" but ultimately ended up wanting a "hotel chain" that people would recognize across the country and that would clearly convey that the quality of the accommodations, service levels and amenities would be first rate as they have experienced at other hotels under the same "brand" elsewhere in the country. The result being that the guests often stick with that brand or chain whenever they travel and that a nationally recognized hotel chain would have a large base of f guests that were loyal, would prefer it and thereby potentially increase occupancy in a manner similar to the level of fractional, travel or residence club operations. Intrawest did not want to fractionalize any of their units so it was felt something needed to be required to ensure that the facility would be a high quality high occupancy turn-over ("HOT") condominium hotel with a hotel chain that has captured a large market share in higher end hotel accommodations. 3. DISCUSION ITEMS: ALTERNATIVES AND IMPLICATIONS 1. Clearly, Related WestPac needs to provide evidence that they have entered into an agreement with an operator that fully satisfies the requirements of Condition 7. The question is not whether Viceroy Hotels & Resorts is a nationally recognized brand or whether Snowmass Village will benefit substantially from the development of a Viceroy Hotel, but rather, whether they are a "nationally-recognized hotel chain" as the term was intended to be interpreted within the Condition. Staff Comments: The Condition references 'Westin, Hyatt or Hilton" as examples of what the term was intended to pertain to regarding hotel chains considered to be nationally recognized. The Viceroy Resorts & Residences "brand" has been in operation for five (5) years with only two (2) Viceroy Hotels currently in operation. As a "hotel chain", staff believes it does not compare, at this time, with the referenced hotel chains in terms of national recognition or technically satisfies the Condition. Staff Recommendation and Rational: Staff recommends that Related WestPac submit a Minor PUD Amendment application to amend the Condition in order to enable The KORR Group to fully outline their operational proposal for the Viceroy Snowmass Hotel. The Town Council could then specifically accept the Viceroy management and operational proposal or clarify the language of the Condition to provide greater flexibility to consider innovative hotel concepts and operations that may prove to be comparable to or even more beneficial for the community than a Westin, Hyatt or Hilton. 2. Related WestPac and The KORR Group submitted a letter dated May 1, 2007 titled Viceroy Snowmass Agreement" setting forth an "initial agreement" between the parties. This agreement commits and confirms that the Viceroy Snowmass Hotel will be operated as a Four Diamond AAA hotel. It further states that a "fully executed operating agreement will be completed "subject to the Town Council's acceptance of the Viceroy Snowmass Hotel proposal." Staff Comments: Prior to building permit issuance, Related WestPac needs to provide an executed agreement that re uires the Base Village Hotel to be operated as a Four Diamond AAA hotel. While considerable information has been provided regarding The KORR Group and the Viceroy Resorts & Residences "brand", the hotel operations conducted by The KORR Group and amenities provided vary from project to project and this proposal does not provide specific information regarding the Viceroy Snowmass Hotel. Staff has no information at this time concerning what interior or exterior architectural or use modifications will be necessary for the hotel to achieve the standards of a Four Diamond operation. Related WestPac has been made aware that an Administrative Modification or Minor PUD Amendment may be necessary for the modifications to occur. Staff Recommendation and Rational: Staff recommends that any acceptance by the Town Council at this time be preliminary in nature and subject to the Town (be it administratively or by the Town Council) providing final authorization upon receipt of: 1) more specific operational information; 2) Related WestPac obtaining all necessary zoning approvals; 3) the amended building permit plans; 4) verification whether the project will be individually owned condominium units operated as a hotel or whether it is intended to be solely owned and operated as a traditional hotel; 5) the executed operational agreement; and 6) information describing how the condominium association will be structured to ensure that the terms of the agreement will be fulfilled. Staff recommended in Discussion Item 1 above that a Minor PUD Amendment be submitted to clarify or modify the Condition. The application could also include a request to amend the PUD for any interior or exterior architectural design or use modifications that will be necessary for the hotel to achieve the standards of a Four Diamond operation. Attachments:l) - Related WestPac April 27, 2007 cover letter Related WestPac May 1, 2007 Viceroy Snowmass Agreement HVS International April 30, 2007 "Proposed Viceroy Hotel' report 2) - 2004 Town Council Meeting Minutes Excerpts 3) —AAA Description of what the Diamond Ratings mean Handouts: 1) - April 26, 2007 letter from Brad Korzen, Founder and CEO of the Kor Hotel Group 2) - AAA 2007 Four Diamond Hotels list 3) - AAA Diamond Rating Guidelines TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE APR 2 7 2007 LNXI 9C5Zt T'M0 bL(C RECEWE® ATTACHMENT 1 April 27, 2007 Town Council and Town Manager PO Box 5010, 16 Kearns Rd Snowmass Village, CO 81615 Honorable Town Council and Town Manager, Related Westpac is currently entertaining an exciting opportunity to improve the brand at the Base Village 13a b property. While we sincerely respect the community's historic efforts in order to land Westin, we and many others firmly believe the KOR Viceroy Hotel will support the local vision to remain 'uniquely Snowmass', while most importantly providing for the resorts goal of attaining a higher annual occupany. Attached is the Viceroy Snowmass Term Sheet signed by both KOR and Related Westpac. This Term Sheet has been placed with your Town Attorney in order to respect the private business dealings of the developer and KOR. We believe this term sheet provides the Town Council and staff with the assurance of both Related Wespac's and KOR Viceroy's commitment to proceed toward development of the improved property. Also attached is a letter from KOR's Founder and CEO Brad Korzen. This letter will provide Town Council, staff and the larger community a sneak preview into how Viceroy will achieve the overarching goals of national recognition, Triple A rating system, a business formula that drives general occupancy and group sales, as well as a particular focus on supporting the uniqueness and special qualities of Snowmass Village. Related Westpac and KOR Viceroy humbly request the opportunity to present the unique attributes of Viceroy, and how it will be a far superior fit in Snowmass Village over a Westin at the next Town Council meeting. Prior to that meeting we hope to provide you with a third party report on KOR Viceroy, prepared by HVS International, a global hospitality consulting firm. We are currently waiting for the report to be completed. Please feel free to contact myself or my staff should you or your staff have any questions. Sincerely, Pat Smith, P sident Related Westpa tCC i Y Related WestPac LLC May 1. 2007 Brad Korzen, CEO The KOR Group 5750 Wilshire Boulevard Suite 500 Los Angeles, CA 90036 Re: Viceroy Snowmass Agreement This letter's purpose shall be that of an initial agreement between Related Westpac and KOR Viceroy in order for our joint efforts moving forward with the Town of Snowmass Village Town Council and community. This agreement seeks to clarify Related Westpac's and KOR Viceroy's commitment to build and operate a hotel on the 13 a &b building site. This agreement wishes to express the firm believe that Viceroy Is considered a nationally recognized brand', as is further evidenced by the attached report by HVS International. Further this agreement commits and confirms that the Viceroy Snowmass to be built on parcels 13 a & b will be operated as a'A diamond" hotel as such standards are determined by the American Automobile Association. A fully executed operating agreement will be completed subject to Town Council's acceptance of the Viceroy Snowmass. Sincerely, Pat Smith, President Bred. orzen Related Westpac LLC CEO, he KO roup a April 30,2.007 Mayor Douglas Mercatoris Council Members: Sally Sparhawk Arnie Mordkin Reed Lewis John Wilkinson Town Manager Russell Forrest Re: Proposed Viceroy Hotel Snowmass Village, CO Ladies and Gentlemen, HVS International, a leading Global Hospitality Consulting Finn, was retained by Kor Hotel Group to provide an independent review of the suitability of opening a Viceroy Hotel in Snowmass Village, CO, versus another commercial brand such as a Westin by Starwood, or similar. Our review consisted of evaluating the Viceroy brand and the performance of existing Viceroy hotels, Kor Hotel Group and its senior officers, and the specific market conditions in Snowmass Village. Our methodology consisted of a detailed analysis of the performance of existing Viceroy hotels versus other commercial brands in their respective markets, interviews with property management of existing Viceroy hotels, interviews with senior company officers of the Kor Hotel Group, and an overall analysis of the Kor Hotel Group. Based on the development pipeline and strong media presence, we think that Viceroy Hotels & Resorts is a nationally recognized brand. Based upon their significant growth over the past five years, we anticipate that the brand will gain even more momentum as additional properties come on line. We note that our remuneration is not contingent upon our findings, and that our analysis has been completed independently of any company objectives that the Kor Hotel Group may have in the development of the aforementioned property in Snowmass Village. We trust that you find our analysis, findings and conclusions useful in your evaluation of the aforementioned project. Please do not hesitate to contact us should you have any further questions regarding the information provided herein. Very truly yours, HOSPITALITY VALUATION SERVICES A Division of Hotel Appraisals,LLC I, Gisle Sarheim Vice President R/olan' ddel Milleret Senior Vice President T 9M I rO/1M0/L Stephen Rushmore,MAI, FRICS, CHA Managing Director GS: RdM HVS INTERNATIONAL HVS INTERNATIONAL is a fully integrated consulting firm focusing exclusively on the hospitality industry, and provides a wide range of services to owners, lenders and operators throughout the world. Founded in 1980, HVS International is the world's leading specialist hotel and hospitality consultancy. With more than 20 offices globally, HVS offers unparalleled international hotel and hospitality market expertise. Worldwide, the firm has acted on over 15,000 assignments in over 60 countries, providing up-to-date knowledge of all of the world's key markets. HVS International literally wrote the book on how to appraise a hotel, available through the American Appraisal Institute.Numerous articles and surveys written by our consultants are published each year, both on a regional and a global basis, including the Hotel Valuation Index, Transactions Article, Canadian Lodging Outlook, Salary Review and more, in addition to our weekly Global Hospitality Report and regional Lodging Industry News. OBJECTIVE & The objective of our assignment is to provide an independent review of the METHODOLOGY suitability of opening a Viceroy Hotel in Snowmass Village, CO, versus another commercial brand such as a Westin by Starwood, or similar. Our review consisted of evaluating the Viceroy brand and the performance of existing Viceroy hotels, Kor Hotel Group and its senior officers, and the specific market conditions in Snowmass Village. Our methodology consisted of a detailed analysis of the performance of existing Viceroy hotels versus other commercial brands in their respective markets, interviews with property management of existing Viceroy hotels, interviews with senior company officers of the Kor Hotel Group, and an overall analysis of the Kor Hotel Group. Interviews were conducted with Nick Clayton, President of Kor Hotel Group, and Tom Santora, Senior Vice President Sales & Marketing, in New York on April 18, 2007. Telephone interviews were also conducted with general mangers of existing Viceroy hotels to better understand market positioning and performance, sources of business,market segmentation,and so forth. OVERVIEW OF THE The Kor Group is a privately held real estate investment, development and KOR HOTEL GROUP management firm that has redefined the concept of "being home' with its distinctive hotel, condominium and apartment properties since 1989. Kor's current portfolio includes 22 uniquely designed hotel assets in operation or under development, and 12 residential properties located in Southern California. The Kor Hotel Group, which is part of the Kor Group, focuses on creating urban retreats and uncommon resorts, and consists of a portfolio of 22 properties (including projects under development). In recent time, Kor Hotel Group has been recognized as one of the most innovative hotel operators in today's lodging market. Kor Hotel Group has been highly popular amongst contemporary travelers who are seeking something more than just a traditional hotel room, which has resulted in strong performance a in the leisure segment, in particular. Similarly, the Kor hotel products have received strong media attention. While still managing uniquely branded and independent hotels, the emerging Viceroy Resorts & Residences and Tides brands represent the group's top-tier products. The new destinations under construction in the Caribbean, Mexico and South Florida bring together Kot's dual expertise in hospitality and real estate development. The group's focus on being present in major upscale resort destinations such as Santa Monica, Palm Springs and South Beach, as well as urban areas such as Beverly Hills, Los Angeles, and San Francisco, coupled with unique designs and service offerings, has resulted in widespread popularity for the group's hotels. The Tides and Viceroy brands are now the group's main focus with several new hotels planned for the near future. OVERVIEW OF THE Kor Hotel Group's first Viceroy hotels opened in Santa Monica and Palms VICEROY BRAND Springs in 2002 and 2003. Due to the immediate success of these properties, the Kor Hotel Group pursued a strategy to significantly grow its portfolio of Viceroy hotels. Thus, the company's supply pipeline consist of an additional six properties scheduled to open between 2008 and 2010. According to company executives, additional locations are presently under review. The list of new properties and their respective opening years is presented below. Viceroy Anguilla(2008) Viceroy IconBrickeU(2008) Viceroy Riviera Maya(2008) Viceroy South Beach(2009) Viceroy Zihuatanejo(2009) Viceroy Punta del Este(2010) Due to the strong Viceroy development pipeline, by the time the proposed Snowmass Village property is likely to open, the Viceroy brand will have quadrupled in size, with new hotels in major resort destinations in Florida, Mexico,and Anguilla. If looking at Kor hotels, the company's portfolio will be larger than other reputed hotel collections such as Morgan Hotels (formerly Ian Schrager Hotels) which is well established with eight hotels,or Rosewood Hotels & Resorts (20 hotels including hotels under development). In this respect, we believe that Kor Hotels and the Viceroy brand will benefit from widespread market visibility at the time of the proposed opening of a property in Snowmass Village. The Kor 1-lotel Group and Viceroy brand builds on the following brand pillars aimed to set the hotels apart from other lodging facilities. Unique design and signature look and feel that is never interchangeable with other brands Impeccable, intuitive service, without being intrusive when privacy is important Inventive food and beverage experiences featuring acclaimed chefs, signature cocktails,top-quality ingredients,and inspiring settings Personal necessities and indulgences including high-thread-count bed linens, therapeutic spa treatments, and experienced concierges Latest technological amenities including wireless broadband, plasma televisions,gaming devices, and digital audio docking stations Destination locations and environments in the world's most beautiful and intriguing places Specially tailored meetings and events including custom business conferences and executive summits, social and press receptions and intimate personal celebrations Based on HVS experience with various lodging brands, the Kor Hotel Group has managed to create lodging products that are distinct, and that become destinations on their own. As such, hotels such as the Viceroy hotels are able to attract demand that otherwise may choose other destinations, due to the uniqueness and appeal of the product. This differ substantially from more widespread brands such as Marriott, Hilton,Westin,and so forth, which only become preferred lodging options at best, in the locations that they are present, due to travelers' familiarity with their products. We also note that other commercial brands such as Westin typically do limited property- dedicated marketing, but rather chain-wide marketing. As such, the specific destination rarely benefit from such marketing efforts. Brands such as Viceroy employ more of a PR directed marketing strategy, which results in property and destination specific exposure in leading publications. In this respect, the destination is more likely to indirectly benefit from the public relation efforts and marketing efforts that a Viceroy Hotel take on, versus a more commercial brand such as a Westin. HVS also notes that the Viceroy brand has been particularly successful in attracting upscale leisure demand, due to the brand's focus on the aforementioned brand pillars. This is particularly important in a resort location, where customers are looking for a complete experience, rather than a hotel room. Other brands such as Westin, Marriott, and Hilton are first and foremost commercial hotels catering to business travelers Lind corporate groups. As such, we believe that a Viceroy Hotel will be equally able, if not more able, to attract strong leisure demand to the proposed property in Snowmass Village. VICEROY BRAND To better understand the performance of the two existing Viceroy hotels we MARKET have examined market data gathered by Smith Travel Research. Smith Travel PERFORMANCE Research (STR) is an independent research firm that compiles data on the lodging industry; its published data is routinely used by hotel properties, hotel companies, hotel buyers and investors, consulting and professional services firms, as well as public entities such as convention and visitors bureaus, State and local tourism departments,and so forth.STR has compiled historical supply and demand data for the two existing Viceroy hotels, and their competitors. We have particularly examined occupancy information, as this is most relevant to our study. The competitive index (Occupancy, ADR, Rev FAR) is calculated by dividing the property performance by the competitive set's performance, multiplied by 100. Thus, if the subject property is achieving a competitive index in excess of 100, the property is performing above the market, and receiving more than its fair share in terms of occupancy,average rate,or RevPAR. RevPAR is calculated by multiplying occupancy by average rate, and provides an indication of how well rooms revenue is being maximized. For example, hotels may lower their average rate in order to attract more demand to their properties, however, a RevPAR index in excess of 100 shows that a hotel's overall performance is above the overall market. Viceroy Santa Monica-Historical Market Pertormance (STR) February 2007 Occupancy(%) ADR RevPAR 3ubletlP:rperry Cc,rq a mJa SubjectPrMany C,^y;a ink. Cub,eR Propeq Ccnq Set uvW Current Monti(92.4 83.4 110.8 310.79 254.02 122.4 287.02 21178 135.5 Year To Date 863 78.6 109.8 301.05 247.21 121.8 259.82 194.36 1333 Running 3 Month 78.4 70.6 111.0 293.93 241.98 121.5 230,47 170.90 134.9 Running 12 Month 84.6 76.6 110.4 290.53 243.21 119.5 245.76 18635 1311 Scone:&TOTram Research Hotels in Sample CRY,State Rooms Viceroy Hotel Santa Monica,CA 162 Sheraton Hotel Deltina Santa Monica Santa Monica,CA 307 Lom Santa Monica Beach Hotel Santa Monica,CA 342 Marriott Marina Del Rey Marina Del Rey,CA 370 Ritz-Carlton Marina Del Rey Marina Del Rey,CA 304 Marriott JW Le Merigot Hotel&Spa Santa Monica,CA 175 As noted in the previous table, the Viceroy Santa Monica has historically achieved substantially stronger occupancy levels than its competitive set.This is particularly evident when examining the running 12-month through February occupancy index of 110.4. As such, the Viceroy Santa Monica achieved an occupancy rate of 84.6% in this period,versus the market,which achieved an occupancy rate of 76.6%, ten percentage points below the Viceroy Santa Monica. This trend is similar in the results for February 2007, the year-to-date period through February 2007, and the running three- months, which recorded equally strong results. We also note that the property's RevPAR index, which factors in average rate and serves as the best performance indicator, exceeded 131 in the running 12-months data. The other hotels in the competitive set represent a cross-section of the largest lodging brands in the nation, including Sheraton, Marriott,JW Marriott, and Renaissance by Marriott, as well as the well-known brands Loews and Ritz- Carlton. 4 Viceroy Palm Springs-Historical Market Performance (STR) February 2007 Occupancy(`Ye) ADR RevPAR Sjb*l kpeM1y Curry Set lm Sublea fteM Comp Set 1i Sugea fteM Comp Set Ime. Current Month 75.3 77.7 96.9 277.74 233.70 118.8 209.04 181.59 115.1 Year To Date 72.1 69.4 103.9 26301 220.91 119.1 18960 153.24 123.7 Running 3 Month 65.3 64.5 101A 264.38 206.20 128.2 172.73 132.92 129.9 Running 12 Month 64.6 67.3 95.9 227.77 180.37 126.3 147.08 121.45 121.1 Sa :Sr.*Tr laeuamb Hotels in Sample CRY,State Rooms Viceroy Palm Springs Hotel Palm Springs,CA 67 Hilton Palm Springs Resort Palm Springs, CA 263 Renaissance Esmeralda Resort&Spa Indian Wells, CA 560 Westin Mission Hills Resort Rancho Mirage,CA 512 Le Meridien Park Palm Springs Palm Springs, CA 144 As noted in the previous table, the Viceroy Palm Springs has historically achieved occupancy levels mostly in line with its competitive set. While in the running 12-month through February, the Viceroy Palm Springs achieved an occupancy index of 95.9, in the year-to-date period through February and running three-months the property achieved occupancy indexes in excess of its fair share at 103.39 and 101.4,.respectively. We also note that the property's RevPAR index exceeded 121 in the running 12-months data. The other hotels in the competitive set again represent a cross-section of the largest lodging brands in the nation, such as Hilton, Renaissance by Marriott, Westin and Le Meridien. Similar to Snowmass Village, the Palm Springs market is highly seasonal; with distinct high and low seasons. During the winter months the area experience a shortage of supply to accommodate potential demand, while the summer months are weak due to extreme heat. During the low season the differences between weak and strong properties is most apparent, which results in overall lower annual occupancies. We note, however, that there are no tangible occupancy differences between the Viceroy Palm Springs and the subject market, which consists of leading, nationwide lodging brands. This can be attributed to the Viceroy's ability to capture substantial meeting demand during low- and shoulder-season months, particularly in terms of incentive groups and high;yield small to mid-size groups, which favor the property's upscale design, amenities, services, and y excellent food and beverage facilities. Thus, the Viceroy Palm Springs' meeting and group segment has ramped up from 8% of overall demand in its first year of operation, to 24'm of total demand in 2006. We expect that a Viceroy Hotel in Snowmass Village will be equally or more able to attract meeting and group demand to the property, as Colorado offers a more pleasant climate, and has been successful in attracting increasing demand during the summer season. REVIEW OF As part of our review of the Kor Group we have also examined the CORPORATE experience and past employment of the senior officers of the company. On MANAGEMENT average these individuals have more than 19 years experience in hospitality and development. In addition, the past employment of the corporate management represents a cross-section of virtually every major upscale and luxury hotel company in the United States, including Mandarin Oriental, Four Seasons, Ritz-Carlton, Rosewood, Orient Express, Fairmont, Marriott, Hilton, and so forth. As such we believe that the company more than possesses the necessary skill-set to continue to build on the success of the Kor Hotel Group and its brands. Overview of Past Employment and Tears in Hospitality/Development-Senior Officers,Kor Group IYYAG TITLE PAST EMPLOYMENT YEARS IN DEVEPMENT/WSPITALITY LO NO NOR GROUP Oran HALM CEG'Princ,pal ror Re.,AY t] Raft Iaffl . RaailanUPV1>,a, hri.!Wlinga:rru.l VY a'NanK 1] LR SmitS Cnal Oprr.mnS Orccrr]FVtnK ILn•A.DrnxnnrwniE:m.rna re PA PYIIM Cn.el Finmael:Ll[K wrr„n.Sack g istgSNaraK.xull:onn»I Rntl.hax:ayl.:enCLYYi /nlaal 19 BraMa Tach. SVP.Llumnn Faav rasa P:w Sen..,na rJ NOR REAL ESTATE SALES a MARKETING GROUP fnS A." P-,O.nt a,Partner Feyy,r,mn.Imnrv.aq IT NOR HOTEL GROUP i MeN GIayWn Pr^Ytlenl.N.r Maul Gr•a.p rnanurm•:r,entn.Ara 4ewnx,?rQiurNm I Ian ManbfcA EVP.AVfu,SAlfaN SCmelq„o—nl M.w4n0 Orunfel ar:xeWU:n h Wia Frmaron - S']a.Eeal Coen ryK.nrrm F o-a:.n.Lrwr E.pr.,a 5 AliLa PTLKI GOP.Hr.trl OexrP pnenl o-m,':curt.>rtY,+tr.., r:a N•:nn RarWJ AiMi SOP. i. nfnL6OC+VnC,:m nay.tlnww,el bru.)ma is Tum Samara GOP,!Lnea L'Aen•nnp bLUUUt Ime ceLrwuY L9 miwh MMY YP.F.,rayrnrn fpernr,nna flupe vNt 511erebn ir.eru j PxW WAS YF.Lh!al Ablu,.awnY rnycr.6nr51,SA T,va td tI Loon wnnM roP,F.rjen Cweu.plror:t _-- TM`am ,p,'ay.,q,,, r-qe, L.nr.1:Ly R'],nlLrr s Lan/LA man OF.Fnam.A GOxr.,,`:cn.6ntux.,y Sauna kYI Seott lrnM A,Cecpn_,y.py— ro Conclusions Based on the aforementioned factors, HVS is of the belief that Snowmass Village will benefit substantially from the development of a Viceroy Hotel. The existing Viceroy hotels have shown strong occupancy performance in their respective markets, in line with,or exceeding competitive sets consisting primarily of large, nationwide, commercially oriented chains such as Westin, Marriot, Hilton, and so forth. In addition, the existing Viceroy hotels have also achieved strong RevPAR performance, in excess of their fair share, indicative of the strong acceptance of the Viceroy brand. The strong performance is also evident in a seasonal market comparable to Snowmass Village (Palm Springs); where the Viceroy hotel has been able to capture significant meeting and group demand to supplement transient leisure demand, resulting in strong occupancy performance.As such,we believe that a Viceroy Hotel in Snowmass Village would be able to capture strong meeting and group demand (particularly incentive groups and smaller groups) to overcome the demand challenges of the low season. The Kor Hotel Group's public-relation-oriented marketing strategy will also benefit both the hotel and the destination, and result in broader awareness of Snowmass as a destination. This is exemplified by the broad media coverage of the existing Viceroy hotels, and their respective destinations (Santa Monica and Palm Springs). We also note that the Kor Group, and specifically the Viceroy brand, is in a significant growth stage, which should result in further widespread brand awareness by the time the proposed hotel would open, outpacing several major hotel collections.As such, based on the development pipeline and strong media.presence, we think that Viceroy Hotels & Resorts is a nationally recognized brand. Based upon their significant growth over the past five years, we anticipate that the brand will gain even more momentum as additional properties come on line. We further note that the existing properties are of Four-Diamond caliber, based on the following definition by AAA. "These establishments are upscale in all areas. Accommodations are progressively more refined and stylish. The physical attributes reflect an obvious enhanced level of quality throughout. The fundamental hallmarks at this level include an extensive array of amenities combined with a high degree of hospitality, service, and attention to detail." We also note that the Kor Group benefits from an exceptionally strong executive team, with widespread experience from most of the major hotel companies in the United States,and throughout the world. ATTACHMENT 2 Excerpted Town Council Meeting Minutes Relating to Buildings 13A & 13B SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL SPECIAL MEETING MINUTES AUGUST 16, 2004 Base Village Preliminary PUD Discussion Excerpt] Mordkin provided a history of the Base Village review and representations of the development as provided by the applicant throughout Sketch Plan and Preliminary Reviews. He stated a concerns that development of the proposed flagship hotel has been misrepresented to the community and felt the hotel to be more of a condominium design rather than a hotel, and that there is no reliable evidence that the development would include a flagship hotel. Mordkin stated that it would be necessary to have a firm commitment from the Westin or other flagship hotel before he could consider an affirmative vote on this Preliminary approval Resolution. Jim Crown, representing Brush Creek Development Company, LLC explained that the hotel trend in most resort areas is to provide a "condo hotel", operated as a hotel, where the design is guest-driven and more appealing to guests. He further explained that the majority of the units, other than the Townhomes, would be owned by individual investors and available for rental year- round with the exception of the 22 days reserved for the owners. Crown stated that although some flagship hotels are run under the flagship brand, hotels can be operated as a franchise by other owners, individuals or Corporations, and are not always operated by the flagship name group. He stated that Brush Creek Development Company, LLC is in alignment with the Westin, although negotiations are still underway. With the Weston's knowledge that the development has been reduced substantially, strapping the applicant financially, and that by Town Ordinance the applicant is required to purchase the Westin product, places the applicant at an unfair and unnecessary disadvantage in negotiations, which does not benefit Snowmass or the applicant. To commit to construct a Westin at this time without being allowed the time to complete business negotiations he felt to be unfair to the applicant and requested some breathing room to allow for arms-length negotiations. Crown stated that the applicant is committed to provide a flagship hotel, and although he suspects the flagship name would be a Westin, it may end up to be another flagship brand. Mordkin stated that the Town Council owes it to the community to complete this application process before the November election. He explained that if the process were not completed by the current Council Members, it would create a hardship on new Council Members who would not have the knowledge to make an informed vote. Crown stated that Council and the applicant agree on all issues except that Council would like a commitment from a flagship hotel before a final vote on Preliminary. He stated that the applicant would have a commitment from a flagship hotel by January of 2005, and explained that in order to provide that commitment now, would limit the applicant's ability to complete negotiations and create a loss of benefits to both the applicant and the Town. Manchester stated that the condo-hotel trend was prevalent in Council's tours of other resorts, that a flagship hotel was very necessary and draws a broader visitor base to a resort, that the density proposed is necessary, felt the success of the Town and Base Village plays a large role in creating vitality and vibrancy in the Village and that the applicant is providing the desires of Council and the community in this development. In order to secure a flagship hotel, the applicant needs to have a Land Use approval and Council is asking for a commitment from a flagship hotel before providing a land use approval. He stressed the need to write a Performance Spec outlining Council's expectations that would be comfortable for both the applicant and Council and remain in place until completion of Final approval in order for Council to provide Preliminary approval. He also suggested that the Building Permit for Building No. 13 be conditioned until the applicant demonstrates their ability to meet the requirements of the Performance Spec. The applicant's representative Jim Crown explained that to obtain financing, the units must include a kitchenette, what the applicant has presented is exactly what they plan to build, that because of its seasonality, and declining level of business, and lack of year- round business, equity and financing would not be available for a traditional hotel in Snowmass Village. Virtue, Boineau and Mercatoris agreed to the creation of a Performance Spec, felt the proposal to be adequate, felt Council has presented their best effort for the community, and indicated their desire for a high-occupancy, high turn-over hotel. There being no further discussion, Mayor Manchester continued the Public Hearing to the August 23, 2004 Council Meeting scheduled to begin at 2:00 p.m. SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL SPECIAL MEETING MINUTES AUGUST 23, 2004 Base Village Preliminary PUD Discussion Excerpt] Council requested that language pertaining to the hotel state that the hotel would be a nationally know hotel chain and would operate Building Nos. 13A and 13B as four- diamond hotels. ATTACHMENT 3 What the AAA Diamond Ratings Mean One Diamond:These establishments typically appeal to the budget-minded traveler. They provide essential, no-frills accommodations. They meet the basic requirements pertaining to comfort, cleanliness, and hospitality. Two Diamond: These establishments appeal to the traveler seeking more than the basic accommodations.There are modest enhancements to the overall physical attributes, design elements, and amenities of the facility typically at a moderate price. Three Diamond: These establishments appeal to the traveler with comprehensive needs. Properties are multifaceted with a distinguished style, including marked upgrades in the quality of physical attributes, amenities, and level of comfort provided. Four Diamond: These establishments are upscale in all areas. Accommodations are progressively more refined and stylish. The physical attributes reflect an obvious enhanced level of quality throughout. The fundamental hallmarks at this level include an extensive array of amenities combined with a high degree of hospitality, service, and attention to detail. Five Diamond: These establishments reflect the characteristics of the ultimate in luxury and sophistication. Accommodations are first class. The physical attributes are extraordinary in every manner. The fundamental hallmarks at this level are to meticulously serve and exceed all guest expectations while maintaining an impeccable standard of excellence. Many personalized services and amenities enhance an unmatched level of comfort. TOWN COUNCIL COMMUNIQUE Meeting Date: May 7, 2007 Agenda Item: FIRST READING —ORDINANCE NO. 04, SERIES OF 2007 — COMPREHENSIVE SIGN PLAN FOR THE BASE VILLAGE PLANNED UNIT DEVELOPMENT FIRST READING, CONSIDERATION OF AN ORDINANCE CONCERNING THE BASE VILLAGE PHASE 1-A COMPREHENSIVE SIGN PLAN. Presented By: Bob Nevins, Planner Core Issues: A Comprehensive Sign Plan provides an Applicant"flexibility"from the strict application of the sign standards while still meeting the purposes of the Municipal Code: Are the signs compatible with their surroundings? Are they appropriate to the type of activity to which they pertain? Are the signs expressive of the identity of both individual proprietors and the community as a whole? Are the legible in the circumstances in which they are seen? Does the CSP enhance the economy and the businesses within the Town by promoting the reasonable, orderly and effective display of signs and encourage better communication with the public? Does the CSP preserve the open and uncluttered feeling characteristic of the Town? Is the Town receptive to deviating from the current standards for regulatory and informational signage along the public roadways adjacent to Base Village? General Info: Base Village Owner, LLC, Applicant, submitted a Land Use Application that seeks approval of the Comprehensive Sign Plan CSP)for Phase 1-A of Base Village. The CSP includes a Signage Criteria Manual for all commercial/retail establishments along with Design, Specifications, Quantities and Locations of all exempt regulatory, informational and way finding signage. Planning Commission reviewed the proposal at two (2) public meetings and formulated their recommendations to Town Council via Planning Commission Resolution No. 03, Series of 2007. Attachments: 1. Planning Commission Resolution No. 07-3. 2. Public Works Comments Exhibit A-Signage Criteria Manual-First Amendment 2-15-07 Exhibit B-Design, Specifications, Quantities and Locations-First Amendment 3-24-07 Council Actions: Determine whether the Municipal Code procedures, requirements and review standards summarized as Core Issues" above have been satisfied; and Grant first reading approval, table or deny TC Ord. 07-04. Recommendation: Staff finds the Applicant has complied with the Municipal Code procedures, requirements and standards; and recommends: Approval of First Reading of Ordinance 07-04. MEMORANDUM TO: Town Council FROM: Bob Nevins,Planner SUBJECT: Base Village Phase 1-A Comprehensive Sign Plan (CSP) DATE: 7 May 2007 ITEM: Attached is the Amended Base Village Phase 1-A Comprehensive Sign Plan (CSP). It contains two (2) elements: 1) the Signage Criteria Manual- lst Amendment 2-15-07, establishes the requirements and review process for Permitted Signs; and 2) the Design, Specifications, Quantities and Locations-1st Amendment 3-24-07, sets the standards for Exempt Signs. Applicant amended the initial Base Village CSP in response to Planning Commission and Staff comments and to further refine their proposal. PURPOSE: Town Council shall review the application and shall adopt an ordinance on first reading approving the Comprehensive Sign Plan as recommended or with modifications, or shall adopt a resolution denying the application citing specific reasons by considering the following: 1) Whether the sign plan contains appropriate limitations within its plan to ensure that the plan will minimize its impact on surrounding land uses; and 2) Is it compatible with the purposes of the Sign Standards Division of the Municipal Code. ISSUES: During their review of the application, Planning Commission members expressed the following: Positives Overall quality of the graphic design elements and materials Improvement over existing Town monument and street signage Encourages creative and vibrant commercial storefronts Concerns Number, size and area of allowable signage per establishment Integration and maintenance costs of new street signs Character of certain materials and lighting Additional Information Allowable signage mock-up on actual building facades Membership/procedures of Architecture Control Committee Town administrative review and variance process Planning Commission's recommendations to Town Council are detailed in PC Resolution No. 3, Series of 2007 (see Attachment 1). Public Works has concerns with the regulatory and informational signage that is being proposed along the public streets (see Attachment 2). ATTACHMENT 1 SNOWMASS VILLAGE PLANNING COMMISSION RESOLUTION NO.03 SERIES OF 2007 A RESOLUTION RECOMMENDING APPROVAL WITH CONDITIONS BY TOWN COUNCIL OF AN ORDINANCE ADOPTING THE BASE VILLAGE PHASE 1-A COMPREHENSIVE SIGN PLAN. WHEREAS, Base Village Owner, LLC (formerly Intrawest Brush Creek Development, LLC),Applicant,is requesting approval to adopt the Comprehensive Sign Plan for Phase 1-A of the Snowmass Base Village permitting certain signage to be designed and located within the public rights-of-way and throughout Base Village; and WHEREAS, Section 16A-4-560 of the Town of Snowmass Village Municipal Code Municipal Code") contains provisions for flexibility from the Sign Standards in Article IV, Division 5; and WHEREAS,a public meeting was held by the Planning Commission on February 7,2007 to receive public comment; and WHEREAS,the Planning Commission reviewed the amended application,receivedpublic comment and heard the recommendations ofthe Town Staff at a public meeting on April 4,2007. NOW,THEREFORE,BE IT RESOLVED,by the Planning Commission ofthe Town of Snowmass Village, as follows: Section One: Findings. The Planning Commission finds that: 1. The Plan has been submitted in accordance with requirements of Section 16A-4- 560, Comprehensive sign plan ofthe Municipal Code. 2. The proposed signage plan will allow flexibility while still meeting the provisions of Article IV,Division 5, Sign Standards of the Municipal Code. 3. The proposed signage will not adversely affect the surrounding land uses. 4. The proposed signage will not conflict with the purpose and intent of the existing Town signage plan. S. The Signage Control Manual provides design standards that encourage creativity, allow flexibility and ensure quality of materials without"over-regulation." 6. The proposed signage program (building/entrance, vehicle direction/regulatory, wayfinding,maps/directories and electronic mountain displays)is very high quality in terms of design,materials, details and colors. Section Two: Action. In accordance with the findings stated in Section One ofthis Resolution,the Planning Commission recommends that Town Council approve the Base Village Phase 1-A Comprehensive Sign Plan subject to the recommendations outlined in Section Three of this Resolution. Section Three: Recommendations. Planning Commission makes the following recommendations to Town Council for consideration in their review and action regarding the signage program proposed for Phase 1-A of the Base Village project: Signage Criteria Manual-Permitted Commercial Signs 1. Adopt the Signage Criteria Manual, First Amendment 2.15.07 with the following modifications: a. Maps or directories may be internally backlit for purposes of visibility and legibility. b. Umbrella signage shall be exempt ifit does not identify the actual business or tenant and are located within designated areas;corporate names or logos may be allowed ifthey are consistent with the theme and character of the particular establishment. c. Operational signs such as"UPS,""FedEx,"etc. are exempt along with credit card and membership medallions if they total four(4)square feet or less. d. Architectural Control Committee needs to be further defined in terms of its procedures and composition; the Committee should include a representative from the Town Marketing and Special Events Department;and the committee should be referred to as the Sign Architecture Control Committee. Design, Specifications, Quantities& Locations-Exempt Signs 2. Approve the Exempt Signage program as shown in the 1st Amendment-Revised 3-24-07, with the following minor adjustments or clarifications: a. Building and Entrance Identification-may consider using a different type-face and size of lettering to increase visibility and legibility. b. Vehicular Direction or Regulatory-should be consistent throughout the Town of Snowmass Village;Town may consider revising or updating its sign standards in terms ofdesign,materials and colors;and more thought should be given to clearly identifying the various parts ofTown, especially the three(3)commercial nodes. c. Pedestrian Wayfinding-should be consistent in terms oflegibility,quality and materials, but the actual design may vary by neighborhood or project within the Town; informational kiosks should be included as part ofthe overall Base Village signage plan. d. Village Map/Directory and Electronic Mountain Display-may be internally backlit to increase visibility and legibility; other commercial signage may not be backlit. INTRODUCED,READ AND APPROVED by the Planning Commission of the Town of Snowmass Village on April 4, 2007 upon a motion by Planning Commission Member Jim Gustafson, the second ofPlanning Commission Member Markey Butler, and a vote of 6 in favor and 0 against. Member Bill Boineau was absent. . SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO PLANNING COMMISSION Doug Faurer, hqrman ATTEST: Cindy F r Secretary Attachments: Exhibit A-Signage Criteria Manual, First Amendment 2.15.07 Exhibit B-Design, Specifications, Quantities and Locations, 1st Amendment-Revised 3-24-07 ATTACHMENT 2 MEMORANDUM TO: Snowmass Village Planning Commission THRU: Bob Nevins, Planner FROM: John Baker, Road Supervisor RE: Base Village Comprehensive Sign Plan-Phase I DATE: 24 January 2007 Subject: Road Division Comment of Base Village Comp Sign Plan We have reviewed the Base Village Phase 1A Comp Sign Plan as it relates or pertains to Town roadways and rights-of- way: 1. The proposed regulatory traffic signage for the roadways is incomplete; a traffic engineer needs to a design sign plan for roadway safety. The proposed signs need to meet the MUTCD standards along with the Town's adopted signage program, which are not reflected in these plans. If we adopt this change in the design of roadway signage, there will be a budgetary impact to our current sign maintenance program and it might confuse the community and guests with a different look from our current program. 2. The proposed plan has no real informational signage along the roadways for information concerning other properties, guest services, parking, Village Mall, Wood Road, Carriage Way, etc. All the signs need to be retro reflective so they can be viewed at nighttime as required by MUTCD. 3. All signs that are not Town regulatory or informational, including any of the proposed signage for their properties, along the roadways must be located ten (10) feet back from the edge of pavement (for sight distance). There will also need to be License Agreements with the Town if the signs are on Town property or within the right-of-way. 4. Need to know what signs are proposed as Town signs and which signs are Base Village's responsibilities? 1 SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL 2 ORDINANCE NO. 4 3 SERIES OF 2007 4 5 AN ORDINANCE CONCERNING THE BASE VILLAGE PHASE 1-A 6 COMPREHENSIVE SIGN PLAN. 7 8 WHEREAS, the Snowmass Village Town Council adopted Ordinance No. 25, 9 Series of 1984, amending the Town of Snowmass Village Municipal Code ("Municipal 10 Code") and establishing regulations for signage within the community; and 11 12 WHEREAS, Section 16A-4-560 of the Municipal Code establishes a provision 13 for a Comprehensive Sign Plan (CSP), the intent of which is to provide flexibility from 14 the adopted sigh standards when said Plan receives approval by the Town; and 15 16 WHEREAS, Base Village Owner, LLC submitted an application for a CSP for 17 Phase 1-A of Base Village in accordance with the provisions established in the Municipal 18 Code; and 19 20 WHEREAS, the Snowmass Village Planning Commission reviewed the 21 application at public meetings on February 7 and April 4, 2007 and forwarded their 22 recommendations to Town Council via PC Resolution 07-03; and 23 24 WHEREAS, public notice was given by publication, mailing and posting 25 pursuant to Municipal Code Section 16A-5-60(b), Manner and Timing of Notice; and 26 27 WHEREAS, a public meeting was held on May 7, 2007 and a public hearing was 28 scheduled for May 21, 2007 before Town Council to receive public comment; and 29 30 WHEREAS,the Town Council reviewed the application and finds the following: 31 32 1. The Comprehensive Sign Plan (CSP) application was submitted in accordance with 33 the requirements of the Municipal Code as described in Section 16A-4-560. 34 35 2. Base Village Owner, LLC identified special circumstances that deserve flexibility 36 from the sign standards prescribed in Division 5 of the Municipal Code and that 37 said flexibility is in the best interest of the community. 38 39 3. The CSP is in conformance with the general purposes of the Town sign regulations: 40 1) Authorization of signs; 2) Promotion of orderly display; and 3) Preservation of 41 open character. 42 43 4. The CSP does not adversely affect surrounding land uses. 44 45 5. The signs for which variations from the provisions of the Municipal Code are 46 requested, are located within the property of Base Village Owner, LLC or Town 47 rights-of-way. 48 NOW, THEREFORE BE IT ORDAINED by the Town Council of the Town of 49 Snowmass Village, Colorado, that: 50 51 Section One: Action 52 53 The Town Council hereby approves the Comprehensive Sign Plan (CSP) for Phase 1-A 54 of Base Village, attached hereto as Exhibit A and subject to the Conditions stated in 55 Section Two below. Said CSP shall supersede the Town's sign regulations, as described 56 in Division 5, Chapter 16A of the Municipal Code. 57 58 Section Two: Conditions 59 60 1. Signage Criteria Manual-Permitted Commercial Signs 61 62 Adopt the Signage Criteria Manual, 1st Amendment 2.15.07 with the following 63 modifications: 64 65 a. Maps or directories may be internally backlit for purposes of visibility and 66 legibility. 67 68 b. Umbrella signage shall be exempt if it does not identify the actual business or 69 tenant and is located within designated areas; corporate names or logos may 70 be allowed if they are consistent with the theme and character of the particular 71 establishment. 72 73 c. Operational signs such as "UPS," "FedEx," etc. are exempt along with credit 74 card and membership medallions if they total four (4) square feet or less per 75 business. 76 77 d. Architectural Control Committee needs to be further defined in terms of its 78 procedures and composition; the Committee shall include a representative 79 from the Town Marketing and Special Events Department; and the committee 80 shall be referred to as the Sign Architecture Control Committee (SACC). 81 82 2. Design, Specifications, Quantities & Locations-Exempt Signs 83 84 Approve the Exempt Signage program as shown in the 1st Amendment-Revised 3-24- 85 07, with the following minor adjustments or clarifications: 86 87 a. Building and Entrance Identification-Owner/applicant may consider using a 88 different type-face and size of lettering to increase visibility and legibility 89 with SACC approval. 90 91 b. Vehicular Direction or Regulatory-signage shall be consistent throughout 92 the Town of Snowmass Village. The Town may consider revising or updating 93 its sign standards in terms of design, materials and colors. 94 95 c. Pedestrian Way6nding-shall be consistent in terms of legibility, quality and 96 materials. Informational kiosks may be included as part of the overall Base 97 Village signage plan subject to Town Planning approval. 98 99 d. Village Map/Directory and Electronic Mountain Display-may be internally 100 backlit to increase visibility and legibility; other commercial signage may not 101 be backlit. 102 103 3. Sign Lighting 104 105 a. Sign lighting-shall be in conformance with the Plan submitted by the 106 Applicant. However, the Chief Building Official shall give final approval of 107 the lighting plan. The proposed lighting may require modifications from the 108 plans presented based upon the Chief Building Official's on-site inspection 109 and determination. 110 111 4. Modifications to Comprehensive Sign Plan 112 113 a. Procedure-once authorized by Town Council, the CSP may only be amended 114 pursuant to Section 16A-4-560(c)(6) Amendment, which requires a review 115 and recommendation by Planning Commission and approval by Town 116 Council. READ, APPROVED AND ADOPTED on first reading on May 7, 2007 upon the motion of Council Member the second of Council Member and upon a vote of_in favor and_opposed. 117 READ, APPROVED AND ADOPTED on second reading on May 21, 2007 upon the motion of Council Member the second of Council Member and upon a vote of_ in favor and_opposed. 118 119 TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE 120 TOWN COUNCIL 121 122 123 Douglas Mercatoris, Mayor APPROVED AS TO FORM: John C. Dresser, Jr., Town Attorney ATTEST: Rhonda B. Coxon, Town Clerk TOWN COUNCIL COMMUNIQUE Meeting Date: May 7, 2007 Agenda Item: CONTINUATION OF PUBLIC HEARING AND DISCUSSION - CLUB COMMONS II EMPLOYEE HOUSING: PRELIMINARY PLAN APPLICATION FOR THE PROPOSED CLUB COMMONS II EMPLOYEE HOUSING PROJECT Presented By. .Jim Wahlstrom, Senior Planner Core Issues: See Section I of a new report format attached for the list of core issue topics for this meeting (beginning on next page). At the last meeting on April 16`", Council discussed and provided direction concerning one-half of the core issues related to additional employee housing needs, building height impacts, employee housing mitigation provisions, unit mix and locations, parking provisions and parking restrictions. The results of the discussion at that meeting will eventually be carried forward into a subsequent resolution, subject to addressing the rollover topics for this meeting. However, there are other items that were previously deferred for scheduling at this meeting. General Info and See Section VI of the a new report format for the referenced Attachments: attachments and separate handouts. Council Options: Pursuant to Code Section 16A-5-70, the order of proceedings involving a public hearing for a land use application is summarized as follows: 1. Staff introduction of the application and/or core issues; 2. Applicant presentation of the core issues as needed; 3. Open the continued public hearing and allow for public testimony; 4. Permit the Applicant to respond to the public comments; 5. Allow Staff to respond to the public or Applicant statements; 6. Provide directives to Applicant and Staff in preparing of findings and conditions for a subsequent resolution; and 7. Continue the public hearing to a date certain. Staff See Section VI of the new report format for the staff recommendations Recommendation: for each core issue/discussion items and Section VII for a summary of the staff recommendations. 1 ATTACHMENT 1 TC Report 05-07-07 MEMORANDUM TO: Snowmass Village Town Council FROM: Planning Department DATE: May 7, 2007 SUBJECT: Continuation of Public Hearing and Discussion for a Preliminary Plan application, pursuant to Municipal Code Section 16A-5-340, Preliminary Plan, for the proposed Club Commons II employee housing project to allow for the development of 36 seasonal and long-term restricted employee housing units generally located approximately 1,200 feet south of Brush Creek Road and east of Clubhouse Drive between the existing Club Commons I complex, golf course maintenance facility and the Snowmass Water and Sanitation District facilities on the southern portion of Parcel 12, 'The Snowmass Club P.U.D." Subdivision, and the northern portion of the unplatted Snowmass Water and Sanitation District site, involving a proposed land exchange. Applicant: Aspen Skiing Company, which is the sole member of the Snowmass Club, which also consented to the application as did the Snowmass Water and Sanitation District, represented by: Mr. Don Schuster, Vice President— Real Estate, and Mark Vogele, Project Manager Planner: Jim Wahlstrom, Senior Planner I, PURPOSE AND ACTIONS REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: The purpose of the meeting would be to review and discuss the rollover and remaining core issues for this application and to provide direction in preparing findings and conditions in a resolution for subsequent review and action. Need specific direction on: Rollover items from the meeting on April 1 e': o The community purpose for the proposed height variation —This is a rollover item from the last meeting as it was not significantly discussed. The Applicant should propose, and the Council agree, on a community purpose item. Some good examples might be retaining the bus turnaround as previously proposed, implementing the Planning Commission's recommended sidewalk connections on Clubhouse Drive, and/or retaining the expanded Black Saddle parking lot, as previous proposed, for possible public usage. 2 Satisfaction of outstanding employee housing mitigation requirements for Snowmass Mountain— How should the 8,360 square feet of employee housing requirements from Snowmass Mountain, originally envisioned to be placed at Club Commons 11, but no longer proposed, be handled? Does Council wish to condition that the Applicant provide an amended restricted housing agreement to indicate how this square footage will be mitigated? And/or, would a cash-in-lieu provision be acceptable? Final determination of which floor area qualifies as mitigation housing (e.g., such as decks) — Staff understood at the last meeting that Council would accept the lower level porches/decks and the locker storage as mitigation square footage, but not the interior stairways and corridors. Staff also understood that Council might be amenable to including the decks on the upper floors as well. This would add 2,106 square feet of square footage. Staff needs to know if this would be acceptable mitigation square footage as well. If the above areas are accepted this would leave 90 square feet to be mitigated for the Base Village housing requirement of 38,143 square feet. Should the shortage amount be mitigated by cash-in-lieu? Determining the numbers of units strictly reserved for the Snowmass Water and Sanitation District—Council previously directed that this item be rolled over to this meeting with the request that a Snowmass Water and Sanitation District representative be present. Should the reserved or first-right-of-refusal of certain units by the SWSD be reduced from three to two units? This should be considered as a result of the project being reduced from three to four stories since Sketch Plan and the fact that number of long-term units are being decreased from 44 to 16 units and the seasonal housing increased from 16 to 24 units since Sketch Plan? Proposed lighting and pedestrian circulation plan, including Nordic crossings — See the separate 11" x 17" color-coded handout showing the Planning Commission's recommended sidewalk connections. Should these connections, including additional bollard lighting, be implemented between the Black Saddle parking lot, the bus turnaround (if to be provided), and Club Commons? Bus turnaround design adequacy— Per the recent letter dated May 2, 2007 from the Applicant (see Attachment 8), the bus turnaround is no longer proposed. However, would it be useful to retain the turnaround in efforts to serve the continuing private shuttle service, to provide increased safety and convenience for the Club Commons residents, and to perhaps utilize as a community purpose item for possible use in the future by public transit? Addressing options including possible funding mechanisms for the provision of bus shuttles or routes and the general transit/transportation service adequacy for the employee housing project — Per the recent letter dated May 2, 2007 from the Applicant (Attachment 8), Staff and the Applicant have determined that public transit should not be provided to Club Commons at this time, and the Applicant has committed to continue operating their shuttle service from the Black Saddle parking lot and add service to Club Commons II during peak periods; and 3 o Determining how the fiscal impact report in the application folds in with or compares with the Base Village fiscal impact report —Capital expenses and additional transit service were previously addressed and accounted for in the Base Village fiscal impact (FIA) report assuming 30 units at Club Commons II. RETT funds gathered from the sale of the market units in Base Village would pay for the added capital expanses. However, it did not assess the costs of an additional transit route to Club Commons or the cost of the Applicant's private shuttle service from Black Saddle. Therefore, this should be considered separately in the future. The Club Commons II FIA assessed the incremental difference of the six additional units. The results were similar to Base Village FIA findings. Council would simply need to make findings in a resolution regarding these matters. II. SUMMARY OF DESCRIPTION OF PROJECT. The Club Commons II is a 36-unit employee housing project generally located approximately 1,200 feet south of Brush Creek Road and east of Clubhouse Drive between the existing Club Commons I complex, golf course maintenance facility and the Snowmass Water and Sanitation District facilities. It would include: 24 seasonal units with 96 bedrooms, and 12 permanent housing units with 24 bedrooms The floor area of the project, pursuant to the measurement standards in the Municipal Code, is 38,839 square feet. This includes floor area outside of the dwelling units. The employee housing would be housed in two, three-story building ranging in height from 42.7 to 44.7 feet above the lower finished floor level. The building would be slightly cut into the existing hillside. III. BACKGROUND Why and how did yroiect inception process start: The proposed project was envisioned by the Applicant for the purpose of mitigating 38,143 square feet of the employee housing requirement for the initial phases of the Base Village project. The project initial began as a Sketch Plan application in September 2003, was subsequently placed on hold to complete the review of the Base Village application, and then modified to a four-story proposal, which eventually was accepted. On January 17, 2006, Council granted the Applicant permission via Resolution No. 5, Series of 2006, to proceed to a Preliminary Plan application. How did this application process start: The Preliminary Plan application was initially submitted on September 21, 2006 and updated as complete on October 25, 2006; On November 6, 2006 Town Council granted, via Resolution No. 55, Series of 2006 (see Attachment 7), the Applicant's requested deferral of the subdivision platting and rezoning information to Final PUD and deferred, rather than waived, the traffic study incorporating 4 turning movement numbers for review by Planning Commission prior to acting upon their resolution; On December 4, 2006, a joint meeting of the Town Council and Planning Commission was held, as required by Code, to hear the presentation of the application by the Applicant; On December 18, 2006, Town Council acted upon Resolution No. 64, Series of 2006, which identified the specific components within the application, including project elements, specific areas of the Land Use and Development Code or core issues, that the Planning Commission should focus upon during the course of their review and provided the direction that the application review shall take (see Attachment 7); The Planning Commission reviewed the application, and the supplemental information or updates thereto, at public hearings on January 3 and 17, and February 7, 2007; and On February 7, 2007, the Planning Commission recommended approval of the project to Town Council subject to certain other recommendations or conditions being addressed via Resolution No. 2, Series of 2007, including strong recommendations that the project include a fourth level for additional employee housing (see the initial Town Council report of March 5, 2007, if needed). Action or Direction From Council To Date: March 5, 2007: Initial public hearing and presentation of the Preliminary Plan application; March 19,2007: Scheduled for review of one-half of core issues as directed by Council; The core issues were not discussed as a result of Applicant's plan, presented at the meeting, to meet with Snowmass Water and Sanitation District (SWSD) board to determine if a fourth-story proposal was possible; The public hearing continued to April 16, 2007. April 16, 2007: It was reported that the SWSD rejected the fourth-story idea, based on certain reasons including the lack of an underground parking area. The meeting began with the review of core issues presented March 19`n considering the three-story proposal. These core issues included, whether there should be any additional housing needs, the building heights/variations, employee housing mitigation provisions, unit mix/locations, parking provisions and parking restrictions. Enough direction was provided for most of the core issues for subsequent inclusion in a resolution, but certain topics were rolled to the next meeting. The public hearing was continued to May 7, 2007. IV. APPLICABLE REGULATIONS Municipal Code review criteria which regulate the review and approval of Preliminary Plan applications include the "Pur ose' and the "Review and intent issues" or questions outlined in Municipal Code Section 16A-5-340, the General Restrictions outlined in Section 16A-5-300(c), and the Review Standards listed in 16A-5-310, which also includes reference to Article IV, Development Evaluation Standards, of the Land Use and Development Code. For the core issues scheduled for this meeting, the following Municipal Code criteria apply: Community purposes for the proposed height variation — Reference Code Sections 16A-5- 300(c)(5-7); Satisfaction of outstanding employee housing mitigation requirements— Reference Code Section 16A-4-400-420, Standards for Restricted Housing, together with the Base Village and Snowmass Mountain Restricted Housing Agreements; 5 Final determination of which floor area qualifies as mitigation housing (e.g., such as decks) Reference Code Section 16A-4-410(b), Square footage per employee; Determining method for the mitigation any remaining housing requirement (e.g., cash-in-lieu or other method)— Reference Code Section 16A-4-420, Methods for complying with requirements; Determining the numbers of units strictly reserved for the Snowmass Water and Sanitation District—Code Section reference not applicable; Proposed lighting and pedestrian circulation plan, including Nordic crossing— Reference Ordinance No. 18, Series of 2003, for the Town's lighting standards placed in the Building Code, and Section 16A-4-220, Public Trails; Bus turnaround design adequacy— Reference Code Section 16A-4-210, Street and related improvements; Addressing options including possible funding mechanisms for the provision of bus shuttles or routes and the general transit/transportation service adequacy for the employee housing project— Reference Code Section 16A-4-310(c)(2), Alternative parking plan, for criteria for such requests. It includes meeting one or a combination of the following options: a) Creating parking is desired location; b) Offering options to automobile usage; c) Providing compact sized parking spaces; d) Providing tandem/stacked parking; and/or e) Contributing $25,000.00 per space. (Note: For this project 180 spaces are required by Code and a minimum of 105 surface parking spaces are proposed on the site for an alternative plan with parking management strategies). Determining how the fiscal impact report in the application folds in with or compares with the Base Village fiscal impact report—This is a submission requirement; Reference Code Section 16A-5-340(b)(12), Fiscal impact, and Section 16A-5-340(c)(2)9, Fiscal Impact report. V. DISCUSION ITEMS: ALTERNATIVES AND IMPLICATIONS Community Purpose for height variance. As of the writing of this report, the Applicant has yet to propose a community purpose for the height variance. Such community purpose could be the provision of employee housing over and above the mitigation requirement, which appears unlikely with the current three-story proposal. Other suggestions for community purposes include the provision of necessary public facilities, such as public parking, transportation facilities or services, and/or recreation facilities or the usage thereof. Therefore, the options for community purpose provisions for the height variations are: Option 1: Allow applicant to present their community purpose proposal. Pros: Council would not be dictating the community purpose for the height variation. Cons: Council would not necessarily be given opportunity to further express what an acceptable community purpose might be up front. Option 2: Council could suggest a possible community purpose for the height variation per the examples stated above. Pros: Council more than less dictates the community purpose that might be acceptable. Cons: It should be the Applicant's burden-of-proof to demonstrate a community purpose, not Council, in justifying the Applicant's proposed height variation. 6 Planning Commission recommendations: If the Black Saddle parking lot expansion is further proposed and accepted (even as a community purpose item), then the Planning Commission recommended that additional berms and landscape buffering around the perimeter of the expanded Black Saddle parking lot be provided especially around or toward the north side of the lot closest to Brush Creek Road. A landscape plan for this area should be submitted for review and approval at the time of Final PUD application. Staff comments/recommendations: Specific examples of community purposes could include, a) public usage of the bus turnaround area, which now is no longer proposed (see Attachment 8) for private shuttles and possible public transit usage later, b) having the Applicant provide or extend their private shuttles for use by long-term residents as well as seasonal housing tenants even if only during peak times of the day during the winter, c) allowing the employee residents to also utilize the Skico's shuttle service for transporting employees to Base Village from the Black Saddle lot, d) improving pedestrian connectivity between the public bus stops on Brush Creek Road, Black Saddle parking lot and the Club Commons site, and/or e) the expansion of the Black Saddle parking lot by a net 50 spaces for use by the general public. Satisfaction of outstanding employee housing mitigation requirements related to Snowmass Mountain. The remaining employee housing requirement of 8,360 square feet from Snowmass Mountain has yet to be satisfied. The Applicant has not yet responded to the last Staff responses concerning the previously proposed use of credits to fulfill the employee housing requirement of 8,360 square feet from Snowmass Mountain. For informational purposes, see Attachment 5 for a summary of the requirements in the Snowmass Mountain and Base Village restricted housing agreements. Therefore, the options for the outstanding employee housing mitigation of 8,360 square feet for Snowmass Mountain include: Option 1: Require the Applicant to amend the Snowmass Mountain Restricted Housing agreement either at this time, after this application or with the submission of the Final PUD application. Pros: So the Town would know the alternative location or other method and time frame where and when the 8,360 square feet employee housing mitigation would be provided; Cons: An amendment to the agreement may not be as favorable as the original provisions and an alternative location or method may not be as desirable. Option 2: Enforce the cash-in-lieu formula provision in the current Snowmass Mountain restricted housing agreement. Pros: Council would receive the funds now for future housing project. Cons: Actual employee housing mitigation for Snowmass Mountain would not be provided at this time. Staff comments/recommendations: The Applicant should submit a proposed draft revision to the current restricted housing agreement for review and consideration. This could be submitted now during the review of the Preliminary Plan, after the application review or conditioned that the Applicant provides it with the submission of the Final PUD application. The other option for 7 fulfilling the requirement was cash-in-lieu per the current agreement since the timing identified for the Club Commons II project was not met, but Staff understood earlier that the agreement as a whole should be amended. Qualifying floor area for mitigation housing and method for mitigating remaining requirements. The Base Village employee housing requirement to be allocated at Club Commons II is 38,143 square feet. Again, see Attachment 5 for a summary of the requirements in the Base Village and Snowmass Mountain and restricted housing agreements. The Applicant requests utilization of the dwelling unit square footage, the porches/decks on the lower level, the storage lockers, the lower level stairways and the interior common hallways as mitigation housing. All of these areas would total 38,839 square feet, above the 38,143 square foot requirement. However, Staff believes only the dwelling unit areas qualify under the Code, but certainly Council could make the determination that other spaces could qualify pursuant to the "Other means" provision in the Code. The Housing Department has mentioned that the storage lockers and the lower level decks could be considered as qualifying as mitigation square footage since these spaces are considered amenities for the units. At the Council meeting on April 16'", there was a suggestion to include the deck areas on the upper two stories of the buildings as mitigation square footage. Below is a breakdown of all the square footage spaces that could be considered: Summary allocation of space per current application with two, three-story buildings: Square footage of employee housing within the dwelling units:34,104 sq. ft. Porch areas (first level only per floor area measurements):1,053 sq. ft. Deck areas (upper two levels on both buildings): 2,106 sq. ft. Interior Corridor circulation (Seasonal housing Bldg A only): 2,379 sq. ft. Stairways in both buildings (first level on per floor area calcs): 513 sq. ft. Lockers storage in Building A: 622 sq. ft. Storage closets off decks in Building B for permanent housing units: 168 sq. ft. Gross floor area measured: 40,945 sq. ft. Minimum mitigation square footage within dwelling units would be: 34,104 sq. ft. As a matter of information, the Sinclair Meadows employee housing square footage included the units and the porches/deck (albeit only two levels) together with storage spaces behind the carports and half credit for the garage/carport areas. Please be advised that determination of floor area mitigation for employee housing, based on the above noted techniques, could set a precedent for how employee housing mitigation is calculated on future projects. Option 1: Require only the dwelling units to be counted as mitigation square footage. Pros: This requirement would meet the specific language and requirements of the Municipal Code for calculating mitigation floor area. Cons: This would discourage Applicants from providing amenity type spaces outside of the dwelling units. Option 2: Allow the Applicant to include decks (first, second and/or third levels) and storage areas as part of the employee housing mitigation square footage. 8 Pros: This would encourage Applicants to provide amenity type spaces outside of the dwelling units. Only a remaining 90 square feet of the Base Village mitigation requirement would then need to be mitigated, not including the 8,360 square feet required under the Snowmass Mountain restricted housing agreement. Cons: These spaces would not be part of the dwelling unit area as required by the Code for calculating the floor area. Decks above the first level do not qualify as floor area per the floor area measurement standards in the Code. These spaces could be expanded as they would be less costly,to construct, which in return might mean less space for the dwelling units. Option 3: Allow the Applicant to also include interior common corridor circulation as part of the employee housing mitigation square footage. Pros: This would likely encourage enclosed versus exposed stairwells and circulation corridors that access dwelling unit entries. Such designs also render a more attractive building fagades with fewer railings. Cons: These are spaces not within dwelling units and not considered livable spaces. By counting such square footage, the Town would lose a certain amount of square footage for units, almost three nicely sized units in this case. It may also set an unfavorable precedent for calculating mitigation floor area on future employee housing projects. In addition, these spaces could be expanded as they would be less costly to construct, which in return could mean less space for the dwelling units. Plannino Commission summary recommendations: 1) The addition of the recommended 4'h story levels on the two buildings is considered to be advisable for either seasonal or permanent housing with certain parking restrictions. 2) The type of units and tenants within the buildings or the recommended 0 levels should be controlled as a means to match or coincide with the demand for seasonal or permanent housing during any given season. 3) If deemed permissible by the Town Council, there should be consideration of allowing additional employee housing mitigation for the site by interpreting certain square footage that would normally not qualify as mitigation square footage, in that enhanced livability such as the square footage within the interior corridor or circulation space, together with the first floor stairways and deck areas on the first levels, in efforts to buy down the incremental cost of constructing a recommended 4`h level of employee housing on the buildings, could also be utilized to mitigate the 8,360 square feet of Snowmass Mountain housing requirements per Ordinance No. 2, Series of 2005, and perhaps beyond this amount as a possible Community Purpose over and above the required mitigation square footage as to be determined as acceptable by the Town Council. 4) Separate from this application, a reassessment of the Municipal Code's employee housing mitigation square footage credits and the cash-in-lieu provisions ought to be considered to include other spaces for mitigation square footage that enhance the livability of employee housing units and to incorporate costs, in the cash-in-lieu formula, associated with amenities or common areas outside of the dwelling units that enhance the units, such as but not necessarily limited to underground parking, ski lockers, laundry facilities, recreation rooms, clubhouses, and additional floors for employee or mitigation housing that require elevators. 9 Staff comments/recommendations: If the compromise solution would be to include the storage spaces and all the porches and deck spaces together with the unit sizes as mitigation square footage, this would total 38,053 square feet leaving 90 square feet to mitigate for the Base Village requirement. The Housing Department was amenable to including these spaces as mitigation square footage earlier. The remaining amount could be mitigated by cash-in-lieu, subject to Council acceptance. However, the restricted housing agreement should be amended as a result, which could be submitted at this time, after the application review, or with the submission of the Final PUD application. Number of units strictly reserved for the Snowmass Water and Sanitation District. During the review and acceptance of the modified Sketch Plan application that included four- story buildings, the first directive in the Town Council Resolution No. 5, Series of 2006, was: 1) The employee housing within the project must be open to all employees within the Town of Snowmass Village for the purpose of mitigating jobs within Snowmass Village. The following restrictions shall apply: For the seasonal housing: a) Aspen Skiing Company employees who work in Snowmass Village will have primary use rights for the seasonal housing beds in Building A16; and b) If space is available after this category has been accommodated, the beds will become available to any Snowmass employee on a seasonal basis. For permanent housing: a) Water and Sanitation District (SWSD) employees will have the first right of refusal on up to a maximum of three (3) units in Building B44 as they become available for their employees; and b) If not exercised by SWSD, the unit may be filled by the TOSV housing office pursuant to the Town's policies and procedures. Such restrictions shall be further clarified at the time of Preliminary Plan application." In the response to the Sketch Plan directives in the application, the Applicant agreed to these restrictions. The reasoning before by Council in accepted these reserved units as mitigation housing was that those SWSD employees might then be removed from the priority lease list at the Town's Housing Department thus freeing up housing inventory in other areas of the Town for remaining full-time employees. Staff's latest understanding is that the SWSD would like reservation of more than just three units since they are a co-developer/sponsor/consenter of this project, but the current application does not note this request. However, even if a certain number of units were limited to SWSD employees only, it would appear that other SWSD employees could still be placed on a waiting list at the Housing Department for other available units at this project. Option 1: Forward the same directives above from Sketch Plan for restrictions on seasonal and permanent housing as conditions into the resolution for the Preliminary Plan application. Pros: If Council deems the units reserved for the SWSD as mitigation housing for the Base Village development, then the restrictions should generally have a negligible effect from Sketch Plan to Preliminary Plan. The SWSD employees would still have option of being placed on the wait list for other available units if other SWSD employees take the reserved units. 10 Cons: With the buildings now at three stories, percentage-wise the restrictions on the number of units would be more favorable to the Applicant versus the Town considering that the proposal was reduced from three to four stories since Sketch Plan and the number of long-term units were decreased from 44 to 16 units and the seasonal housing increased from 16 to 24 units since Sketch Plan. Option 2: Reduce the number of reserved units for the SWSD from three to two units as a result of the reduction of the floor area and the number of stories from three to four for the project. Pros: This reduction of reserved units for the current three-story proposal would be proportionate to the directive provided at Sketch Plan when the project was presented at four-stories with additional floor area. It would also provide additional true mitigation employee housing square footage for the Base Village development. Cons: The SWSD is co-sponsoring/co-developing the project with the Skico. Further restrictions may penalize the SWSD for trying to provide housing for their employees who also work within the Town. Planning Commission recommendation: This housing project should be restricted to, a) employees within the Town of Snowmass Village, b) employees within Pitkin County, and then c) other employees, such as but not necessarily limited to employees or students of profit or non-profit organizations provided they are not housed for short-term occupancy. Staff Comments/Recommendations: As stated in the previous reports, Staff believes that since the amount of mitigation housing was reduced from the last Sketch Plan proposal (e.g., because the buildings were reduced from four to three stories with the current Preliminary Plan), the maximum number of units within now the smaller-sized building for long-term housing (e.g., for the strict reservation or first-right-of-refusal usage by Snowmass Water and Sanitation District SWSD) employees), which was also previously accepted by Council during Sketch Plan as qualifying as mitigation housing, ought to be reduced from three units to two units. This would be more in proportion with the directive provided at Sketch Plan when the proposal was for four- story buildings with additional floor area and significantly more long-term housing units in the larger of the two buildings. Proposed lighting and pedestrian circulation plan, including Nordic crossing provisions. The Applicant has provided a revised pedestrian circulation and lighting plan pursuant to the Planning Commission recommendations below. See the separate 11" x 17" handout. Also see the attached excerpt from the Snowmass Club Recreational Use Agreement dated June 2002 (Attachment 6). It appears that the 'winter road crossing' (i.e., for Nordic trail use primarily) on Clubhouse Drive still needs to be provided. Option 1: Provide additional lighting than that already exists as bollard lighting along the walkway on Clubhouse Drive. Pros: Additional lighting may increase the pedestrian usage of the sidewalk and transit services, and improve the pedestrian safety of the walkway between Club Commons, Black Saddle parking lot and the bus stops on Brush Creek Road. Cons: Additional lighting may create a nuisance for other residents in the area. Option 2: In addition to Option 1, implement the Planning Commission's recommendations concerning walkway connections between Brush Creek Road, Black Saddle parking lot, bus turnaround (if needed or desired) and Club Commons as conditions in the resolution. Pros: The additional walkway connections may increase the pedestrian usage of the sidewalk and transit services, and improve the pedestrian convenience in accessing Club Commons, Black Saddle parking lot and the bus stops on Brush Creek Road. Cons: Additional maintenance and snow removal responsibilities. Option 3: In addition to Options 1 and 2, delete the provision for a winter crossing on Clubhouse Drive per the Planning Commission's recommendations. Pros: It would eliminate a barrier for vehicular and emergency vehicles to access Club Commons and the Snowmass Club. It would open up year-round access between Brush Creek Road and Club Commons/Snowmass Club. It would eliminate the need to maintain a skiable crossing on Clubhouse Drive during the winter or the or the need to install a rubberized crossing, for example. Cons: The Nordic trail would not be continuous through this area. Skiers may be forced to click in and out of their skis. The Nordic Council may object to the removal of the crossing. They were involved with the review of the Snowmass Club development a few years ago. Planning Commission recommendations: 1) As offered by the Applicant, the plans should incorporate the following items to encourage pedestrian safety and usage of the walkway segments between the Club Commons site and Brush Creek Road: a) The installation of additional pedestrian bollard lighting around the bend of Clubhouse Drive and the tees/putting greens located between the existing clubhouse, the proposed bus transit turnaround and the Club Commons site; b) The installation of additional pedestrian bollard lighting near pedestrian crosswalks, especially between the clubhouse, the transit turnaround and the Club Commons site; c) Extension of the sidewalks on Clubhouse Drive toward the west from the new bus turnaround and around the outside bend of Clubhouse Drive to create a seamless pedestrian connection between the Club Commons site, the transit turnaround and the existing walkway system leading to Brush Creek Road; d) Maintenance of the snow removal for all walkways between the bus stop on Brush Creek Road, the Club Commons site and the transit turnaround; e) The installation of two street lights located at, 1) the southwest corner of Brush Creek Road and Clubhouse Drive, and 2) at the bus shelter near the pedestrian crossing of Brush Creek Road of which both should be designed to match the street light pole/fixture at Brush Creek Road and Horse Ranch Drive; f) Installation of directional/control signs where needed at the pedestrian crossings; and g) The Applicant should review the lighting plan with the Town's Chief Building Official for conformance with the Lighting Ordinance No. 18, Series of 2003, at the time of construction drawing review and prior to issuance of a certificate of occupancy. 2) The "winter crossing" provision on Clubhouse Drive in the Snowmass Club Phase II Recreational Use Agreement dated June 26, 2002 should be deleted. Staff Comments/Recommendations: Additional street lighting should not necessarily be needed if the Applicant maintains the bollard lighting in working order, except for maybe some additional bollards along the recommended extended walkway connections. 12 Concerning the Nordic crossing and pursuant to the language in the Recreation Use Agreement Attachment 6), Staff is unaware of any unsatisfactory positions by the Applicant or the Fire District that were presented to Council earlier for resolution. Therefore, in lieu of eliminating the provision for a winter crossing, require the Applicant to provide a rubberized crossing. Common amenities and a usable open space area for residents should be provided in particular for the long-term housing building. There does not appear to be a location for outdoor entertainment, recreation or a safe area for children to play. This could be addressed with the Final PUD application if Council is agreeable. The plan does, however, provide a trail connection to the golf course trail on the east side of the site. Bus turnaround design adequacy. The bus turnaround is now no longer proposed since it was determine that public transit service should not be provided at this time (see letter— Attachment S). However, the Transportation Department previously indicated that the earlier proposed bus turnaround area at Club Commons, intended for private shuttles and possible public buses later, would likely be adequate for public shuttle usage for a preliminary plan level of review. The bus shelter turnaround location was proposed on Parcel 10 of the Snowmass Club and outside the boundaries of the proposed site for Club Commons 11, and could be retained if proposed or desired as a community purpose item. Option 1: Applicant to provide bus turnaround, even if only to be used by private shuttles in the interim, which could also serve as a possible community purpose item for their proposed alternative parking plan. Pros: A separate bus turnaround area would likely improve the pedestrian safety and convenience for the shuttle drivers and the riders coming from Club Commons. Cons: Such a turnaround may be an unnecessary expense or exaction if public transit would not be provided to the site in the near future. The Applicant has stated that their shuttles can access the Black Saddle parking lot for the pick of their employees during peak periods of the day during the winter or peak periods. Option 2: Eliminate the proposed bus turnaround area since the Applicant has indicated that they do not need for their shuttle service. Pros: This would retain open space/landscaping for the area. Cons: The Applicant's private shuttle service through the Black Saddle parking lot might be constrained and unsafe for pedestrians entering and leaving the shuttles. Walking to the Black Saddle lot from the Club Commons area would be less convenient for the residents. Planning Commission recommendations: None specific to the bus turnaround; However, see the previous recommendation concerning the need for extended walkway connections to this area. Staff comments/recommendations: The bus turnaround could be considered a community purpose item. If not, there should be adequate pedestrian connections between the bus turnaround area and/or other facilities in the area, including the Black Saddle parking lot, as generally described in the previous section of this report. 13 Addressing options including possible funding mechanisms for the provision of bus shuttles or routes and the general transit/transportation service adequacy for the employee housing project. See the latest Applicant letter of May 2, 2007 (Attachment 8). As a matter of background information, attached are excerpts from the Base Village fiscal impact analysis, the transportation impact analysis and parking strategy, and a page from their parking management plan related to the proposed Club Commons II project (Attachment 4). The Base Village fiscal impact report (FIA) assessed the transit impact of 30 units at the water treatment plant utilizing existing Routes 3 and 8. In essence, it was projected that the one-time capital costs, including four new Town shuttles, would eventually be covered by the collection of RETT revenues from the initial sales of residential units and non-residential space within the Base Village project. It assessed projected ridership and indicated at least one additional shuttle would be required for Route 3. The Club Commons II FIA assessed impacts for the net increase of six units, but it was a nominal difference and the results were similar (see the next core issue section below for details). The Base Village FIA originally did not anticipate the fiscal impact of creating an additional route specific to Club Commons I and II much less picking up the costs to transport Skico employees at the Black Saddle parking lot. In fact, Club Commons I (which likely might begin using shuttle service more frequently if provided a bus stop proximate to their project) was not factored much less any consideration of assuming transportation of the Skico employees in the Black Saddle parking lot. Therefore, the creation of a bus stop along Clubhouse Drive creates an entirely different scenario that what was assessed in the FIA. Their parking management plan indicates that the Aspen Skiing Company would provide the private shuttle service for their employees during peak times during the day to and from the Black Saddle parking lot in the winter season or peak periods (see Attachment 8). Planning Commission recommendations: 1) The Transportation Department should propose to the Town Council a program to redesign the transit routes in the vicinity, including the nearby Entryway area, based upon current transit ridership data. The Transportation Department should then propose to Town Council transit service options in the area utilizing a rearrangement or redesign of existing routes, adding new routes or a combination thereof that adequately serves the area. Fiscal impacts should subsequently be assessed based upon the results of these analyses. 2) The Applicant's Traffic Impact Analysis (TIA) should be modified to address the latest comments from the Transportation Department dated January 25, 2007 and from the Town's Traffic Engineer consultant dated January 31, 2007, and the updated TIA resubmitted in time for Town Council review and prior to action upon their resolution. (Note: This condition has since been resolved by the resubmittal of the TIA on February 2007; see the details of the report and the map excerpts —Attachment 3). Staff comments/recommendations: The Brush Creek bus stop is only about 1,200 feet walking distance from Club Commons, the equivalent of two city blocks. Staff questions whether it is fiscally responsible to extend public transit route services to certain residential buildings if they are only located the equivalent of two city-blocks from an existing bus stop, especially if the Applicant is already providing private shuttle service during peak periods. This may be a satisfactory provision for the Applicant's alternative parking plan together with the extended sidewalk connections previously noted and recommended. However, if front-door transit service 14 to Club Commons is desirable, then the Applicant should mitigate the cost of such service or portion thereof. Determining how the fiscal impact report in the application folds in with or compares with the Base Village fiscal impact report. As stated earlier, the Base Village Fiscal Impact Analysis (FIA) and Traffic/Transportation Impact Analysis (TIA) assessed the impacts and mitigation assuming 30 units at Club Commons 11. The FIA and the TIA in the Club Commons II Preliminary Plan submission re-assessed the impacts and mitigation for the net increase of 6 units. See the attached summary details of each report (Attachments 2 and 3). Also see Attachment 4 for excerpts from the Base Village studies. Below is a net executive summary overview of the Club Commons II Fiscal Impact Analysis FIA) submitted October 2006: As is typical for stand-alone residential development, a negative fiscal impact for the Town is forecast as summarized below. The Base Village FIA accounted for 30 employee units at the Club Commons site. The analysis in the application accounts for over 80% of the . impacts identified in the FIA. The net summary impacts are: Projected revenues: 49,096 Projected expenditures:60,119 Net estimated annual deficit: $11,022 One-time capital cost: 1,186 (portion of police vehicle) The FIA states that the remaining impacts of the net increase of six (6) units proposed could adequately be covered by the Town's operating surplus generated by the entire Base Village project, estimated at $50,146 at the end of Phase 1 and growing to $564,708 at project buildout. Also, the capital needs could be offset by the $532,132 net surplus in one- time revenues (RETT) generated at the end of Phase 1. See the fiscal impact analysis details on the subsequent pages. The Snowmass Water and Sanitation District expects to operate on a cost recovery basis via user fees. The project is expected to result in an estimated annual deficit of $11,048 for the Snowmass-Wildcat Fire Protection District mainly due to the need for a projected 0.2 emergency staff member. Per the Base Village FIA, even though estimated using 30 employee units at the Club Commons II site, the Fire District would operate in surplus of 32,700 at the end of Phase 1 and growing to $74,400 at project buildout for Base Village. Planning Commission recommendations: In the resolution findings, Planning Commission stated that, "employee housing is not a fiscal revenue generator, but rather a "revenue facilitator" in that the Resort Operation as that principal revenue generator depends on available employee base and that conversely the Town relies heavily on employee housing to drive the tourist business. Therefore, the fiscal impact report as presented in the application seems adequate." Otherwise, see the previous section of this report above and Attachment 2 of this report for a detailed breakdown of the fiscal analysis. Staff Recommendations: See the previous core issue section of this report. 15 VI. OTHER HEADINGS RELATED TO THE TOPICS Attachments: 1. Updated summary staff report of remaining core issues, utilizing new report format; 2. Summary details of the Club Commons II Fiscal Impact Analysis (FIA), including transit rout maps for reference; 3. Summary findings from the Club Commons II Traffic Impact Analysis (TIA); 4. Excerpts from the Base Village FIA, the TIA and Parking Strategy, and the Parking Management Plan; 5. Summary requirements from the Base Village and Snowmass Mountain Restricted Housing Agreements; 6. Excerpt from the Snowmass Club Recreation Use Agreement (e.g., winter crossing); 7. Council directives from Resolutions Nos. 55 and 64, provided for reference as needed; S. Latest letter dated May 2, 2007 from the Applicant. As needed, please reference as needed the referral agency comments and Planning Commission Resolution No. 2, Series of 2007, from the March 7`h meeting. See the separate handout packet with 11" x 17" drawings (i.e., enlargements from the Planning Commission resolution exhibits) that include: Colored pedestrian circulation and lighting plan. VII. SUMMARY OF STAFF RECOMMENDATIONS AND FINDINGS Note that the draft findings will eventually be prepared and inserted into a subsequent resolution for consideration following the complete review of the core issue topics. See the findings in the Planning Commission Resolution No. 2, Series of 2007, provided in the introductory report for the March 5, 2007 Council meeting. Community Purpose for height variance. A community purpose needs to be proposed by the Applicant. See the previous options and suggested examples. Qualifying floor area for mitigation housing and method for mitigating remaining requirements. The area within the dwelling unit is what counts as mitigation floor area per the Municipal Code. The Housing Department is amenable to counting the porches/decks and the storage lockers as mitigation square footage since these spaces are viewed as amenity type features. Satisfaction of outstanding employee housing mitigation requirements. The Applicant should submit a proposed draft revision to the current restricted housing agreement for review and consideration and/or provide the cash-in-lieu option. Number of units strictly reserved for the Snowmass Water and Sanitation District. The maximum number of units within the long-term housing building (e.g., for the strict reservation or first-right-of-refusal usage by Snowmass Water and Sanitation District (SWSD) employees), which was also previously accepted by Council during Sketch Plan as qualifying as mitigation housing, ought to be reduced from three units to two units. 16 Proposed lighting and pedestrian circulation plan, including Nordic crossing provisions. Implement the recommendations by Planning Commission concerning the extended walkway connections. Add more bollard lighting along these stretches where necessary. In lieu of eliminating the provision for a winter crossing, provide a rubberized crossing. Add a recreation space for the long-term residents on the site. Bus turnaround adequacy. The bus turnaround may still prove valuable for pedestrians and the private shuttles, for possible usage by public transit later, and could be considered as a possible community purpose item. Appropriate pedestrian connections should be provided. Addressing options including possible funding mechanisms for the provision of bus shuttles or routes and the general transit/transportation service adequacy for the employee housing project. Public transit service to the Club Commons site seems unnecessary given the two-block distance from the bus stops on Brush Creek Road and the fact that the Applicant is providing private shuttle service for their employees during peak periods see Attachment 8). This would be subject to the Applicant providing extended walkway connections as previous discussed. These items in turn should justify the Applicant's proposed alternative parking plan. Determining how the fiscal impact report in the application folds in with or compares with the Base Village fiscal impact report. See above for the staff recommendation. VIII. NEXT STEPS Next Steps include: On May 21, 2007, consider a resolution and possible action for the Preliminary Plan application; On June 4, 2007, consider edited and final version of the resolution for action, if needed. 17 ATTACHMENT TC Report 05-07-07 Club Commons II Preliminary Plan Fiscal Impact Analysis (FIA) Detailed summary October 2006 The report mentions 124 bedrooms for the analysis, but the other parts of the application indicate 120 bedrooms proposed. The Applicant was requested to clarify where the additional four bedrooms would be located on the plans, whether it is an adjoining manager's unit or another subterranean unit, for example. The Applicant has since indicated that only 120 bedrooms are proposed in the project. Methodologies used included, identifying extraordinary impacts, estimating ongoing and one-time revenues, estimating revenues and costs for other serving districts, utilizing the 2005 Town budget, case studies using a multiplier of property taxes based upon market value, deriving per capita costs or revenues, and the recovery of direct costs. A summary of the assumptions used in the FIA were that: o The market value of Club Commons II estimated at $3.76 million or $104,546 per unit; o All the residents of the employee housing were characterized as permanent residents for the analysis; however, most of the residents are seasonal, which trigger a greater need or demand for transit services. o The analysis assumes 3.4 persons per unit (or 123 people in 36 units) in 124 bedrooms; however, other parts of the application note 120 bedrooms. The alternative is a nominal change at 3.3 persons per unit (120 bedrooms/36 units). o The occupancy rate used is 100%for the employee housing project, but for calculating tax revenues, an average annual 73% occupancy rate was used assuming that 65% of the seasonal housing would be occupied year-round and 8% of the permanent housing would be 100% occupied. o The Base Village FIA addressed impacts related to 30 employee units at this site, and that this analysis measures the fiscal impacts of the 36 units and the net impacts of the increase of six (6) units from that previously analyzed. A summary of the estimated revenue for the Town per the FIA are: Per the estimated project value at buildout of $3.8 million and the General Mill levy fund of 0.744 mills, the project would produce $223 per year in new property taxes. Annual average salary for the residents at the new complex is estimated at $22,880, based upon average $11 per hour wage over full-time equivalent of 2080 hours per year to analyze sales tax revenue. It's projected that each resident would spend about 34.5% of their income on retail goods and services and that the Club Commons residents will spend $715,459 on retail goods and that 43%of that would be spent in Snowmass Village. Based on assumptions above, the new residents would generate approximately 309,481 of taxable retail sales, which would in the end calculate to about $8,232 in annual sales taxes. Based on the Town's mill levy of 5.0 mills that 70% is mainly used for roadway project, the project's assessed value would generate about$1,498 per year with roughly$1,049 transferred to the general fund for road projects. No one-time revenues are anticipated. A summary of the estimated expenditures for the Town per the FIA are: The fiscal impact analysis projects an assumed 50% of the gross multiplier for an increase in expenditures for the Town Departments, except that 10% of Planning and Zoning will be cost recovered, and the Building Department will be 100% cost recovered. Note that the Planning Department costs related to project and plans reviews are typically 100% cost recovered. The preamble of the expenditure analysis section indicates that the parking costs were reduced by 50 percent to account for the higher transit ridership; however, there currently is no Town shuttle route serving Clubhouse Drive. The closest one is Route #8 off of Brush Creek Road and Route #3 off of Snowmass Club Circle, both about 0.2 mile or approximately two city blocks) from the Club Commons site. According to the FIA, the Police Department indicated that calls for service to the existing employee housing project were typical of other development in the Town. Police was analyzed using 2005 staffing levels with a 0.6 vehicle per officer rate. The FIA states that this ratio assumes that the Police Department should utilize other officer vehicles that are not typically on patrol, such as animal control vehicles. The FIA projects a need for approximately 0.1 officer or $7,571 for additional operating expenditures and $237 for replacement costs and $1,186 for approximately 0.05 police car. Total annual expenditures for the project are estimated at$60,119 and $1,186 for one- time expenditures per the Police Department projections above. FIA's evaluation of the transit/bus Program: Staff believes it would be valuable for the decision makers to read pages 14 and 15 of the application's FIA regarding the bus program. In summary, the FIA states that: The Skico provides shuttle service from the Club Commons site to the ski base area during peak times only (7-9 AM and 4-6 PM) during the ski season for work related trips. Staff finds this type of service level appears to serve the needs of the Applicant more so than the needs of the employees. For non-work related trips, the Skico expects the employees to walk 0.2 mile (or the equivalent of two city blocks) to the nearest bus stop on Brush Creek Road or the one on Snowmass Club Circle. This might be difficult when carrying retail goods and groceries home, and if that is the case, then staff questions the 43% capture rate in calculating revenues in the FIA, especially for those residents who do not possess a vehicle. The FIA projects no negative impact upon Town shuttle services. However, Staff points out that the reports indicate that the existing Town shuttle service could serve non-work trips. Without convenient transit service during non-work hours, Staff questions if the 43% capture rate could be achieved. It's anticipated that the Club Commons II residents by themselves could generate 16 additional transit riders in the morning peak hours and 22 riders in the afternoon peak hours. This is estimated to be approximately one-half of the riders from the Club Commons I project. The FIA states that these generation rates may underestimate transit ridership for the proposed project, given that the project will likely have more transit-dependent residents than is found elsewhere in the Town. Staff believes the 2 latter is the case, because the ridership numbers supplied by the Applicant are based on a 45%or 60% generation rate per unit, not bedroom, during the peak hours. If utilizing bedrooms, the Transportation Department believes that the potential demand might be: 80 cars in Black Saddle lot at 1.8/car= 126 people (100 cars would be 180 people), plus Club Commons Phase 1 at 154 residents at 60% in the peak hour = 92 people, plus Phase II with 124 residents at 60% in the peak hour= 74 persons. Therefore, the total conservative demand might be closer to 292 passengers. Staff believes this is real transit dependency. The FIA states that the Skico is committed to providing its shuffle service for the additional residents from Club Commons II and to expand its service to accommodate growth of peak riders (assuming those residents need to get to and from work only). The proposed transit stop near the Club Commons site is viewed by the Applicant as addressing an existing deficiency and not as an impact created solely by the proposed Club Commons II project. Per the FIA, the Applicant believes that Town transit access to the employee housing is a planning issue that will need to be addressed in the future and that it is premature to evaluate its fiscal impacts as part of this review. However, more frequent shuttle service may be necessary in order to ensure that the project's estimated 43% capture rate is being achieved and to further restrict parking if additional employee housing is desired by adding a fourth level to the buildings. 3 La ROUTE :t ROUTE ACCOMMODATIONS POINTS SERVED ANDERSON RANCH F RODEO PARKING LOT 4 COUNTRY CLUB TOWNHOMES SERVICE FREE DAY PARKING v-COUNTRY CLUB VILLAS FAIRWAY THREE MEADOW RANCH SNOWMASS CHAPEL murtLe SNOWMASS CLUB euszcO, TWO CREEKS eu°ssor 11 0, N urnOm4s Oti A nnOUn RODEO LOT ROUTE 4 15 MINUTEo This mute mm from www 6A5 a.m to 6:20 p.m. e f I FROM O 10-MINUTE SERVICE 7:00 Lm ma f cOm" 7:20 a.m.-5:2.0 P.M. 20-MINUTE SERVICE 6:45 a.m.-7-.20 a.m. A L 5:20 p.m:6:20 P.M. D mv.w. To reach the Free m.DOm D., Parking In the Rodeo D lot after 6:20 p.m,D use Route R orcall D MEADOW rrovrsx RANCx Dom: 923-3500.ARAPT AD.= sw Affj 4 m",LWp1 snumsnw rtL LmxomL EK FAIRWAY THREE e TWO CREEKS J-y/ unrn COUNTRY CLUB TOW HOMES wucu w SNOWMASS CLUB 8 CLUB vacs cowwnrsn uu sswoa aouwxucmwn,. u. wD FO'Duouwvz xomc^wcx wwnuxw X-COUNTRY ROUTE 3 00 A RODEO PARKING L FREE DAY PARKINGGRunsevery30minutesfrom6:30 a.m to 11:15 p m. Yls 6J Departs Snowmass Club and Villas at:00 and :p0 travels up L,•^"^" Owl Creek.Departs the Mall at:15 and:45 past every hour.Note:for service from 11:15 p.m.to 12:45 a.m."If 923-3500. irLrMi+°s;'lui.,D„rD,,,w,:u°Two Leeks on demand after 5:00 p.m. uweom. Aff..L.......x for service after IZA5 a.m.see-Dida Ride-Info on the Ms/de. e e e S s ROUTE ROUTE ACCOMMODATIONS P DALY TOWNHOMES ACCOMMODATIONS sxunlr sMOUNTAINVIEW4n!' TED.HOMESTEAD TIMBERS CLUB j HORSE RANCH MELTON RANCH Eq,T n SNOWMASS VILLAS o u E MALL LH BIIS STOP s m t r ti1rXEIsOYOptT Av 3 C f cAMT6` DUND b G n 9 A urrnrnrs IN 9 NG aE dY" HORSE RANCHH VR.LAGE ROUTE S I a p RBeE every 30 mhedes Y from 7 a.m to 9:30 p.m.urtncunA E tl Departs the Mall at:00 and 30 past every hour. FI. Departs Stirrup Circle In TC Horse Ranch at:15 and 94jA w 3 45 past every hour. TtcaOS Notes for service from urt w 930 p.m.to 12A5 a.m. o W1923-3500. Em YMCe fhrISMSa.n m t PW a Rlde'b.Ip oa autre. 3 snow,wus fYyr 4400sdD I w mmrvem napoust CLPIIC 7 i.....:F.'• .. 1N'O[) X1100 A MELTON Y unKSns SNOWM RANCH f CENTER swn vM¢ VILLAS LuTTtcROS Ilb tit HOMESTEAD t au*aN DEERBROOR Runs every 20 teWutes.Departs Mall sNO 1^'s TONYWOMU 15,35,:55 past every how. Ri Departs the Slowmasv Carder heading is Loss. AD. to Moutdaht View at A8,all,AS uosscolwnn rn Yta TO DALY past every hour.Rellwe&35 Lm. 3 slu'a RUN 70WNHOMES or after limp m.fad 923-3500 r COURSE THE RIDGE to arrange pick-up. 9 YwNCYYIMDO NORSE RANCH I t ToThe RWgc fromthe Mad use Route 6. THE CROSSEWS I To MLMEw from the Mail use Route 2.SHUTTLE LEAVES STIRRUP CIRCLENotesForservicefromTheRidge or mitmew please call 923-3500. For service after 12AS a.m.see DWI a Ride"Info on inside page. 1 ATTACHMENT TC Report 05-07-07 Club Commons II Preliminary Plan Traffic Impact Analysis (TIA) Summary findings December 2006 The Club Commons II project would generate 180 trips per day (90 inbound and 90 outbound), 22 of which would occur during the evening peak hour. It's anticipated that bus and/or shuttle service could reduce the trip generation reported in the table by up to five percent (5%) in the summer and up to 35% in the winter. For projected future winter traffic volumes on Brush Creek Road, the traffic from the project would constitute less than one percent of the daily and peak hour traffic on the roadway in the winter. Because of construction on Brush Creek Road this past summer, the traffic on the roadway would not normalize until after Labor Day when the shoulder-season begins, so traffic turning movement analyses were not initially conducted on the affected nearby intersections for the project. In Resolution #55 (November 6, 2006), Council did not accept the waiver of such information, but instead stated that the 'Traffic Study Waiver' requested earlier by the Applicant shall only be deferred with said report due prior to Planning Commission resolution and adoption of said resolution. Note: Such an update has since been provided in February 2007. The TIA indicates that the project's effects on roadway and intersection levels of service would be negligible. It is mentioned in the TIA that the road system's capacity is sufficient to accommodate the projected traffic demand, especially since the recent construction project on Brush Creek Road consists of a roundabout that will significantly increase the capacity of the Brush Creek/Highline intersection. The TIA projects that the new units in the project would add approximately 16 riders in the morning and 22 riders in the afternoon. See the previous comments under the FIA review. The TIA states that the Applicant is committed to maintain shuttle services for employees, both with the new project and at least a portion of the existing employee housing project. 4 FELSBURG CiHOLT & l ULLEVIG A/A Roundabout / Baia j/ To Highway 82 Rj e i9 0(2) T203(463 1010(35;- N 0 0a Snowmass Lodge a/a1\ p and Club Site m to e Country f G` eg Club Circle 3744;— w yr 90 Creek Roadd OO To Village Mall To Highway 82 LEGEND xxx(xxx) = AM(PM) Peak Hour Traffic Volumes XXXX = Daily Traffic Volumes x/x = AM/PM Peak Hour Unsignalized Intersection Level Of Service i = Stop Sign Figure 3 Existing Winter Total Traffic Conditions North Snov ass Club Commons 06139 2119107 FELSBURG Cd HOLT & ULLEVIG To Highway 82 e o e e o(t) 20% e 65% e e 3 Snowmass Lodge 0 PO and Club Site- 0 m Country Ogee Club Circle 15% d OW/Creek Road 0 i To Village Mall To Highway 82 LEGEND xXx(XXX) = AM(PM) Peak Hour Traffic Volumes XXXX = Daily Traffic Volumes XX% = Trip Distribution Figure 4 Site Trip Distribution North Snowmass Club Commons 061392/20/07 if OR FELSBURG4HOLT & ULLEVIG Roundabout To Highway 82 cal CO, q h` 2p0` g 45512051 S 205(470 oy^ oo^ G 6 /y o0 10(3 ---7 o rn 65 Co o Snowmass Lodge 0ai1 and Club Site a m F Country T fee Club Circle 40 45 r 90 Kl Creek Road j p0 To Village Mall To Highway 82 LEGEND XXX(XXX) = AM(PM) Peak Hour Traffic Volumes XXXX = Daily Traffic Volumes x/x = AM/PM Peak Hour Unsignalized Intersection Level Of Service a- = Stop Sign Figure 5 0 2008 Winter Background Traffic Conditions North Snowmass Club Commons 06-1392/20/0] 4OP FELSBURG HOLT & ULLEVIG is Roundabout To Highway 82 O e 0 o 20 o 9 45512051 L 4 0 0) a 206(471)- - oo^10(35) o r`mn o NB UFO _ Y Snowmass Lodge a/a oaa and Club Site 19 m F Country X06 Club Circle 41 45 G w yr Ao wa 9 OH'/Creek Road j 19 To Village Mall To Highway 82 LEGEND XXX(XXX) = AM(PM) Peak Hour Traffic Volumes XXXX = Daily Traffic Volumes x/x = All Peak Hour Unsignalized Intersection Level Of Service 11111- = Stop Sign Figure 6 2008 Winter Total Traffic Conditions North Snowmass Club Commons 06-1392/19/0] 0 aFELSBURG C4 HOLT & ULLEVfG Roundabout r/ To Highway 82 li leg ol\s hoo r Lys O A 0l01 y f 10 0(5 —? o 260(590 6 0\o0 15(45 Co J no Snowmass Lodge 3 a,a— 0 and Club Site —0 t0 P Country T tg0 Club Circle 45(55 NGo J`'r oa r 90 da Owl Creek Road jt9 00 To Village Mall To Highway 82 A LEGEND xxx(xxx) = AM(PM) Peak Hour Traffic Volumes XXXX = Daily Traffic Volumes x/x = AM/PM Peak Hour Unsignalized Intersection Level Of Service Stop Sign Figure 7 0 2030 Winter Background Traffic Conditions North Snowmass Club CommonsO6-1392/20/07 i i FELSBURG Ci HOLT & ULLEVIG A/A Roundabout To Highway 82 Rte/ y`NI) ON 5\ 6, 57012551 Oj\ 261(5 1)---- t ( g°^ 15(45) to 0 6 Snowmass Lodge N°% a/a PO and Club Site—0 a to Country B Gaye Club Circle 46(56) Soo per 90 do, owl Creek Road jtp O To Village Mall To Highway 82 LEGEND XXX(XXX) = AM(PM) Peak Hour Traffic Volumes XXXX = Daily Traffic Volumes x/x = AM/PM Peak Hour Unsignalized Intersection Level Of Service i = Stop Sign Figure 8 2030 Winter Total Traffic Conditions North Snowmass Club Commons 06-139 2119/07 ATTACHMENT 4 TC Report 05-07-07 Excerpts from the Base Village Fiscal Impact Analysis, the Transportation Impact Analysis and Parking Strategy, and the Parking Management Plan Base Village Revised Fiscal Impact Analusis Draft^Report i• April 2004 At the same time, the ro ect will require expansion of municipal services in articular those ated to police an transit as well as expansion of emergency services. The project will also trigger the need or a range of off-site infrastructure improvements, most notably including the reconstruction of the Wood Road and Brush Creek intersection. Table 1 Proposed Development Phases IN Base Village Fiscal Impact Analysts Non-Residential Residential Skier Food Community Total Market Total Phases Services Retail &Bev. Facilities SF Employee' Rate Units Beds' By Phase Phase 46,056 10,175 30,524 20,873 107,627 8 138 146 268 Phase 11 3,460 13,241 9,988 6,100 32,789 8 226 234 339 Phase III 0 0 0 0 0 6 128 134 244 Phase IVA' 0 .0 0 , 0 0 8 131 139 270 Cumulative Phase 46,056 10,175 30,524 20,873 107,627 8 138 146 268 Phase 1-11 49,516 23,415 40,512 26,973 140,416 16 364 380 607 Phase 1-111 49,516 23,415 40,512 26,973 140,416 492 514 851 Phase IN 49,516 23,415 40,512 26,973 140,416 30 623 653 1,121 One bedroom equals one bed. Employee units have are bedmom u,L its «j AA y,. Phases IV and V are wmbined. Source:Intr st;Ewnomic 6 Planning Systems BACKGROUND A fiscal impact analysis is a requirement of the Town's Development Code. The Base Village Fiscal Impact Analysis combines the economic activity generated by the project with detailed"time-series" estimates of public revenues and costs including impacts on the operating and capital budgets of the affected jurisdiction. The specific objectives for of the Fiscal Impact Analysis include:. Estimate ongoing and one-time revenues that will accrue to the Town's General fund as well as estimate the costs of providing General fund Town services as well as capital items paid by General fund sources. Estimate the costs and revenues to other Snowmass governmental jurisdiction, including the Snowmass-Wildcat Fire District and Snowmass Water and Sanitation District. 2 Base Village Revised Fiscal Impact Analysis Draft Report April 2004 V. NET FISCAL IMPACTS This section compares annual expenditure to annual revenues to estimate the net fiscal impact on the Town of Snowmass Village General Fund as well as related other jurisdictions impacted by the proposed project. TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE Because of its size,the Base Village Project would require a significant expansion of Town services. However,project revenues are expected to exceed these costs. At the end of Phase I,the project will have a net fiscal impact of$50,146 increasing to$564,708 at buildout(the end of Phase V)as shown on Table 23. Table 23 Net Fiscal Impact, TOSV Base Village Fiscal Impact Analysis Category Phase 1 Phase 141 Phase 1411 Phase I-V On-Going Impacts Revenues 202,838 592,073 924,632 1,249,891 Expenditures 152,692 _399-296 -539961 -685-183 Subtotal 50,146 $192,776 $384,671 $564,708 One-Time/Capital Impacts Revenues 674,529 1,642,858 2,169,922 2,709,340 Expenditures 142397 -375-487 -507.535 -642.717 Subtotal 532,132 $1,267,371 $1,662,387 $2,066,622 Source:Economic 8 Planning Systems The projectis also expected to r uire$642,717 in one-time General Fund ex enses for the acquisition capital assets including a public safety vehicle and four transit shuttles. terse ca ital costs are offset b $2.7 million m one-time revenues or a net fiscal balance of mi 'on. I'heseone-timpreventleswi be generated from the RETT revenues Tom^theinitial s e ofresidential and non-resi entia property. t 29 Snowmass Base Vinaae and Outlying Parcels Transportation Analysis & Parking Management Strategyw Table 1.Base Village Vehicular Trip Generation Estimator Peak Season Day Daily.Trip AM Peak Hour PM Peak HourUse/Slze.? Daily.TripSGenerationRate In Out ,in Out New Uses Residential—640 Unots 3.0/Unit 1,920 34 136 125 67 Employee Units 30 Units 1.25/Unit 38 1 3 3 1 Fanny Hill— 10 Units 5.0/Unit 50 2 4 5 2 Aqua Center 200 0 0 10 10 Commercial-63,900 SF 2011,000 SF 1,278 20 11 57 57 SUBTOTALS 3,486 57 154 200 137 Existing Activity 51'51 SF 1,573/1,000 SF 71 0 5 6 6 6 Bus/Shuttles/Taxis/Limos 1,800 90 90 90 90 Day Skiers—200 Spaces 2/S ace 400 100 0 0 80 Displaced Day Skiers—285 2/Space 570 142 0 0 114 Spaces SUBTOTALS 1,701 53 96 96 62 GRAND TOTALS 5,187 110 250 296 199 Includes effect of lock-off units;assume one-half of lock-off units are closed(613 units plus 27 locked-off studios). I Based on TOSV trip generation rates reduced 40%to reflect central location.This assumes that 60%of residential trips are external to Base Village and 40%are internal via a mode other than a auto.This rate is supported by a variety of sources. Square footage reflects non-skier services uses. Based on TOSV trip generation rates reduced 50%to reflect captive market and central location. This assumes that 50%of commercial trips are specifically attracted to Base Village for commercial purpose and the other 50%are already on-site for other reasons(such as skiing). This is a conservative assumption as a much greater percent of the food and beverage uses will draw from the captive market already at Base Village during peak hours.5 Trip generation rate from ITE's Trio Generation,Sixth Edition reduced 50%to reflect central location. This assumes that one-half of the clinic trips are from the Base Village area via a mode other than auto. 6 These trips exist today during peak times;these estimates are not new trips to the adjacent roadways,but they must be accounted at the Base Village driveways.7 FHU estimate oftrips. e Based on TOSV generation rates reduced 75%to reflect employees living at the same location in which they work. This results in fewer vehicle-trips since employees can walk or utilize transit to make work trips and hence the reduction. i P FELSBURG HOLT & ULLEVIG Page 10 Snowmass Base Viflage and Outlying Parcels Transportation Analysis & Parking Management Strategy B. Transit The Base Village is anticipated to accommodate significant transit activity during peak season. The site plan includes an internal circulation scheme that would accommodate a two-way bus/shuttle operation in which shuttle vehicles would make use of the Snowmelt Road and Wood Road entrances. Given the ski access and activity that the Base Village will provide,the transit center area is expected to serve a significant number of users, most of whom will originate from outside the Base Village area. Seven bus stop parking spaces are provided in the site plan which can be used for Town Shuttles and RFTA buses. A two-way bus/shuttle circulation plan has been created as part of the Base Village development. The seven spaces satisfy the Town's Comprehensive Plan. The Base Village development will "produce" some ridership demand due to residential use, but the development will tend to be a major attraction due to the commercial and ski access. Being located at the Town core, guests/residents staying at Base Village will be in close proximity to most of the Town's activity centers.There is some potential for guests/residents to utilize transit for travel to Aspen. As such,the RFTA and Town service could expect an increase in ridership in light of the Base Village residential component. However, most of the transit service associated with Base Village will be comprised of riders residing outside Base Village being attracted to the area. The Base Village development is also proposed to include a cabriolet connection to the Mall. This people mover is anticipated to operate during day time and night time hours. It will improve the connectivity between the Mall and Base Village. Also incorporated into the Base Village application is the provision for a strong pedestrian connection to the Snowmass Center. These measures, coupled with the Base Village Shuttle service and the fact that the development will already be located at the Town core,will collectively result in a relatively low impact on the Town's shuttle system due to the residential component of Base Village.Again, some overnight Base Village guests are anticipated to make use of RFTA's and the Town's services to travel to Aspen. Transit service to/from the airport will be provided by Base Village and this element will not impact the public transit systems.Also, the Base Village will attract a significant number of riders due to the provide ski access and to the commercial activity. The other proposed development parcels will impact the Town's shuttle system. Using transit rider generation rates from the Snowmass Club Transportation Analysis, prepared by Felsburg Holt& Ullevig,Table 3 was prepared to illustrate potential impacts on the Town's system.As shown, Route 3 would experience the greatest amount of i m Sinclair an Iwaterplantegeveopmens. a i ional 50 riders could be ex ected during , a our, an is impact equates o approxima y o u shuttle rips per our. FELSBURG HOLT & ULLEVIG Page 21 Snowmass Base Village Transportation Analysis & Parking Management Strategy Impact on the Town's shuttle routes will be created by the other development parcels. Route 3 is expected to see the most impact with an houriv increase of up to 50 riders durina peak hours. IAnadditionalshuttawineeoeplacedintoservicetoaccommodatetheincreaseddemand ue o e proposed C. Parking 1. Remote Parking Needs The structured parking proposed is adequate to accommodate all the Base Village uses except the employees associated with the Skier Services and other Base Village functions. Parking for these users is proposed to be accommodated remotely. Base Village is anticipated to generate 650 employees. If 40 percent of these employees could a Ouse wi in own an one-half o'f e Me remaining60 percent commute via automobile at an average auto occupancy of 1.4 persons q per vehicle, the increase in employees could induce 140 vehicles that would need to be accommodated off-site. The recently approved Maintenance facility near the Divide will partially fulfill the off-site parking. A total of 30 s aces are bein rovided to serve employees that are currently parking at either o s , or or a e yin o . s such, 110 off-sites aces would still need to be 1uplied. These spaces should be provided a a ovation or loca ions t at en themselves to s u e service. Preferred locations to accommodate the off-site include the new Golf Course Club House and the S 82/Brush reek Road Intercept Lot. The Golf ourse has a capacity to accommodate 120 vehicles when golfing is out of season. The SH 82 intercept lot may serve as acontingency m e even an extreme condition requesmore employee parking than the Golf Course Club House lot can accommodate. The new Golf Course Club House can be served b TOSV Routes 4 and 8.These routes run adjacent to the Club House an are the most s o serwn o e epa an e Mute 4 s u e s+on e 8 is under utilized. Both routes are proposed to serve the employee parking at the new Golf Club House via esi na e s o s Creek Road. 0- As previously mentioned, 285 day skier parking spaces will be displaced with the development of Base Village. It is anticipated that these vehicles will make use of available parking capacity elsewhere including Two Creeks, the Rodeo Lot, and the SH 82 Intercept Lot. 2. Parking Management The proposed parking structure will require proper management to ensure that is will function at peak times. The Base Village applicant has prepared a detailed parking management plan to ensure that this occurs. Once in place, the plan will be modified and updated as conditions require, and there will be on-going coordination with Town staff relative to the details of the plan. P ELSBURGMOLT & ULLEVIG Page 36 Snowmass Base Village Transportation Analysis & Parking Management Strategy I S-kMM.M1:.Y £ldira w>t pAtT Or { 'R.A . Base Village is anticipated to become a significant center for transit activity within Town. The ski access and commercial uses will attract a significant number of users during peak season. The residential component of Base Village will generate some bus ridership, but given its central location and close proximity to the Town activities, this component is not expected to be significant. The other develo ment parcels associated a Village will generate 50 eak hour riders on the Town's bus s istem. oute 3, serving eastern Snowmass Village and Two ree cs, will a impacte the most necessitahng an additional cusunngpeatimes.es- Off-site will need toded to accommodate Base Villa a emplo aeysand dis laceeddaa -sers"''I s aces can e rTi ovideec at ilTaMIT u—rse luERouse—h'Tiic can est be serve by TOSV Routes 4 and 8. Additional parking would also be available at the remote lots including the SH 8ZBrush Creek Road Intercept Lot possibly with accompanying shuttle service to Base Village. A 679-space parking structure (including surface parking)will be incorporated into the Base Village development. Given the nature and quantity of uses to be served by the structure, its size will be adequate. Key considerations in the parking supply/demand analysis are: Parking for Village uses will not all peak at the same time during the day. Most employees for the various Village uses will park off-site, thus reducing the demand for each.use relative to typical requirements. A very strong public transit service will be available for users of the Village facility. Base Village management will provide an airport shuttle service to overnight guests eliminating the need for guests to possess a vehicle. A firm mana errant parking plan will be implemented to ensure that shared parking can take p ace and can be flexible as demand fluctuations take place. A cabriolet connection will be provided between Base Village and the Mall permitting non-Base Village guests to travel without reliance on an automobile. I FELSBURG HOLT & ULLEVIG Page 38 t Employee Parking Employees will not be allowed to park in the Base Village Parking structure during peak periods. ASC employees who choose to drive will be required to park in the parking lot for the Snowmass Club Golf Clubhouse, (150 spaces). All other Base Village employees except one space for business managers and owners will park in the Highway 82/Brush Creek Road Intercept lot. From these location employees will utilize TOSV or RFTA shuttle service to and from Base Village. During peak usage periods. shuttle service for ASQ employees from the golf clubhouse lot and Intercept lot will be provided by ASC. To avoid over parking in the golf clubhouse lot a permit system similar to that now used for the lettered lots will be implemented. Commercial non-restaurant space parking is provided at the code mandated rate which includes provisions for employee parking This should allow employee parking to occur during the free parking hours after 6 p during ski season and during non-ski season periods. Surface Short Term Parking/Children Center The 34 space surface lot adjacent to Building 2A will be an intensely managed parking area during the ski season. ASC employees will expedite the unloading and loading of equipment and children during peak periods. The primary purpose of this lot is to provide for short-term drop off and pick up of children enrolled in the Children Center located in Building 1. During the morning hours from 8am until 10 am and during the afternoon hours of 2:30 to 4:30 pm, an ASC employee will be in charge of the entrance to this lot initially. As the Village Company(Master Association)becomes fully functional, this enforcement task, towing if necessary, at the short- term parking will fall under their ownership and management of the Master Association. Thus, during peak periods, access will be restricted for the single purpose of the Children's Center. Between the designated drop off and pick up periods and after 4:30 pm, parking will be signed for free 30 and 60 minute parking similar to Parking Lot 6. During non-ski season, this lot will continue to be restricted to 30 and 60 minute free parking on an all day basis. This area will be monitored after Base Village operation commences to determine the appropriate length of parking time limits and the limits may be adjusted to match parking demand. Check-In Parking/Van Drop off A total of 24 parking spaces are being provided under Building 2C and in front of Building 7 to allow short-term parking for guest arrival/check-in. The Bell Staff located at the entry to Building 7 will monitor these spaces. Bellman will offer to valet park vehicles for guests/ owners after they have checked in or the guests may choose to Self Park in the designated residential space using their room key for access. Vans transporting skiers from other hotel properties from either Snowmass Village, Aspen or down valley will utilize the area directly in front of Building 7 to drop off and pick up skiers other than The Little Nell which will exclusively use the Building 8 entry area. Ski groups using coaches for transportation to the Base Village will be managed to utilize the arrival area of Building 7, but one of the below grade bus stops directly behind Building 7 may be utilized as available space permits during off-peak periods. Transit center bus stops maybe used during peak periods as space permits, but priority will be given to public transit. Overnight coach parking for groups staying in the village will be offsite utilizing the Rodeo, Two Creeks or Intercept lots. 4 ATTACHMENT 5 TC Report 05-07-07 Summary requirements from the Base Village and Snowmass Mountain Restricted Housing Agreements COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS RESTRICTED HOUSING AGREEMENTS' REQUIREMENTS JANUARY 2007 Category Base Village Snowmass Mountain Amendment Ordinance 04- 21 Ordinance 05- 2 Restricted Housing 137, 455 sq. ft. 8, 360 sq. ft. Mitigation Requirement . Methods of Satisfaction Provision of employee housing on- site, off- site and Not addressed utilization of a portion of 42, 105 sq. ft. of housing credit. Base Village site: 19, 010 sq. ft. Club Commons II: 38, 143 sq. ft. Sinclair Meadows: 31, 708 sq. ft. Credits: 38, 931 sq. ft. Other: 9, 664 sq. ft. Timing for Satisfaction Developer intends to use Club Commons II to satisfy a " Can be satisfied by the development of Club Commons portion of the restricted housing requirement attributable II provided that ASC has obtained Final PUD Plan to Phase 1 of the Base Village project( Sinclair approval prior to January 1, 2006 and has received a Meadows for Phase 2). certificate of occupancy for the completed project prior to January 1, 2008" Club Commons II construction will begin September 2005 and completed October 2006. ( Sinclair Meadows between May 2006 and November 2007) Club Commons II will be completed prior to final completion of Phase 1 of Base Village ( Sinclair Meadows prior to finishing Phase 2 of Base Village) Developer shall obtain a building permit for Club Commons II or other employee housing before the developer obtains a permit for Building 6 in Base Village same applies with issuance of a C. O.) Category Base Village Snowmass Mountain Amendment Ordinance 04- 21 Ordinance 05- 2 Caveat condition ASC acknowledges that Club Commons If has not yet ASC acknowledges that Club Commons 11 has not yet been approved by the Town and that the Town has no been approved by the Town and that the Town has no obligation to approve such project. obligation to approve such project. Remaining Mitigation to 9, 664 sq. ft. remains un- mitigated. It shall be mitigated If the above conditions are not timely met by ASC, the be Satisfied by alternative method for mitigation by amending ASC will pay to the Town a cash- in- lieu amount agreement prior to issuance of a building permit for calculated by multiplying $ 146/ sq. ft. construction and Building 10AB, 11 or 12 or pay cash- in- lieu to Town land costs by sq. ft. of unmitigated housing by the CPI prior to issuance of a building permit for Building 11 by Adjustment Factor. multiplying$ 90/ sq. ft. design and construction costs and 56/ sq. ft. land costs by sq. ft. of unmitigated housing by the CPI Adjustment Factor, Club Commons 11 Agreement assumed approval by the Town of Club See above. relation Commons II project similar to the Sketch Plan submitted August 15, 2003. If Club Commons II is not approved by the Town before June 1, 2005, Developer and the Town shall cooperate in identifying an alternative method for mitigating that portion of the Restricted Housing Requirement allocated to Club Commons U. Developer shall not be entitled to receive a building permit for Buildings 5, 9AB or 9C in Phase 2 of the Base Village project or for any building in any subsequent phase, unless and until such alternative mitigation method has been identified and/ or satisfied, as the Town may require. Ownership Club Commons II Restricted Housing shall be retained The Club Commons II project will not be owned by the by the Developer, or an affiliate of Developer, and Town and it is intended that it be owned by ASC, or an leased to eligible individuals in the Town. affiliate, and leased to eligible individuals in the Town. Category Base Village Snowmass Mountain Amendment Ordinance 04- 21 Ordinance 05- 2 Initial sales price Initial sales prices to be consistent with the then- current Not applicable sales prices for comparable units and sizes in the Daly Townhomes project. Rental rates Initial rental rates to be consistent with the then- current Initial lease rates to be consistent with the then- current rental rates for comparable units and sizes at Mountain rental rates for comparable units and sizes at Mountain View Phase II and Club Commons I projects. View Phase II and Club Commons I projects. Restrictive Covenant Prior to the sale or leasing of a restricted housing unit, Prior to the lease of the project, ASC will restrict the use Developer shall execute and record a" Declaration of of the property for the benefit of the Town maintaining Restrictive Covenants" against the restricted housing the units in perpetuity in conformance with the restricted unit. It shall provide that such units shall be maintained housing agreement at restricted rents and establishing a in perpetuity at restricted rents and that Snowmass preference for Snowmass Village employees as tenants, Village employees will be favored as renters of the to the extent that sufficient demand therefrom exists. restricted housing units, to the extent that sufficient demand therefrom exists. ATTACHMENT 6 TC Report 05-07-07 Provided, however, the winter use trails shall each year be generally as comprehensive and consistent with the trail alignment for the 2001-2002 winter season. 4. Winteroad Crossing. SCA shall allow TOSV to maintain a twenty foot wide portion Clubhouse Drive as a winter road crossing, including markers adjacent to the crossing to identify its location. The crossing shall be located generally in the mid-point of the portion of Clubhouse Drive between Brush Creek Road and the clubhouse parking lot entrance. SCA shall place removable bollards within Clubhouse Drive at the Brush Creek Road entrance and in a location directly North of the clubhouse parking lot entrance during the times when the winter road crossing is in place. These road crossing operations are subject to review by SCA, TOSV and the Snowmass-Wildcat Fire District not earlier than one year after the effective date of this winter use license. If such continued operations are unsatisfactory to any of the above named parties, TOSV staff may refer the issue to TOSV Town Council for resolution. SCA agrees to cooperate with any such resolution provided that such cooperation does not cause SCA to incur any additional costs nor cause any damage to the golf course and its improvements. 5. No Conveyance. SCA does not hereby convey to TOSV any right, title or interest in or to the Property but merely grants the License as set forth herein. SCA, for its successors and assigns, excepts and reserves all rights not expressly granted to TOSV hereunder, including without limitation, the right to use and enjoy the Property, including the land beneath and the airspace above, for all purposes that do not unreasonably interfere with the License granted hereunder. Use of the Property pursuant to this License shall not unreasonably interfere with the use of the Property by SCA. 6. No Improvements; Limitations on Uses. TOSV and its invitees may use the area subject to the License solely for trails for pedestrians, skiing, and other on-snow non-motorized uses, including snowshoes and sleds. TOW and its invitees shall be prohibited from operating horses, mountain bikes, snowmobiles, snowcats or any other motorized equipment except for trail setting and maintenance purposes. TOSV shall be prohibited from storing or parking any equipment, vehicles or material within the area subject to the License except in areas, if any, designated by SCA in its sole discretion. Except for the grooming vehicle storage area described below, TOSV shall not construct, erect or place on the area subject II II DAVISIIIIIIIIIIlli I IIIIIIIIII III I II'IIII II 0 469188 D f Page 3 of 10 ei:sza ATTACHMENT 7 TC Report 05-07-07 Page 1 of 2 TOWN COUNCIL RESOLUTION NO. 64, SERIES OF 2006, EXCERPT DIRECTIVES TO PLANNING COMMISSION REVIEW OF CLUB COMMONS II PRELIMINARY PLAN Section Two: Direction to Planning Commission. Having determined that review of this application should first be completed before the Planning Commission, to address a comprehensive review of the application against Code Sections 16A-5-340(b), Preliminary Plan Review Intent and Issues," 16A-5-300(c), "General Restrictions," 16A- 5-310, "Review Standards" for PUDs, 16A-5-220, the Town Council hereby identifies the following components or core issues within the application which the Planning Commission should primarily focus upon and provide their recommendations: 1. How the remaining employee housing requirements for Base Village and the remaining 8,360 square feet employee housing requirement from the Snowmass Mountain Final PUD Ordinance No. 2, Series of 2005, would or might be mitigated; 2. Determine if there might be additional needs for employee housing, also in consideration of any height impacts; 3. Address proposed height impacts against the Code criteria; 4. Address Options including possible funding mechanisms for the provision of bus shuttles or routes and the general transit/transportation service adequacy for the employee housing project; 5. Bus turnaround design adequacy; 6. Adequacy of pedestrian activity areas and connectivity provisions; 7. Adequacy of Nordic crossings in the vicinity; 8. Adequacy of unit locations and their mix, including ADA units as they relate to elevators and their locations; 9. Adequacy of the parking provisions and how it compares with Club Commons I; 10. Determine options for restricting parking, such as for seasonal units or for certain other units, especially if additional employee housing units are recommended; and 11. Determine how the fiscal impact report in the application folds in with or compares with the Base Village fiscal impact report. ATTACHMENT TC Report 05-07-07 Page 2 of 2 TOWN COUNCIL RESOLUTION NO. 55, SERIES OF 2006, EXCERPT CONDITION OF DEFERRAL ITEM VS. WAIVER The "Traffic Study Waiver" requested by the Applicant shall be a deferral with said report due prior to Planning Commission resolution and adoption of said resolution. Note: The comprehensive Traffic Impact Analysis[TIA]was initially provided in December 2006 and referred to affected staff and the Town's traffic engineering consultant for review and comment. The latest update of the TIA was submitted on February 22, 2007 in response to previous staff comment. That TIA was under review earlier with comments requested by March 12, 2007. As of the writing of this report, no additional review comments were submitted on the latest TIA). SNOWMASS ASPEN MOUNTAIN ASPEN HIGHLANDS BUTTERMILK ASPEN S N O W M A S Sn ASPEN SKIING COMPANY May 2, 2007 ATTACHMENT 8 TC Report 05-07-07 Jim Wahlstrom Town of Snowmass Village PO Box 5010 Snowmass Village, CO 81615 Dear Jim, Based on recent discussions with Russ Forrest and David Fackler in reference to funding a new transit route that would serve the Rec Center, Rodeo Housing, Club Commons, Black Saddle and Melton Ranch it was determined that our best course of action at this time will be to continue the private shuttles provided by ASC. We commit to continue to run those shuttles as required by the Snowmass Club Phase 1 and Base Village approvals and will add service to Club Commons 11. If the Town decides at some time in the future to establish a new route to serve the Town related entities mentioned above, we will entertain discussions to fund a portion of that expense in return for relief from the private shuttle obligations. Since no shuttle service to Club Commons II is contemplated by the town at this time, the applicant wishes to remove the proposed bus turnaround from Council's consideration in the review of this application,We will continue to provide the additional sidewalks, as suggested by the planning commission to provide better access to transit for those employees walking to the RFTA and TOSV stops at the intersection of Brush Creek Road and Clubhouse Drive. In reference to parking we commit to a Parking Management Plan that will allow permit only parking with preference provided first to the residents of the B12 Building designed for year round residents at a ratio of 1.25 spaces per bedroom. No permits will be provided to residents of the seasonal housing if the number of permits requested exceeds the parking ratios proposed in this application. Additionally, the applicant is comfortable with the town prohibiting residents of Club Commons II from obtaining a Town permit to the numbered lots.The Town Council may want to discuss whether the residents of the year round housing should be eligible for TOSV permits for the numbered lots. We look forward to our meeting on May 7th. Sincerely, Don Schuster T,' PAY 0 :: 2007 Coalmun;; Davelopment P.O.Box 1248 Aspen,CO 81612.1248 970-925.1220 www.aspensnowmass.com TOWN COUNCIL COMMUNIQUE Meeting Date: May 7,2007 Agenda Item: RODEO PLACE HOMES SOLAR PANEL UPDATE & DISCUSSION Presented By: Joe Coffey Core Issues:Review proposed solar panel placement on home roofs. Determine if the solar panels will be a purchase option or mandatory feature for homes. Background: Council requested a follow up discussion on the Rodeo Place Homes solar panel option from the April 16, 2007 meeting. The proposed solar panel system will produce domestic hot water for these homes. The Snowmass Village Homeowners Association Rules allow solar panels of this type and size to be installed on the Rodeo Place home roofs. I have attached a site plan with the solar panel placement identified on each roof of the Rodeo Place Homes for discussion and review. The solar panels require an 8' X 8' section of the roof. Light House Solar of Boulder has reviewed our site and determined our roof orientations are very favorable for this application. There are only three homes that do not operate at the optimum performance level and these homes still operate in the 90%, 92%, and 94% percent efficiency range. The Housing Manager to date has presented the solar panels as an option to the prospective home- buyers. The Rodeo Place Home purchase application period has ended and we are now qualifying applicants for a housing lottery to be held in mid—May. The application process requires employees to provide a loan pre approval letter from a lending institution for the purchase price of these homes. At this time the solar panel system has not been included in the sales prices of these homes. The solar panel system is an $ 8,800.00 expense for each home. These homes have been designed to be very energy efficient and the solar panels were always considered as a purchase option. Altering the sales prices of these homes at this time is not recommended, as this will require many applicants to obtain new loan qualification letters and possibly delay the lottery. Council Options: Approve the solar assisted domestic hot water heating system as a homeowner purchase option. Direct the Housing Manager to add the solar hot water heating s stem onto the sales price of each home. Approve and subsidize the installation of the solar hot water heating system for each home with housing construction funds. This will be a $ 211,200.00 subsidy for all 24 applications. Staff The Development Team has made energy conservation a top Recommendations: priority for the Rodeo Place Homes. The use of solar panels reconfirms the Town's commitment to building a green, sustainable, and energy efficient employee housing neighborhood. Reducing energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions has been a top priority in the design of these homes. The Housing Manager has set the home prices with Council approval and the solar panels have always been a purchase option. I do not believe the Town should raise the sales prices at this time for the solar panel system. The Council has two options at this time. Option one is to leave the solar panel system as a homeowner purchase option. Option two is to subsidize the solar panel installation with Housing Funds for each home. I recommend for the Town Council to subsidize the installation of the solar panels with Housing Funds. In addition to creating new housing saving our environment and reducing energy consumption seems to be the most appropriate use for the Town's Housing funds. RODEO PLACED SOLAR H . W. PANEL LQC A ii NS MAY 1, 2007 SOLAR HOT WATER T - _ - _ _ _ _ _ _ COLLECTOR LOCATION ( TYP.) WEST o EAST mil- - - - - SNOWMASS DESIGN COMMITEE Post Office Box 5670 Snowmass Village, Colorado 81615 (970) 923-4733 April 27, 2007 Town Housing Authority Box 5010 Snowmass Vlg., CO 81615 Attn: Joe Coffey Dear Joe: The Snowmass Design Committee met on April 19`h, and at that meeting we discussed the proposed solar panels for the Rodeo Place subdivision. The Committee applauds the foresight of using solar. Our only comment would be if circumstances require the use of raised panels instead of flat to gain maximum solar advantage, that might have a negative impact on the neighboring subdivisions. If we can help in any way, please do not hesitate to contact us. Sincerely, Jim Gustafson, Acting Chairman Cc: Design Committee members TOWN COUNCIL COMMUNIQUE Meeting Date: May 7, 2007 Agenda Item: SECOND READING - ORDINANCE 5, SERIES OF 2007 MODEL TRAFFIC CODE UPDATE SECOND READING OF AN ORDINANCE ADOPTING THE 2003 REVISION TO THE COLORADO MODEL TRAFFIC CODE BY REFERENCE FOR THE REGULATION OF TRAFFIC IN THE TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE BY AMENDING THE PROVISIONS OF CHAPTER 8 OF THE MUNICIPAL CODE OF THE TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE. Presented By: John Dresser TOSV currently operates under the 1977 revision to the General Info: Model Traffic Code (MTC). TOSV declined to adopt the 1995 revisions to MTC and now the 2003 revisions have been promulgated for municipalities in Colorado to consider. TOSV Police Chief, Sergeant and the Town Attorney have consulted with each other, reviewed other relevant jurisdiction's (State of Colorado, Glenwood Springs and Aspen) codifications of the MTC together with those jurisdiction's local amendments to the MTC and fine schedules to insure an effective method of regulating traffic within TOSV. Council Options: Discuss Ordinance No. 5 of 2007 and either approve at second reading, amend at second reading, or deny at first reading Resolution. Staff Recommendation: Approve second reading of Ordinance No. 5. TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL ORDINANCE NO. 05 SERIES OF 2007 AN ORDINANCE ADOPTING THE 2003 REVISION TO THE COLORADO MODEL TRAFFIC CODE BY REFERENCE•FOR THE REGULATION OF TRAFFIC IN THE TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE BY AMENDING THE PROVISIONS OF CHAPTER 8 OF THE MUNICIPAL CODE OF THE TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE. WHEREAS, the Town of Snowmass Village previously adopted the 1977 revision of the Colorado Model Traffic Code, with local amendments, to regulate traffic in the Town; and WHEREAS, the Town Council of the Town of Snowmass Village finds that updating the Colorado Model Traffic Code by adoption of the 2003 revision thereto, together with updated local amendments by the adoption of this Ordinance is necessary for the preservation of the public health, safety and welfare; and WHEREAS, the Town Council has reviewed the 2003 revision of the Colorado Model Traffic Code, together with the local amendments and conducted a public hearing on May 7, 2007. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED by the Town Council of the Town of Snowmass Village as follows: 1. Action. Chapter 8 of the Snowmass Village Municipal Code shall be amended and restated as written on Exhibit "A", which is attached hereto and made a part hereof. 2. Severability. If any provision of this Ordinance or application hereof to any person or circumstance is held invalid, the invalidity shall not affect any other provision or application of this Ordinance which can be given effect without the invalid provision or application, and, to this end, the provisions of this Ordinance are severable. READ, APPROVED AND ADOPTED on first reading on April 16, 2007 upon the motion of Council member Lewis, the second of Council member Sparhawk and upon a vote of four (4) in favor and zero (0) opposed. Mayor Mercatoris was absent. Ordinance No. 5, Series of 2007 Page 2 READ, APPROVED AND ADOPTED on second reading on May 7, 2007 upon the motion of Council Member the second of Council Member and upon a vote of_ in favor and _ opposed. TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE By: Douglas Mercatoris, Mayor ATTEST: Rhonda B. Coxon, Town Clerk APPROVED AS TO FORM: John C. Dresser, Jr., Town Attorney CHAPTER 8 Vehicles and Traffic Article I Model Traffic Code Sec. 8-1 Adoption Sec. 8-2 Deletions,amendments and additions to the MTC Sec. 8-3 Applicability See. 8-4 Penalties Sec. 8-5 Validity Article If Parking Regulations Sec. 8-21 General Sec. 8-22 Definitions Sec. 8-23 Permit required Sec. 8-24 Repealed Sec. 8-25 Distribution of permits Sec. 8-26 Display of permits Sec. 8-27 Fee schedule Sec. 8-28 Prohibited areas Sec. 8-29 Camping prohibited Sec. 8-30 Exemption Sec. 8-31 Penalty Article III Penalty Fines and Points Sec. 8-51 Penalty assessment fine schedule Sec. 8-52 Point assessment for scheduled violations Sec. 8-53 Schedule 8-1 Supp.3 Vehicles and Traffic Section 8-2 ARTICLE I b) Section 109 of the MTC is hereby amended by the addition of the following Model Traffic Code subsection: Sec.8-1. Adoption. Subsection 109(13). No person shall operate any type of motor or motorized vehicle, Pursuant to parts 1 and 2 of article 16 of title including snowmobiles on any sidewalk, trail, 31 and part 4 of article 15 of title 30, C.R.S., path or other pedestrian way, except town and there is hereby adopted by reference Articles I county maintenance,police, fire, ambulance and and II, inclusive, of the 2003 edition of the emergency vehicles are permitted" Model Traffic Code" promulgated and published as such by the Colorado Department c) Section 228 of the MTC is hereby of Transportation, Safety and Traffic amended by the addition ofthe following: Engineering Branch, 4201 East Arkansas Avenue, EP 700., Denver, CO 80222. The Subsection (9)(a). The Chief of Police is subject matter of the Model Traffic Code relates authorized to close any portion of a public primarily to comprehensive traffic control street or highway within the Town to public regulations for the Town. The purpose of this travel or to prohibit the use thereof unless Ordinance and the Code adopted herein is to motor vehicles using same are equipped with provide a system of traffic regulations thoughout adequate snow tires or tire chains as defined the state and the nation. Three (3) copies of the herein during storms or at such times when Model Traffic Code adopted herein are now other dangerous driving conditions exist and, filed in the office of the Clerk of the Town of in the discretion of the Chief of Police, such Snowmass Village, Colorado, and may be closure or prohibition is necessary for the inspected during regular business hours. protection and safety of the public. Such prohibition or restriction of use shall be Sec. 8-2. Deletions,amendments and effective when signs giving notice thereof are additions to the MTC. erected upon such portion of said public street or highway, and it shall be unlawful to a) The following Articles and Sections of proceed in violation of such notice. the MTC are hereby deleted: 8-3 Supp.3 Vehicles and Traffic Section 8-2 b) The following types of tires or tire chains are considered adequate: 1. Tires with conventional mud and snow treads (M/S designation), with or without studs and minimum tread depth of 1/8 of an inch. 2. Any type of tire equipped with plastic, cable, or steel link tire chains. I Four wheel drive vehicles (all four wheels engaged) with snow tires or conventional road tread tires with a mini- mum tread depth of 1/8 of an inch." 8-4 Supp.3 Vehicles and Traffic Section 8-1 d) Section 504 of the MTC is hereby 40,000) pounds GVW on all Town roads amended by the addition of the following: between 12:00 a.m. on March 15 to 12:00 p.m. on June 15 of every year. The load 7)Length limitations on certain roadways. limitation may be waived or modified at the The length limitations set forth in this section discretion of the Public Works Director shall apply to the following roads: based on the structural integrity of the road system in any particular year, due to climatic conditions. A special permit may be granted 1. Brush Creek Road. to vehicles used for the mobilization of equipment only; maximum GVW allowed for 2. Carriageway Road, a/k/a Snow- five-axle vehicles (two [2] tandem axle melt Road. groups) shall be sixty thousand (60,000) pounds GVW; maximum GVW for seven- I Snowmass Club Circle. axle vehicles (two [2] tri-axle groups) shall be eighty thousand(80,000)GVW. 4. Daly Lane. 5. Divide Road. 6. Elbert Lane. 7. Fall Lane. 8. Faraway Road to the driveway of the Ridge Condominiums. 9. Highline Road." 10. Owl Creek Road. 11. Wood Road to the driveway of the Wood Run V Condominiums. On all other roads in the Town the maximum length of a vehicle or combination of vehicles shall be forty-five(45) feet. A special permit for over-length vehicles for material delivery or mobilization of equipment may be granted,but not for continuous trips by vehicles engaged in ongoing construction activities related to earthwork excavation or roadway construction. e) Section 508 of the MTC is hereby amended by the addition of the following: d) Seasonal weight limitations. There shall be a weight limitation of forty thousand 8-2 Vehicles and Traffic Section 8-1 e) Exemption from seasonal weight g) Section 1101 ofthe Model Traffic Code limitations. The following roads shall be is hereby amended to read as follows: exempt from the seasonal weight limitations Section 1101(2)(b). Fifteen miles per . set forth in this Code: hour in any business district, as defined in section 42-1-102(11), C.R.S.;" 1. Brush Creek Road. Section 1101(2)(c). Twenty miles per hour in any residence district, as defined in2. Carriageway Road, a/k/a Snow- section 42-1-102(80), C.R.S.;" melt Road. h) Section 1202 of the MTC is amended 3. Snowmass Club Circle. by the addition of the following subsections: 4. Daly Lane. Subsection (1). No persons shall park a motor vehicle which exceeds 18 feet in 5. Divide Road. length in any Town regulated parking lot. The Town Manager may, from time to time, 6. Elbert Lane. designate parking lots or other areas where the parking of oversized vehicles will be 7. Fall Lane.allowed and may promulgate such rules and regulations governing the same as it deems 8. Faraway Road to the driveway of appropriate. the Ridge Condominiums. Subsection (2). No person shall park any9. Highline Road."vehicle upon a street, highway or public parking lot in such a manner or under such10. Owl Creek Road. conditions as to interfere with the free movement of vehicular or pedestrian traffic 11. Wood Road to the driveway of or proper street, highway or public parkingtheWoodRunVCondominiums. lot maintenance and snow removal. f) Section 509(1) of the MTC is hereby amended to read as follows: Any police officer, as defined in section 18-1-901(3)(1)(IV), C.R.S., having reason to believe that the weight of a vehicle and load is unlawful is authorized to require the driver to stop and submit to a weighing of the same by means of either portable or stationary scales or shall require that such vehicle be driven to the nearest public scales." 8-3 Vehicles and Traffic Section 8-2 Subsection (3). No person shall store 1804(2), C.R.S., or any of the circumstances any items of personal property, including but or conditions listed below, such officer shall not limited to automobiles, recreation require such vehicle to be moved, removed, vehicles, trailers, construction equipment or or cause the same to be immobilized, moved materials, or similar items, in or upon any or removed and placed in storage in the Town regulated parking lot without the prior nearest garage or other place of safety approval of the Town Manager. The Town designated or maintained by the munici- Manager may impose such reasonable terms pality, and neither the officer nor anyone or conditions upon his approval as deemed operating under his direction shall be liable appropriate. For the purpose of this for any damage to such vehicle occasioned regulation, any such item of personal by such movement, immobilization or re- property which has remained in the same moval. general location or upon any Town regulated parking lot for more than 168 consecutive 1. Vehicle left unattended and hours shall be deemed to be stored by the unlocked with engine running, or ignition owner thereof unlocked or keys left in the ignition switch. 2. Vehicle stopped, standing or Subsection (4). Whenever any police parked upon any area or portion of a street officer finds a vehicle, attended or unat- or parking lot in violation of or contrary tended, stopped, standing or parked upon any to a parking limitation or prohibition set portion of a public road, street or parking lot forth in the MTC, provided that such normally open to and accessible by the public street or parking lot has been posted with within this municipality in such manner as to an official sign or signs giving notice of constitute a violation of Section 1204 of this such limitation or prohibition. Code, or left unattended for a period of twenty-four (24) or more hours and pre- 3. When any vehicle is stopped, sumed to be abandoned under the conditions standing or parked in violation of any prescribed by 42-4-1803(2) and 42-4- traffic ordinance and is an obstruction or hazard to any lawful function or restricts normal ingress or egress to property pub- lic or private. 4. When operator or person exercis- ing control over a vehicle is taken into custody by the police department and the vehicle would thereby be left unattended upon public or private property. 5. When any vehicle is found being operated upon any road, street or public way in violation of the provisions of Sec- tions 202,204-210, 223 and 224 herein. 8-6 Vehicles and Traffic Section 8-2 6. When the owner or operator of a streets, roads, alleys or driveways for the vehicle is reasonably suspected to be purpose of conducting fire suppression or using invalid license plates, license per- rescue operations. mits or inspection certificates. 12. When any vehicle is stopped, 7. (i) When any vehicle is reasonably standing or parked within ten (10) feet of suspect of being involved in any hit and the point on the street, road, alley or run accident; or (ii) when any vehicle is driveway closest to a fire hydrant or when under the control of a driver who is rea- any vehicle in any way obstructs a fire sonably suspected of having been hydrant or fire department connection for involved in any hit and run accident. an automatic sprinkler or stand pipe sys- tem that prevents its being readily acces- 8. When any vehicle is reasonably sible to the fire department." suspected of being stolen or parts thereof to be stolen. 13. When the owner of a vehicle has failed to respond to four (4) or more 9. When the owner/operator of any notices of parking violations within the vehicle is turned into custody for a sus- specified ten (10) days from the first pected misdemeanor or felony, or when notice, or if an arrest warrant has been the vehicle is suspected of containing issued for the owner." stolen goods or other contraband. 10. When any vehicle has had an immobilizing device unlawfully removed i) Section 1204(1) of the MTC is hereby there from or any vehicle has been unlaw- amended by the addition of the following fully removed from the police storage or paragraph: impounded area without obtaining a proper release for the vehicle or without Paragraph (1). On any roadway or within payment of the required release fees.six (6) feet of the main traveled portion of such roadway unless otherwise permitted by 11. When any vehicle is stopped, official sign." standing or parked on any public street, road or alley or any private street, road, alley or driveway in a manner that restricts the clear unobstructed width to j) Section 1204 of the MTC is hereby less than twenty (20) feet, when such amended by the addition of Subsection (5), (6), street, road, alley or driveway provides (7)and(8), which shall read as follows: emergency vehicle access to any building. It is intended that fire equipment be able Subsection (5). No person shall remove to position at any point along these or cause to be removed any immobilizing device that has been installed or affixed by any personnel of the Town of Snowmass Village or remove or cause to be removed any vehicle from any authorized police storage area or impound facility without first paying any required fee and obtaining a written release from the Police Department 8-9 Supp.3 Vehicles and Traffic Section 8-2 and exhibiting such written release to any police officer upon demand." Subsection (6). As to any vehicle impounded by or at the request of the Town of Snowmass Village, its agents or employees, a person who has a legal entitlement to possession of the vehicle has a right to a post-seizure administrative hearing to determine whether there was probable cause to impound the vehicle, if such person files a written demand, on forms to be provided by the Town, with the Town of Snowmass Village within ten (10) days after the mailing of a Notice of Stored Vehicle. The Notice of Stored Vehicle shall be mailed to the registered owner or the owner's agent, based on the address reflected on the vehicle registration, within forty-eight (48) hours, excluding weekends and holidays, after impounding and storage of such vehicle. 8-10 Supp.3 Vehicles and Traffic Section 8-2 Subsection (7). As to any vehicle 1) Section 1406 of the MTC is amended immobilized by or at the request of the Town by the addition of the following subsections: of Snowmass Village, its agents or employees, an Immobilization Notice will be Subsection (6). No person shall place or affixed to the immobilized vehicle stating cause to be placed snow on or upon any area that release can be obtained only after the that is owned or controlled by the Town, owner (or agent) posts a bond with the Clerk including, without limitation, parking lots, of the Municipal Court or the Police rights-of-way, roads, sidewalks or trails, Department, after which a post-seizure unless such person has first obtained the administrative hearing to determine whether approval of the Public Works Director." there was probable cause to immobilize such vehicle may be held if a written request for such a hearing is made within twenty (20) days of the payment of the bond. Subsection (8). The post-seizure hearing shall be conducted before a hearing officer designated by the Town Manager within forty-eight (48) hours of receipt of a written demand therefor from the person seeking the hearing unless such person waives the right to a speedy hearing. Weekends and holidays are to be excluded from the calculation of the forty-eight-hour period. The hearing officer shall be someone other than the person who directed the impounding and storage, or immobilization, of the vehicle. The sole issue before the hearing officer shall be whether there was probable cause to impound or immobilize the vehicle in question. Probable cause to impound or immobilize" shall mean such a state of facts which would lead a person of ordinary care and prudence to believe that there was a sufficient breach of local, state or federal law to authorize the removal or immobilization ofthe vehicle." k) Section 1205 of the MTC is hereby amended by the addition of the following subsection: Subsection (4). On those streets and municipal parking lots which have been approved for angle parking, no person shall stop, stand or park a vehicle at other than the angle so approved." 8-10 Supp. 12 Vehicles and Traffic Section 8-2 Sec. 8-3. Applicability. This Article shall apply to every street, alley, sidewalk area, driveway, park and every other public way, public place or public parking area, either within or outside the corporate limits of the Town, the use of which the Town has juris- diction and authority to regulate. The provisions of Sections 1401, 1402, 606 and 1413, of the adopted Model Traffic Code, respectively concerning reckless driving, careless driving, unauthorized devices and eluding officers shall apply not only to public places and ways but also throughout the Town. (Prior code Ch. XV 1-4) See.8-4. Penalties. It is unlawful for any person to violate any of the provisions stated or adopted in this Chapter. The arresting officer may offer to give a notice to the person in charge of or operating the motor vehicle involved, which notice shall be in the form of a penalty assessment notice. Should the person to whom the penalty assessment notice is tendered accept said notice, such acceptance shall constitute an acknowledgement of guilt by such person of his or her violation of the offense stated in such notice and a promise on such per- son's part to pay the fine specified in the official penalty assessment schedule of the Town, either in person or by mail within twenty (20) days of the date of arrest. Refusal or inability to remit the specified fine by mail when required shall constitute a refusal to accept a penalty assessment notice. The officer shall advise the person arrested of the points to be assessed in accordance with state law. Acceptance and payment 8-11 Supp. 12 Vehicles and Traffic Section 8-4 of the prescribed fine shall be deemed a com- Sec. 8-22. Definitions. plete satisfaction for the violation, and the vio- lator shall be given a receipt which so states As used in this Article, the following words when such fine is paid in currency or other form shall be construed to have the meanings defined of legal tender. Checks tendered by the violator below: and accepted by the Town and on which pay- ment is received by the Town shall be deemed 1) Designated parking areas means sufficient receipt. Should the violator refuse to those areas of real property within the Town accept the notice prescribed above when ten- which are intended to be used for the parking dered, the officer shall proceed to issue a sum- of motor vehicles and which have been iden- mons and complaint requiring appearance of the tified and designated by the Transportation violator in Municipal Court. Should the violator Director. accept the notice but fail to pay the prescribed penalty within twenty (20) days thereafter, the 2) Merchant reserved parking means notice shall be construed to be a summons for merchant reserved parking spaces located in the particular charge indicated, and the prosecu- Lot 7, with no more than five (5) merchant tion for said violation shall thereafter be heard in reserved parking permits issued per parking the Municipal Court and the violator shall be space. privileged to answer the charge made against him or her in the same manner as if he or she 3) Oversized vehicle parking areas had not been served with a penalty assessment means areas for parking motor vehicles summons. (Prior code Ch. XV §1-3; Ord. 4- eighteen (18) feet or greater in length as may 1994 §1) be designated for this purpose by the Transportation Director. Sec. 8-5. Validity 4) Parking permit means a decal, hang If any part or parts of this ordinance are for tag, sticker or other device issued by the any reason held to be invalid such decision shall Town that identifies a category of parking not affect the validity of the remaining portions area user. of this ordinance. The Town Council hereby declares that it would have passed this ordinance 5) Parking symbol means a symbol used and each part or parts thereof, irrespective of the to identify which parking permits are allowed fact that any one part or parts be declared in which designated parking areas, which invalid. have been designated by the Transportation Director for each category of permit parking. Secs. 8-6-8-20. Reserved. ARTICLE II Parking Regulations Sec. 8-21. General. It is unlawful for any person to operate or park a motor vehicle in violation of the provi- sions of this Article. (Ord. 17-1991 §1) 8-11 Supp. 12 Vehicles and Traffic Section 8-22 6) Permit parking season means a por- present to the Town proof of land ownership tion of each year, identified and announced or residential leasehold interest within the by the Transportation Director, during which Town and current vehicle registration in the time it is necessary to regulate parking by name of the landowner or lease holder, for permits. (Ord. 17-1991 §1; Ord. 11-1993 §1; each vehicle to be permitted. No more than Ord. 19-1994 §1; Ord. 10-1997 §6; Ord. 2- three (3) resident permits shall be issued per 2003 §3) property. Sec.8-23. Permit required. 2) Guest permits shall be available for issuance by the management of any Town No vehicle shall be parked in a designated short-term rental unit solely for further dis- parking area during the permit parking season tribution to their tenants in such units, and by unless a valid parking permit has been displayed the Town directly. Guest permits shall not be in a manner clearly visible from outside the valid unless all information has been pro- vehicle which authorizes parking the vehicle in vided on the face of the permit including the the specific lot. (Ord. 11-1993 §1; Ord. 10-1997 expiration date. The term of the permit shall 6) be determined annually by the Transportation Director. Sec. 8-24. No overnight parking. Repealed 3) Employee permits shall be available to eligible employees as follows: Sec. 8-25. Distribution of permits.a. Provided that the physical location of the place of business of an employer No person shall falsify information on a per- possessing a valid business license, con- mit application or affix a permit to a vehicle tractor license or a franchise issued by the other than the vehicle appearing on the permit Town necessitates that an employee util- application, copy, alter or forge any permit or ize Town-regulated parking lots during improperly distribute guest permits. Conditions working hours, one (1) employee permit relating to specific parking permits shall be as or one (1) transferable employee permit follows: may be available to a qualified employee of such licensee or franchisee, as deter- 1) Resident permits. Resident permits mined by the Transportation Director. shall be available to those individuals who 8-12 Supp. 12 Vehicles and Traffic Section 8-25 b. An employer shall be responsible Sec.8-26. Display of permits. to promptly notify the Town when any employee permit holder leaves their Resident, employee, gold pass, senior passes, employ, at which time the employee per- guest or merchant parking permits shall be per- mit shall become invalid and must be sur- manently affixed in the lower left-hand corner of rendered to the Transportation Director.the front windshield of the vehicle permitted. Day skier and transferable employee permits c. An employee permit may only be shall be hung from the interior rearview mirror displayed on a motor vehicle designated only while the vehicle is parked. Only currently on the approved employee permit appli- valid permits shall be displayed. Permits shall cation. not be displayed in a manner which obstructs the driver's vision. (Ord. 17-1991 §1; Ord. 19-1994 4) Day skier permits. The day skier §0 permit shall be sold at locations designated by the Transportation Director. Sec. 8-27. Fee schedule. 5) Gold pass. Gold passes will be a) The charge for permits shall be available to any motorist. Gold passes will determined annually by the Transportation be limited to an issue of one hundred (100). Director. 6) Senior pass. Senior passes shall be b) The charge for permits, per vehicle per- available to those individuals who present to mitted per day, shall be determined annually by the Town proof that they are sixty-five (65) the Transportation Director. years of age or older, and vehicle registration for the vehicle to be permitted issued by the County Clerk and Recorder. Senior passes will be limited to an issue of one hundred 100). Senior passes shall be valid only if the vehicle is operated or occupied by an individual age sixty-five (65) or older at the time it is parked. (Ord. 17-1991 §1; Ord. 11- 1993 §1; Ord. 4-1994 §1; Ord. 19-1994 §1; , Ord. 5-1995 §1; Ord. 10-1997 §6; Ord. 2- 2003 §3) 8-13 Supp. 12 Vehicles and Traffic Section 8-27 c) The charge for a parking space lease, abode or as a place to sleep. Camping on private per space, per car, shall be determined annually property within the Town limits is regulated by by the Transportation Director. Chapter 16A of this Code. (Ord. 17-1991 §1; Ord. 4-1998 §1) Ord. 17-1991 §1; Ord. 11-1993 §1; Ord. 19- 1994 §1; Ord. 5-1995 §1; Ord. 14-1999 §1; Ord. Sec. 8-30. Exemption. 2-2003 §3) The provisions of this Article shall not apply Sec. 8-28. Prohibited areas. to parking in timed parking spaces which com- plies with the time limit for the specific parking It is a violation of this Article for any person space, or handicap parking spaces utilized by to park a motor vehicle in any location within vehicles displaying valid handicap license plates the corporate limits of the Town where parking or permits. (Ord. 17-1991 §1; Ord. I1-1993 §1) is specifically prohibited by an official sign or signs, or where parking is not specifically Sec.8-31. Penalty. authorized by an official sign or signs. (Ord. 17- 1991 §1; Ord. 11-1993 §1) a) Any person convicted of falsifying information on permit applications, of transfer- Sec. 8-29. Camping prohibited. ring a permit to a vehicle other than the vehicle appearing on the permit application, copying, No person shall camp in or upon any Town- altering or forging a permit, or of improperly regulated parking lot or upon any Town-owned distributing guest permits shall be fined not less property. The Town Council may, from time to than three hundred dollars ($300.00) nor greater time, designate an area or areas where camping than one thousand dollars ($1,000.00) per may be allowed and may promulgate such rea- violation, which shall be a strict liability offense, sonable rules and regulations governing camping for which the fine shall not be suspended. as it deems appropriate. For the purpose of this regulation, a person shall be deemed to be b) Any person convicted of violating any camping if such person occupies any Town- provision of this Article, other than those listed regulated parking lot, or other Town-owned in Subsection (a) above, shall be fined an property, in a motor vehicle, tent or other shelter amount not less than fifty dollars ($50.00), nor with the intent of utilizing such shelter as an greater than one thousand dollars ($1,000.00) per violation, which fine shall be a strict liability offense, for which the fine shall not be suspended; provided, however, that the original penalty assessment may be paid within twenty 20) days from the date of the violation. (Ord. 17-1991 §1; Ord. 11-1993 §1; Ord. 19-1994 §1) Sees. 8-32-8-50. Reserved. 8-14 Supp. 12 Vehicles and Traffic Section 8-53 ARTICLE III Penalty Fines PART 1 TRAFFIC Sec. 8-51. Penalty assessment fine schedule. MTC Sec. The Schedule of Penalty Assessment Fines Violation Description Fine contained in Section 8-53 below shall be appli- cable to all violations of this Code which are 107 Obedience to police or 150.00 specifically defined in the Schedule. If a fine is sheriffs identified with a violation of a specific section of the Code, payment of the fine within twenty 109 Motorized bicycles,animals, 50.00 skis,skates,toy vehicles,and20) days of the date of the citation shall avoid all-terrain recreational vehicles the necessity of appearing in Municipal Court. on highways. ,motorized For all other specifically defined violations, in vehicles on sidewalks,trail which no fine or a summons is stated, or path. appearance in Municipal Court shall be 109.5 Neighborhood electric vehicles.summons mandatory. (Prior code Ch. XV §3-1) 114 Removal oftraffic hazards. summons Sec. 8-52 Point assessment for scheduled violations. PART 2 EQUIPMENT The Schedule of Point Assessments shall be 201 Obstructing view of driver. 30.00 maintained and assessed by the State. 6)Driver allowed rider outside. 50.00 202 Unsafe Vehicles. 30.00 Sec. 8-53. Schedule. 204 When lighted lamps are 30.00 The following is a Schedule of Penalty required Assessments and Fines applicable to violations 205 Head lamps on motor vehicles. 30.00 of the Model Traffic Code. 205.5 Lamps on motor vehicles- 30.00 additional requirements 206 Tail lamps and reflectors. 30.00 207 Clearance lamps and 30.00 identification. 208 Stop lamps and turn 30.00 signals 209 Lamp or flag on projecting 30.00 load. 210 Lamps on parked vehicles. 30.00 8-17 Vehicles and Traffic Section 8-53 MTC Sec.Adequate snow tires required. Violation Description Fine 229 Safety glazing material in 30.00 motor vehicles. 230 Emergency lighting equipment 30.00 211 Lamps on farm equipment 30.00 who must carry and other vehicles and equipment. 231 Parking lights. 30.00 212 Spot lamps and auxiliary 30.00 232 Minimum safety standards 30.00 lamps for motorcycles and motor-driven cycles. 213 Audible and visual signals 30.00 Glassess and footrests. on emergency vehicles.233 Alterations ofsuspension 30.00 214 Visual signals on service 30.00 system. vehicles. 234 Slow-moving vehicles-30.00 215 Signal lamps and devices- 30.00 display of emblem. additional lighting equipment.236 Child restraint systems 50.00 215.5 Signal lamps and devices- 30.00 required-definitions- street rod vehicles and exemptions. custom motor vehicles. 237 Safety belt systems- 30.00 216 Multiple-beam road lights. 30.00 mandatory use-exemptions. 217 Use of multiple-beam lights. 30.00 PART 5 SIZE-WEIGHT-LOAD 218 Single-beam road-lighting 30.00 502 Width of vehicles. 75.00 equipment. 503 Projecting loads on passenger 30.00 219 Number of lamps permitted. 30.00 vehicles. 220 Motorized bicycles- 30.00 504 Height and length of vehicles 75.00 motor-driven cycles- on certain roads restricted. lighting. 505 Longer vehicle combinations. 75.00 221 Bicycle equipment. 30.00 506 Trailers and towed vehicles. 30.00 222 Volunteer firemen-volunteer 30.00 ambulance attendants-special 507 Wheel and axle loads. lights and alarm systems. 1-2,500 lbs.over 75.00 2,500-5,000 lbs.over 100.00 223 Brakes. 30.00 5,000-7,500 lbs.over 150.00 7,500 lbs.over summons 224 Homs or warning devices. 30.00 508 Gross weight ofvehicles 225 Mufflers-prevention of noise. 50.00 and loads. 1-2,500 lbs.over 75.00 226 Mirrors-exterior placements. 30.00 2,500-5,000 lbs.over 100.00 5,000-7,500 lbs.over 150.00 227 Windows unobstructed-30.00 7,500 lbs.over certain materials prohibited- Seasonal weight limitations windshield wiper requirements. 509 Vehicles weighed- 75.00 228 Restrictions on tire requirements. 30.00 excess removed. 8-18 Vehicles and Traffic Section 8-53 entering intersection. MTC Sec. Violation Description Fine 702 Vehicle turning left yield to 40.00 oncoming vehicle. 510 Permits for excess size. summons 703 Entering through highway- 50.00 Obey stop or yield intersection. 704 Vehicle entering roadway 50.00 512 Liability for damage to summons yield to oncoming vehicle.highway. 705 Operation on approach of 75.00 PART 6 SIGNALS-SIGNS-MARKINGS emergency vehicles. 603 Obedience to official traffic 50.00 709 Stop when traffic obstructed. 50.00 control devices. 710 Emerging from or entering, 50.00 605 Flashing signals.50.00 alley,driveway,or building 606 Display of unauthorized 50.00 711 Driving on mountain highways.50.00 signs or devices. 712 Driving in highway work area. 50.00 607 Interference with official summons devices. PART 8 PEDESTRIANS 608 Signals by hand or signal 30.00 801 Pedestrian obedience to traffic 30.00 device requied. control devices. 609 Method of giving hand and 30.00 802 Pedestrians'right-of-way in 30.00 arm signals. crosswalks. 610 Unauthorized insignia. 30.00 803 Crossing at other than 30.00 611 Paraplegic persons or person 100.00 crosswalks. with disabilities-distress flag. 805 Pedestrians walking or 30.00 612 When signals are inoperative 30.00 traveling in a wheelchair on or malfunctioning.Duty highways. to yield. 806 Driving through safety 50.00 613 Failure to pay toll established summons zone prohibited. by rural transportation 807 Drivers to exercise due care. 50.00 authority. 808 Drivers and pedestrians,other 100.00614Designationofhighwaysummonsthanpersonsinwheelchairs,to maintenance,repair,or yield to persons with disabilities. construction zones-signs increase in penalties. PART 9 TURNING- STOPPING 615 School zones-increase in summons 901 Required position and method 30.00 penalties for moving traffic ofturning. violations. 902 Limitations on turning around. 30.00 PART 7 RIGHTS-OF-WAY 903 Turning movements and 30.00 required signals. 701 Vehicles approaching or 40.00 8-19 Vehicles and Traffic Section 8-53 1202 Parking or abandonment of 40.00 PART 10 DRIVING-OVERTAKING- vehicles. Oversized vehicle, PASSING Overtime storage. MTC Sec.1204 Stopping,standing,or parking 30.00 Violation Descri tion Fine prohibited in specified places. p Removing from storage/boot. Prohibited by sign. 1001 Drive on right side-exceptions 50.00 1205 Parking at curb or edge of 30.00 roadway-angle parking required. 1002 Passing oncoming vehicles. 50.00 1206 Unattended motor vehicle. 30.00 1003 Overtaking vehicle on the left. 50.00 1207 Opening and closing vehicle 30.00 1004. When overtaking on the right is 50.00 doors. permitted. 1208 Parking privileges for persons 100.00 1005 Limitations on overtaking on 50.00 with disabilities. the left. 1211 Limitations on backing. 30.00 1006 One-way roadways and rotary 50.00 traffic islands. PART 14 OTHER OFFENSES 1007 Driving on roadways laned 50.00 1401 Reckless driving-penalty. summons for traffic. 1402 Careless driving-penalty. 50.00 1008 Following too closely. 50.00 1403 Following fire apparatus 50.00 1009 Coasting prohibited. 30.00 prohibited 1010 Driving on divided or 50.00 1404 Crossing fire hose. 30.00 controlled-access highways. 1405 Riding in trailers. 30.00 1011 Use of runaway vehicle ramps. summons 1406 Foreign matter on highway prohibited. 50.00 1012 High occupancy vehicle lanes. 50.00 1407 Spilling loads on highways 50.00 PART 11 SPEED REGULATIONS prohibited. 1101 Speed limits. 1407.5 Splash guards-when required 30.00 1-4 mph over limit 30.00 5-9 mph over limit 50.00 1408 Operation of motor vehicles on 30.00 10-19 mph over limit, 75.00 property under control of or 20 mph or more over limit summons owned by parks and recreation 3)Too fast for conditions 50.00 districts. 1103 Minimum speed regulation. 50.00 1409 Compulsory insurance-penalty. summons 1104 Speed limits on elevated 50.00 1411 Use of earphones while driving.30.00 structures. 1105 Speed contests. summons 1412 Operation of bicycles and other 30.00 human-powered vehicles. PART 12 PARKING 1413 Eluding or attempting to elude summons 1201 Starting parked vehicle.30.00 a police officer. 8-20 Vehicles and Traffic Section 8-53 1414 Moving construction related 30.00 equipment. MTC Sec. Violation Description Fine 1415 Use of dyed fuel on highways summons prohibited. PART 15 MOTORCYCLES 1502 Riding on motorcycles. 30.00 1503 Operating motorcycles on 30.00 roadways laned for traffic. 1504 Clinging to other vehicles. 30.00 PART 17-PENALTIES AND PROCEDURE 1703 Parties to a crime summons 1704 Offenses by persons controlling 30.00 vehicles PART 19 SCHOOL BUSES 1901 School buses-equipment 50.00 1902 School buses-driver training 50.00 1903 School buses-stops—signs 60.00 passing. 1904 Regulations for school buses 50.00 regulations on discharge of passengers-penalty-exception Schedule of Appearance Bonds Reckless driving 100.00 Careless driving with accident 100.00 Speeding 20 and over 100.00 All other traffic violations 50.00 Sees. 8-54-8-70. Reserved. 5-21 TOWN COUNCIL COMMUNIQUE Meeting Date: May 7, 2007 Agenda Item: Follow-up from Council Retreat Presented By: Russ Forrest Action Requested of The purpose of this discussion is to review the "outcomes"from the Council retreat and ensure that the Town Council agrees with the next steps recommended in this memorandum. Overview: On April 1 oth the Snowmass Village Town Council conducted a one day retreat to: 1) clarify expectations for both Council and staff and 2) to help define a several critical goal areas to provide focus in.the future. Council Options: Approve or modify next steps Staff See memorandum Recommendation: MEMORANDUM TO: Snowmass Village Town Council FROM: Town Manager DATE: May 7, 2007 SUBJECT: Follow-up from Retreat 1. PURPOSE AND ACTIONS REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: On April 10`h the Snowmass Village Town Council conducted a one day retreat to: 1) clarify expectations for both Council and staff and 2) to help define several critical goal areas to provide focus in the future. The purpose of this discussion is to review the "outcomes' from the retreat and ensure that the Town Council agrees with the next steps recommended in this memorandum. 2. SUMMARY OF HIGHPOINTS OF RETREAT A. Major Themes of the Retreat included: 1. Ensure that the quality of life the community expects is not fundamentally impacted by new development either during construction or after construction. 2. Refine and provide definition to a community vision and ensure that the Town's plans for future development reflect the values and needs of the community. 1 Clear, open, honest, and full communication between Council members, Council and staff, and the Town and the community. 4. Ensuring civility in our meetings and public discussions. B. Ground Rules for Success The Town Council created a set of ground rules for the day and then suggested that these would be good ground rules to use on an ongoing basis and that they should be able to constructively and respectfully hold each other accountable around these ground rules. Ground rules included: Listen Fully (Understand before being Understood) Respect other people's point of view. Trust others to perform Open full, honest, clear, concise communication Participate fully Critique with out being critical Maintain a sense of humor Balanced/equal time for opinions and input C. Expectations Council reviewed their expectations of the Town Manager and the primary expectations included: Provide clear, honest, full, and proactive communication Provide support and training for new council members Provide your opinion... with justification w/o being an advocate The Town Manager asked for the following things from Council Provide clear direction/strategic goals Trust staff— recognizing that trust needs to be earned Open and honest communication In addition, the Council discussed the community's expectations of the Town and of the Town Council. A major theme in this discussion was to actively solicit community input, listen to that input and to provide leadership in making decisions. In addition maintaining civility in public discussions was also identified as an ongoing need. D. Definition of Success The Town Council came to consensus on a definition for success in the future. The following statement focused on maintaining the values of the community. The statement reflects the need to maintain the high quality of life the community expects while facilitating any new development or change in the community. Success is ensuring: That the Town of Snowmass Village is a livable sustainable, enjoyable community" E. Goal Areas Each Department was given the opportunity to communicate issues or goals they felt were critical to their areas. After receiving that input the Council working with the Directors articulated several goal areas which were summarized as the following: That Snowmass Village shall be a Livable, Healthy, and Sustainable Community. Maintain a sustainable community (we can enjoy the ride) through the construction process by actively managing construction and its timing. The Community will create a consensus based process to develop a vision which balances community and the resort and with that vision ensure that planning for the West Village and the community as a whole meets the community's needs. Future development needs to ensure that the carrying capacity is not exceeded with respect to services, infrastructure, sense of community, and the environment. In addition, future planning needs to specifically evaluate how the three commercial nodes will be connected and compliment each other for both the community and the guest. Foster pride in the community through appropriate physical planning and community programs. This includes integrating community values into community forums and decisions. F. Recommended Actions After reviewing the input from the Retreat, staff is recommending the following next steps: Targeted Comprehensive Plan Update: After reviewing the input from the Council, staff is recommended that a targeted update to the comprehensive plan be implemented to (see memorandum for the Comprehensive Plan): Refine and provide definition to the Town's vision for the future through a community based process. Ensure future development works within the carrying capacity of the community. Complete the west village plan as part of a comprehensive plan update so that: community goals can be realized in this commercial area, new development does not exceed the community's carrying capacity, the three commercial nodes can complement each other, and transit oriented development can effectively be integrated with other public and private uses in the area. Develop a comprehensive Work Plan: Staff will develop a comprehensive work plan to achieve the Town Council's goals within three months. Construction Mitigation: Staff will continue to diligently implement the Town's Construction Management Program as presented to the Town Council so that we can maintain a sustainable community and economy. Work sessions: To ensure that information is communicated and received effectively, schedule Work Session when needed prior to a decision. Work sessions would not include any decisions and would continue to be public meetings. Implement Ongoing Actions: Staff will continue to implement ongoing actions to improve community involvement and complete critical community projects such as: Initiate rodeo housing construction, Conduct a community survey, Develop plans for the recreation center gymnasium, Improve and enhance special events and promote business in Snowmass Village year round to ensure a sustainable.economy during construction. Continue construction on the Entry-Way Park, and Complete the Town Hall project on time and on budget 3. ACTION REQUESTED OF COUNCIL 1. Does the Council want to utilize the ground rules moving forward in Council meetings? 2. Review and provide clarification to the above-mentioned goals and recommended next steps? 3. To help facilitate communication and streamline the Council meeting, can the Town Manager work with the Council to identify opportunities for Work Session where the sole purpose of the Work Session is to communicate information related to a topic that would be considered for a decision? It could be a public meeting where no decisions would be made. It could be scheduled on a Monday when there is no Council meeting or at another time convenient for the Council. P:\MANAGER.XSC\Memos\Retreat Follow-up.doc TOWN COUNCIL COMMUNIQUE Meeting Date: May 7, 2007 Agenda Item: 1998 COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AND WEST VILLAGE PLAN Presented By: Group Presentation: Russ Forrest, Chris Conrad, Jason Haber, Kathleen Wanatowicz & David Peckler Action Requested Staff requests Council's direction in initiating a targeted of Council: update of the Town's Comprehensive Plan. This update would result in refining the Town's long-range vision for Snowmass Village and developing guidelines in the West Village including the Mall Transit/Parking Plaza Staff See memorandum Recommendations: MEMORANDUM TO: Snowmass Village Town Council FROM: Russell Forrest, Chris Conrad, Jason Haber, David Peckler, Kathleen Wanatowicz DATE: May 7, 2007 SUBJECT: Targeted update to the 1998 Comprehensive Plan and West Village Plan I.PURPOSE AND ACTIONS REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: Staff requests Council's direction in initiating a targeted update of the Town's Comprehensive Plan. This update would result in refining the Town's long-range vision for Snowmass Village and developing guidelines in the West Village including the Mall Transit/Parking Plaza II.BACKGROUND / NEED FOR COMP PLAN UPDATE A. 1998 Comprehensive Plan Purpose: The Town's Comprehensive Plan is a regulatory document to guide elected and appointed officials, staff, businesses, developers, property owners, and other entities in implementing our goals and objectives. Updating the Comprehensive Plan is a community wide effort and will involve several opportunities for citizen involvement in implementing decisions and in the land use planning process for future development. The Comprehensive Plan should be updated every two years. Status: Concurrently, the 1998 Comprehensive Plan needs to be updated to reflect approved development projects, additional carrying capacities, and future redevelopment of the West Village. The Plan did not specifically contemplate the level of development approved in Base Village and the current project proposed at the Village Center. It did recognize that these areas were appropriate for more dense commercial and residential development. The Comprehensive Plan process will reconfirm the Town's vision for Snowmass Village and clearly define a set a values. B. West Village Revitalization Purpose: In 2003, after experiencing nearly five years of steadily falling sales tax revenues, and increasing concern over outdated accommodations and infrastructure in the West Village area, the Town initiated a focused planning effort to turn these trends around. Although sales tax revenues have been on the rise since 2004, with the Base Village Project under way and the proposed redevelopment of the Snowmass Center, there is an ongoing concern that the West Village / Mall area will be left behind. What is envisioned for West Village? The West Village Mixed Use Comprehensively Planned Area and the Multi-family Residential Comprehensively Planned Area, was created as a part of the West Village Revitalization Plan process. West Village is intended to complement and integrate with the Town's other commercial centers, yet be unique in its character and identity. Planning Efforts: In early 2002, the Forward Plan was published by the Village Leadership Forum (VLF). This group was organized to address a range of challenges facing the Town from international resort market realities, upgrading and reinvesting in the resort's assets, and balancing resort and community values. Among other strategic recommendations and guiding principles, the VLF produced the Town's Aspiration Statement: We aspire to be the leading mulit-season, family-oriented mountain resort community. We will do this by creating, marketing and delivering distinctive choices for fun, excitement, challenge, learning and togetherness. All this is done amidst our unique, natural splendor...as part of a memorable Aspen/Snowmass experience. Further, we wish to be seen by this as welcoming, dynamic, convenient and successful. We will always be responsible stewards of our environment, economy and society. When successful, Snowmass Village will have achieved the quality of life and economic vitality that will assure our future as a sustainable resort community. In 2002 and 2003, the property owners within West Village's Mall area met with Town staff to identify opportunities to ensure the Mall's continued viability, prepare a plan for West Village's future (including redevelopment), and coordinate potential West Village improvements with the Base Village Project. It was agreed that the Town would take the lead in a planning effort with the commercial core stakeholders as active participants. Also in 2003, the Town Council and staff led a series of public meetings to assess the standing of Snowmass Village within the resort industry and to understand how best to address shortcomings. A fundamental shortcoming identified was the lack of a vital and vibrant commercial core, which prevents Snowmass Village from being highly competitive. Necessary components to creating a successful commercial core included critical mass of the right commercial mix, good design, and operational excellence. A next step created as a part of this effort was to continue to work with the West Village ownerships to develop a plan for revitalization. In late 2003, a concept paper for West Village Revitalization was prepared for the Town by Economic Planning Systems (EPS). The intent of this paper was to further explore principles from the Forward Plan specific to the revitalization of West Village. The paper recommended creating new zone districts that supported mixed-use types of development, and preparing a general development plan to better understand the potential impacts and opportunities for revitalization. The services of Bluegreen were engaged to carry this planning effort forward. Bluegreen's process relied on numerous past reports and studies of the West Village area. The Town has invested in efforts to understand the deficiencies in West Village and the best approach to move forward was to review this past work, identify those opportunities and barriers that still have merit in helping to achieve the Town's.goals, and verify their relevance through additional limited study with Town staff and consultants. In collaboration with the stakeholder group (primarily business and property owners and their consultants), redevelopment options were created from the best of the previous proposals and the latest ideas coming out of Bluegreen's analysis. Various options were presented as potential solutions to existing conditions that should be corrected. Over a period of more than two-years, various combinations of 36 unique solutions were assembled to create four distinct redevelopment scenarios. These scenarios represent the range of potential redevelopment visions from the easiest (and least costly) to accomplish to the most difficult. In 2005 and 2006, the preferred Scenario 4 was presented to more than 12 community interest groups, including homeowners associations, lodging and merchant groups, special district boards and Town boards. The plan was presented during a handful of Community Forums and to Town Council on several occasions, most recently in December 2006, at which time staff was directed to temporarily discontinue efforts to move the West Village Revitalization Plan forward. Status: To date the West Village Revitalization Plan is not complete and needs further analysis. One developer has purchased a significant amount of the land area and this now presents new opportunities from a land planning perspective. C. Mail Transit/Parking Plaza Purpose: The 1998 Comprehensive Plan specially speaks to a parking plaza in the West Village. In 2002, Base Village went through a long review. A transit station was incorporated in the arrival facility in Building 7, tangent to the loading and delivery area. The representative of Intrawest and the Transportation Planner for ASC both maintained that the transit facility in Base Village would function as an interim facility between the Mall and Snowmass Center. Upon approval of the Base Village submission, private interests in the Mall area approached the Town to discuss the revitalization of the West Village (Mall) area. In reviewing the land uses for the West Village Revitalization, the Station elements were again brought up for review. Staff began working on the design of the Station with the land planners from Design Workshop on conceptual layouts of transit islands for the Station. The private sector invited the Town to participate in a Joint Development venture under FTA guidelines using the company Urban Innovations to secure FTA funding, and to craft an agreement between the Town and private sector on development options. FTA was contacted to inform them of the Town's interest to propose a Joint Development project, as relates to grant funding activities noted above in Section 5309 grants. The FTA has been kept informed of the progress to date on creating a Joint Development Project. The Needs Assessment and Feasibility Study has been presented to FTA for their approval. This document includes appraisal of Town property that may be impacted by West Village Redevelopment. Staff has just begun to conduct public outreach meetings to engage the community in discussion for the Station as part of the West Village Revitalization land use. Status: Town Council has approved Urban Innovations to move forward with completion of the following tasks: 1. Coordinate submission of National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) assessment to the Town by the engineering firm; 2. Establish financing mechanism (cost sharing % between Developer and Town) for Joint Development planning funding; 3. Coordinate filing of Planning Grant application with FTA/CDOT for additional planning funding; 4. Arrange receipt of Developer planning funds. The Town has selected a firm to conduct an Environmental Assessment of the site, and a scoping meeting will be held mid-May. We hope to have the Environmental Assessment completed by late July and submitted to FTA for their review. The Town is hoping that the project will be granted Categorical Exclusion status by FTA. A new RFP will be released for architectural and design work upon completion of the update of the master plan. The Transportation Department will continue to work on keeping the project positioned for FTA funding. At a planning meeting for the Colorado Transit Coalition at the Colorado Association of Transit Agencies, TOSV will be proposing a 2010 construction date for the project at that meeting. The Town has some funding from CDOT set aside for architecture/design work once the Environmental Assessment is completed. The Town is waiting for CDOT to draft the agreement for these funds. CDOT is working on the 2008 and 2009 grant requests. A major component of a targeted update of the comprehensive plan is to update the Transportation plan for the Town. III. APPLICABLE REGULATIONS The Town's Land Use Code clearly states that the Comprehensive Plan should be updated every two years. The last update to the Town's Comprehensive Plan was in 2005. FTA has regulations and criteria for projects to qualify as a Joint Development project. The Mall Transit/Parking Plaza is listed in CDOT State Transportation Improvement Program and will need to be listed as a priority project to be eligible for funding. An amendment was made in 2005 to the Comprehensive Plan to facilitate planning in the West Village. IV. DISCUSION ITEMS / NEXT STEPS A. Goals for Plan Update Staff would recommend the following goals for updating the Comprehensive Plan: Refine and provide definition to the Town's vision for the future through a community based process. Ensure future development works within the carrying capacity of the community. Complete the west village plan as part of a comprehensive plan update so that: community goals can be realized in this commercial area, new development does not exceed the community's carrying capacity, the three commercial nodes can complement each other, and transit oriented development can effectively be integrated with other public and private uses in the area. Provide clear guidelines for new development and identify needed public benefits. B. Public Process Staff would develop a communication plan to engage the community in this process. It is important for Community Relations to oversee and implement a strategic stakeholders public input plan. The plan will describe ways for citizens to actively engage in the planning process. This process will remain open to the public and the public will be able to track progress on the Town's website. The first process of a public outreach plan is to present a State of Snowmass Village address to the community sometime in July and then to develop with the community a shared set of values and then provide a vivid description for the community's future. C. Proposed Process The following is an overview of the recommended process: To begin this process staff recommends developing a report that synthesizes the work to date on the West Village Master Plan Bluegreen) and Transit Plaza (UI). The objective is to combine the two efforts into a Master Planning Initiative, which will culminate in a successful and inclusive public process. Staff would recommend that the Planning Commission would act as the primary steering committee with two council representatives and begin a targeted update to the Town's 1998 Comprehensive Plan. Part of this effort would include taking inventory of past planning efforts to integrate all plans moving forward. Staff would recommend that an RFP be issued to obtain independent resources for this effort. Resources anticipated for this project include: land planners, retail/market consultants, and transportation consultants. This new effort would update the Transportation Plan in the Comprehensive Plan to include new transit/parking plaza. In addition, staff would propose to pursue transit funding grants to help pay for the planning process. Staff would also ensure that EOTC and Federal funding opportunities are preserved in this process. Cultivate a clear vision of the future with a vivid description developed out of a community process through several public workshops. Develop an overall plan for the Village Mall, including a new Transit Center partially funded by FTA under a Joint Development agreement. Regulatory Plan/Overlay District for West Village. Implement amendments to the Land Use Code. Maintain an engaging public process. Throughout the planning the Town would actively engage all the major stakeholders in the community including: Aspen Skiing Company, Related Westpac, business owners, employees, residents, non-residents, families, and second homeowners. Staff would target January 2008 for completion of the plan update. V. NEXT STEPS / MAJOR MILESTONES May—June Develop a strategic work plan including a chronological timeline of the West Village Planning Process RFP for Master Plan update including Transit Planning Deliver a State of Snowmass Village presentation with current market trends Form steering committee (Planning Commission) and appoint members of the council Develop a communications plan for the public process. Agree on common themes collected from past community input sessions to launch a visioning process. Create survey questions included in the Community Survey related to overall Master Planning VI. ACTION REQUESTED OF COUNCIL Does the Council support conducting a targeted update of Comprehensive Plan and does the Council support moving forward with developing an RFP with the approach mentioned above? P:\MANAGER.XSC\Memos\5-7-07 Staff Memo_M.doc TO: SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL FROM: RUSSELL FORREST, TOWN MANGER SUBJECT: MANAGER'S REPORT DATE: May 07, 2007 Rodeo Storage and Ticket Booth Sheds By: Hunt Walker SWHA has asked the Town to purchase three portable sheds to be used as storage sheds and ticket booths (see the attached letter from Chris Kelly). In the past the Town has budgeted money for physical improvements for the Snowmass Rodeo, but there is no funding for 2007. Since the Entryway project has made running the rodeo difficult the last two summers, staff recommends purchasing the sheds for SWHA's use at a cost not to exceed $8,000. Because the purchase is for recreation purposes it is RETT eligible. Investigate the road problem at the Miller's house location (Horse Ranch) and determine what can be done By: Hunt Walker Dean Gordon and I have investigated the problem, and determined that it is not a Town issue. Although the "run off' originates on Town owned open space, it was up to the original developer or the current homeowner to construct adequate drainage facilities to protect their property. The Snowmass Water and Sanitation District also investigated the drainage issue and determined it was not their problem either. Town Hall Floor Plan By: Jason Haber As a follow-up to our discussion on April 16, 2007, and after several meetings among staff and the project architects, the attached floor plan is provided to show Council the solution that has been agreed upon in order to satisfy the needs of both the Finance Department, the Marketing & Special Events Department and Group Sales Department. Five design parameters were identified, as follows: 1. Equity of Office Spaces, 2. Marketing to be "open'; 3. Group Sales to have doors, 4. Shared Meeting Space, 5. Function outweighs form. With an aim to maximize functionality and minimize construction cost impacts, this solution was found to provide a greater degree of equity among the departments, while avoiding the need to significantly redesign building systems. Due to the progress that has already been made on the building to date, especially with regard to materials that have been ordered for this area, any floor plan revisions resulting in changes to the HVAC system would cause significant schedule delays and cost impacts. As such, avoiding such changes was regarded as a sixth parameter of this redesign. Manager's Report 05-07-07 Page 2 of 2 The following is a list of strategic projects and there current status for your information. Staff Action Status Date to follow- Contact up with Council Russ Retreat Follow- The Directors will begin working on a End of July Forrest up action plan to implement the Council's goals Russ Comprehensive Overview of process on May 7 and May 21, 2007 Forrest, Plan Update review of an RFP on May 21s`. Chris Conrad, Kathleen W. David P Hunt Entry Overall entryway plans reviewed with May 7, 2007 Walker way/Gymnasium Council on May 7 h Staff will review plans for gymnasium in Jul Jason Construction Ongoing updates throughout construction Each Council Haber Mitigation season. Will bring policy changes to meeting affect the proposed construction guidelines to Council in June. Chris Village Center Will receive new plans pending outcome June 18, 2007 Conrad Project or 6-18-07 T.C. Meeting on Village Center Joe Coffee Rodeo Place Update on solar panels. Construction to May 7, 2007 Housing commence in May David TOD Project in Proceeding with NEPA work and May 7, 2007 Peckler West Village obtaining Federal grants. Staff working on process to ensure land planning is integrated with the overall mall plan versus selecting an architect at this time. o ,,Ass tt.fS,P Wma: w1ri ?N EI?ITA E ASSOCIATION P.O. Box 17165 A Snowmass Village!! Colorado 81615 970-923-8898 www.snovvmassrodeo.org ERr?ACti A55o GtA to Presenters of the Mr. Hunt Walker SNOWMAZS 110=0 TOSV Public Works Dept. P.O. Box 5010 Snowmass Village, CO 81615 Board of Directors Marty Schlumberger, Dear Hunt: Chairman The Snowmass Western Heritage Association and the Town of Snowmass Village have Archer Bishop enjoyed a successful cooperative effort over the past three years to continue to present the John Canning Snowmass Rodeo each summer. We are grateful to the town for its financial support in our Doug MacKenzie first year of operation and for continuing to waive the rent on the use of the current facility,Jim Rathell and for providing new spectator stands.Barb Yocum Tom Yocum We believe we have provided outstanding entertainment for thousands of visitors to the Town, appealing particularly to families which Snowmass Village seeks to attract. Plus we Executive Director have been fiscally responsible in our management and operation of the rodeo and have Chris Kelly repaid S25,000 of the town's $40,000 loan to us. As we gear up for another rodeo season, we do appreciate you efforts to assure that we will have adequate trailer parking. But the removal of the brown building on the east side in preparation for the housing devel- opment will cause some difficulties for us. One section of that building serves as both our storage facility and contestant sign-up area. Each week we store boxes of VIP cushions, thousands of programs, prizes for mutton bustin' and calf scramble, tickets and ticketing cash registers and other materials essential to the operation of the Rodeo. Then each Wednesday our contestants line up to register with the rodeo secretary who collects their fees. Without that building we are literally left standing outside. I would like to suggest that the town buy 3 portable sheds (see sample in photos enclosed) that could serve as both ticket booths and storage sheds. Our current ticket booths are, as you know quite dilapidated, and the new sheds would present a much more inviting entrance to the rodeo for those thousands of visitors, crating a better image for one of the town's main events. These sheds can be provided in any shape and size, in a variety of materials and are quite reasonably priced($2,00072,500 each). They could be used for a variety of other purposes at special events held in Snowmass or eventually incorporated Snowmass Western Heritage Association is a tax-exempt 501(c)(3) (EIN 90-0138524) nonprofit organization that strives to preserve and enhance the western heritage and character of Snowmass Village and the Roaring Fork Valley. into the new multi-purpose facility. As you know we rely heavily on individual and business contributions to fund the rodeo, and do not have the monies to purchase these ourselves. In addition, as a non-profit we would rather not have funds tied up in hard goods. Without these sheds we are hard-pressed to come up with any other storage options for all of the items we need for each rodeo. We appreciate your giving this request full consideration and hope that we can work together on this to improve the functionality as well as the appearance of the current rodeo grounds. Sincerely, Chris Kelly Executive Director I I I I I I I 1 TAX ANYL5T FAYRM MAN. A55TN.DIR FINANCE DIR. 110 sf 110 sf 110 sf 152 sf I1 112sf III1 I 1 p 1niHiYiYiYiYiLiYiYM!AR M M Nt bdliY ]Y iY iY iY iY iY iY iY iY iR 1R IR AR GORR w w w w w w w w w w ns ns ne ne s 129 sf a I new new new new FILE/COFf 1 1 80 sN L j 516 sf i,/ \1 T 55 sfITsf Lam.FILE COFY 1 ash bb sf I 1 6RP.5L5 I bb sf Fi i--- J 6RP.SLS 6RP.SLS I I 6RP.51-5 86 sf 90 sf - I— bb sf 1 III I I I 6RP.51.5 6RP.51-5 t 565f 'I 86 sf1 408 sf II 1I II II II II 1 DN e6sf. 1 MI sf II 86sf II 86sf II Mb41 I 8b sf 86 sf I I 86 sf 86 sf a 86 sf I I I I II I II I II I II I I T-_ I II II II 17 I 1 I II I II I I It I 1 I I 11 I II I I II I I I I II I II I II I II I I I I II I II I II I II I I I I II I II I II I II I I i\L-) II L I 1 I 1 1 San Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat 1 2 3 4 5 r Y Cinco de Mayo 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Town Council Meeting 4:00 p.m. 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 t Mother's Da 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 Town Council Meeting 4:00 p.m. 27 28 29 30 31 II i Memorial Day Town Hall Closed Fun E Mon TIe Wed Thu Fri Sat 1 2 Town Cleanup Day 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Town Council Meeting 4:00 p.m. 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 Town Council l -S Meeting 4:00 p.m. Summer Father's Day Solstice 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 85" CML 85th CML Annual Annual Conference Conference At Snowmass At Snowmass Village Village 1 1 Base Village Hotel Discussion May 7 Town Council Agenda Town Council Handout 1) - April 26, 2007 letter from Brad Korzen, Founder and CEO of the Kor Hotel Group 2) - AAA 2007 Four Diamond Hotels list 3) - AAA Diamond Rating Guidelines THE KOR GROUP K TD BRADFORD KORZRN Chief Executive Officer 323-930-3888 Via Federal Express DeOvery April 26, 2007 Honorable Mayor and Town Council of Snowmass Village, Colorado P.O. Box 5010, 16 Kearns Rd Snowmass Village, CO 81615 Honorable Mayor and Town Council: I am grateful to come before you today and introduce Kor Hotel Group and its Viceroy brand, and thank you for your time and interest in our products. It is my team's and my own conviction that Viceroy is the most appropriate and best brand for the Town's and Related Westpac's newest development at Base.This belief is so strong we have signed a term sheet.with Related Westpac, and can provide Town Council with this information if necessary. It is my understanding that there are currently a few questions surrounding Kor's Viceroy brand, and I would like to take this opportunity to address them. I would further appreciate the opportunity to visit with you during a regularly scheduled Town Council meeting, and provide a more in depth review of our company and our strategy. Kor Hotel Group- A Nationally Recognized Hotel Group Our hotel group is a leader in the development and operation of an impressive and highly successful collection of"Urban Retreats"and branded hotels and resorts, such as Viceroy and The Tides. In the United States, we have developed a revered collection of hotels that allowed us to establish a Kor signature style—which includes the innovation of the traditional hospitality model through inspirational design, intuitive service and a unique approach to food and beverage programs. Our Viceroy Resorts & Residences brand is currently experiencing its largest property growth ever, with successful projects ready to launch in South Beach, Downtown Miami, Anguilla and Mexico's Riviera Maya. Viceroy Santa Monica, our flagship property on the California coast, provided us with a successful model from which to grow this successful brand. In its 5 years of operation, the property has shown robust growth in occupancy and rates, and has established a hugely successful, locally accessible food and beverage program and patronage among Los Angeles citizens. Kor Realty Group Kor Hotel Group Kor Management Group 5750 Wilshire Boulevard Suite 500 Los Angeles California 90036 7 323 930 3700 F 323 930 3701 www.thekorgroup,com THE KOR GROUP Our U.S.-based "Urban Retreat"collection is admired by the nation's top travel, consumer and lifestyle magazines, naming our properties to the most prestigious lists. Among them are Conde Nast Traveler magazine's"Gold List," Travel+Leisure magazine's "Top 500 Leading Hotels of the World"and Town& Country magazine; a complete 2006 list is attached for your reference. Kor Hotel Group continues to make front-page news in this country's most influential hotel trade publications, and national, regional and local newspapers, such as the Wall Street Journal, the New York Times and USA Today, to name a few. Viceroy and Kor Hotel Group are highly acclaimed for their inspirational design. Kelly Wearstler, a powerful force in interior design and currently featured in Time magazine, is at the helm of design and interiors concepts for Kor Hotel Group and select Viceroy brand hotels. Architect and designer Jean-Michel Gathy of Denniston International would be retained for our project at Snowmass. Gathy, recognized by an impressive roster of hospitality and travel media, has completed projects such as One and Only, Aman and The Setai hotels. On the business development side, our national recognition and brand identity is strong among key national accounts like Virtuoso and Andrew Harper's Q Club. In addition, key national accounts in the fashion, advertising and creative services areas continue to funnel a clientele that highly values service and style. An impressive team of national and global sales and marketing professionals located in Los Angeles, New York, Dallas, Vancouver, Miami and Mexico target and successfully cultivate business leads from all segments, including leisure, corporate, group and meetings/conferences. These demographic segments specifically point to strong group and extended family stay guests, especially at Viceroy Santa Monica, where, like Snowmass, recreational activities and geographic location are a top draw. These assets reflect in our bottom line. Our portfolio, as of March 2007 indicated an impressive 85% average occupancy and $334 average rate group-wide. Kor Hotel Group thrives on its own internal Central Reservations Office and cadre of Internet research and distribution strategies and technologies. Viceroy& AAA's Four Diamond Award The American Automobile Association, in their guidelines and Diamond rating scale describe a Four Diamond property as maintaining the following: These establishments are upscale in all areas. Accommodations are progressively more refined and stylish. The physical attributes reflect an obvious enhanced level of quality throughout. The fundamental hallmarks of this level include an extensive array of amenities combined with a high degree of hospitality, service and attention to detail."(Source: www.aaa.biz <http://www.aaa.bizt> ) Viceroy Snowmass under Kor Hotel Group ownership and management would strive for this respected endorsement. Our hotel group recognizes the demands and expectations of our THE KOR GROUP guests, and as our company grows, we continue to be driven by guests' psychographic preferences, which call for inspirational design, a stylish approach and uncompromising service standards. Our amenities, which range from world-class spa destinations to innovative culinary programs, provide our guests with the opportunity to enjoy the destinations in which they find themselves and complement them with activities and services appropriate to the world region, culture and history that surrounds them. Whether it's a Maya-themed spa treatment at The Tides Riviera Maya or the organic"Beauty Bar" experience of the seaside Viceroy Santa Monica, Kor guests can be assured that the amenities, service, style and quality of Viceroy or any Kor Hotel will always be appropriate to their location and worthy of the most specific standards. What's Next Kor Hotel Group will be presenting our business plan and supporting information to key stakeholders and the Snowmass community. Kor Hotel Group will offer you the opportunity to experience our Viceroy brand first-hand, through a facilitated visit to our flagship Viceroy Santa Monica hotel. HVS International, a global hospitality consulting firm, is preparing a third-party report on Kor's Viceroy brand for your review. My team and I are looking forward to addressing you in a public forum through a forthcoming town council meeting In closing, I want to reiterate my gratitude for your time and consideration. I look forward to increased dialogue and the opportunity to answer any and all questions in regards to our vision for Viceroy Snowmass and our Viceroy brand. Sincerely, Brad Korzen Founder & CEO Kor Hotel Group C USA Today April 2, 2007 ute-stinations Diversions rw Very bunny Fr Atm'4,7 Twice the hnnny with 2 new hotel chains As upscale travel booms,two new luxury hotel chains checked in this week One is from Sam Nazarian,an LA.nightclub king and CEO of the fledgling SBE Hotel Group. It an- nounced the SIS chain. First property: the trans- formed Beverly Hills Meridien,due in 2008.Expect a high hip quotient:Famed boutique hotel designer Philippe Starck is workingwith the chain.The Kor Hotel Groupp umreded The Tidesbrand,an extension ofits chic The Tides hotel in South Beach It91 include the iktl del Mar hideaway south ofCan- cunrtn he called The Tides Riviera Maya). Kitty Berm Yancey t Hotel Business March 7th - 20th, 2007 L GOW('2ZNCO) a o%, o1r1 O rxrntwsrulR cos ioseute eeanai MMmRs VOL 16 tm.0 MRRCRi-10,1001 C Z He• Woh 7 70. 2nn7 x 4 C Kor Hhmndroups pictured here in Miami,will soon emerge in Mexico.nr r•w, G' Kor Hotel Group building two brands ER yYBRUCESEyLENispreciselythetasktheKorcompanyv. meanwhile, has a Hotel Group's management Tides open in South Reach LOS ANGELES— As the in- tcaut has set for itself. mid one under construction in dustry's luxury tier has grown With 19 hotels and msorls in Mexico. A second Mexican Increasingly competitive the Its overall portrolio,Kor,based property, acquired in mid- past few years, hlanding has helc, already has Vicemy Ho- 2006,will be rebinnded a Tides hccome a more and more crit. tels upen in Santa Monica and later this month. ical preregnisite for success. Palm Springs, CA, and The remainder of Kor's port. For a hotel company,building Viceroys underconstructiol in folio is comprised by-and-large one luxury bland is a chat, downtown Miand and Miami's of independently named ho- lengc, building my at once is South Beach as well as two ill Icls, ranging from the Avalon monumental. But with its Mexicoand one on Anguilla in in Bes'crly Hills, CA. to the Viceroy and Tides bn nds,this the British West Indies. The continued on page u Hotel Business (page 3) March 7 - 2047x, 2007 Kor Hotel Group grows luxury Nags Viceroy, Tides gain traction I iE - a•rrWin]J h mpl.a xLu NI Irmc mle pfr•JI1MiWnFbMhlarllIUukuluknrc.mur.wLIJI b Iuprump rM6,lll nnyYluum m,lns nbw N}h hs parnitYUNler exuamlbn. MINI vlllry AUlr4muLN IwNN 4nm- .- 6rtxryY Ln Yxuy bnMr Tu..vYagvanil\lhawNnllr In.lab loon P vnkn axnM1I]Ibf leYalh t! v•mwFan nkPlk crNr'xlFlr IwMr:oiA N41m r U:rrm, w LhUIpMflph, MhmMY In JIRmm Wfa ml Mw u x Iwlml rya klnr of YtrehWHh'IWlrlut SepumtnT.i1 un AIn plMx;n,wew rlo hwl Jlx \km r NM lkka Iuvx..rxlr IK wlrk.IuY a kYr bheretry'anA m M MYN i40YVAay,nnrMlT Lnual maqmwlpPLmnnc ylmfM4N Lm Ir.lp ifY Mrs m.w' Ir•h.N.wsu a Jm rYnnrn rlryr ylrrmc Wn whMly mnY mM rmrasr+wnrc hYxc1\lu. a )q•WCYJII(I RPQC- YYA III rl$r'.x—xnmf,PIM xlLt Fn alll nJvn umn IMIu Ivry rlmlm<b. 4 rcmPin Ivnwf lµl Mari N.mmd "0 nN,gbrm m v.Omvd ".1d Ihp&U.WhohdneAKmfromJlnh4ndaAn U•.mW Iluml lkmrp.1.. 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JJmIFwaWmr4lrq Lw Wp Muni N«npnW Ano1 rnvb4ri dm:Ira nm«n 7n Ihr rIM. uCr red CHMY(ll,oM]4 dm Imtel urrrn+ful-.4 AruaMy miavrxelabrP nut. anti drnxa. phis f, V.ad J1w 1'vr1'r Immlr rcrrc maw m I..Q,1 r e1rR Im1 Iernay m the rxrlm I I The strategy 90IN 1 forward is to mhWn an edadfc wlleation of hotels In dlHemnt I simsandshapes." lildmin Clayton Mot Hatbl Group m1 a Jro ranin 6nlemem. 9W nxaa nih.yrrrw W.I darnnll ua.... I.,lor n,r person }bttM„. Iluy'rc umry in woe o1 xiul dmnrudr me SIrnA61e ddn Jtn. 4 daY W1M<+n^°ATJI ar Barr, fm wmpn,' Ire nM. LwmyrawW r,a nM pmmar4rdrWwarmlhfWm16 rna•.ii:PM4mkr,p«uwv,n yrH.w+laghrc JAr IrJr1n Ihm{0aruinlp Wumdy,my iarwn mean uk.W rah ofprgr4,a11bh u tow a , .•ha rnndr, tiro.'N adm m1.me dme.wr hMri tlrilpP m IMdrm n11Ahr mfra adan<nl drmmbn'+par New York Times October 15, 2006 Mije Neu Iark fftws Travel THE NEW YORK TIMES,SUNDAY,OCTOBER 25,2006 IN TRANSIT' JENNIFER.GONLIN Hotels Think Pink To Fight Cancer Il you nceda9=00qcpsseetopinn agtrlN gotawey,here'aonc:Oetober5abreast ego- rlraWare11e53mOPth,Rlld¢lWetal hate) I packOgus limntll Mtortsto fight theill"mm, tThatmonth,M KOrgroup'cIDhbmLL fn the beltedSmte;fooludmgtpeTlQa SOom J l r Beach and the Viceroy Palm Springs,arc donating le percent 91 oorrmi raleafo tbe RevlonIIIILA erepst Cenlor,For S9Down gutaUwachodx theThfNi Pink POrkoge tbatineludal,i mdgiRS worth$120,ln- — ale. cplokrk,pwe,bacludhtgaPlukMUrrhiiCO.aTshirtanda b cnnCCrhoildbapit(wwvr aptiiOafOproll'6(avaMthslttpwenr,4nB •IeL9•hteast rnnt;ecampplgn TprOngll tae'ihiakPinkhotelx.com). ieomerlw{m ilwBrent CarverResedreh CmmNlatpachlonDmilincriofAinerlm _ttw Hllloil Rawailm VHlaeelfeaoh Re- Fomdilflon,fbe CanyghRanrh InLmoo, andthe PaihionTargets Breast Cancer age and SPa LLOlterirtgiTrnvol Pick perk- tdpaa.,aiM tlid WdatlnTfmhs gqupro Hpiel cpmpalgd,Marly20deslgn¢rs(ukevndq Kamm Bimilldgatmwppon) ha Susm G_ . matter woLbree,bf tGIriftiond Gat-' Met=Kamm BrcastCmeirFwndaiton of lfa kd Cymh/o Rowley}hovaereat- vail.GumbiwillmcMVamammlryWa Marys.t'he Newude, apckagggewm4ro , edm.ad rchaWrobaa,aamoct,ove,tobefWithbathproducrapndorhergoodiesworthMarchlms,Include,apaJame pop'erxalk, 'mrHmedon ogey¢ronmgnn OC421.pro•S50mdo20perem it "a treat. wilbltblmmPagasuldoImflmmlholOWY "=eCCd9WI116ppetafhebreantmmOrmm- mcatsmdlunrhlnlheRavilawLmNRes- datlonforaachpart(eipun[ theCa"m pal5n/aswiBPnpercentofthesalesa(uRm- lmrmt.Athr fight in isrryulred;vnl• Rmdiirip,fromApril lgto3.a,Inemdea d itedodldmmaiLvallnbieatwhotelscom. Idthra mDoc.20(in(armntlm:www weilnealeeminor;[W will dOnpmSl6afor - W Hotels Varm and On eBayuntil rMma AlltmhnWmtdnvtllage.ccia" ). each booking(www.kmm deubmgermm). timrms,m NOV.2(www.wbotels.cmn XN Karen Nouburgor,known farmaking RebatoRewverybthdnameofWHO• frobestorre6ory). The New York Times March 26, 2006 Travel,u.„•.,tu or, urvar uur rr.m. f.OFMt It r 1 GOING TO Palm Sprlrlgs all rh n0..a1 ary. J erl r4fP lr1 0 n rvn-Iw.r L 1 .Fi f r S tMFR 9 I aMERCiU'.TAT I 1 f. r .- I• rniw- , r,.r,,n•• nry q r4m 1YRfxrrtotq n ,. _ e'e' , u r i. pax.. 1 USA Today December 2, 2005 HoW gft _ Fnmrht..4in uestmations ws Nf i ice-'" t Diversions b i Rejuvenatirfg Des resort W(es a dip in,;retro PalmSprings fountain of youth Coven USA Today (page 2) December 2, 2005 CnverSMry ISti get aJ kick out of mid-century style l d a kT, f tY h FI n 5 tt'v;t ywro hmao. d r1'u a , 1 C IplN.t t U rtl' AI n C : i°; da n. s ! 1 nL a.FsJ t 1 ar tdr9 n!rM1.6'T.Nx 7 1 e I 1 1 1 Spnh W'N'wNY1' rn l.Ik Air Rm}rd.- 4itih 'Ie:rmU!'"rM nprr p 5.: L •mlr.,, I.aa 1 N'n!c i1.tm r emv- 1 h:i>l. P! 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"filn h:. p r' L USA Today (page 3) December 2, 2005 I.P. rofn-lau, v.,ndo a & in- tPFI,:it,..i...i in is flas wf'd. firiCN '.vOl ck"aa to mndt[ntsm'" s Ptrbwad. "I thiO r1hr'% tm,on= a`mat Pahn Spriu, b t.h ', 't, e d s'that'4 on itfi•IMF&at fmtm^ it,-U Nallud. kAV ln:n;.,s -lio, it 1• Xc[ but it1.5'IC dhr•of P(I11J UJ( mau nnm e'hn r L1+n ll ,MrYu v.nr YI i n mmemlra'. W m•WUCm,nwni Lan fi: QmplMvutmnuG u+ OIwA,lwiu. . WF qm e nw n..n ao. vWLOf1IIluPRled V tnl lw,l/Fl 'Ikrt 1. I6'IiWMmryinm iLe1vN..: .y • 1F..v M110fP1a1 p0. Wall Street 9ournal August li, 2005 Personal Finance.Gadgets•Health.Ravel.Cars¢Leisure 6 Arts PERSONAL SOURNAL. t g •'. T_^"" won\SdnAv,Aunut T Ir,teas al An XbOX.OI1 YOII>r-PW0W t 1 r'.,y t.'j, AN the mot*IN on Internet run.EonLijieflotelsStarLtoAdd Faq amM. Gutting-Edge Game Gear; 1 =F a vW1. irepy onp ddr awm asxr -• G'" far newness m-gIRMJto Nei,Uutiesfortheco` ieNme,Nbomun BA a vocOn vR¢mNa1nyPaagnSti+om I Groin! AN rMW rYndm the*A a 2.1 haw.U undaltl askovi eta. d"7rI8VECHtOY Horstto Sind loom, dou A!tlN m3Hdalb Again,Nla..C*lwd sw vlu ti " we CWlwyv rtmmntlY', rl6>=` XI h.lauo'vrn,Wxtime iwN a LA Weed A ugo m W Na lob dr;mlpib){t. l 'ProPaktaromea Pm1abM a,-'INaN-pay df YID WimM4 AE mlanfe proPanlaa lnkoaiiy the aPmPaB uNbyyradbuy'9 mhfirmdq BmmJ don to wf.mnd.te.Name:tvpy tale 01 Ad Atrk aidWATIfil sblm Naas pear vine.they are staining NpaU filgb-tea4edod did.uq hGndTggottn Lame*foment N The list of genenides they'. -- aids Laos hove oessfue susAw for ponds.tit die Vimroy,whiting Owoed by Me. A 01,4 01Aa vatel Y lbtM'MSetf4 AIPAfUk,ICaU1 at2ng aaq hlkcm alpalmsc U?+*q l?[per Ker BON]Broup,{.M111 jao ehMiLoot a Sony Wthe 41114 ROUS14dw Pprtohtedeaku Oy ONP9.4 red. Rhdplmt Wat Omm. I KtW PlaySta No d or WayStetldll POripble.aayt4 wmtdW lla mwp step of charge.Then,ff aecgemry, Gen roe B trd%a have long PKered at lest(On sIL(Anwa}; n 'ail asks eaed taISAN date,0s wml AS Personal;mNpYons..Bran somi[AdsokisjeS but,, i9mOMn[InbetlaN ad01m'm mach them on rtes near xima of Smaller,heMndAeld aavieek plot me right too., Nlhnluamw TV dnten0lhl rtti%attest.esyanofMotorgameslikeTIstbklMend:Bead now nactlon vibudlWes use W shade d IntoNatald- stnmare letlyiotyey uaf11 todenear ploAi too, or'not share Cart;lawn Tee." rWon So,says John Weir Mned,4 Be sic add;NNid It on.sgeea cob nit mt"al. lama mnMNnllktNna-41png.with any. NI'ada,Ma. Bai'kecvµ{¢Bahia inhndbgy,nn'ellnnge m my Of blgnINh scar than at hireling Asia, Bmmndftl Wirings Ninter lvhsaimedarA Wktly;BmNa talsmany hptela urd to oW;OWON game form—are giWng Pppser-vlew moot. "werafmonnisteeled On Me thoWia{{byaido volyiPmad(IroNrmm.dkY Jojativa' arfte ellandnvetPrlcpdhutsinhotelreams. me earned Battle Rurldvade,thorn Reason Nrectb to Nd TV-nawkn as.sWG rdaunn as Alart101t IntrnmtNpo Nc,;geeing an In• rompary that Oprmstioe Radisaren and Cade-', Youndav a vfdgpaemm. mmgns number ae qquasls'bnnglog nigh-Nee trylone isSLINGbroost.umOnR omen.sinkek- Ap0laggOidgtoplbvsNNe etPndped.IW`mis Pmine aM ontaonelCol rWinm[nl Moo imo mm'Tageha P016L soYi Cadsan fl,hopcn7 N inW'beaOYbatW(mi n,at9aA0ulop andgwmtlrmome.Is ceding Mgrtpmid71p11 NI[rWml mlmaA ggnnmlae otldm.m the room Its Int mnniake It pprdmleny all6bdl,Por large rha(OisellNmegoheaytoOnminMtodevicesInternetfOddlow.""is N pNy galonly Montt 'N 4504 try vim 1hOmaat olferinge:Ivs eNAIIeN such as Mirratgft Corp.'s lfhoa and PNyst.- Older Kohl guests:but dim against anyond aul- • f9raN nfio to 74da BL C 1 1 s' Motels Offer Videogame Gear l ow-finued Paul Wye DI Clap„goys,visit while the-videogame ter hptgls W lodge demand, segment It a h0oming Business for.peu•As a MO 1_1 mWque,properties ere Ole,oho play at home,it Isn't clear l0 after'early dtlfinite;By,rdrnreof their HUM Net tmmidn ame.lamorhar forsmallersite,theyOavc bgeh able t,0 ad- gumma Woo/um Ia rooms.Nihon hasJugmomquickly. offered Nintendo gadding Nrough We In,LOS A4ekS.based Kor 40101 Group, rimm"Iclevishm entertainment system for martens¢,which has saved boutique 'for yours.remand Is sea.the company pasta s,ads addAj Plaleatioh prod- says,Although in IRINn'a case the gmaO ucn nett only,At the ANdroy,but alm.61 SYatem iscurrently three orlour genera. cutest Its other upsente heNIS,Including ions behind the curve.That means.pro. Me Viceroy Palm gpnugs,the AVWWI m pN SAO BoomMe-option to play video• Reverly+Bills.and the ChatedwimN In games In their rooms.Out are faced West HoUrSM, Calif. 'It's all.ebput with titles teat may he'flve or musswantingtoheconnectedtowhat's cur. years old. rent•and we want to have relevance at People am now carrying their ownourausalmcrWlu.'-soya John Amen, remBaI explains Mr. Q. 'Pint it president at Dr. was Oa their PCs,and Crow It's realty By coutras4Den is'god,senior vice moved onto the Internet as Interacllvd President[Or operations wpmpportat Buy- games,beWma men and,inN pops• nY Hiles. Ca11L•based Hllleh:It&NIS her:"I The New York Times 3uly 29, 2005 DI Wim grin k.4 A4,MAndClmifiWAdrativraa ianNY,lIfLYra,roes Cool Deals: Resorts Fight the Heat RyMICHELLE ryIGGINS want udr guest to leek'said Mark The AVaion In Bevvdy HIIH,GAI.Vinciguerra, managing director at h¢ :uen in upud in mqw H for h. the Phaeniclm in S<mtsdalq,Kmeb i>idc china,.vddtlt 1.tfm"hia lyASTGak, idler lampoolunts ouerswdt tflesuponni"U.Ni gl.a v.imu IS toed wd b.vor -oelonbWasnighasIZUdearceschilledIsmon-scmtad towels on the meam m. "Pm,frli martmle;in Palm Sprine.Cahf,the Vito- 6011courm"We'rehappylddotL" wbtch u ,Veld tortsi7 by the Intel at mymaort cam.up.0h a navel .It's nor just desert and beach lo- me TWe.m Mt.au4 have le vu vwYwaytoCooldirgedawn.11 dumped cotes gatteig into the act.In New papuhr.And m n beh IWIV m meI"und blocks of Ica turn In swim York,ma R09MY an Park Avenue had•ton, m.n l',Z- on ,ry'. 'it themhµPenn.Now,=Saturdays—the of 81st StreM roust out a free lemorl- Sedlaglo in Las Vegs le u-inn calma,l p.pmer ,,I day—dm 1,4rt Re stand when thetemperature out- marbles Instead of hot rocks in 115 plates cox era tune doal 5 dbase• Sure MMration Is offering pltchcn fo"mursa theheat can mean Wr.ing the temperature1 down b dekren of lemonade upon check-W through gain.for travelers.The S4 Raid.He,to about b7.Divalg b cat advised ws• chid-AuguaL At the Graad America wrt in Aspen,Colo.,is offering a m- tilIt alai.eerily sNVn Hotel in salt Lake City,Sunbathers d...d'lummer ewape'rate of gZ55 H weliteda oeryresW that keep by lW Pact are athod chilledlevels, a ought through SepL4.SwcieuryonButandhaplerritn(lip totry to keep Rented with a citrus essential all, Camelbpalt maturate a boutique co-,guests cool.Amain the offers:all' hourly, "You would think chat you son In Sommdale,where rooms n r.mauseommlled golf runs at the were giving tom money,guests gar malty start far$415 is offering primShemmoWildHOWPassHewn& Sp exched.- said the spa director, as tow as$165 through Saps,14, SPAfast outsidePhoenix,Where com- Tggv Pam,,1B. Some tfaorw haven't etlnngd a perahoes recently ha 118 degrees. Of catime,a heat wave ran goner, thing, Canyon Reach In Tucson Is frown grapes at the nearby Pour eta maim revenue for a resort, es still waking up guests for hikesSeasonsResortinScarsdale; and 8p ,y spg,minds."They da land to around 6:95 a m The Green VWigypoolvnlltybailIASISadatHwhoochstoopmine;' smd Ileborait Evens, Restart& Soo m SL George,Utah, variety,(toavoM the scorching Sandi genemi meager at the Red Mann- conthwes to offer aqua acmbies af- roLoews Memo Beach. tam Syam Sc Georg.,that carrammg hikev.Alot ofpeople mlManycourtsconsidersuchperks61gqtempemturasandnearbywild• a the beat.smd the owner,Aim m be part of the Iasi or doing bull- Ores recently forced the Spa re sus Coombs,May Wantto bake and geton% --here aim certain things We read afternoonhikes reallywarm." Los Angeles Times July 10, 2005 l„ Sunday,July 10,2005 SN.lvet. IAH AMaELESTIME9 G NEWS, TIPS & BARGAI Cool hangouts next' to the pool With mcali,masagts and A hotel cabanas zit so _ _ __--; . -- 1n hot,yoOl need mxrvations. I,.==— '?cT- ry w gW4 nano toievroW}e s •. I yva hoed pvotle mt SQmlfI111efi MY'n fG{fY- MbnktlbtpEFfnmtr M1QL4PkmplFnpll4h'}Irh®IILOtIAtl. Y bwl0ut4o6rTam WwPV,ee Mm pl4ab nRf liLLMrettlnAYhmitMYltemlm. a,iMToat eWnorvLLM arc e WRQ MN 3,.` bbneri.NwlpWOxloam I afm try b4m HM NabemannnlY QeaiWluo ole fieum:SVmW1 eM1[er,OW 1: 2:no!!!!eed.•e nexM1 ar pool'lu Derweb. I' geYe_neViwoEQa ewlll[Hboonl. t ,_L"'t,..n _ Chenbne'Nlo'ymn iokTmll{You w i YPY atew L blmaNa.dpPm[ •vapl wekWb.Nnn2 vkwnf pVne 'even dtNgki(malanmeM[e[ra pt. 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Kor Hotel Group - Awards & Recognitions Avalon One of the"Top 36 New Hotels" Conde Nast Traveler Hot List 2000 blue on blue - America's 50 best hotel restaurants Food& Wine 2002 Named one of the best city hotels in Town & Country's Luxury Survey Town & Country November 2006 Included in 2007 Zagat Guide Zagat Top U.S. Hotels, Restaurants & Spa Guide Chamberlain Hotel Finalist in the Hospitality Design Awards 2006 in mid-range hotel category Hospitality Design July 2006 The Year's 130 TOP New Hotels" for 2006 Conde Nast Traveler Hot List 2006 Campton Place One of the World's Top 500 Best Hotels Travel + Leisure Gold List January 2006 Campton Place Restaurant - One of the top 100 hotel restaurants Zagat Survey 2006 Named One of the Top 20 U.S. City Hotels Andrew Harper's Hideaway Report September 2006 Campton Place Dining Room - Four Stars Mobile Travel Guide One of the World's Top 500 Best Hotels - No. 1 in San Francisco Travel + Leisure January 2007 Conde Nast Traveler Gold List: "World's Best 700 Hotels, Resorts" Conde Nast Traveler Gold List January 2007 Jefferson D.C. World's top 500 best hotels Travel + Leisure 500 January 2006 World's top 500 best hotels Travel + Leisure 500 January 2007 Maison 140 One of the best bars in Los Angeles" 1 Los Angeles Magazine Best of LA 2002 Sheraton Delfina Winner of the Hospitality Design Awards 2005 in mid-range hotel category Hospitality Design July 2005 Sheraton Gateway LAX Finalist in the Hospitality Design Awards 2005 in mid-range hotel category Hospitality Design July 2005 Tides South Beach One of the World's Top 500 Best Hotels Travel + Leisure January 2007 Conde Nast Traveler Gold List: "World's Best 700 Hotels, Resorts" Conde Nast Traveler January 2007 Included in 2007 Zagat Guide Zagat Top U.S. Hotels, Restaurants & Spa Guide Viceroy Santa Monica 50 Best Hotel Restaurants Food& Wine 2003 Among the Hot List's Hippest Conde Nast Traveler 2003 L.A.'s best hotel bars Travel + Leisure June 2006 Included in 2007 Zagat Guide Zagat Top U.S. Hotels, Restaurants & Spa Guide Viceroy Palm Springs Hot List" of the 80 hottest hotels in the world Conde Nast Traveler 2003 Readers' Favorites Survey Departures Magazine 2004 25 Restaurants We Love" Desert Living November 2006 Included in 2007 Zagat Guide Zagat Top U.S. Hotels, Restaurants & Spa Guide Villa del Sol Conde Nast Traveler Gold List: "World's Best 700 Hotels and Resorts" 2 Conde Nast Traveler January 2007 Award for Excellence Most Outstanding Hotel North America / Mexico 2005 Condd Nast Johansens World's Best Hotel Mexico, Central and South America 2004 Travel& Leisure Magazine Number 7 of 15 Top Latin American Resorts 2003 Conde Nast Traveler One of the 500 Best Hotels of the World 2003 Travel& Leisure Magazine World's Best" #14, Mexico and South America 2002 Travel +Leisure, Top 10 Latin America Hotels" 2001 Conde Nast Traveler Top 10 Latin American Resorts" 2000 Conde Nast Traveler 15 Top Caribbean/Latin America Small Hotels" 1999 Conde Nast Traveler AAA Four Diamonds awarded in January 1999 25 Top Small Hotels of the World" 1998 Conde Nast Traveler Mexico's Charming Little Beachfront Hideaways Harper's Hideaway Report November 1998 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999 & 2000 Conde Nast Traveler Gold List of "Best Places to Stay in the Whole World" 3 w 2007 AAA/CAA Four Diamond Lodgings UNITED STATES Alabama Amara Creekside Resort,2 BIRMINGHAM Canyon Villa Bed&Breakfast Inn of Sedona, 15 Renaissance Ross Bridge Golf Resort&Spa, 1 Casa Sedona Bed and Breakfast Inn, 11 The Wynfrey Hotel,21 Enchantment Resort, 19 L'Auberge de Sedona Resort,4 POINT CLEAR Sedona Rouge Hotel&Spa, 1 The Grand Hotel Marriott Resort,Golf Club&Spa,4 The Inn on Oak Creek, 10 The Lodge at Sedona, 1 Alaska TUCSON JUNEAU Arizona Inn,3 Pearson's Pond Luxury Inn&Adventure Spa, 1 JW Marriott Starr Pass Resort&Spa,2 Loews Ventana Canyon Resort,22 The Lodge At Ventana Canyon,11 Arizona The Westin La Paloma Resort&Spa,5 FOUNTAIN HILLS CopperWynd Resort and Club,5 Arkansas LITCHFIELD PARK EUREKA SPRINGS The Wigwam Resort,3 Angel at Rose Hall,8 ORO VALLEY LITTLE ROCK Hilton Tucson El Conquistador Golf&Tennis Resort,23 The Peabody Little Rock,5 PARADISE VALLEY Sanctuary on Camelback Mountain,5 California ANAHEIM PHOENIX Disney's Grand Californian Hotel&Spa,6 Arizona Biltmore Resort&Spa,3 JW Marriott Desert Ridge Resort&Spa,4 APTOS Pointe South Mountain Resort,5 Seascape Resort,7 Royal Palms Resort and Spa,9 Sheraton Wild Horse Pass Resort&Spa,4 BERKELEY The Ritz-Carlton,Phoenix,2 Claremont Resort and Spa,6 SCOTTSDALE BEVERLY HILLS FireSky Resort&Spa, 1 Beverly Wilshire,a Four Seasons Hotel,14 Hilton Scottsdale Resort&Villas,4 The Beverly Hills Hotel and Bungalows, 1 Hotel Valley Ho,1 Hyatt Regency Scottsdale Resort at Gainey Ranch, 19 BIG BEAR LAKE Radisson Fort McDowell Resort&Casino, 1 Alpenhorn Bed&Breakfast,7 Scottsdale Marriott at McDowell Mountains,4 Scottsdale Resort&Conference Center,3 BODEGA BAY The Westin Kiedand Resort&Spa,4 Bodega Bay Lodge&Spa,19 SEDONA BORREGO SPRINGS Adobe Grand Villas,3 La Casa del Zorro Desert Resort, 14 Adobe Village Graham Inn, 14 Alma de Sedona Inn,6 Number indicates consecutive years as a AAA Four Diamond Award Winner. List published October 30, 2006, and is subject to change based on establishment operation. Available online at AAA.com/Diamonds 1 2007 AAA/CAA Four Diamond Lodgings BROOKS FISH CAMP Cache Creek Casino Resort,2 Tenaya Lodge at Yosemite, 16 BURLINGAME GARBERVILLE San Francisco Airport Marriott,20 Benbow Inn, 15 CABAZON GLENDALE Morongo Casino Resort&Spa,2 Hilton Los Angeles North/Glendale&Executive Meeting Center,7 CALISTOGA Foothill House Bed&Breakfast,7 HALF MOON BAY Mill Rose Inn, 16 CAMBRIA Seal Cove Inn, 10 Blue Whale Inn Bed&Breakfast,16 HEALDSBURG CAPITOLA Honor Mansion A Resort Inn,9 The Inn at Depot Hill,8 HUNTINGTON BEACH CARMEL-BY-THE-SEA Hilton Waterfront Beach Resort, 16 Carmel Valley Ranch,19 Hyatt Regency Huntington Beach Resort&Spa,4 Carnage House Inn,31 Highlands Inn,Park Hyatt Carmel,5 INDIAN WELLS Quail Lodge,27 Hyatt Grand Champions Resort,20 Tickle Pink Inn, 14 Renaissance Esmeralda Resort and Spa,4 CAYUCOS IRVINE Cayuoos Sunset Inn,5 Hyatt Regency Irvine,4 CORONADO JULIAN Hotel del Coronado,2 Orchard Hill Country Inn, 11 Loews Coronado Bay Resort, 15 LA JOLLA CUPERTINO Estancia La Jolla Hotel&Spa,2 Cypress Hotel, 1 Hilton La Jolla/Torrey Pines, 17 Hyatt Regency La Jolla, 17 DANA POINT La Valencia Hotel, 18 Blue Lantern Inn, 16 LAFAYETTELagunaCliffsMarriottResort&Spa,3 Lafayette Park Hotel&Spa,21St.Regis Resort,Monarch Beach,2 DEATH VALLEY NATIONAL PARK LAGUNA BEACH F Surf&Sand Resort, 16 Furnace Creek Inn,20 LITTLE RIVER DEL MAR Stevenswood Spa Resort, 16 L'Auberge Del Mar Resort&Spa,5 LOS ANGELES EUREKA Hilton Checkers Lost Angeles,4 Carter House Inns,6 Hotel Bel-Air,26 Hyatt Regency Century Plaza,24 FALLBROOK Omni Los Angeles Hotel,4 Pala Casino Spa and Resort,3 Park Hyatt Los Angeles at Century City, 19 Number indicates consecutive years as a AAA Four Diamond Award Winner. List published October 30, 2006, and is subject to change based on establishment operation. Available online at AAA.com/Diamonds 2007 AAA/CAA Four Diamond Lodgings LOS OLIVOS RANCHO BERNARDO Fess Parker's Wine Country Inn&Spa, 18 Rancho Bemardo Inn,30 MCCLOUD RANCHO CORDOVA McCloud Hotel Bed&Breakfast,4 Sacramento Marriott Rancho Cordova,20 MENDOCINO RANCHO MIRAGE Brewery Gulch Inn,5 The Westin Mission Hills Resort, 15 Joshua Grindle Inn,5 Stanford Inn by the Sea&Spa, 15 RANCHO SANTA FE Rancho Valencia Resort,17 MENLO PARK REDWOOD CITY Stanford Park Hotel,23 Sofitel San Francisco Bay, 16 MONTEREY ROHNERTPARK Hotel Pacific,21 DoubleTree Hotel Sonoma Wine Country, 10 Monterey Marriott, 1 Monterey Plaza Hotel&Spa,21 SACRAMENTO Old Monterey Inn,9 Amber House Bed&Breakfast Inn,9 Hyatt Regency Sacramento,19 MURPHYS Sheraton Grand Sacramento Hotel,4 Dunbar House 1880,4 SAN DIEGO NAPA Manchester Grand Hyatt San Diego, 14 Silverado Resort,31 Omni San Diego Hotel,2 San Diego Marriott Hotel&Marina,23 NEWPORT BEACH The Balboa Bay Club&Resort,3 SAN FRANCISCO Argonaut Hotel,3 OCCIDENTAL Campton Place Hotel,23 The Inn at Occidental, 11 Four Seasons San Francisco,5 Hilton San Francisco,31 OLYMPIC VALLEY Hotel Monaco, 11 Resort at Squaw Creek, 16 Hotel Nikko San Francisco, 10 Hotel Palomar,7 PALM DESERT Hotel Vitale,I Desert Springs,JW Marriott Resort&Spa,20 Hyatt Regency San Francisco, 13 J.W.Marriott Hotel San Francisco, 17 PALM SPRINGS Le Meridian San Francisco, 18 The Willows Historic Palm Springs Inn, 10 Mandarin Oriental,San Francisco,5 Mark Hopkins InterContinental,27 PALO ALTO Omni San Francisco Hotel,5 The Westin Palo Alto,1 Palace Hotel, 15 Renaissance Pare 55 Hotel,8 PASADENA San Francisco Marriott, 1 The Westin-Pasadena,2 The Argent Hotel,22 The Fairmont San Francisco,6 PEBBLE BEACH The Prescott Hotel,4 Casa Palmero,6 The Westin St.Francis, 17 The Inn at Spanish Bay,19 W Hotel,t The Lodge at Pebble Beach,28 Number indicates consecutive years as a AAA Four Diamond Award Winner. List published October 30, 2006, and is subject to change based on establishment operation. Available online at AAA com/Diamonds O 2007 AAA/CAA Four Diamond Lodgings qVNP Tell SAN JOSE SUTTER CREEK DoubleTree Hotel San Jose, 10 Hanford House Bed and Breakfast Inn,3 Hotel De Anza, 14 Hotel Valencia Santana Row, 1 TEMECULA The Fairmont San Jose, 19 Pechanga Resort and Casino,5 SAN RAFAEL TWAIN HARTE Embassy Suites Hotel,16 McCaffrey House Bed&Breakfast Inn,8 SANTA BARBARA WALNUT CREEK Fess Parker's DoubleTree Resort, 1 Renaissance Club Sport,4 Harbor View Inn,10 Inn On Summer Hill, 17 YOSEMITE NATIONAL PARK The Ahwahnee,16 SANTA CLARA Hilton Santa Clara Hotel,6 YOUNTVILLE Hyatt Regency Santa Clara, 13 Napa Valley Lodge,29 Villagio Inn&Spa,8 SANTA CRUZ Vintage Inn,21 Chaminade at Santa Cruz,6 SANTA MONICA Colorado Le Mengel-A JW Marriott Beach Hotel&Spa,5 ASPEN Loews Santa Monica Beach Hotel,18 St.Regis Resort,Aspen,9 The Fairmont Miramar Hotel Santa Monica,5 BEAVER CREEK SANTA ROSA Beaver Creek Lodge,2 Hyatt Vineyard Creek Hotel and Spa in Sonoma County,4 Park Hyatt Beaver Creek Resort and Spa,5 Vintners Inn, 19 BROOMFIELD SANTA YNEZ Omni Interlocken Resort,7 Chumash Casino Resort&Spa,3 Renaissance Boulder Suites Hotel at Flatiron,4 Santa Ynez Inn,5 COLORADO SPRINGS SOLVANG Old Town GuestHouse,9 Petersen Village Inn,23 The Ballard Inn,14 DECKERS Lost Valley Ranch,31 SONOMA MacArthur Place, 1 DENVER The Fairmont Sonoma Mission Inn&Spa,21 Brown Palace Hotel&Spa,31 The Lodge at Sonoma,Renaissance Resort&Spa,3 Hotel Monaco Denver,7 Hotel Teatro,6 SOUTH LAKE TAHOE Hyatt Regency Denver at Colorado Convention Center,1 Embassy Suites-Lake Tahoe Resort,4 JW Marriott Denver At Cherry Creek,3 The Grand Hyatt Denver, 1 ST.HELENA The Westin Tabor Center Denver, 12 Harvest Inn,22 Meadowood Napa Valley, 18 Number indicates consecutive years as a AAA Four Diamond Award Winner. List published October 30, 2006, and is subject to change based on establishment operation. Available online at AAA.com/Diamonds 9 2007 AAA/CAA Four Diamond Lodgings WVP1W P C paW DURANGO OLDSAYBROOK Apple Orchard Inn,5 Saybrook Point Inn&Spa,5 General Palmer Hotel,31 UNCASVILLE EDWARDS Mohegan Sun,5 The Lodge&Spa at Cordillera, 17 WESTPORT ENGLEWOOD The Inn at National Hall,4 The Inverness Hotel and Conference Center,8 GLENDALE Delaware Loews Denver Hotel, 19 DOVER Dover Downs Hotel&Casino,4 KEYSTONE Keystone Lodge, 18 REHOBOTH BEACH Boardwalk Plaza Hotel, 15 MANITOU SPRINGS Rockledge Country Inn,7 WILMINGTON The Cliff House at Pikes Peak,6 Hotel du Pont, 14 STEAMBOAT SPRINGS Steamboat Grand Resort Hotel&Conference Center,4 District of Columbia WASHINGTON VAIL Hotel Monaco Washington DC,4 Sonnenalp Resort of Vail,7 Mandarin Oriental,Washington D.C.,3 The Lodge at Vail,A Rock Resort, 1 Omni Shoreham Hotel,6 Vail Cascade Resort&Spa, 11 Renaissance Mayflower Hotel, 15 Vail Marriott Mountain Resort&Spa,4 Sofitel Lafayette Square Washington DC,3 St.Regis,Washington,D.C., 19 WESTMINSTER The Fairmont Washington,D.C.,22 The Westin Westminster,7 The Hay-Adams,23 The Jefferson,20 The Willard InterContinental,21 Connecticut GREENWICH Homestead Inn-Thomas Henkelmann,3 Florida AMELIA ISLAND GROTON Amelia Island Plantation-Courtside Villas,1 Mystic Marriott Hotel&Spa,6 Amelia Island Plantation-Sea Dunes Villas, 1 Amelia Island Plantation-Amelia Inn&Beach Club,27 HARTFORD Amelia Island Plantation-Beachwalker Villas, 1 Marriott Hartford Downtown,t Amelia Island Plantation-Beachwood Villas,t Amelia Island Plantation-Captain's Court Villas, 1 LEDYARD Amelia Island Plantation-Sandcastles Villas,l Grand Pequot Tower at Foxwoods Resort Casino,4 Amelia Island Plantation-Shipwatch Villas, 1 Amelia Island Plantation-Turtle Dunes Villas,l NEWHAVEN Amelia Island Plantation-Windsong Villas, 1 Omni New Haven Hotel at Yale,8 OLD GREENWICH Hyatt Regency Greenwich,5 Number indicates consecutive years as a AAA Four Diamond Award Winner. List published October 30, 2006, and is subject to change based on establishment operation. Available online at AAA.com/Diamonds w 2007 AAA/CAA Four Diamond Lodgings Cif AVENTURA ISLAMORADA The Fairmont Turnberry Isle Resort&Club,21 Cheeca Lodge,2 BIG PINE KEY JACKSONVILLE Little Palm Island Resort&Spa,18 Omni Jacksonville Hotel,2 Plantation Manor Inn,9 BOCA RATON Boca Raton Resort&Club,5 KEY WEST Heron House,9 BONITA SPRINGS La Mer Hotel&Dewey House,2 Hyatt Regency Coconut Point Resort&Spa,5 Ocean Key Resort&Spa,A Noble House Resort,4 The Marquesa Hotel, 18 CELEBRATION Westin Key West Resort,9 Celebration Hotel,4 KISSIMMEE COCONUT GROVE Gaylord Palms Resort,4 Grand Bay-Miami,23 Mayfair Hotel&Spa,21 LAKE BUENA VISTA Disney's Beach Club Resort,4 CORAL GABLES Disney's Grand Floridian Resort&Spa, 18 Hyatt Regency Coral Gables, 18 Disney's Yacht Club Resort, 16 The Biltmore Hotel Coral Gables, 12 Hilton in the Walt Disney World Resort,23 The Colonnade Hotel,11 Hyatt Regency Grand Cypress,5 Orlando World Center Marriott Resort&Convention Center,21 DAVENPORT Walt Disney World Dolphin, 17 Omni Orlando Resort at ChampionsGate,2 LAKE WORTH DAYTONA BEACH SHORES Sabal Palm House B&B Inn,8 The Shores Resort&Spa, 1 LONGBOAT KEY FORT LAUDERDALE Longboat Key Club&Resort,24 Harbor Beach Marriott Resort&Spa, 17 Hyatt Regency Pier Sixty Six,22 MARCO ISLAND Lago Mar Resort&Club,6 Hilton Marco Island Beach Resort,8 Renaissance Fort Lauderdale Hotel,5 Marco Beach Ocean Resort,4 The Atlantic,2 Marco Island Marriott Resort,Golf Club&Spa,28 FORT MYERS MIAMI Sanibel Harbour Resort&Spa, 17 Conrad Miami,2 Doral Golf Resort and Spa,A Marriott Resort,5 HALLANDALE BEACH Hilton Miami Airport, 12 The Diplomat Country Club&Spa,6 Hyatt Regency Miami,8 InterContinental Miami,12 HOLLYWOOD JW Marriott Hotel-Miami,4 Hollywood Beach Marriott,1 Mandarin Oriental,Miami, 1 Seminole Hard Rock Hotel&Casino Hollywood,2 Miami Marriott Dadeland,4 The Westin Diplomat Resort&Spa,5 Sofitel Miami,3 The Spa at Doral,A Marriott Resort,6 Number indicates consecutive years as a AAA Four Diamond Award Winner. List published October 30, 2006, and is subject to change based on establishment operation. Available online at AAA.com/Diamonds o 2007 AAA/CAA Four Diamond Lodgings MIAMI BEACH ST.AUGUSTINE Loews Miami Beach Hotel,8 Casa Monica Hotel,6 Sagamore Hotel,3 Hilton-St.Augustine Historic Bayfront,2 The Hotel,6 The National Hotel,3 ST.PETE BEACH The Ritz-Carlton,South Beach,3 Don CeSar Beach Resort,A Loews Hotel,27 The Setai, 1 Pasa Tiempo"A Private Waterfront Resort",3 The Tides Hotel,8 TradeWinds Island Grand Beach Resort, 14 MOUNT DORA ST.PETERSBURG Heron Cay Lakeview Bed&Breakfast,2 Renaissance Vinoy Resort and Golf Club,14 Sunset Bay Inn Bed&Breakfast,8 NAPLES Bellasera Hotel,3 SUNNY ISLES BEACH Edgewater Beach Hotel, 12 Le Meridian Sunny Isles Beach Miami, 1 Hilton Naples,6 Trump International Sonesta Beach Resort,4 LaPlaya Beach&Golf Resort,5 Naples Grande Resort&Club, 1 TAMPA Grand Hyatt Tampa Bay,25 ORLANDO Renaissance Tampa Hotel International Plaza,2 Hard Rock Hotel,at Universal Orlando,a Loews Hotel,6 Seminole Hard Rock Hotel and Casino Tampa, 1 Hyatt Regency Orlando International Airport, 1 JW Marriott Orlando Grande Lakes,3 Portofino Bay Hotel,at Universal Orlando,a Loews Hotel,6 Georgia Renaissance Orlando Resort at SeaWorld,20 ATLANTA Royal Pacific Resort,at Universal Orlando,a Loews Hotel,4 Grand Hyatt Atlanta, 10 The Peabody Orlando,20 Intercontinental Buckhead Atlanta, 1 The Ritz-Carlton Orlando,Grande Lakes,3 JW Marriott Buckhead Atlanta, 17 The Villas of Grand Cypress,.11 Omni Hotel at CNN Center,4 Westin Grand Bohemian,5 Renaissance Waverly Hotel,4 Renaissance Concourse Hotel,3 PALM BEACH The Westin Buckhead Atlanta, 16 Brazilian Court Hotel,2 The Colony,2 BRASELTON The Four Seasons Resort,Palm Beach,3 Chateau Elan Winery and Resort,5 PALM BEACH GARDENS COLUMBUS PGA National Resort&Spa,25 Rothschild-Pound House Inn,4 PALM COAST HAPEVILLE Ocean Hammock Resort,The Lodge,2 Hilton Atlanta Airport, 18 PLANTATION MACON Renaissance Ft.Lauderdale/Plantation Hotel,4 1842 Inn,20 PONTE VEDRA BEACH MARIETTA The Lodge&Club at Porte Vedra Beach,8 Marietta Conference Center&Resort,8 PERRY Henderson Village,6 Number indicates consecutive years as a AAA Four Diamond Award Winner. List published October 30, 2006, and is subject to change based on establishment operation. Available online at AAA.com/Diamonds 2007 AAA/CAA Four Diamond Lodgings SAVANNAH Illinois Ballastone Inn, 10 CHICAGO Foley House Inn,4 Conrad Chicago,5 Hamilton-Turner Inn,7 Hard Rock Hotel Chicago,3 The Gastonian,21 Hilton Chicago,3 The Mansion on Forsyth Park,1 Hotel Monaco Chicago,3 Westin Savannah Harbor Golf Resort and Spa,6 House of Blues Hotel,A Loews Hotel,5 Hyatt Regency Chicago on The River Walk,4 STONE MOUNTAIN Hyatt Regency McCormick Place Chicago, 1 Mamott Evergreen Conference Resort, 14 InterContinental Chicago, 17 Omni Chicago Hotel, 14 THOMASVILLE Park Hyatt Chicago,4 1884 Paxton House Inn,6 Renaissance Chicago Hotel, 15 Melhana Plantation Resort,9 Sofitel Chicago Water Tower,4 Swissotel Chicago, 16 The Drake Hotel,Chicago, 15 Hawaii The Fairmont Chicago, 19 HANA The Sutton Place Hotel, 12 Hotel Hana Maui,4 The Westin Chicago River North,4 The Westin Michigan Avenue Chicago,4 HONOLULU W Chicago-City Center,5 Halekulani,6 W Chicago Lakeshore,5 The Kahala, 1. Wyndham Chicago,8 KAANAPALI EVANSTON Hyatt Regency Maui Resort&Spa, 12 Hotel Orrington,2 KAPOLEI GENEVA JW Marriott Ihilani Resort&Spa at Ko Olina,7 The Herrington Inn&Spa, 13 KOHALA COAST ITASCA Mauna Lani Bay Hotel&Bungalows,8 Eaglewood Resort&Spa, 1 The Fairmont Orchid,Hawaii,16 NORTHBROOK POIPU Renaissance Chicago North Shore Hotel,4 Grand Hyatt Kauai Resort&Spa,16 ROSEMONT PRINCEVILLE The Westin O'Hare,4 Princeville Resort, 13 SCHAUMBURG WAILEA Renaissance Hotel&Convention Center, 1 Grand Wailea Resort Hotel&Spa,8 The Fairmont Kea Lani,Maui,5 Indiana INDIANAPOLIS Idaho Canterbury Hotel,22 COEUR D'ALENE Indianapolis Marriott Downtown,6 The Coeur d'Alene Resort,21 Omni Severin Hotel, 17 The Westin Indianapolis,3 SUN VALLEY University Place Conference Center&Hotel, 1 Sun Valley Lodge&Sun Valley Inn,2 Number indicates consecutive years as a AAA Four Diamond Award Winner. List published October 30, 2006, and is subject to change based on establishment operation. Available online at AAA.com/Diamonds w 2007 AAA/CAA Four Diamond Lodgings SOUTH BEND W New Orleans,6 Cushing Manor Inn,8 Windsor Court Hotel,8 Wyndham New Orleans at Canal Place,22 Iowa BETTENDORF Maine The Abbey Hotel,14 BAR HARBOR Bar Harbor Hotel-Bluenose Inn, 12 COUNCIL BLUFFS Bar Harbor Tides Bed&Breakfast,5 Ameristar Casino Hotel,9 BASSHARBOR PERRY Ann's Point Inn, 1 Hotel Pattee,7 GREENVILLE The Lodge at Moosehead Lake, 13 Kansas COTTONWOOD FALLS KENNEBUNK BEACH Grand Central Hotel, 10 The White Bam Inn&Spa, 18 KENNEBUNKPORT Kentuc Captain Lord Mansion,28 COVINGTON The Yachtsman Lodge&Marina,8 Cincinnati Marriott at RiverCenter,8 LINCOLNVILLE LEXINGTON The Inn at Oceans Edge,8 Griffin Gate Marriott Resort,25 The Inn at Sunrise Point, 12 LOUISVILLE PORTLAND Marriott Louisville Downtown,2 Portland Harbor Hotel,4 The Brown,A Camberley Hotel, 14 The Seelbach Hilton Louisville,25 ROCKLAND Berry Manor Inn,7 Louisiana ROCKPORT NEW ORLEANS Samoset Resort,7 Astor Crowne Plaza Hotel New Orleans,4 Elysian Fields Inn,3 YORK HARBOR Hotel Monteleone,4 Stage Neck Inn,31 InterContinental New Orleans,4 JW Marriott New Orleans,22 Le Pavillon, 11 Maryland Loews New Orleans Hotel,3 ANNAPOLIS Omni Royal Orleans Hotel, 12 Loews Annapolis Hotel, 1 Renaissance Arts Hotel New Orleans,3 Renaissance Pere Marquette Hotel,5 BALTIMORE Royal Sonesta Hotel New Orleans,3 Baltimore Marriott Waterfront Hotel,5 The Fairmont New Orleans,4 Hyatt Regency Baltimore,26 The Iberville Suites,5 InterContinental Harbor Court Baltimore,20 The Maison Orleans-Ritz Carlton,5 Renaissance Baltimore Harborplace Hotel, 19 The Ritz-Carlton New Orleans,2 The Sheraton New Orleans Hotel,4 Number indicates consecutive years as a AAA Four Diamond Award Winner. List published October 30, 2006, and is subject to change based on establishment operation. Available online at AAA.com/Diamonds w 2007 AAA/CAA Four Diamond Lodgings Iry q P 014° CAMBRIDGE PROVINCETOWN Hyatt Regency Chesapeake Bay Golf Resort,Spa and Marina,4 Crowne Pointe Historic Inn&Spa,7 CUMBERLAND SEEKONK Rocky Gap Lodge&Golf Resort,6 Historic Jacob Hill Inn,6 TYNGSBORO Massachusetts Stonehedge Inn, 18 BOSTON Boston Harbor Hotel,20 VINEYARD HAVEN Fifteen Beacon,7 Thorncroft Inn, 17 Hilton Boston Financial District,7 Hilton Boston Logan Airport,5 WALTHAM Hotel Commonwealth,3 The Westin Waltham-Boston,5 Hyatt Regency Boston,2 Jurys Boston Hotel,3 WILLIAMSTOWN Langham Hotel Boston,25 The Orchards Hotel,21 Nine Zero Hotel,5 Onyx Hotel,3 Seaport Hotel,6 Michigan The Eliot Hotel,8 BIRMINGHAM The Fairmont Copley Plaza Boston, 13 The Townsend Hotel,19 The Lenox Hotel,9 The Ritz-Carlton Boston Common,4 BLOOMFIELD HILLS The Ritz-Carlton,Boston,4 Radisson Hotel Detroit-Bloomfield Hills,3 The Westin Copley Place Boston,6 Westin Boston Waterfront,l DEARBORN Hyatt Regency Dearborn,5 CAMBRIDGE The Dearborn Inn,A Marriott Hotel,4 Hotel @ MIT,3 The Ritz-Cadton,Dearborn, 18 Hotel Marlowe,4 The Charles Hotel,Harvard Square,7 DETROIT The Atheneum Suite Hotel&Conference Center,14 CHATHAM Captain's House Inn of Chatham,21 GRAND RAPIDS Chatham Bars Inn,3 Amway Grand Plaza Hotel,22 EAST HARWICH KALAMAZOO Wequassett Inn Resort and Golf Club,5 Radisson Plaza Hotel&Suites, 14 FALMOUTH MACKINAC ISLAND The Palmer House Inn,8 Grand Hotel, 13 LENOX MOUNT PLEASANT Blantyre,l Soaring Eagle Casino&Resort,9 Cranwell Resort,Spa&Golf Club,5 Wheatleigh,4 ROCHESTER Royal Park Hotel, 1 NANTUCKET ISLAND The Wauwinet, 1 ROMULUS The Westin Detroit Metropolitan Airport,4 Number indicates consecutive years as a AAA Four Diamond Award Winner. List published October 30, 2006, and is subject to change based on establishment operation. Available online at AAA.com/Diamonds 2007 AAA/CAA Four Diamond Lodgings C SOUTHFIELD ST.LOUIS Westin Hotel Southfield-Detroit,5 Chase Park Plaza,3 Hyatt Regency St.Louis At Union Station, 17 Renaissance Grand Hotel St.Louis,4 Minnesota The Renaissance St. Louis Suites Hotel,3 BLOOMINGTON The Westin St.Louis,5 Sofitel Minneapolis,24 DULUTH Montana Fitger's Inn, 10 EMIGRANT Mountain Sky Guest Ranch, 15 MINNEAPOLIS Graves 601 Hotel,2 Hyatt Regency Minneapolis,3 Nebraska Radisson Plaza Hotel Minneapolis,4 OMAHA The Grand Hotel Minneapolis,5 Hilton Omaha,3 The Marquette Hotel,3 ROCHESTER Nevada International Hotel, 1 CARSON CITY Bliss Mansion,2 ST.PAUL The Saint Paul Hotel,24 HENDERSON Green Valley Ranch,5 Hyatt Regency Lake Las Vegas Resort,6 Mississippi BILOXI INCLINE VILLAGE Beau Rivage Resort&Casino,5 Hyatt Regency Lake Tahoe Resort,Spa&Casino, 12 Palace Casino Resort Hotel,4 JACKPOT GREENWOOD Cactus Petes Resort Casino, 15 The Alluvian Hotel, 1 LAS VEGAS JACKSON Caesars Palace,6 Fairview Inn, 12 Golden Nugget Hotel,30 JW Marriott Las Vegas Resort&Spa,2 NATCHEZ Mandalay Bay Resort&Casino,7 Monmouth Plantation,26 MGM Grand Hotel&Casino,l Monte Carlo Resort&Casino, 1 Pads Las Vegas,7 Missouri Renaissance Las Vegas Hotel,2 BRANSON The Mirage, 17 Chateau on the Lake Resort Spa&Convention Center,8 The Venetian Resort Hotel Casino,7 THEhotel at Mandalay Bay,3 CLAYTON Treasure Island-TI,8 The Ritz-Carlton,St.Louis,17 STATELINE KANSAS CITY Harrah's Lake Tahoe,6 Hotel Phillips,5 Harveys Hotel,Casino&Resort,26 The Intercontinental Kansas City at the Plaza,15 The Westin Crown Center,2 Number indicates consecutive years as a AAA Four Diamond Award Winner. List published October 30, 2006, and is subject to change based on establishment operation. Available online at AAA.com/Diamonds 2007 AAA/CAA Four Diamond Lodgings New Hampshire BERNALILLO BEDFORD Hyatt Regency Tamaya Resort and Spa,6 Bedford Village Inn,20 ESPANOLA BETHLEHEM Rancho de San Juan Country Inn&Restaurant,5 Adair Country Inn,14 RUIDOSO HOLDERNESS Inn of the Mountain Gods Resort&Casino,2 The Manor on Golden Pond, 10 SANTA FE JACKSON Eldorado Hotel&Spa, 10 The Inn at Thorn Hill,3 The Hacienda at Hotel Santa Fe,4 Inn of the Anasazi,A Rosewood Hotel, 10 NEW CASTLE Wentworth By The Sea Marriott Hotel&Spa,4 TAOS Casa de las Chimeneas Inn&Spa, 7 PLAINFIELD Inn on La Loma Plaza,6 Home Hill Inn,5 WHITEFIELD New York Mountain View,The Grand Resort&Spa,4 AURORA Aurora Inn,2 New Jersev BANGALL ATLANTIC CITY Bullis Hall,2 Atlantic City Hilton Casino Resort, 11 Borgata Hotel Casino&Spa,3 BOLTON LANDING The Sagamore,22 BASKING RIDGE North Maple Inn at Basking Ridge,3 BUFFALO The Mansion on Delaware Avenue,3 BERNARDSVILLE The Bernards Inn, 11 CANANDAIGUA 1795 Acorn Inn, 11 JERSEY CITY Morgan-Samuels Inn,4 Hyatt Regency Jersey City on the Hudson,2 CHESTERTOWN LAMBERTVILLE Friends Lake Inn,7 Lambertville House-A National Historic Inn,9 COOPERSTOWN LIVINGSTON The Otesaga Resort Hotel,7 Westminster Hotel,3 GENEVA SHORT HILLS Geneva-On-The-Lake,6 Hilton Short Hills Hotel and Spa,4 LAKE PLACID Mirror Lake Inn Resort and Spa,23 New Mexico The Whiteface Lodge, 1 ALBUQUERQUE Hyatt Regency Albuquerque, 16 Number indicates consecutive years as a AAA Four Diamond Award Winner. List published October 30, 2006, and is subject to change based on establishment operation. Available online at AAA.com/Diamonds 06v 2007 AAA/CAA Four Diamond Lodgings IWI%Vl qv Gam° NEW YORK CITY Richmond Hill Inn, 16 Hotel Gansevoort,3 The Grove Park Inn Resort&Spa,6 Hotel Plaza Athenee,23 Jumeirah-Essex House, 15 BOONE Le Parker Meridian New York,4 Lovill House Inn, 10 Millenium Hilton,4 Omni Berkshire Place, 12 CASHIERS Renaissance New York Hotel Times Square, 10 Innisfree Victorian Inn&Garden House, 13 RIHGA Royal Hotel, 17 Sofitel New York,5 CHAPEL HILL The Benjamin Hotel,7 Carolina Inn, 10 The Bryant Park Hotel,3 The Siena Hotel, 11 The Carlyle,31 The Kitano New York,5 CHARLOTTE The Lowell Hotel, 16 Ballantyne Resort,The Luxury Collection,4 The Mark,New York,10 Charlotte Marriott Southpark,18 The Michelangelo,4 Omni Charlotte Hotel,6 The Muse Hotel,6 The Duke Mansion Historic Inn&Meeting Place,2 The New York Palace,5 The Westin Charlotte,3 The Otesaga Resort Hotel, 1 The Pierre New York-A Taj Hotel, 10 DURHAM The Regency Hotel,5 Arrowhead Inn Bed and Breakfast,4 The Waldorf=Astoria, 10 Washington Duke Inn&Golf Club,7 The Westin New York at Times Square,3 Trump International Hotel&Tower,9 GREENSBORO W New York-Union Square,4 Grandover Resort&Conference Center Golf&Spa,8 0. HENRY HOTEL,8 NIAGARA FALLS Seneca Niagara Casino&Hotel, 1 HIGHLANDS Old Edwards Inn and Spa,2 NORTH CREEK Copperfield Inn, 17 LAKE TOXAWAY Greystone Inn,21 SKANEATELES Mirbeau Inn&Spa,3 PINEHURST Holly Inn,5 TARRYTOWN The Carolina Hotel,25 Castle on the Hudson,9 WILMINGTON VERONA Graystone Inn,8 Lodge at Turning Stone,2 The Verandas,5 The Tower Hotel at Turning Stone Resort, 1 WINDHAM Ohio Albergo Allegria Historic Bed&Breakfast, 10 BURTON Red Maple Inn Bed&Breakfast,5 North Carolina CINCINNATI ASHEVILLE Hilton Cincinnati Netherland Plaza,4 Albemarle Inn,4 The Cincinnatian Hotel,10 Inn on Biltmore Estate,6 The Westin Cincinnati,4 Number indicates consecutive years as a AAA Four Diamond Award winner. List published October 30, 2006, and is subject to change based on establishment operation. Available online at AAA com/Diamonds wa 2007 AAA/CAA Four Diamond Lodgings VI 4F C CLEVELAND FARMINGTON InterContinental Hotel Cleveland,4 Nemacolin Woodlands Resort,4 The Ritz-Carlton,Cleveland, 16 HARRISBURG COLUMBUS Hilton Harrisburg,4 Hilton Columbus At Easton,6 Hyatt on Capitol Square,23 HERSHEY The Westin Columbus, 10 The Hotel Hershey,27 HUBBARD INTERCOURSE Julia's Bed&Breakfast,2 The Inn&Spa at Intercourse Village,8 NORWALK LEOLA Georgian Manor Inn-Bed&Breakfast,7 Leola Village Inn&Suites,4 NEW HOPE Oklahoma The Mansion Inn, 10 OKLAHOMA CITY Renaissance Oklahoma City Hotel,5 PHILADELPHIA Waterford Marriott Hotel, 11 Hyatt Regency Philadelphia At Penn's Landing,5 Omni Hotel at Independence Park, 16 TULSA Park Hyatt Philadelphia at The Bellevue, 12 Renaissance Tulsa Hotel&Convention Center,4 Renaissance Hotel Philadelphia Airport,4 Sofitel Philadelphia,6 The Hilton Inn at Penn,6 Oregon The Westin Philadelphia,7 CANNON BEACH Stephanie Inn, 12 PITTSBURGH Renaissance Pittsburgh Hotel,5 GOLD BEACH Tu Tu'Tun Lodge,31 SOUTH STERLING The French Manor,4 GLENEDEN BEACH Salishan Spa&Golf Resort, 15 STATE COLLEGE Carnegie House,12 PORTLAND Hotel Monaco Portland,10 Hotel Vintage Plaza,6 Rhode Island RiverPlace Hotel,21 BRISTOL The Benson Hotel,a Coast Hotel, 12 Point Pleasant Inn&Resort,4 The Governor Hotel,6 The Heathman Hotel,22 NEWPORT The Westin Portland,7 Abigail Stoneman Inn,4 Cliffside Inn,4 SUNRIVER Hydrangea House Inn,2 Sunriver Resort,8 The Chanler at Cliff Walk,3 Pennsylvania BRADFORD Glendom, 11 Number indicates consecutive years as a AAA Four Diamond Award Winner. List published October 30, 2006, and is subject to change based on establishment operation. Available online at AAA.com/Diamonds o wi 2007 AAA/CAA Four Diamond Lodgings PROVIDENCE KINGSTON The Hotel Providence,2 Whitestone Country Inn, 10 The Westin Providence,4 MEMPHIS Madison Hotel,4 South Carolina Peabody Memphis, 10 BEAUFORT The Rhett House Inn, 12 NASHVILLE Hilton Nashville Downtown,4 CHARLESTON Loews Vanderbilt Hotel Nashville,22 Charleston Place, 15 Nashville Marriott at Vanderbilt University,3 French Quarter Inn,5 Renaissance Nashville Hotel, 19 HarbourView Inn,8 John Rutledge House Inn, 18 NEWPORT Market Pavilion Hotel,4 Christopher Place An Intimate Resort,12 Planters Inn,12 Renaissance Charleston Hotel Historic District,4 Texas CONWAY AUSTIN The Cypress Inn,9 Barton Creek Resort&Spa,11 Four Seasons Hotel,20 GREENVILLE Hilton Austin,3 The Westin Poinsett,4 Hyatt Regency Austin,10 Omni Austin Hotel&Suites, 14 HILTON HEAD ISLAND Omni Austin Hotel Southpark,3 Crown Plaza Hilton Head Island Beach Resort,12 Renaissance Austin Hotel,3 Hilton Head Marriott Beach&Golf Resort,4 The Driskill,7 Hilton Oceanfront Resort Hilton Head Island,l The Inn at Harbour Town,4 CORPUS CHRISTI The Westin Resort Hilton Head Island, 13 Omni Corpus Christi Hotel-Bayfront Tower,7 ISLE OF PALMS DALLAS The Boardwalk Inn at Wild Dunes Resort,9 Hilton Dallas Lincoln Centre, 19 Hilton Dallas Park Cities, 1 LATTA Hotel Crescent Court,5 Abingdon Manor, 10 Hotel St.Germain,15 Hotel ZaZa,4 MYRTLE BEACH Hyatt Regency Dallas at Reunion,6 Myrtle Beach Marriott Resort at Grande Dunes,2 Renaissance Dallas Hotel,4 Sheraton Myrtle Beach Convention Center Hotel,4 The Adolphus,14 The Fairmont Dallas,7 SIMPSONVILLE The Melrose Hotel, 1 Ryan Nicholas Inn,5 The Westin Galleda,Dallas,24 FARMERS BRANCH Tennessee Omni Dallas Hotel Park West, 10 CHATTANOOGA The Mayor's Mansion Inn,3 FORT WORTH The Ashton Hotel,5 GATLINBURG The Renaissance Worthington Hotel,26 Eight Gables Inn, 13 Number indicates consecutive years as a AAA Four Diamond Award Winner. List published October 30, 2006, and is subject to change based on establishment operation. Available online at AAA.com/Diamonds v 2007 AAA/CAA Four Diamond Lodgings FRISCO Omni La Mansion del Rio,31 Embassy Suites Dallas-Frisco Hotel&Conference Center, 1 Omni San Antonio Hotel, 11 The Westin Stonebriar Resort,4 San Antonio Marriott Rivercenter, 18 Sheraton Gunter,1 GALVESTON The Columns on Alamo, 10 Hotel Galvez-A Wyndham Historic Hotel,3 The St.Anthony-A Wyndham Historic Hotel,4 Moody Gardens Hotel&Spa,3 The Westin La Cantera Resort,5 The San Luis Resort Spa&Conference Center,7 The Westin Riverwalk,4 The Tremont House-A Wyndham Historic Hotel,3 Watermark Hotel&Spa,2 GRAPEVINE STONEWALL Embassy Suites Outdoor World,4 Rose Hill Manor, 1 Gaylord Texan Resort&Convention Center on Lake Grapevine,2 THE WOODLANDS Hilton DFW Lakes,4 The Woodlands Waterway Marriott Hotel&Convention Center,3 HORSESHOE BAY Horseshoe Bay Resort Marriott Hotel,2 Utah HOUSTON MIDWAY Hilton Americas-Houston,2 Blue Boar Inn, 10 Hilton Houston Post Oak,2 Homestead Resort,20 Hotel Icon,2 Invited Inn,3 Intercontinental Houston,4 Johnson Mill Bed&Breakfast,4 Omni Houston Hotel, 1 Omni Houston Westside, 1 MOAB Renaissance Houston Hotel Greenway Plaza,5 Sorrel River Ranch Resort&Spa,5 The Houstonian Hotel,Club&Spa,12 Sunflower Hill Luxury Inn, 10 The Westin Galleria,Houston,4 The Westin Oaks,Houston,4 PARK CITY Hotel Park City,3 IRVING Silver King Hotel, 19 Omni Mandalay Hotel at Las Colinas,20 The Grand Summit Resort Hotel,4 LAJITAS SALT LAKE CITY Lajitas The Ultimate Hideout,3 Hilton Salt Lake City Center,4 Hotel Monaco,7 RICHARDSON Little America Hotel,22 Renaissance Dallas-Richardson Hotel,6 Salt Lake City Marriott City Center,4 Salt Lake City Marriott Downtown,26 SAN ANTONIO Crowne Plaza San Antonio Riverwalk,9 ST.GEORGE Emily Morgan Hotel,2 The Green Valley Spa&Resort,8 Hilton Palacio del Rio,31 Hotel Contessa, 1 TORREY Hotel Valencia Riverwalk,3 Skyridge Inn Bed&Breakfast,12 Hyatt Regency Hill Country Resort, 14 Hyatt Regency San Antonio,25 Marriott Plaza San Antonio,28 Marriott Riverwalk,27 Noble Inns-The Jackson House,6 Number indicates consecutive years as a AAA Four Diamond Award Winner. List published October 30, 2006, and is subject to change based on establishment operation. Available online at AAA.com/Diamonds w 2007 AAA/CAA Four Diamond Lodgings Vermont CHRISTIANSBURG BARNARD The Oaks Victorian Inn, 12 The Maple Leaf Inn, 11 GLEN ALLEN ESSEX JUNCTION Virginia Crossings Resort,3 The Inn at Essex,2 HOT SPRINGS MANCHESTER The Homestead,3 The Inn at Ormsby Hill,8 IVINGTON MANCHESTER VILLAGE The Tides Inn,3 The Equinox Resort&Spa,A Rock Resort, 15 KESWICK PLYMOUTH Keswick Hall at Monticello,6 Inn at Waters Edge,5 LEESBURG STOWE . Lansdowne Resort, 16 Stowellake Mountain Resort&Spa,7 Topnotch Resort and Spa, 1 MCLEAN The Ritz-Carlton,Tysons Comer,15 WARREN The Pitcher Inn,4 NORFOLK B&B @ Historic Page House Inn,12 WATERFORD Rabbit Hill Inn, 14 RESTON Hyatt Regency Reston,16 WOODSTOCK The Jackson House Inn&Restaurant,3 RICHMOND Woodstock Inn&Resort,7 The Berkeley Hotel,18 WASHINGTON Virginia Middleton Inn,9 ABINGDON The Martha Washington Inn&Spa,9 WILLIAMSBURG Colonial Williamsburg-Williamsburg Inn,5 ALEXANDRIA Kingsmill Resort&Spa, 17 Morrison House,22 Liberty Rose Bed&Breakfast, 13 ARLINGTON The Ritz-Carlton, Pentagon City, 17 Washington BELLEVUE CHANTILLY Bellevue Club Hotel, 11 Westfields Marriott, 11 Hyatt Regency Bellevue,4 The Westin Bellevue, 1 CHARLOTTESVILLE Boars Head Inn,6 BLAINE Omni Charlottesville Hotel,7 Semiahmoo Resort, 11 KIRKLAND The Woodmark Hotel on Lake Washington, 17 Number indicates consecutive years as a AAA Four Diamond Award Winner. List published October 30, 2006, and is subject to change based on establishment operation. Available online at AAA.com/Diamonds wv . 2007 AAA/CAA Four Diamond Lodgings V1W Tore C(+aW SEATTLE Wyoming Alexis Hotel,24 GRAND TETON NATIONAL PARK Grand Hyatt Seattle,5 Jenny Lake Lodge,13 Hotel Monaco,9 Hotel Vintage Park,14 JACKSON Inn at the Market,22 Rusty Parrot Lodge&Spa, 15 Sheraton Seattle Hotel,23 Sorrento Hotel, 18 TETON VILLAGE The Edgewater, 1 Snake River Lodge&Spa,4 The Westin Seattle,26 W Seattle,2 SNOQUALMIE Salish Lodge&Spa, 17 SPOKANE The Davenport Hotel and Tower,4 WINTHROP Sun Mountain Lodge, 14 West Virginia ROANOKE Stonewall Resort,4 SHEPHERDSTOWN Bavarian Inn,24 Wisconsin ELKHARTLAKE The Osthoff Resort,9 LAKE GENEVA Grand Geneva Resort&Spa,9 LODI Victorian Treasure Inn,6 MADISON Mansion Hill Inn,5 MILWAUKEE The Pfister Hotel,31 Number indicates consecutive years as a AAA Four Diamond Award Winner. List published October 30, 2006, and is subject to change based on establishment operation. Available online at AAA com/Diamonds o w 2007 AAA/CAA Four Diamond Lodgings C CANADA Alberta VICTORIA BANFF Delta Victoria Ocean Pointe Resort&Spa,7 The Fairmont Banff Springs,8 Hotel Grand Pacific,4 The Rimrock Resort Hotel, 13 Marriott Victoria Inner Harbour,3 Prior House Bed&Breakfast Inn,5 CALGARY The Fairmont Empress, 18 Hyatt Regency Calgary,7 The Magnolia Hotel&Spa,8 Kensington Riverside Inn,4 Sheraton Suites Calgary Eau Claire,8 WHISTLER The Fairmont Palliser, 10 Four Seasons Resort Whistler,3 The Westin Calgary,12 The Fairmont Chateau Whistler, 17 The Westin Resort&Spa,7 EDMONTON The Fairmont Hotel Macdonald, 16 Nova Scotia LAKE LOUISE BUCKLAW Post Hotel&Spa,4 Castle Moffett,5 The Fairmont Chateau Lake Louise,2 HALIFAX British Columbia Halifax Marriott Harbourfront,22 BURNABY The Prince George Hotel,5 Hilton Vancouver Metrotown,6 MALAHAT Ontario The Aerie Resort,12 ALTON The Millcroft Inn&Spa, 19 RICHMOND The Fairmont Vancouver Airport,7 BAYFIELD The Little Inn of Bayfield, 12 SUN PEAKS Delta Sun Peaks Resort,4 CAMBRIDGE Langdon Hall Country House Hotel&Spa, 12 TOFINO Wickaninnish Inn,8 ELORA The Elora Mill Inn,3 VANCOUVER Four Seasons Hotel Vancouver,4 GODERICH Hotel Le Soleil,7 Benmiller Inn&Spa, 12 Sheraton Vancouver Wall Centre Hotel,9 The Fairmont Hotel Vancouver, 10 GRAFTON The Fairmont Waterfront, 10 Ste.Anne's,a Haldimand Hills Spa, 13 The Wedgewood Hotel&Spa, 19 The Westin Bayshore Resort&Marina,7 LINCOLN The Westin Grand,Vancouver,7 Inn on the Twenty,7 Vancouver Marriott Pinnacle Downtown,7 Number indicates consecutive years as a AAA Four Diamond Award Winner. List published October 30, 2006, and is subject to change based on establishment operation. Available online at AAA.com/Diamonds w 2007 AAA/CAA Four Diamond Lodgings Tow. qF Cc'?aW LONDON Park Hyatt Toronto,8 Hilton London Ontario, 7 Renaissance Toronto Airport Hotel,3 Renaissance Toronto Hotel Downtown,3 MARKHAM SoHo Metropolitan Hotel,4 Hilton Suites Toronto/Markham Conference Centre&Spa,7 The Fairmont Royal York,21 The Old Mill Inn&Spa,5 MCKELLAR The Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel,I I The Inn at Manitou,13 The Sutton Place Hotel,7 The Westin Harbour Castle,25 MISSISSAUGA The Westin Prince Toronto,31 Sheraton Gateway Hotel in Toronto International Airport, 14 Toronto Airport Marriott Hotel, 13 Toronto Marriott Bloor Yorkville, 11 NIAGARA FALLS Toronto Marriott Downtown Eaton Centre, 16 DoubleTree Resort Lodge&Spa Fallsview,2 Windsor Arms Hotel,7 Embassy Suites Niagara Falls Fallsview,3 Hilton Niagara Falls Fallsview,6 WINDSOR Marriott Niagara Falls Fallsview Hotel&Spa,9 Casino Windsor Hotel,8 Niagara Fallsview Casino Resort,3 Renaissance Fallsview Hotel,4 Sheraton Fallsview Hotel&Conference Centre, 15 Prince Edward Island Sheraton on the Falls,5 MORELL Rodd Crowbush Golf&Beach Resort,3 NIAGARA-ON-THE-LAKE Harbour House Hotel,4 Queen's Landing1,17 Quebec Riverbend Inn and Vineyard,3 AYER'S CLIFF The Charles Inn,3 Auberge Ripplecove, 19 Pillar&Post,7 The Prince of Wales Hotel&Spa,8 GATINEAU White Oaks Conference Resort&Spa,6 Hilton Lac-Leamy,5 OTTAWA GRENVILLE-SUR-LA-ROUGE Brookstreet,4 Hotel du Lac Carling,8 Fairmont Chateau Laurier, 10 Minto Suite Hotel, 13 LA MALBAIE The Westin Ottawa,24 Fairmont Le Manoir Richelieu,8 La Pinsonniere,8 PORTHOPE The Hillcrest, 12 MONTEBELLO Fairmont Le Chateau Montebello,5 STRATFORD Touchstone Manor,3. MONTREAL Fairmont Le Refine Elizabeth,8 TORONTO Hilton Montreal Bonaventure,9 Cambridge Suites Hotel,2 Hotel InterContinental Montreal,15 Four Seasons Hotel,9 Hotel Le St-James,5 Hilton Toronto,5 Hotel Nelligan,3 Hotel Le Germain,4 Hbtel Omni Mont-Royal, 13 InterContinental Toronto Centre,5 Le Centre Sheraton Montreal,6 InterContinental Toronto Yorkville,17 Le Saint-Sulpice Hbtel Montreal,5 Le Royal Meridien King Edward Hotel, 12 Loews Hotel Vogue, 16 Number indicates consecutive years as a AAA Four Diamond Award Winner. List published October30, 2006, and is subject to change based on establishment operation. Available online at AAA.com/Diamonds w 2007 AAA/CAA Four Diamond Lodgings MONTREAL Marriott Chateau Champlain,3 Ritz-Carlton Montreal,5 Sofltel Montreal,4 W Montreal,2 MONT-TREMBLANT Fairmont Tremblant,10 Hotel Quintessence,3 Le Westin Resort&Spa,6 NORTH HATLEY Manoir Hovey,20 QUEBEC Auberge Saint-Antoine,3 Chateau Bonne Entente,4 Fairmont Le Chateau Frontenac,31 Hilton Quebec,7 Loews Le Concorde,8 STE-ADELE 1-16tel L'Eau a la Bouche,8 VAUDREUIL-DORION Chateau Vaudreuil Suites-Hotel, 13 Saskatchewan REGINA Radisson Plaza Hotel Saskatchewan, 13 Number indicates consecutive years as a AAA Four Diamond Award Winner. List published October 30, 2006, and is subject to change based on establishment operation. Available online at AAA com/Diamonds w 2007 AAA/CAA Four Diamond Lodgings C CARIBBEAN Bermuda Anauilla SANDY'S PARISH MAUNDAYS BAY Cambridge Beaches,4 Cap Juluca,4 SOUTHAMPTON PARISH MEADS BAY Southampton Princess Hotel,25 Malliouhana Hotel&Spa,20 RENDEZVOUS BAY Cayman Islands CuisinArt Resort&Spa,7 GEORGETOWN Westin Casuarina Resort&Spa,Grand Cayman, 10 Antigua and Barbuda JUMBY BAY Dominican Republic Jumby Bay Resort,3 BAVARO Paradisus Palma Real, 1 ST.MARY'S Paradisus Punta Cana, 1 Carlisle Bay,2 Hilton Santo Domingo,t Aruba Grenada ORANJESTAD ST.GEORGE'S Aruba Marriott Resort&Stellaris Casino,6 Spice Island Beach Resort, 1 Hyatt Regency Aruba Resort&Casino,16 Radisson Aruba Resort&Casino,7 Renaissance Aruba Resort&Casino, 1 Guadeloupe Westin Aruba Resort&Casino,4 ANSE DES FLAMANDS Hotel St.Barth Isle de France, 1 The Bahamas GEORGE TOWN Jamaica Four Seasons Resort Great Exuma at Emerald Bay,3 HOPEWELL Round Hill Hotel&Villas, I HARBOUR ISLAND Pink Sands, 10 MONTEGO BAY Half Moon,25 LUCAYA The Westin Grand Bahama Island Our Lucaya Resort,2 NEGRIL Grand Lido Negril Resort&Spa,11 NASSAU Atlantis Paradise Island,7 OCHO RIOS Couples Sans Souci, 13 Jamaica Inn, 10 Barbados Royal Plantation Ocho Rios,Jamaica,5 BRIDGETOWN Hilton Barbados, 1 RIO BUENO Grand Lido Braco Resort&Spa, 7 PORTERS The Fairmont Royal Pavilion, 10 Number indicates consecutive years as a AAA Four Diamond Award Winner. List published October 30, 2006, and is subject to change based on establishment operation. Available online at AAA.com/Diamonds w 2007 AAA/CAA Four Diamond Lodgings Virgin Islands,British Puerto Rico PETER ISLAND FAJARDO Peter Island Resort, 16 Las Casitas Village&Golden Door®Spa, 1 RIO GRANDE Virgin Islands, U.S. Paradisus Puerto Rico,2 ST JOHN The Westin Rio Mar Beach Golf Resort&Spa,9 Cereal Bay-A Rosewood Resort, 17 The Westin St.John Resort&Villas,5 SAN JUAN Hotel El Convento,9 ST.THOMAS Intercontinental San Juan Resort&Casino,2 The Ritz-Carlton,St.Thomas,2 San Juan Marriott Resort&Stellaris Casino,4 The Ritz-Carlton San Juan Hotel,Spa&Casino,9 St Barthelemy GRAND CUL-DE-SAC Hotel Guanahani&Spa,3 GUSTAVIA Hotel Carl Gustaf,8 TOINY Le Toiny,4 St Kitts and Nevis BASSETERRE St.Kitts Marriott Resort&Royal Beach Casino,3 GINGERLAND Montpelier Plantation Inn,2 St.Martin/St Maarten MARIGOT Hotel La Samanna,2 St. Vincent and the Grenadines CANOUAN Raffles Resort Canouan Island, 1 Turks and Caicos Islands NORTH CAICOS Parrot Cay Resort&Shambhala Spa, 1 PROVIDENCIALES Point Grace,4 The Palms, 1 Number indicates consecutive years as a AAA Four Diamond Award Winner. List published October 30, 2006, and is subject to change based on establishment operation. Available online at AAA.com/Diamonds 2007 AAA/CAA Four Diamond Lodgings MEXICO Guanajuato Aguascalientes GUANAJUATO AGUASCALIENTES Quinta Las Acacias,7 Quinta Real Aguascalientes, 15 LEON Hotel Fiesta Americana-Leon,4 Baia California Sur CABO SAN LUCAS SAN MIGUEL DE ALLENDE Esperanza An Auberge Resort,4 Casa de Liza Villas en el Parque,5 Fiesta Americana Grand Los Cabos,4 Casa de Sierra Nevada Quinta Real,21 La Puertecita Boutique Otel's SA de CV,8 SAN JOSE DEL CABO Hilton Los Cabos Beach&Golf Resort,4 Marquis Los Cabos Beach,Golf,Spa&Casitas Resort,3 Guerrero One&Only Palmilla,2 ACAPULCO Quinta Real Acapulco,6 The Fairmont Pierre Marques,3 Coahuila SALTILLO ZIHUATANEJO Camino Real Saltillo,20 Hotel Villa del Sol,9 La Casa Due Canta,5 Colima MANZANILLO Jalisco El Careyes Beach Resort,4 GUADALAJARA Grand Bay Hotel-Isla Navidad Resort-A Wyndham Luxury Crowns Plaza Hotel and Resort Guadalajara, 14 Resort,5 Hilton Guadalajara, 11 Karmina Palace All Suite,All Inclusive Grand Class Resort,3 Hotel Presidente Intercontinental Guadalajara, 11 Las Alamandas,3 Hotel Villa Ganz,2 Las Hadas Golf Resort&Marina,5 Quinta Real Guadalajara,16 Meson Dona Paz,4 PUERTO VALLARTA Casa Velas Hotel Boutique,4 Distrito Federal CasaMagna Marriott, 16 MEXICO CITY Fiesta Americana Puerto Vallarta,6 Camino Real Mexico City, 13 Hacienda San Angel, 1 Fiesta Americana Grand Chapultepec,5 Presidente InterContinental Puerto Vallarta,3 Gran Melia Mexico Reforma,2 The Westin Resort and Spa Puerto Vallarta, 14 Hotel Centro Historico S.A.DE C.V.,3 Villa Premiere Hotel&Spa, 1 Hotel Nikko Mexico, 10 Hotel Presidente InterContinental Mexico City,23 JW Marriott Hotel Mexico City,10 Michoacan Marquis Reforma Hotel, 15 MORELIA Sheraton Maria Isabel Hotel&Towers,30 Villa Montana Hotel&Spa, 13 W Mexico City,2 Number indicates consecutive years as a AAA Four Diamond Award Winner. List published October 30, 2006, and is subject to change based on establishment operation. Available online at AAA com/Diamonds 2007 AAA/CAA Four Diamond Lodgings CqJaW Morelos PUERTO MORELOS CUERNAVACA Paradisus Riviera Cancun,3 Camino Real Sumiya,Cuernavaca,2 Las Mananitas Hotel Garden, 17 SOLIDARIDAD El Dorado Royale Spa Resort, 1 Nuevo Leon MONTERREY San Luis Potosi Hotel Quinta Real Monterrey,4 SAN LUIS POTOSI Presidents InterContinental Monterrey, 12 The Westin San Luis Potosi, 11 Radisson Hotel Casa Grande Garza Gracia Monterrey,2 Sheraton Ambassador Hotel&Towers Monterrey,10 Sonora ALAMOS Nuevo Vallarta Hacienda de los Santos,4 NUEVO VALLARTA The Grand Mayan Resort,l Vallarta Palace,l Tabasco VILLAHERMOSA PUNTA MITA Camino Real Villahermosa,2 Casa Las Brisas,3 Veracrus Oaxaca VERACRUZ OAXACA Fiesta Americana Veracruz,8 Camino Real Oaxaca,9 Yucatan Puebla MERIDA PUEBLA Hacienda Xcanatun Casa de Piedra,4 Camino Real Puebla, 10 Hyatt Regency Merida,2 Fiesta Americana Puebla,I Zacatecas Queretaro ZACATECAS QUERETARO Quinta Real Zacatecas, 17 La Casa de la Marquesa, 11 SAN JUAN DEL RIO Fiesta Americana Hacienda Galindo,11 Quintana Roo CANCUN Fiesta Americana Condesa Cancun, 19 Gran Melia Cancun Beach&Spa Resort,2 Hilton Cancun Beach&Golf Resort,11 JW Marriott Cancun Resort&Spa,3 Le Meridien Cancun Resort&Spa,8 Presidente InterContinental Cancun Resort, 19 Number indicates consecutive years as a AAA Four Diamond Award Winner. List published October 30, 2006, and is subject to change based on establishment operation. Available online at AAA com/Diamonds T e i a m e n e R a e 9 y 4a y} I AAA Publishing KA pw' Tourism mSr g%n Development fit1000AAADrive Heathrow, FL 82746-SOBS 7 / \ Ar THANK YOU ! I AAA wishes to acknowledge and thank the following hospitality industry representatives for their participation in the Lodging Requirements& Diamond Rating Guidelines revisions: Dick Boehning—Executive V.P. & General Manager, Saddlebrook Resort Tampa Fred Bonani—Regional Director, Brand Standards, Hilton Hotels Corporation Norm Canfield—Vice President-Rooms Division, Hyatt Hotels Corporation Jack Damioli—Director of Operations, The Greenbrier John Dirnberger—Regional Manager, Drury Inns Inc. Beth Fisher—Innkeeper, Wentworth Mansion Bruce Jennings—Resort Room Operations Manager, Walt Disney Attractions Inc. Brian Johnson —General Manager, Portofino Bay Hotel Robert Keesler—Director of Hotel Operations, Broadmoor Hotel Inc. Paul Leone—President/COO, The Breakers Palm Beach Lynn Mucciano—Director of Sales and Marketing, Goldman Properties Loyd Nygaard, CHA—Director, Member Operations Support, Best Western International Inc. Spencer Oberle—General Manager, Walt Disney World Polynesian Resort John Raney—Director-Resort Quality, Resort Condominiums International LLC Scott Rohm—Vice President of Rooms Operations, The Ritz-Carlton Hotel Company LLC Christian Sargent—Manager of Brand Quality, Extended Stay Products, Bass Hotels& Resorts Simon "Si" Sloman—Vice President of Operations, Best Western International Inc. Margaret Stacey—Director, Partner Marketing, Fairmont Hotels & Resorts Glenn Tuckman—Senior V.P., North American Hotel Operations, Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide Inc. Robert Tutnauer—Executive V.P., Industry Relations, The Ritz-Carlton Hotel Company LLC Jeff Wagoner— Senior V.P., Room Operations, Wyndham Hotels &Resorts Henry Walther-Regional Director, Fiesta Americana Grand Coral Beach Cancun Charles Woo—President, The Sutton Grande Hotels Group 1 Introduction Dear Hospitality Professional, On behalf of AAA, I am pleased to introduce to you the new edition of the Lodging Requirements & Diamond Rating Guidelines. By requesting this booklet,you have demonstrated an awareness ofNorth America's premier hospitality rating program: the AAA Diamond Rating Process. More importantly,you have expressed an interest in providing a high level of hospitality to AAA/CAA members. Your interest and involvement is very much appreciated. Our goal in establishing these new guidelines is to ensure that each accommodation we review meets the basic needs of our 47 million members. All properties are consistently compared to a set of objective criteria; however, we cannot ignore that each evaluation does include a certain degree of subjective elements, specifically when measuring "quality." We rely on our professionally trained, full-time Tourism Editors to evaluate the quality of both physical attributes and services. Our experts are exposed to a wide range ofproperties throughout North America; each with their own levels of quality. The outcome of the combination of these factors equals a AAA diamond rating. The AAA Diamond Rating Process is distinguished from other hospitality rating systems by the level of experience garnered by evaluating a combined total of 50,000 establishments per year. The essential AAA diamond rating requirements are common-sense qualifications that AAA/CAA members have told us are important to them and, similarly, that most professional operators routinely employ. All properties must first meet this set of criteria in order to be considered for AAA approval and diamond rating. Conversely,the diamond rating criteria are not rating requirements, but are guidelines used to determine the appropriate diamond rating level. These diamond rating guidelines are simply a reflection of what is typically seen throughout the various market segments of the lodging industry. To capture such comprehensive information takes the combined effort of many dedicated individuals. AAA wishes to acknowledge and thank all of the hospitality industry representatives, as listed under the Acknowledgements section, for their participation in the revision process of this edition of the Lodging Requirements &Diamond Rating Guidelines. AAA is committed to a partnership with the hospitality industry, and we will continue to seek the necessary involvement to enhance the expertise of our Tourism Editors and meet the needs of our membership. We look forward to your continued service on behalf of AAA/CAA members at large and appreciate your support of, and participation in, AAA/CAA programs. Sincerely, Michael Petrone, CEC Director/AAA Tourism Information Development_ 2 LODGING REQUIREMENTS&DIAMOND RATING GUIDELINES ITABLE OF CONTENTS Acknowledgements Introduction Section One—Overview AAA AAA Publishing AAA Tourism Information Development Section Two-The Diamond Rating Process Applying for a AAA Diamond Rating Diamond Rating Requirements The Evaluation and Rating Process The AAA Five Diamond Award Section Three-The Diamond Rating Criteria What The Diamond Ratings Mean Diamond Rating Guidelines (Exterior) Diamond Rating Guidelines (Public Areas) Diamond Rating Guidelines (Guestroom) Diamond Rating Guidelines (Guestroom Amenities) Diamond Rating Guidelines (Bathrooms) Four and Five Diamond Service Expectations Section Four—Additional Information The Listing Property Classifications Accessibility Member Complaint Procedures The AAA Appeals Process Green Programs Addresses and Phone Numbers 3 SECTION ONE: OVERVIEW AAA AAA IS A NOT-FOR-PROFIT ORGANIZATION OF SOME 80 MOTOR CLUBS, WITH OVER 1,100 BRANCH OFFICES SERVING MORE THAN 47 MILLION MEMBERS IN THE UNITED STATES AND CANADA. When traveling in Canada, the CAA logo is synonymous with AAA. Although AAA is changing at a rapid pace, one thing remains the same --- the association's lifelong commitment to providing safety, security,and peace of mind to its members. According to AAA's Basic Beliefs, "We exist for our members and will judge everything we do by how well it serves their needs." In 1902, only 23,000 motor vehicles were registered in the United States. Roads were treacherous and driving was restrictive. Meeting in Chicago, delegates from nine independent motor clubs,representing fewer than 1,000 members, united to combat unfair traffic laws and to campaign for better roads and more reliable vehicles. AAA is now a federation with more than 1,000 service offices throughout the United States and Canada. The AAA National Office is located in Heathrow, Fla. In 1905,AAA published its first road maps, and two years later,established the Bureau 1 of Touring Information, supplying national information on roads, hotels, service garages, and vehicle regulations. i In 1915,AAA began the first emergency road service program. 1 In 1937,the first field representatives were hired to inspect lodgings and restaurants. In 1963, AAA began rating accommodations as good,very good, excellent, and outstanding. In 1977,the diamond rating system was introduced for lodging evaluations during AAA's 75 anniversary. In 1988,with the cooperation of Cornell University, the diamond rating system for restaurants was developed. I In 1989, the diamond rating system for restaurant evaluations was introduced. Looking to the fixture, AAA is developing customized products and services—enhanced travel and entertainment offerings, financial services, improved automotive services, and new membership privileges—designed to meet the ever-changing needs of our members. As one of the world's largest travel organizations, AAA annually: 4 Evaluates more than 30,000 accommodations, 14,000 restaurant and 4,200 campgrounds i for travel publications and electronic information delivery. iPublishesnearly300millioncopiesoftravel-related materials for the exclusive use of members, including more than 38 million TourBook guides. Provides over$3 billion in travel agency services. Provides more than $2 billion in American Express Travelers Cheques. When new members join AAA, they join a network with the collective resources to develop new products, services, and technologies, and the ability to influence legislation affecting all motorists and travelers. A AAA listing makes good business sense for your establishment, since 26 percent of all U.S. households have AAA memberships. AAA members are an excellent market for the hospitality and tourism industry. Member research shows: 1 97 percent ofAAA members who use TourBook guides take an average of six trips each year and spend an average of nearly 17 nights in a hotel or motel. i i 91 percent ofAAA members who use TourBook guides stay in hotels and motels. 86 percent of AAA members who use TourBook guides traveled for pleasure and 39 percent for business.-- Compiled by Simmons Market Research Bureau) AAA Publishing AAA PUBLISHING IS ONE OF THE WORLD'S LARGEST TRAVEL INFORMATION PUBLISHERS. The various departments within the Publishing group work closely together to collect, produce, and distribute, in both print and electronic format, a variety of travel publications to AAA clubs and the retail marketplace. Member—only products include 24 TourBook guides, seven foreign TravelBook guides, and 11 CampBook guides, as well as 75 regional, state, and city sheet maps. The combined circulation of these products exceeds 100 million copies annually. In addition, AAA publishes dozens of products sold at discount to members at club travel stores and in the retail market outside clubs. AAA Publishing, in cooperation with AAA/CAA clubs, creates and owns most of the product content used in AAA publications, including the diamond ratings, all editorial content, the Official Appointment licensing, and display advertising. AAA Tourism Information Development AAA TOURISM INFORMATION DEVELOPMENT IS THE DIVISION OF AAA PUBLISHING RESPONSIBLE FOR THE DIRECT MANAGEMENT OF THE AAA DIAMOND RATING PROCESS. The department exists to provide pertinent travel information 5 that effectively meets AAA/CAA member needs and expectations. Our full-time and professionally trained representatives evaluate all diamond rated establishments appearing in AAA travel publications. They collect data, assign ratings, and create valuable intellectual property for AAA publications. Although AAA Publishing provides a variety oftravel information, only the exclusive diamond rating means that the establishment has passed a stringent evaluation conducted by our extensively trained professionals. AAA Tourism Information Development recognizes the importance of maintaining a close, collaborative working relationship with the hospitality industry. Therefore, we have developed ongoing relationships with many industry associations. Additionally, AAA maintains three separate scholarship programs that promote the growth and development of future hospitality industry professionals and assists in creating opportunities to ensure a brighter future for the hospitality industry. AAA Tourism Information Development j Mission Statement WE WILL ENHANCE THE VALUE OF A AAA MEMBERSHIP BY PROVIDING AAA/CAA CLUBS UNIQUE TRAVEL INFORMATION OF SUPERIOR QUALITY THAT MEETS THE NEEDS OF OUR MEMBERS... I 6 SECTION TWO: The Diamond Rating Process Applying for a AAA Diamond Raging AAA CONSIDERS ALL VALID APPLICATIONS FOR EVALUATION. To apply for an evaluation, refer to the Addresses and Phone Numbers section for the appropriate contact in your area. Currently listed establishments need not reapply, as our Tourism Editor will routinely conduct an evaluation of your property on a continual basis. All applicants should carefully read this booklet. Ifyour property meets all diamond rating requirements as outlined below, complete the AAA Application for Evaluation. Include recent and accurate pictures of the exterior, public areas, as well as examples of a standard guest unit and bathroom, and return to AAA. Please note that if our research indicates past disqualifying issues, you may be asked to provide written documentation of the corrective action taken since that date. AAA does not guarantee an immediate evaluation of all properties that apply but does guarantee a fair review of all applications. Additionally, AAA reserves all rights to apply priority consideration to those properties demonstrating traits that provide the highest degree of AAA member value. Through ongoing member research, AAA has developed criteria reflecting key elements of consideration in making travel related decisions. Some examples of AAA member value criteria are: LOCATION NEWLY BUILT/RENOVATED HIGH DEGREE OF CLEANLINESS AND COMFORT APPROPRIATELY MAINTAINED CONDITIONS PRICE(willingness to provide a discount or best rate available) Once AAA has received a completed application, a property will be advised in writing of its status within the next five working days. A property that has received a letter from AAA stating that it has been acceptedforfurther consideration can expect an unannounced evaluation within one year from the date of the letter. Once your property is approved, it will be evaluated at least once per evaluation cycle by a AAA Tourism Editor. All evaluations are unannounced to ensure that our Tourism Editors see your property just as our members would see it. The conditions noted at the time of the annual evaluation will be the basis of the decision to list or rate a property. This decision is at the sole discretion of AAA. By applying for an evaluation,you agree to allow AAA topublish your property information and the respective diamond rating in our travel publications. AAA will make every effort to ensure that your property is fairly represented. If, after continued review, or up to and including the end of one year, the property is determined to be of limited AAA/CAA member value, a letter will be sent advising that the property has been released from any further consideration. Listings are provided without charge to approvedproperties. 7 Diamond Rating Requirements DIAMOND RATING REQUIREMENTS REFLECT THE BASIC EXPECTATIONS OF AAA/CAA MEMBERS AS ESTABLISHED THROUGH SURVEYS AND CONTINUOUS FEEDBACK. Prior to the assignment of a diamond rating, an establishment must be able to meet the following requirements: Management Style of Operation . i. The establishment must be a primarily transient operation. 2. The establishment must be in compliance with all local, state, and federal codes. 3. If the establishment is not open all year, an accurate operating schedule must be provided and continually updated for AAA publications. 4. Guests must have easy access to 24-hour incoming and outgoing phone service, ensuring prompt guest unit message delivery. Emergency messages must be delivered to the guest immediately upon receipt. 5. The establishment must assist AAA in the resolution of all member complaints. 6. The establishment must accommodate unannounced AAA property evaluations within a reasonable period of time. 7. The establishment must provide AAA rates and discounts upon request and must honor AAA published rates and discounts as last contracted. 8. Property management, or their representative,must be readily accessible at all times for guest needs or requests. 9. All property staff must conduct business in a professional and ethical manner providing attentive, conscientious service to guests. Exterior and Public Areas 10. All property signage must be legible and visible as appropriate. I. All facilities directly associated with a property must meet all appropriate AAA Diamond Rating Requirements. 12. Adequate illumination is required in all public areas. This includes sufficient lighting in all corridors, stairways, landings, and parking areas. Quest Unit Security 13. Each guest unit door must be equipped with both a primary lock and a secondary deadbolt lock. A primary lock is defined as a device that permits a guest to enter a unit using some form of key and allows the door to be locked while the unit is occupied and when the guest leaves the unit. Passkeys assigned to appropriate staff members will function to operate only these locks. A secondary lock is defined as a mortised, deadbolt-locking device with a throw that extends at least one inch from the edge of the door. This permits a guest an extra measure of security against any unwanted intrusions. Unlike the primary lock, deadbolt master keys will not be provided to guests or to staff. Master key systems will be acceptable when the emergency master key is only available to top management and securitypersonnel. Secondary Lock Variances 8 In certain instances, the requirement for secondary locks may be modified to meet a variety of exceptions. The most common are noted below. AAA claims the right of final arbitrator in all decisions of this nature. Sliding Glass Doors—Each sliding door must be equipped with an effective locking device. A secondary security lock is required on all ground floor doors and those which are accessible from common walkways and adjoining balconies. French Doors—In addition to the deadbolt lock requirements, surface-mounted slide bolts must be provided at the top and bottom to secure the stationary/auxiliary door. These bolts must extend into the upper doorframe and the lower doorframe or floor and must be strong and sturdy mechanisms. 14. Each door to connecting guest units or maintenance corridors must be equipped with a deadbolt lock. 15. Each guestroom entry door must have a viewport or window convenient to the door. 16. Windows - Each window overlooking a common walkway or in a ground floor unit must be equipped with a functional lock. Fire Protection 17. An operational, single station smoke detector is required in each guest unit. Hard-wired smoke detectors are preferred. When battery-operated detectors are used, there must be an adequate maintenance program to routinely test and replace batteries. Properties must meet allfederal, state, and localfire codes. Housekeeping and Maintenance 18. All facilities directly associated with a property must be clean and well-maintained throughout. 19. At a minimum, each guest unit must be thoroughly cleaned with complete bed and bath linens changed between guest stays. Fresh linens, maid services, and bathroom supplies must be available upon request. Room Decor and Ambiance 20. Each guest unit must have adequate shades, drapes, or blinds to cover all windows or other glass areas to provide the guest with privacy. 21. The level of soundproofing must be adequate to muffle outside noises and normal sounds in adjacent units and public areas. Furnishings. 22. Each guest unit must contain a comfortable bed with one mattress pad, two sheets, a blanket, a suitable bedspread, pillows, and pillowcases. 23. Each guest unit must have a nightstand or equivalent by each bed, a functional chair, clothes- hanging facilities,hangers and drawer space for two guests, and a wastepaper basket. Illumination 24. Each guest unit must have an active light switch at the main entry. In addition, each guest unit must have good illumination at a writing surface, a sitting area, and at each bed. Illumination is a very important guest need. Overall unit brightness is considered. Dark shades or dark walls may impact unit brightness. 9 Bathrooms 25. Each guest unit must have its own private bathroom. All bathroom floor surfaces must be easily cleaned. Carpeting is not acceptable in the commode area. Fixtures 26. All bathrooms must contain a commode, a sink with a well-lighted mirror and convenient electrical outlet, adequate shelf space, and a tub or a shower with a non-slip surface. Supplies 27. Each bathroom must be equipped with toilet tissue, a cloth bath mat, and two soaps. Each guest must be provided a large bath towel, hand towel, face cloth and a drinking tumbler. The Evaluation and Rating Process THE EVALUATION PROCESS IS MADE UP OF THREE PARTS: AAA/CAA DIAMOND RATING REQUIREMENTS, OBJECTIVE RATING GUIDELINES FOR BOTH PHYSICAL ATTRIBUTES AND SERVICE LEVELS (WHERE APPLICABLE), AND SUBJECTIVE ELEMENTS BASED ON PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE AND TRAINING. First, all establishments must meet diamond rating requirements and be determined to provide member value. This validation is conducted through a combined process of applications, referrals and media research. Ifa property is presumed to qualify, one ofour Tourism Editors will visit and observe the curbside appeal, exterior, and other factors pertaining to the basic foundation of the establishment. This preliminary review will verify that this property clearly exhibits characteristics that would appeal to AAA/CAA members. If satisfied, our representative will contact the owner,general manager, or property designee for a brief interview. This interview is an extremely important part of the evaluation as factual data is gathered for inclusion into our travel information inventory with potential use in AAA's worldwide printed and electronic publications. This session also gives the property representative a chance to advise AAA/CAA of any plans for improvement that may be forthcoming. Following the interview, the Tourism Editor will tour the property with the property representative, verifying the existence of the AAA/CAA diamond rating requirements outlined above. Additionally,the AAA/CAA representative will apply a set of diamond rating guidelines that represent objective criteria prevalent throughout the lodging industry. This tour will include an evaluation of all public areas and a cross section of rooms. The Tourism Editor will discuss both strengths and weaknesses of the property, including expert subjective comments pertaining to overall quality as seen at the time of the evaluation. This dialogue is unique to the AAA Diamond Rating Process and is a valuable resource to any property. The overall evaluation process will include the review of six key areas: MANAGEMENT AND STAFF HOUSEKEEPING AND MAINTENANCE EXTERIOR, GROUNDS, AND PUBLIC AREAS ROOM D$COR, AMBIANCE,AND AMENITIES BATHROOMS GUEST SERVICES (if applicable) 10 Management and staff Properties will receive a mark of pass or fail based on the manner of interaction with all property representatives. The Tourism Editor will be evaluating the degree of hospitality, professionalism, and deportment. It is critical to receive a passing mark to be considered for a diamond rating. Housekeeping and Maintenance All establishments must be clean, comfortable, and well-maintained. The Tourism Editor will evaluate the overall condition of the property and assign a housekeeping and maintenance designation as either outstanding, excellent, or good. All properties must achieve at least a good designation to be considered for a diamond rating. Exterior, grounds, and public areas This area is assigned a specific rating overall based on the criteria as listed under The Diamond Rating Criteria section. Varying weights are applied based on the classification of the property. For example, the exterior, grounds, and public areas at a resort carry more weight than at a downtown hotel. Room decor, ambiance, and amenities This area is assigned a specific rating overall based on the criteria as listed under The Diamond Rating Criteria section. Varying weights are applied based on the classification of the property. For example,the room decor, ambiance, and amenities at a hotel carry more weight than at an outdoor vacation resort. Bathrooms This area is assigned a specific rating overall based on the criteria as listed under The Diamond Rating Criteria section. Weights remain relatively the same regardless of classification. Guest Services A high level of guest services is the hallmark of the coveted AAA Four and Five Diamond ratings. Properties that display the potential (as determined by AAA/CAA Tourism Editors) to achieve these ratings will receive an anonymous overnight evaluation of guest services. To achieve a Four or Five Diamond rating in this area, a property must offer and excel in a respective percentage of the services as listed here. All properties must achieve at least a Four Diamond rating in guest services to be considered for a Four Diamond rating overall. A property must achieve a Five Diamond rating in guest services to be considered for a Five Diamond rating overall. THE ACHIEVEMENT OF A AAA DIAMOND RATING MEANS THAT AN ESTABLISHMENT IS ONE OF AN EXCLUSIVE GROUP THAT HAS SUCCESSFULLY COMPLETED THIS THOROUGH EVALUATION PROCESS. If the determination is made that an establishment should be listed,the Tourism Editor will assign, or recommend, a diamond rating or other appropriate designations. The overall rating is determined by weighting, combining, and averaging the individual ratings for the six key areas previously noted. Each rating assignment is based on conditions that exist at the time of the evaluation. 11 At the conclusion ofthe evaluation,the Tourism Editor will provide the property representative a written summary of the evaluation, including the rating decision. The frequency of subsequent AAA evaluations varies slightly, depending on the classification and the assigned rating ofeach establishment. The AAA Five Diamond Award This prestigious award is reserved for only the finest properties throughout North America. Less than 0.25 percent of all lodgings evaluated by AAA receives this coveted mark. Establishments must consistently reflect Five Diamond characteristics in both physical attributes and level of guest services. If the AAA Tourism Editor determines that your establishment meets our maximum criteria, and all elements represent a first-class experience, he/she will recommend consideration for AAA's prestigious Five Diamond Rating. All Five Diamond rating recommendations are forwarded to AAA's Five-Diamond Committee for thorough review. Once the committee's assessment is concluded,the establishment will be advised in writing ofthe outcome. SECTION THREE:- —-- - - - - - The Diamond Rating Criteria AAA DIAMOND RATINGS REPRESENT A COMBINATION OF THE OVERALL QUALITY, THE RANGE OF FACILITIES, AND THE LEVEL OF SERVICES OFFERED BY A PROPERTY. These widely recognized and trusted symbols help AAA/CAA members choose lodgings that will meet their needs and expectations. AAA Tourism Editors are responsible for determining a property's diamond rating based on established standards. These criteria are established with input from our trained professionals, AAA/CAA members, as well as various lodging industry professionals. AAA's Diamond rating criteria are broad guidelines to designate what is typically found at each rating level. The size, age, and overall appeal of an establishment are considered, as well as regional architectural style and design. Diamonds are assigned based on the overall guest impression rather than on individual criteria. Therefore, meeting all of the criteria in certain categories or failing to meet a few criteria will not necessarily affect the diamond rating. The final factor in determining the diamond rating for a property is professional judgement. This is a very important part of the rating assessment. Tourism Editor expertise is based upon ongoing training and experience in conducting more than 850 evaluations a year. 12 What the Diamond Ratings Mean One Diamond These establishments typically appeal to the budget-minded traveler. They provide essential, no-frills accommodations. They meet the basic requirements pertaining to comfort, cleanliness, and hospitality. Two Diamond These establishments appeal to the traveler seeking more than the basic accommodations. There are modest enhancements to the overall physical attributes, design elements, and amenities ofthe facility typically at a moderate price. Three Diamond These establishments appeal to the traveler with comprehensive needs. Properties are multifaceted with a distinguished style, including marked upgrades in the quality of physical attributes, amenities, and level of comfort provided. Four Diamond These establishments are upscale in all areas. Accommodations are progressively more refined and stylish. The physical attributes reflect an obvious enhanced level of quality throughout. The fundamental hallmarks at this level include an extensive array of amenities combined with a high degree of hospitality, service, and attention to detail. Five Diamond These establishments reflect the characteristics of the ultimate in luxury and sophistication. Accommodations are first class. The physical attributes are extraordinary in every manner. The fundamental hallmarks at this level are to meticulously serve and exceed all guest expectations while maintaining an impeccable standard of excellence. Many personalized services and amenities enhance an unmatched level of comfort. 13 ONE TWO THREE FOUR FIVE DIAMOND DIAMOND DIAMOND DIAMOND DIAMOND EXTERIOR Curb Appeal The combination The combination The combination The combination The combination of all exterior of all exterior of obvious of all exterior of all exterior elements elements design elements elements provides basic, provides a enhancements provides an provides a unadorned curb modestly and all exterior impressive, well- stunning, appeal enhanced,good elements integrated, and unique, and curb appeal provides a very excellent level of outstanding level good level of curb appeal of curb appeal curb appeal Basic, simple Good variety of Very good Excellent variety Extensive variety of landscaping variety of of landscaping variety of landscaping landscaping with professionally landscaping with noticeable planned and meticulous enhancement to manicured attention to layout and detail in design placement and care Basic building Good building Contemporary or Impressive Stunning and structure and structure and classic building architectural unique design design structure with features well- architectural noticeable integrated into features design element the surrounding enhancements area Parking Varied parking Paved/marked 2D plus: 3D plus: N/A -Valet surfaces; parking areas; Lighting is well- Lighting fixtures parking is illumination is lighting is from positioned and reflect expected adequate several sources provides very characteristics of providing good good overall the design of the illumination;illumination;property; drive-through porte-cochere evidence of covered entry added security exists; excellent overall illumination PUBLIC AREAS Furnishings and Basic functional Good, Furniture, Upscale, well- Outstanding Di6COr decor with comfortable fixtures, appointed, and elegance and limited decor with equipment, and in the theme of appeal with coordination of evidence of decor are well- the property; unique style furniture, increased coordinated,high degree of displaying fine fixtures, and coordination of attractive, and comfort, antiques, equipment furniture, offer an featuring paintings, and fixtures, and enhanced degree professionally artistic equipment that of comfort; a fitted coverings; elements; an reflect current very good an abundant outstanding industry trends; variety of live variety of live variety of live some silk or live plants or very plants or unique plants and fresh plants good quality dried floral floral artificial floral arrangements arrangements arrangements throughout 14 ONE TWO THREE FOUR FIVE DIAMOND DIAMOND DIAMOND DIAMOND DIAMOND Floor Coverings Basic quality of Good quality Very good Excellent quality Outstanding simple design floor coverings quality carpet, carpet, wood, quality of carpet coordinated with wood, or tile marble, or or tile with a the overall decor floors with area granite floors distinctive rugs accenting with unique area design pattern; the overall decor rugs highly polished wood, marble, granite, or high- grade stone Floors with custom area rugs Illumination Functional Enhanced Decorative Light fixtures are 4D plus: lighting fixtures lighting fixtures lighting fixtures well-appointed Custom lighting that provide are appropriately are well- and of an fixtures of adequate positioned to positioned to upscale design outstanding illumination provide good provide very that quality providing overall good overall complements a unique effect illumination illumination the overall theme of the property; multi- placement provides overall excellent illumination Corridors Walls and Walls are Walls are Walls have Walls have ceilings are of plasterboard or painted, excellent quality outstanding basic, simple have vinyl stuccoed, or wall coverings or quality, quality and coverings; have vinyl wall treatments with decorative wall design ceilings are coverings with ceiling trim or coverings or suspended or vinyl or carpeted decorative treatments that painted baseboard; border and are enhanced by plasterboard; ceilings are carpeted or wainscot or chair climate painted wood rails with ceiling controlled plasterboard or baseboard; trim or have an ceilings are decorative enhanced, painted border and wood textured finish plasterboard or baseboard; have an ceilings are enhanced, unique, with textured finish enhanced architectural design Signage Adequate, Professionally 2D plus: 3D plus: Design 4D plus: legible manufactured Noticeably is well-defined in Signage is of directional signs directional signs enhanced detail harmony with outstanding in limited in many in design the theme of the quality and locations locations property. unique design throughout the throughout the Location of property property signage is extensive 15 ONE TWO THREE FOUR FIVE DIAMOND DIAMOND DIAMOND DIAMOND DIAMOND Lobby/ Adequate sized Good-size Very good-size Spacious 4D plus: Privacy Registration registration area registration area registration area registration area seating areas Area with limited or with a seating with an located away are available; no seating area arrangement expanded from main traffic recognizable featuring a sofa seating areas with concierge area and arm chairs arrangement multiple accommodating convenient for conversational one small group conversational groupings seating accommodating accommodating several small two small groups; groups; luggage upgraded carts available luggage carts; recognizable guest-service area and bellstand Miscellaneous Telephone on Telephones on Telephones and 3D plus: 4D plus: Chair site site in house phones Multiple or bench at the convenient are located recessed phones telephone locations conveniently with notepads providing extra inside the and pens, comfort building located away from traffic areas Elevator is 20 plus: 3D plus: 4D plus: available for Elevator Elevator Elevator guests' use in landings are landings are landings exhibit multistory attractively well-appointed design elements buildings furnished and in with an upscale of outstanding a recessed area design keeping elegance and away from lobby in the theme of appeal and corridors the property; additional service elevator is available for staff use Vending and ice Vending and 2D plus: Vending and ice 4D plus: is available sealed ice Located in a needs are Specialized machines recessed area handled in a delivery service specialized available manner, such as an in-room service bar Coin-operated Valet laundry 3D plus: 4D plus: laundry facilities available at Pressing is Specialized specific times available at service available specific times 24 hours, seven days a week 16 ONE TWO THREE FOUR FIVE DIAMOND DIAMOND DIAMOND DIAMOND DIAMOND Breakfast Area If an on-premise If an on-premise N/A N/A restaurant is not restaurant is not available, available, standard expanded continental continental breakfast is breakfast is served in a served in a good-size area large-size in, or adjacent breakfast room to, the lobby; with appropriate limited seating is seating for the available size of the establishment Restaurant &In lieu of In lieu of Upscale, full- Multiple outlets; Dining Facilities breakfast area: breakfast area: service full-service One full-service Full-service restaurant; formal or The number and outlet or food outlet or food separate lounge casually elegant; type of food&court court; small or bar area separate lounge beverage outlets lounge or bar or bar area should be in area harmony with the theme of the property. Multiple outlets are expected at resorts) Recreational Swimming pool Weather- 3D plus: 4D plus: Design Facilities with good appropriate Swimming pool elements are of quality pool swimming pool area is well-outstanding furniture, with very good appointed with elegance and availability is quality and upscale design appeal; pool limited variety of pool elements and an furniture is of furniture; hot excellent quality outstanding tub and variety of quality; full-time pool furniture; professional hot tub and attendant is on steam room;duty food and beverage is available poolside Full spa services available Limited variety Exercise room is On site with 4D plus: of exercise in a designated state-of-the-art Extensive equipment on room with extra equipment; variety of state- site amenities lockers and of-the-art dressing area equipment; provided customized training programs offered by professionally trained attendants 17 ONE TWO THREE FOUR FIVE DIAMOND DIAMOND DIAMOND DIAMOND DIAMOND Additional Limited, basic Very good Excellent variety 4D plus: First- Recreational recreational variety of of additional class facilities Facilities (e.g.,facilities additional recreational with a unique playground, recreational facilities are variety of lawn games, facilities; on-or- available on site services offered tennis es off site privileges or arrangements golf, are made for off- horseback site services riding, etc.) Meeting Rooms One small Expanded Variety of well- 4D plus: Design meeting room meeting room appointed elements are of with good, with enhanced meeting rooms outstanding comfortable comfort and with upscale elegance and decor elements; decor elements; design appeal; first- basic audiovisual a very good elements; state- class facilities equipment variety of of-the-art and a unique available audiovisual audiovisual variety of equipment equipment services offered available available Restrooms One unisex Separate ladies 3D plus: 4D plus: First- and men's Upscale facilities class facilities restrooms appropriate for convenient to the number of public areas and meeting rooms adequate for the number of meeting rooms Sundries and Sundries Sundry area Upscale gift shop Variety of first- Other Shops available at the offering limited class shops front desk variety of merchandise GUESTROOM Furnishings and Basic functional Good, Furniture, Upscale, Outstanding Decor decor with comfortable fixtures, decorative, well- elegance and limited decor with equipment, and appointed, appeal with coordination of evidence of decor are well- keeping with the unique style, furniture, increased coordinated,theme of the displaying fixtures, and coordination of well-fitted, property; high luxurious equipment furniture, attractive, and degree of furnishings and fixtures, and offer an comfort, artistic equipment that enhanced degree featuring elements; reflect current of comfort professionally additional industry trends fitted coverings furnishings such as end tables, coffee, or occasional tables are common 18 ONE TWO THREE FOUR FIVE DIAMOND DIAMOND DIAMOND DIAMOND DIAMOND Free Floor Space Sufficient space Good-size rooms Very good-size, 3D plus: 4D plus: to allow guests with limited well-Obvious degree Allowing freedom of seating area proportioned of spaciousness generous ease of movement rooms with allowing movement, throughout the comfortable increased ease comfort, and guestroom with seating area of movement for relaxation for no restrictions guests guests Wall Coverings Basic quality of Walls are Walls are Walls have Walls have simple design plasterboard or painted, excellent quality outstanding vinyl coverings; stuccoed or have wall coverings or quality, rubber or vinyl vinyl wall treatments with decorative wall baseboard floor coverings with ceiling trim or coverings or coving carpeted or decorative treatments with wood baseboard border and wood ceiling trim or floor coving baseboard decorative coving border and wood baseboard coving Wall Hangings Posters or Good quality Very good Upscale, matted, Sophisticated commercial framed artwork quality matted and framed prints or artwork with and framed artwork lithographs with wood or metal artwork enhanced frames matting and frames Floor Coverings Basic quality of Good quality Very good Excellent quality Outstanding simple design floor coverings quality carpet, carpet, wood, quality of carpet coordinated with wood or tile marble, granite, with distinctive the overall decor floors with area or other high- design pattern; rugs accenting end stone floors highly polished the overall decor with unique area wood, marble, rugs granite, or other high-end stone floors with elegant area rugs Window Basic drapes, Good quality; Very good 3D plus: 4D plus: Coverings blinds, or shades semi- or full quality blackout Excellent quality Outstanding blackout drapes drapes; with sheers and quality and enhanced valance design shades or blinds with side drapes 19 ONE TWO THREE FOUR FIVE DIAMOND DIAMOND DIAMOND DIAMOND DIAMOND Bedding Adequate quality ID plus: Good 2D plus:Very 3D plus: 4D plus: mattress and quality and good quality and Excellent quality Outstanding box springs comfort comfort with obvious quality and comfort comfort enhancements Various style Good quality bed Very good Excellent quality Outstanding bedspreads and linens, including quality bed bed linens, quality bed bed linens semi-quilted, linens, including including quilted linens, including cotton/poly filled and quilted bedspreads,plush, quilted bedspreads bedspreads comforters with bedspreads, dust ruffles, comforters with duvets, or dust ruffles, similar duvets, or enhancements; similar triple sheeting enhancements; and choice of triple sheeting pillow fills and choice of pillow fills Clothes Hanging Open wall- Semi-enclosed Fully enclosed 3D plus: At 4D plus: At Space mounted clothes clothes hanging clothes-hanging least eight open- least ten rack area with space with at hook wood hangers; detachable least six wood or hangers illuminated wood, plastic, or plastic closet heavy metal removable, hangers matchinghangers Clothes Storage Open clothes Enclosed clothes 2D plus: Ample 3D plus: 4D plus: Ample Space storage space or storage space space for one Sufficient space space drawers piece of for two pieces of luggage; folding luggage; metal rack or upgraded racks credenza top or benches Illumination Adequate overall Good overall Very good 3D plus: 4D plus: illumination illumination overall Excellent overall Outstanding provided by illumination illumination; free level of three well- provided by four standing fixtures illumination positioned or more well- in appropriate providing the sources positioned places highest degree sources of guest comfort Furniture Basic functional Good quality Very good Excellent quality Evidence of furniture of particleboard quality furnishings; custom design mixed style and construction with construction with veneer finish and construction laminate finish laminate finish; with solid wood workmanship in solid wood trim trim accents, style of accents; laminate insets furnishings; solid furnishings are wood or other freestanding upscale materials 20 ONE TWO THREE FOUR FIVE DIAMOND DIAMOND DIAMOND DIAMOND DIAMOND Seating One chair 1D plus: One 2D plus: 3D plus: 40 plus: additional Comfortable Excellent quality, Outstanding comfortable conversational comfort, and quality providing chair; vinyl or and television variety, such as an ultimate fabric upholstery viewing a loveseat or degree of guest arrangement; oversized chair comfort arm chairs have with ottoman fabric upholstery with padded seats Writing Surface Duplex, triplex, Desk or good- 2D plus: Very 3D plus: Large 4D plus: or small task size task table good size oversized desk Desktop table enhancements, such as desk blotter, pen/pencil set, etc. Television Wall-mounted, Pedestal or Television Television Television Placement pedestal, or stationary located on located in closed located in closed stationary television credenza top or armoire armoire television in open armoire Ventilation Heat and air 3D plus: 2D plus: Easily Central system Thermostat conditioning Conveniently accessible with thermostat control available; located through controls; control window-style wall units temperature air-conditioning controls in each units guestroom; offer guest choice of air conditioning and heat GUESTROOM AMENITIES 1D plus: 2D plus: 3D plus: 4D plus: Touch-tone Television Oversized Multiple or Expanded phone telephone remote control television with cordless features such as telephone pre-programmedportablefull function remote dialing keys control Basic styrofoam Channel Free and pay- Two-line Fax machine ice bucket with directory per-view movie telephones plastic tumblers channels Data ports Video games High-speed Decorative, available Internet access insulated ice bucket with lid; selection of glassware Message light Easily accessible Insulated and Enhanced clock data ports padded vinyl ice radio bucket with lid; glass tumblers 21 Plastic ice bucket Long phone Enhanced guest- CD player with cords service directory at least one CD in folder selection Clock Voice messaging Upgraded Upscale guest- stationery service directory in folder Notepads and Insulated, plastic Framed or Umbrella pencils ice bucket with beveled full- lid length mirror Clock radios Full-size iron and Two robes and ironing board two pairs of slippers Notepads and Additional In-room safe pens reading materials such as magazines, books, etc. Guest-service Minibar directory Utility bags Full-length mirror Iron and ironing board Coffee maker and supplies, including tea bags Complimentary daily newspaper BATHROOMS General Basic functional Good decor with Fixtures and Upscale, Outstanding decor with evidence of decor are well- decorative, well- elegance and limited increased coordinated,appointed, and appeal with coordination of coordination of attractive, and in keeping with unique style fixtures fixtures that offer enhanced the theme of the displaying reflect current style property; high luxurious industry trends degree of style; furnishings and some artwork or artistic elements wall enhancements Free Floor Space Relatively Good-size Very good-size Excellent-size Spacious compact yet bathrooms; bathrooms; bathrooms bathrooms sufficient space exterior vanity exterior vanity affording guests allowing for unrestricted areas are areas are increased ease generous ease of guest movement positioned in positioned in of movement movement, plain view of the restricted view and comfort comfort, and guestroom from the rest of relaxation the guestroom 22 ONE TWO THREE FOUR FIVE DIAMOND DIAMOND DIAMOND DIAMOND DIAMOND Wall and Floor Wall and floor Good quality Very good Excellent quality, Outstanding Coverings coverings are of wall and floor quality, including including quality and basic quality and covering, vinyl or textured ceramic tile,design simple design including painted walls and marble, or or vinyl walls ceramic tile granite flooring with vinyl, flooring, ceramic, or reflecting mosaic floor industry trends tiling Fixtures Mixture of 1D plus: Good Tub/shower 3D plus: 4D plus: Large tub/shower and quality ceramic combinations; Excellent quality separate shower shower only tile,fiberglass, very good ceramic tile,stall in addition combinations; or acrylic shower quality fixtures; marble or to the tub; fiberglass or walls; good very good poured acrylic; outstanding adequate quality quality fixtures quality ceramic enhanced quality marble or ceramic tile tile or poured faucets and outstanding shower walls; acrylic; nylon or fixtures; quality ceramic adequate quality vinyl shower decorative tile shower fixtures curtain double shower walls; curtain; outstanding upgraded quality showerheads; decorative tub- and double shower shower-height curtain with soap dishes enhancements Wall-mounted 1D plus: Good- Very good-size 3D plus: 4D plus: sink with limited size laminate or poured acrylic, Excellent quality Separate or additional shelf cultured marble skirted vanity ; including marble semi-separate space or small skirted vanity; very good-size or other high- enclosed skirted vanity; good-size beveled or grade surface; commode area small mirror or mirror; fixtures framed mirror large framed medicine cabinet reflect current mirror industry trends Amenities Adequate quality Good quality Very good 3D plus: 4D plus: towels on towels on bars quality towels on Excellent quality, Outstanding caddies or bars bars or shelves plush towels; quality towels oversized Two small bars Two medium- Two large bars Five-piece 4D plus: Seven- of soap or size bars of of soap, or amenity package piece amenity equivalent soap, or equivalent; one of excellent package of equivalent; one bottled item; quality with an outstanding packet item;attractively upscale quality simple presented; presentation; presentation additional upscale, amenities are decorative soap available at the dish front desk Facial tissues Facial tissues in Facial tissues Facial tissues of Facial tissues in chrome, wall- inset in vanity excellent quality custom-designed mounted covers in decorative container container 23 Hair dryers and Wall-mounted Free-standing 4D plus: Scale; extra amenities hair dryer hair dryer illuminated available at the makeup mirror front desk Night-light 3D plus: Bathroom area rug; makeup mirror; telephone 24 Four & Five Diamond Services Service Level Guest Services 4 5 Reservations x Accepted 24 hours, either at property or through a central reservation system x Phone promptly answered within three rings x Warm and sincere greeting offered x Reservationist thanks guest for calling, provides an introduction, asks for guest's name X Reservationist addresses guest by name x Reservationist anticipates guest's needs x Reservationist offers rate structure, available rooms, facilities, and services x Reservationist exhibits competent knowledge of all associated facilities and hours of o eration x Reservationist gives choice of smoking or nonsmoking room, explains if property is a smoke- free remise x Reservationist collects registration information x Reservationist explains deposit and cancellation policies x lReservationist explains unusual payment options x IReservationist reviews reservation request x IReservationist exhibits sincerity and polish in complying to all guest requests X x IReservationist gives confirmation number or contact's name x Reservationist asks if there are any other ways to be of service X x I Reservationist warmly and sincerely thanks guest for calling X x IReservationist addresses guest by name during closing x Property sends written confirmation 4 5 Arrival x Uniformed attendant promptly opens the car door and provides a warm and sincere welcome reetin X Attendant makes a proper introduction inquiring about the guest's name X Attendant uses guest name x Attendant explains parking procedure x Valet parking is automatic x Attendant promptly unloads luggage, explains handling procedure, and gives direction to registration area X lAttendant anticipates guest's needs X Attendant exhibits sincerity and polish in complying to guest requests X Attendant escorts guest to appropriate area x Attendant offers a warm and sincere closing X Attendant addresses guest by name during closing x Lobby greeters are available to escort guest to appropriate area 25 4 5 Check-In x Attendant provides a warm and sincere greeting; recognizes guest appropriately X Attendant addresses guest by name during initial greeting, as appropriate thereafter x Attendant acknowledges guests waiting in line with a warm and welcoming greeting x Registered guests are not asked for duplicate information x Attendant confirms rate and type of room x Attendant delivers messages discreetly x Attendant provides room number discreetly x Attendant places all registration materials into the guest's hand x lAttendant exhibits a sincere desire and compliance to all guest requests X Attendant asks if there are any other ways to be of service x Attendant arranges escort of guest and belongings to room x Attendant provides introduction to escort x Attendant offers a warm and sincere closing x Attendant addresses guest by name during closing 4 5 Check-In Bell Services x Escort provides a warm and sincere greeting, using guest's name x Escort is able to provide information about facilities when asked X Escort takes the initiative in providing information about all facilities X Escort exhibits a sincere desire and compliance to all guest requests X Escort anticipates guest's needs x Escort offers to hang garment bag and place luggage on luggage stand or in appropriate area x lEscort explains features and functions of room x jEscort offers to fill ice bucket x jEscort asks if there are any other ways to be of service X x lEscort offers a warm and sincere closing x lEscort addresses guest by name during closing 4 5 Housekeeping Services X ITumdown service available on request(Service maybe requested with 4 diamond only) x IFull evening housekeeping service is automatic x 10perator answers phone promptly within three rings x 10perator provides a warm and sincere greeting, using guest's name x Operator exhibits a sincere desire and compliance to all guest requests x 10perator anticipates guest's needs x Operator asks if there are any other ways to be of service X x 10perator offers a warm and sincere closing x 10perator addresses guest by name during closing X x lAttendant accommodates requests for time of service X x Folds back or removes bedspread LX x Turns up pillows x Straightens bathroom, re-points tissues, wipes surfaces x Replaces used towels x Replaces depleted amenities X Empties wastebasket 26 x ICleans ashtray x jAdjusts drapes x jAdjusts room lighting x IDelivers gift amenity such as goodnight wish, chocolates, etc. x IRefreshes ice x Replaces used glasses x Displays evening services such as robe on bed, laundry, shoeshine, etc. X x Turns on soft level music X Attendant leaves personalized welcome message for guest X Evidence of personalized services exists 4 5 Wake Up Calls x IService is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week x jService number is answered within three rings x Operator provides a warm and sincere greeting, using guest's name when call is requested x Operator asks appropriate questions and replies in a professional manner X Operator asks if there are any other ways to be of service x Operator offers a warm and sincere closing X Operator addresses guest by name during closing X Automated, personal call received within five minutes of requested time (Service may be automated with 4 diamond onl X Live, personal call received within five minutes of requested time X Message includes a warm and sincere greeting with use of guest's name x IMessage includes time of call x IMessage includes other pertinent information such as weather x Operator asks if there are any other ways to be of service x Operator offers a warm and sincere closing X Operator addresses guest by name during closing x Evidence of personalized services exists 4 5 Room Service Order Taking x IService is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week X x IService number is answered within three rings X x Operator provides a warm and sincere greeting, using guest's name X Operator exhibits a sincere desire and compliance to all guest requests x Operator anticipates guest's needs X x Operator asks appropriate questions and replies in a professional manner X x Operator repeats order to guest X Operator asks if there are any other ways to be of service X x loperator gives time estimate for delivery(within 30 minutes) X x Operator offers a warm and sincere closing x 10perator addresses guest by name during closing X x Operator calls to advise guest if order will be late or items ordered are not available X x Special express services are available for breakfast orders x Evidence of personalized services exist Room Service Delivery 27 x IDelivered within five minutes of time promised x Morning newspaper delivered to door or with breakfast(If delivered to guest door, the paper is resented with breakfast x lAttendant provides a warm and sincere greeting, using guest's name x lAttendant exhibits a sincere desire and compliance to all guest requests x Attendant anticipates guest's needs x lAftendant offers a suggestion as to tray/table placement x lAttendant is conversant during set-up and delivery x lAttendant reviews guest order x lAttendant prepares table set-up and removes food covers with guest permission x IFood presentation and quality of ingredients reflects an upscale experience x JAII appropriate dishware and linens are of an upscale quality x JAII food is served at the proper temperature (hot food hot and cold food cold) x All food is prepared as ordered X Evidence of personalized services exists x Attendant offers to pour beverage x Attendant provides written or verbal instructions for the table/tray removal X Attendant asks if there are any other ways to be of service x Attendant offers a warm and sincere closing x Attendant addresses guest by name during closing x jPrompt removal of trays/tables, upon request 4 5 Bell Service Check-Out x IService number is answered within three rings x 10perator provides a warm and sincere greeting, using guest's name x 10perator exhibits a sincere desire and compliance to all guest requests x Operator anticipates guest's needs x Operator offers to retrieve car or arrange other transportation X Operator asks if there are.any other ways to be of service x Operator offers a warm and sincere closing X Operator addresses guest by name during closing x Bellman arrives promptly; if not within five minutes, guest is notified of delay at time of request x Bellman provides a warm and sincere greeting, using guest's name X Bellman exhibits a sincere desire and compliance to all guest requests x Bellman anticipates guest's needs x 113ellman inquires about guest's stay x Bellman is conversant with guest while providing assistance x Bellman asks if there are any other ways to be of service x Bellman offers a warm and sincere closing x Bellman addresses guest by name during closing 4 5 Check-Out x x Express check-out services are available 24 hours a day, seven days a week X Attendant provides a warm and sincere greeting; recognizes guest appropriately x Attendant addresses guest by name during initial greeting, as appropriate thereafter x Attendant acknowledges guests waiting in line with a warm and welcoming greeting 28 x x lAttendant inquires about guest's stay x lAttendant exhibits a sincere desire and compliance to all guest requests x lAttendant asks if there are any other ways to be of service X x lAttendant provides a copy of bill for review into the guest's hand X x lAttendant confirms payment method X x lAttendant places check out folio into the guest's hand X x lAttendant expresses a warm and sincere thank-you for staying at the property x lAttendant sincerely encourages guest to return x Attendant arranges escort of guest and belongings to exit X Attendant provides introduction to escort X x Attendant offers a warm and sincere closing x Attendant addresses guest by name during closing 4 5 Departure x Guest's vehicle is waiting or comfortable accommodations are made by escort X x IGuest does not wait more than five minutes for transportation x x Attendant provides a warm and sincere greeting, using guest's name x lAttendant anticipates guest's needs X x Attendant is conversant pertaining to the guest's stay X Attendant reviews all of guest's belongings and placement in vehicle X x Attendant opens and closes door for guest(s) X Attendant asks if there are any other ways to be of service x x Attendant offers a warm and sincere closing X Attendant addresses guest by name during closing 4 5 1 Concierge & Miscellaneous Services x Concierge is on duty or a special services number is available for guests 24 hours a day, seven days a week X x Accurate pre-programmed phones x Attendant makes a proper introduction, asks guest's name X Attendant uses guest's name X x Concierge service number is answered within three rings x If by phone, operator provides a warm and sincere greeting, using guest's name X Attendant/operator exhibits a sincere desire and compliance to all guest requests x Attendant/operator anticipates guest's needs x Attendant/operator is knowledgeable of all area attractions and services x Attendant/operator asks if there are any other ways to be of service x lAttendantioperator offers a warm and sincere closing x Attendant/operator addresses guest by name during closing x Overnight valet and laundry available x Short-notice pressing is available x Shoe shine service is available x Miscellaneous charges are billed directly to the guest's room X Butler services are available X x Food and beverage outlets reflect the characteristics of the property 29 4 5 Staff x x All associates exhibit a professional vocabulary x Guests are graciously escorted to areas when directions are requested x x All associates consistently maintain eye contact with guests x There is evidence that all associates are empowered by management to resolve guest issues immediate) X x All associates are appropriately attired; name tags 30 SECTION FOUR: -- Additional Information The Listing ONCE A PROPERTY IS APPROVED, AAA PUBLISHING ESTABLISHES THE CONTENT AND FORMAT OF EACH LISTING IN ALL OF OUR PUBLICATIONS. The basic listing is provided at no cost to the establishment. This listing does not contain advertising or promotional phraseology purchased by the operator. The listing copy describing the lodging is based in part on objective information provided by the establishment. This listing information is updated annually, and your establishment will be contacted either in person,by mail, or via the telephone. Failure to provide this information in a timely manner will result in the deletion of your establishment from our database. Additionally, AAA's professionally trained Tourism Editors enhance our inventory with descriptive prose for each establishment. This skilled degree of subjectivity enables us to capture the feel of an experience and pass along this valuable information to members. Each diamond rated property has the opportunity to participate in the AAA Official Appointment Program, entitling the establishment to use the renowned AAA/CAA emblem and diamond rating in its advertising and promotions. This program also entitles the establishment to an enhanced listing in AAA publications. Personalized display advertising in AAA publications is also available. FYI Designation This designation means that a property has not been diamond rated by a AAA Tourism Editor but is of notable significance and potential member value. The property is unrated due to one of the following reasons: The property is too new to rate. The property is under construction. The property is undergoing extensive renovations. The property has not been evaluated. s The property does not meet Diamond Rating requirements. 31 Property Classifications ALL DIAMOND RATED LODGINGS ARE CLASSIFIED USING THREE KEY DESCRIPTIVE ELEMENTS. FIRST, ALL LODGINGS ARE CLASSIFIED BY STYLE OF OPERATION: Bed and Breakfast: Small-scale properties emphasizing a high degree of personal touches that provide guests an"at home" feeling. Guest units tend to be individually decorated. Rooms may not include some modern amenities such as televisions and telephones, and may have a shared bathroom. Usually owner-operated with a common room or parlor separate from the innkeeper's living quarters, where guests and operators can interact during evening and breakfast hours. Evening office closures are normal. A continental or full, hot breakfast is served and is included in the room rate.See the B&B/Country Inn Requirements&Diamond Rating Guidelines bookletfor additional information. Condominium: Vacation-oriented or extended-stay, apartment-style accommodations that are routinely available for rent through a management company. Units vary in design, decor and often contain one or more bedrooms, living room, full kitchen, and an eating area. Studio-type models combine the sleeping and living areas into one room. Typically, basic cleaning supplies, kitchen utensils and complete bed and bath linens are supplied. The guest registration area may be located off site. Cabin/Cottage: Vacation-oriented, small-scale, freestanding houses or cabins. Units vary in design, decor and often contain one or more bedrooms, living room, kitchen, dining area, and bathroom. Studio-type models combine the sleeping and living areas into one room. Typically, basic cleaning supplies, kitchen utensils, and complete bed and bath linens are supplied. The guest registration area may be located off site. Country Inn: Although similar in definition to a bed and breakfast, country inns are usually larger in scale with spacious public areas and offer a dining facility that serves at least breakfast and dinner.See the B&B/Country Inn Requirements & Diamond Rating Guidelines booklet for additional information. Motel: A one to three story establishment typically with exterior room entrances facilitating convenient access to parking. The standard guest units have one bedroom with a bathroom and are typically similar in decor and design throughout. Public areas are limited in size and/or the variety of facilities available. Ranch: Typically a working ranch with an obvious rustic, western theme. In general, equestrian- related activities are featured, but ranches may include other animals and activities as well. A variety of guest unit styles is offered in a family-oriented atmosphere. Small-scale Hotel: A multistory establishment typically with interior room entrances. A variety of guest unit styles is offered. Public areas are limited in size and/or the variety of facilities available. 32 Casino: Extensive gambling facilities are available such as blackjack, craps, keno, and slot machines. Classic: Renowned and landmark properties, older than 50 years, well known for their unique style and ambiance. Historic: These properties are typically over 75 years of age and exhibit many features of a historic nature with respect to architecture, design, furnishings, public record, or acclaim. Properties must meet one of the following criteria: Maintained the integrity ofthe historical nature Listed on the National Register ofHistoric Places National Historic Landmark Located in a National Register Historic District Accessibility Barrier-Free Travel Full access to lodgings, and their public areas, is an important issue for mature travelers and those with disabilities. Currently, there are 54 million Americans with disabilities, about 20 percent of the population; 5.3 million Canadians have a disability, about 18 percent of the population. In the U.S., this powerful market segment has a combined annual income of nearly 700 billion-- $175 billion in discretionary dollars. They spend an average of$3,000 per trip, representing $117 billion in travel dollars. Yet, because ofbarriers to travel, 80 percent ofpeople with disabilities do not travel. AAA has long recognized the importance of meeting the needs of all travelers by providing barrier-free travel information for travelers. In 2001, AAA began displaying anew Accessible Features icon in AAA and CAA membership publications and in retail products. Also in 2001, new, expanded accessible criteria icons will appear with selected properties in AAA specialty retail publications. icon Accessible Features: This property has some accessible features. It may be fully accessible, semi-accessible or meet the needs of hearing-impaired individuals. Call the property directly to determine exactly what accessible features are offered. icon HOH/Deaf: Suitable for a guest who is deaf or hard of hearing but has no mobility impairment. Communication and alerting equipment can be portable. icon Visually ImpairedBlind: Suitable for a guest who is blind or has low vision but has no mobility impairment. Property provides orientation to public areas and guestroom. icon Dexterity Impaired: Suitable for a guest who has any condition that limits hand/arm movement and fine motor activities. Performing tasks requiring fine motor skills are difficult or not possible. 34 icon Mobility 1: Suitable for a guest who is able to ambulate; may use a mobility aid such as cane, crutch or walker; may be frail; has limited stamina, is a slow walker; experiences balance difficulties. Can stand and is able to use stairs. icon Mobility 2: Suitable for a guest using a wheelchair or electric scooter; has good upper body strength or is able to stand but is unable to use stairs; is able to transfer independently; can manage without lateral transfer space; can manage with transfer shower or tub. icon Mobility 3: Suitable for a guest using a manual or electric wheelchair but does not have good upper body strength; cannot transfer independently or only under ideal conditions; may need assistance; requires lateral transfer space, 2 grab bars and a roll-in shower. AAA's accessibility criteria are consistent with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and include additional features that are important to the mature or travelers with disabilities. The Tourism Editor will check for Accessibility Features during the inspection of your property. Accessibility is not a requirementfor listing and will not affectyour diamond rating. However, we stronzlv encourage you to make every a ort to meet the needs of all your guests—including the mature traveler and those with disabilities. Member Comment Procedures AAA CLOSELY MONITORS THE NUMBER AND TYPE OF COMMENTS WE RECEIVE FROM MEMBERS REGARDING LISTED ESTABLISHMENTS. When members write to us expressing dissatisfaction with a particular lodging, it is tracked through the AAA National Office Member Relations department. All complaints are carefully reviewed for validity. The establishment is then notified of each complaint so they have an opportunity to respond and resolve the matter within a reasonable period of time. Of the more than 46,000 listings in AAA publications, the average ratio ofmember complaints received by AAA/CAA clubs and the National Office is less than one per establishment. Even though a complaint may be satisfactorily resolved, the complaint becomes a permanent part of the establishment's record. Because we are a member-driven organization, we are highly sensitive to the needs of our members. Therefore, our Member Relations department will continually track, warn, and take judicious action with regards to AAA/CAA member complaints. If a member complaint is determined to be of an extreme nature, an establishment may be disapproved immediately and without warning. This action is at AAA's sole discretion. If a property has been disapproved for excessive member complaints, a written request for a reevaluation may be submitted, accompanied by an explanation of the actions taken to limit future complaints. Note: Such properties may not reapply until two years have elapsed from the date of disapproval. All requests may be addressed to: 35 AAA Tourism Information Development 1000 AAA Drive Mail Stop 51 Heathrow, FL 32746-5063 The AAA Appeals Process THE APPEALS PROCESS WAS ESTABLISHED AS A RESOURCE FOR ALL RESTAURANTS, LODGINGS, CAMPGROUNDS AND ATTRACTIONS EVALUATED BY THE AAA TOURISM INFORMATION DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT. The process was created to: Aid in maintaining a fair and respectful relationship with the hospitality industry Allow establishments to raise issues without fear of forfeiting future opportunities for a fair evaluation Ensure that all issues are addressed in an efficient and timely manner Help identify policies, practices, or procedures that may be in need of review How do Ifile an appeal? First, contact the AAA Customer Service Center, Monday through Friday, from 8:30 am to 5:15 p.m. EST at (407) 444-8370. In many cases, our analysts will be able to resolve your concern immediately. If resolution is not obtained, your call will be directed to the AAA Regional Manager for your evaluation territory. If an issue remains unresolved after the above steps, an establishment is asked to state its concerns in writing for review by the AAA Appeals Committee. All appeals entertained by the committee must be in writing from the establishment only. Exercise utmost care to specifically state your concerns and provide your case for the committee's final review. Each appeal is thoroughly researched and given thoughtful consideration and substantive reply. All appeals should be sent to the attention of: AAA Appeals Committee 1000 AAA Drive Mail Stop 51 Heathrow, FL 32746-5063 The AAA Appeals Committee convenes on a monthly basis and is comprised of five voting members of AAA management from various business lines within the association. After consideration of your appeal, the committee will take one of three actions: Support the appeal Reject the appeal Table the appeal pending further information or reevaluation 36 Please note: The committee's decision on your appeal will be considered as AAA's final decision. You will be notified by mail as to the status of your appeal within 45 days of receipt of your written statement. Green Programs AAA SUPPORTS ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT IN THE LODGING INDUSTRY TO THE EXTENT THAT TRULY EFFECTIVE PROGRAMS MAINTAIN QUALITY STANDARDS OF GUEST COMFORT. We strongly encourage continued use ofprograms that offer guests choices without consequences for noncompliance. Effective green programs are intended to reduce waste without reducing guest comfort. As an example of good environmental practices, we fully support the AH&LA endorsed Project PlanetTM program, such as optional bed linens and towel reuse, provided that guests are offered a choice and are not penalized or charged for daily laundering selection. Other energy, water, and solid waste management programs are encouraged. However, AAA does have concerns in two areas, as they may have a significant effect on a property's listing or diamond rating. Water-saving showerheads that significantly limit water flow. Energy-saving light bulbs that reduce actual foot-candle output, causing dimness at the task areas. Addresses and Phone Numbers If you have additional questions, please call AAA at: Evaluation Applications 407) 444-8370 Evaluation Operations 407) 444-8370 Rating and Listing Information 407) 444-8370 Display Advertising 407) 444-8280 Official Appointments 407) 444-8280 Visit us at www.aaa.biz/approved or write to AAA at: 37 AAA Tourism Information Development Mail Stop 51 1000 AAA Drive Heathrow, FL 32746-5063 Establishments located in Southern California should contact the following AAA club: Automobile Club of Southern California PO Box 25001 Santa Ana, CA 92799-5001 714) 885-2247, Option 2 (Evaluations, Ratings, and Official Appointments) 714) 885-2410 (TourBook Advertising) 38 MULTIPLY Your Market Impact ENJOY a complete package of benefits that sets The annual AAA/CAA you apart from the competition and effectively licensing• O• multiplies your exposure — and business: Preferred positioning and —maximizes impact by . . • ""•• Nw 4 s' your affiliation with new for all Official Appointments the AAA/CAA your property photo in the lodging search results onbrand — the AAA.com. trusted symbol of quality for Access to AAA Approved members Lodging logos. nonmembers alike. Tii Po•FbT SUms sss°°r eceame-,.mn, "\ t[eAa'J.I N M U9 50 fyM,Gfm9 i Rcf f.01M.FeYYY:iifu.YN mN7w mM1'mW VYwr LiRPCJM11Uf/prcw'SY.`n y uusl pPdv.•1 nM,GwM.MxMMF wW mi TourBook listing m„ enhancements that make your property stand out— r k{" bold red Diamonds and special amenities for members. Official Appointments are the 9"1 propertie licensed to use the highly recognized AAA/CAA logo and your 4°r 05 Diamond rating. Feature it in all of your promotional W.e tu1T.WG40- Complimentary e _ efforts—on outdoor sign or flag Q- to boost your visibility and walk-in. . traffic. your Web site. Af e o e • • e StrongMembers e e o e s NOT YET /,U+1-/Vk A Approved? Take the first step to become eligible for AAA/CAA's high-impact marketing programs, including kfL TourBook multimedia advertising and Official Appointment licensing. Visit www.AAA.biz/Diamonds today for evaluation requirements and information. i f I Club Commons II - Employee Housing PUD - Preliminary Plan application Supplemental Materials Presented to Planning Commission Submitted for Town Council Review May 7, 2007 Town of Snowmass Village Town Council Meeting J ' w 11 - - - - — ' P B A i-- SRU CREEK ROAD 2401 L rlmer 54eetph: 103 592- 2904 Oenwr, CO 60205 5: ptEOpteurc231 emSPENTSNOWMASS PO Be. 1246 ple m 92} 5600 Aspen, CO 61612 4t 070 921- 1BR X 18 l L. i 101 BIId AHBOd B,( IIC. sF 50 250 SD 9mru07a 1 Recommended Sidewalks & Existing Walkways r r 1 lessessi 4 `I r_. f— sue—__—_ SS Vl 0 1 Ti C I J[ 1\ 13 2007 PARCEL 10 O O t I / L I I ' a Snot: mass VillageDevdopmerj y SSUEO FOR: DATE: In 55 PRELIMINARY DESIGN 01- 10-07 001 srm m1e: i 1 ® .- cry-- L,-'- - y \_ / \\` " u2 J 43, 4/C EXISTIN LIGHT BOLLARDS I EA r.n m rsaq ucr xuxern: Item No. 7: FIRST READING — ORDINANCE NO. 04, SERIES OF 2007 —COMPREHENSIVE SIGN PLAN FOR THE BASE VILLAGE PLANNED UNIT DEVELOPEMENT Time: 1 .5 hours): FIRST READING, CONSIDERATION OF AN ORDINANCE CONCERNING THE BASE VILLAGE PHASE 1 -A COMPREHENSIVE SIGN PLAN. ACTION REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: ADOPT FIRST READING OF ORDINANCE AS RECOMMENDED; WITH MODIFICATIONS; OR DENY BY RESOLUTION . Bob Nevins Signage Criteria Manual Snowmass Base Village Snowmass Village, Colorado First Amendment 2.15.07 48 as the space may be utilized for various skier related services, the following Signage Allowance has 49 been specifically established: 50 A. For all skier services establishments that are owned or managed by the ski area 51 operator: 52 Skier Services denote"Ski Related Facilities"as such term is defined in the 53 Municipal Code,together with the Base Village Declaration ofCovenants, 54 Conditions, and Restrictions for Commercial Units. 55 For the purposes of allocating Signage Allowances, separate and defined 56 Skier Services uses as permitted by the Base Village PUD Guide, facing a 57 primary pedestrian or vehicular street may be considered to be separate 58 establishments.A total maximum of three(3) signs are allowed for all 59 establishments per building frontage. 60 Skier Services operational and recreational informational, directional or 61 identification signs are allowed and are exempt from the requirements of this 62 Comprehensive Sign Plan. 63 B. Signs NOT included in Signage Allowance 64 The following signs are also allowed but they do not count as part of the total signage 65 allowance: 66 Menus/Menu Displays 67 Flags and banners 68 Mounting Brackets 69 70 D. Commercial sign area shall be determined by the width of the store frontage. The 71 following table shall be used to determined the permitted sign area: 72 Frontage Width Permitted Sign Area Less than 16 feet 14 square feet 16.1 to 26 feet 20 square feet 26.1 to 32 feet 22 square feet Over 32 feet 25 square feet 73 74 In the case where establishments and skier services have store frontages with primary entrances 75 on separate pedestrian or vehicular streets,the allowable sign area shall be calculated for each 76 frontage up to a maximum of two(2)frontages. 77 78 Size: The area of commercial signs shall be calculated by multiplying the length of the sign 79 by its width. Where signs are composed of individual letters,the area shall be calculated by 80 multiplying the length of each word or line of text by its height. Signs with silhouettes and/or 81 irregular shapes will be calculated using their outer dimensions. Sign can be measured using 82 multiple rectangular fields according to the complexity of the sign. 83 84 2. Location 85 A. Signs shall be positioned so they are clearly legible and do not obscure any key 86 architectural details, interfere with vehicular sight distance or impede fire or pedestrian 87 access. February 15, 2007 2 Signage Criteria Manual Snowmass Base Village Snowmass Village, Colorado First Amendment 2.15.07 1 Overall Theme 2 3 The overall theme and character ofBase Village has been inspired by the local history, but not 4 stuck in the past. It integrates the old with the new to promote creativity and eccentricity. The 5 theme embraces the soul, passion and energy ofthe community and is the love of art in allforms 6 and textures. The element of soul draws from history not only literally but alsofiguratively while 7 concurrently embracing the artistic sense ofthe community. The theme will reflect the future 8 and the past through new and exciting ideas and non-conventional ways oflooking at traditional 9 materials, textures and color. 10 11 Classy but not classic, inspired and exceptional, energetic and lively, Base Village will have 12 something that is unique, timeless and diverse promoting stimulation around every corner that 13 will appeal to all ofyour senses and draw you to discover what the Snowmass Base Village has 14 to offer. 15 16 Purpose and Design Guidelines for Snowmass Base Village 17 18 These guidelines have been created as a design control for implementation of Owner and Tenant signage 19 and graphics at Snowmass Base Village. The purpose of this document is to provide Owners and Tenants 20 with a basic understanding of the importance of style,quality and limitations of what is allowable and 21 preferred in creating a clear and cohesive sign image in Snowmass Base Village's commercial 22 neighborhoods. The following commercial sign program involves a series of sign standards that will 23 compliment architecture,animate and enhance the guest resort experience,excite guests and most 24 importantly, communicate the specialty of each shop while reinforcing pedestrian scale by controlling 25 number, size,mounting height and location of signs. 26 To make the greatest contribution to the visual image of Snowmass Base Village,this signage program 27 addresses the need for Owner identity, Tenant presence, promotes Guest way-finding, and emphasizes 28 that the appearance of all design elements must be appropriate and of consistent quality. These guidelines, 29 while ensuring unity and reflecting the overall resort theme should encourage individual creativity. As 30 such, careful aesthetic consideration is given to any and all signage applications.The restrictions stem 31 from concerns of safety and workmanship. Additionally signs must meet all signage criteria established 32 by the Architectural Control Committee and Town of Snowmass Village. 33 34 1. Sipnaee Allowance 35 All establishments may choose one(1),two(2)or three(3) signs for their commercial store 36 front, in any one(1)combination with a maximum of up to three(3) of the below described 37 signs: 38 One(1)Blade Sign 39 One(1)Freestanding Sign 40 One(1)Flush Mounted Sign 41 One(1)Window Sign 42 One(1)Awning or Canopy Sign 43 One(1)Umbrella Sign 44 45 Special Conditions such as shops with extremely long store frontages or comer locations will be 46 treated individually. The Tenant space in Hayden Lodge includes two floor levels with distinct and 47 separate store frontages including a vehicular drop offentry as welt as several village plaza entrances, February 15, 2007 1 Signage Criteria Manual Snowmass Base Village Snowmass Village, Colorado First Amendment 2.15.07 88 B. Signs within public right-of-ways must obtain a License Agreement from the Town 89 Public Works Department.Minimum setback from the edge ofthe pavement to a sign or 90 improvements is ten(10)feet. 91 92 93 3. Shape 94 A. Sign shapes for establishments should be interesting and may be irregularly shaped(non- 95 rectangular signs are encouraged). 96 B. Business Signs which are symbolic or three dimensional are encouraged because they 97 create visual interest and diversity. 98 C. Directional and regulatory should incorporate international symbols or graphics. 99 100 4. Materials 101 A. Imaginative use of materials is encouraged. Suggested premium quality materials include 102 but are not limited to: cast metal with dimensional form, decorative ironwork and carved 103 wood or stone. 104 B. Materials should be durable, easy to maintain, climate appropriate and compatible with 105 the building finishes. 106 C. Other types of materials proposed are to be reviewed and approved by the Architectural 107 Control Committee and the Town of Snowmass Village. 108 109 5. Text/Graphics 110 A. Lettering must be a sufficient and legible size, style and color to be easily,read by 111 motorist and/or pedestrians. 112 B. As a general rule, letter forms on a sign should occupy no more than 75%of the total sign 113 area. 114 C. Signs within public right-of-ways shall be consistent with the Town of Snowmass 115 Village's existing lettering and graphic standards. 116 117 6. Content 118 A. Silhouette images and symbols, which convey information without words, are 119 encouraged. 120 121 7. Color 122 A. Awnings, signs and sign accessories such as mounts,frames, and supports must be 123 consistent and compatible with colors in the approved storefront. 124 B. Bright and lively colors are encouraged(on dark or neutral backgrounds)in order to 125 create visual interest and a festive environment. 126 127 8. Illumination 128 A. Illumination is mandatory for primary signage and may be utilized for minor signage.All 129 illumination should be indirect and external to the sign. Awning signs should not be 130 backlit, neon based or reflective.An external source of illumination for a sign is required 131 to be a non-flashing halogen or incandescent lighting.Exterior gooseneck type lights are 132 encouraged. 133 B. Light sources for signage must be shielded or diffused to prevent glare.Illuminating 134 lights and light levels should not compete with other functional lighting. 135 C. Lighting elements must be incorporated in the design of sign so that it is suitable and 136 complementary. Lighting elements must be included in the signage proposal. February 15, 2007 3 Signage Criteria Manual Snowmass Base Village Snowmass Village, Colorado First Amendment 2.15.07 137 D. Any lighting remodel or retrofit is subject to review by the Architectural Control 138 Committee. 139 E. Holiday lighting is encouraged on signage, in all store fronts based an annual theme 140 predetermined by the Village Company. 141 142 143 9. Mounting 144 A. Mounting styles and techniques should reflect or complement the architecture of the store 145 frontage and the resort character. 146 B. Care must be taken to ensure that the commercial store frontage is not damaged during 147 signage installation. 148 C. The general installation should ensure for adequate waterproofing, and must be 149 engineered for wind loads and snow loads. 150 D. Signage mounting specifications must be approved prior to installation. 151 152 Permitted Shen Types 153 154 10. Blade Signs 155 A. Blade Signs can be mounted perpendicular to the face of the building, and may be 156 attached to the building or to another element such as a balcony, arbor, arcade or post. 157 Both sides of a projecting sign should be visible and of the same design. 158 B. Blade signs are strongly encouraged for establishments in the middle of blocks, facing a 159 street, pedestrian way or the courtyard/plaza area. Projecting signs are ideally suited for 160 buildings with covered walkways, arcades or arbor features. 161 C. Blade Signs should be located near eye level,unless the signs are located in a passage 162 area. Signs that project more than four(4)inches over a pedestrian walkway must 163 provide a minimum of seven and one-halfto eight(7 'h-8)feet of clearance from the 164 bottom. 165 166 11. Freestanding Signs 167 A. Freestanding signs may include but are not limited to 3-dementional elements.These 168 elements can be dimensional letters, carved/sculpted graphics or objects and decorative 169 pieces that protrude from the body of the sign. 170 B. Halo lit(opaque letter face with only the sides emanating light) are also acceptable. 171 C. While signage with internal illumination is strongly discourage, it may be utilized if the 172 lettering is the only translucent portion and it comprises less than thirty percent(30%) of 173 the total display area.Lighting shall be designed and incorporated into the signage to 174 reflect the design concept,quality of construction and the architecture ofthe building. 175 Small decorative lighting is required on all sign faces.Lighting source(s)must be 176 indirect, concealed and preferably downcast to protect the night sky. 177 D. Restaurant menus(18"by 24" or less)are exempt and may be incorporated into the sign. 178 E. Freestanding signs may be single or double sided,these signs will be considered as one 179 1)sign while L-Shaped signs may be counted as two(2) signs for purposes of 180 determining Sign Allowance. Maximize size is 12 square feet. 181 F. Freestanding signs must be located close to the establishment or building in a landscape 182 bed or terrace. Directional or informational signage kiosks are exempt and may be 183 located in pedestrian walkways if adequate fire access is provided. 184 G. Signage post(s)must be incorporated into the design. 185 186 February 15, 2007 4 Signage Criteria Manual Snowmass Base Village Snowmass Village, Colorado First Amendment 2.15.07 187 12. Flush Mounted Signs 188 A. Flush mounted signs are attached to a building wall or similar structure and consist of 189 letters or graphic elements,with or without a defined background. We recommend that 190 flush mounted signs have a three dimensional element and be positioned within an 191 architectural feature ofthe building. 192 B. The bottom of flush mounted signs shall be a minimum of five (5)feet above grade and 193 not project more than six(6) inches from the wall on which it is mounted. Flush mounted 194 signs may be located above the ground level,only when they can be seen from a distance, 195 such as on a corner building. 196 C. Any lighting shall be designed and incorporated into the signage to reflect the design 197 concept, quality of construction and building architecture.Lighting source(s)shall be 198 indirect, concealed and preferably downcast to protect the night sky. Halo lit(opaque 199 letter face with only the sides emanating light)signs are allowable while flush mounted 200 signs with internal illumination are strictly prohibited. 201 202 13. Window Signs 203 A. A window sign is a sign that is applied or attached to the exterior or interior of a window 204 or located in such a manner within a building that it can be seen from the exterior of the 205 structure through a window. 206 B. Acceptable and recommended materials are gold leaf, etching or such materials as 207 approved by Architectural Control Committee 208 C. Window signs may be indirectly illuminated if the source does not interfere with 209 pedestrian or vehicular traffic. 210 D. No structural backing on window signs will be allowed. 211 E. The maximum area allowed can be no greater than 33% of window area of the individual 212 window. 213 214 14. Awnings and Canopy Signage 215 A. Awnings and canopies may be utilized to brighten and accentuate each establishment and 216 will establish a base architecture color scheme upon which Tenants may add accent 217 colors that compliment the overall village theme. 218 B. Lettering or logos are permitted on any or all sides of one awning. Coverage shall be 219 determined by measuring the rectangular shape occupied by any logos or graphic 220 elements. Lettering on the awning is limited to five(5) inches in height. 221 C. Awnings and canopies must be made from a sturdy, inherently flame retarding fabric that 222 is subject to approval by the Architectural Control Committee and the Snowmass Wildcat 223 Fire Marshall. 224 D. The lettering and/or logos shall be located on the vertical part ofthe awning and above 225 the ground floor openings. 226 E. Awning or canopy signs may be indirectly illuminated from gooseneck type lights. 227 Florescent lights or reflective materials are not permitted. 228 F. Awnings must be engineered for wind and snow loads. 229 230 15. Umbrella Signage 231 A. Umbrellas with text and/or logos will be calculated as Allowable Signage. Corporate 232 names or logos are discouraged. (ex.Evian,Heineken.) 233 B. Umbrellas can be solid colors or in panels of complimentary colors. Umbrella fabric can 234 be used to identify the name of the establishment provided that identification does not 235 exceed a maximum area of one and a half(1 ''/2) square feet and is displayed on every February 15, 2007 5 Signage Criteria Manual Snowmass Base Village Snowmass Village, Colorado First Amendment 2.15.07 236 other parasol panel. The umbrella flap may also be used to identify the business provided 237 the identification is no higher than four(4) inches. 238 239 16. Menu 240 A. Menu displays may be permitted upon review one per establishment or unless otherwise 241 authorized by the Architectural Control Committee. 242 B. The display may not exceed 18 inches by 24 inches; otherwise it shall be calculated as 243 part ofthe Allowable Signage. 244 C. An actual menu is permitted if cleanly mounted,not simply tacked up. Menu displays 245 may be either free standing or flush mounted and subtly illuminated to be readable in the 246 evening 247 D. The menu will not be counted in the signage allowance but is subject to review and 248 approval by the Architectural Control Committee. 249 250 17. Credit Card and Membership Medallions 251 A. Credit cards accepted,member medallions, etc. 252 B. Material maybe decals, paint or similar treatment mounted on the window or door. 253 C. Total area may not exceed four(4) square feet; otherwise it may be calculated as part of 254 the total Allowable Signage. 255 D. Mounting to the window or door. 256 257 18. Hours of Business 258 A. Size cannot exceed 24 square inches 259 B. Materials, decals are acceptable,paint, or similar treatment is preferred 260 C. Mounting to the window or door. 261 262 19. Door Handles 263 A. Personalized door handles are required to give the visitor a hint of what to expect inside. 264 Possible material would be carved wood, brass or metal. 265 266 20. Sign Types&elements NOT permitted 267 A. Secondary corporate brand signs (Excluding Ski Operator branding and logos) 268 B. Sandwich boards and"A-frame" signs 269 C. Video,flashing, slide shows, or similar means. 270 D. Flat vinyl will not be permitted unless the vinyl is used as an accent or a detail enhances 271 the artistic quality of the sign 272 E. No reflective elements on any establishment signage including awnings and canopies. 273 F. Reflective elements are permitted for street and public regulatory signs. 274 G. Temporary signs such as for"SALE"or"DISCOUNT'with the exception of 275 predetermined sales events set by the Village Company.. 276 H. Commercial product posters,neon signs or"inflatable signs"that can be readily seen 277 from the exterior of the building. 278 I. Operational signs such as"UPS" 279 J. Digital,reflecting and like signs which do not reflect the theme and character imagery of 280 Snowmass Base Village. The few exceptions for the digital display has to do with public 281 information, mountain operations,parking and transportation my use digital images to 282 inform the public of changing conditions and other information of interest. 283 K. Construction Company signage February 15, 2007 6 Signage Criteria Manual Snowmass Base Village Snowmass Village,Colorado First Amendment 2.15.07 284 L. All signs,with the exception of the window signs, will not display specific products, 285 tenant advertising such as website or phone number, corporate brands and any other 286 information other that company name and logo. 287 288 289 290 Design and Approval Process 291 292 Since all exterior signs are such an integral part ofevery business, it is important that signage 293 concepts be developed simultaneously with the overall design ofthe establishment. 294 295 In order to best represent the distinct style and nature of the establishment,the merchants must 296 select and contract with a qualified Signage designer. The signage consultant will be responsible 297 for shop drawings,which will include materials used in construction, color schemes and 298 mounting method. It is very important that the signage consultant be familiar with the Signage 299 Guidelines for the specific location and the building architecture in order to present the best 300 possible signage options. 301 302 Every merchant is required to complete a Commercial Sign Application Form to be submitted and 303 reviewed by the Architectural Control Committee. All required submission drawings and details 304 will be clearly itemized on the Application Form. Signage submissions will not be reviewed until 305 all submission requirements are included. 306 307 Approval to proceed with fabrication and installation of the submitted signs will rely on the 308 following items: 309 310 Clear and easily understood submission drawings and details 311 Conformance to Signage Guidelines,as well as Comprehensive Sign Plan as approved by 312 the Town of Snowmass Village. 313 Most importantly, all signs must reflect creativity and quality workmanship. Signs may 314 be declined simply on lack of aesthetic value or design. 315 Town of Snowmass Village signage permit need to be obtained after written approval by 316 the Architectural Control Committee. 317 318 All signs will be evaluated on the following criteria: 319 o Signage Criteria Manual Standards 320 o Amount of Building Frontage 321 o Allowable Signage(Number of signs/allowable area) 322 o Location and sitting 323 o Legibility and clarity 324 325 The approval process is in place to ensure that all establishments within Base Village at 326 Snowmass uphold a high standard in aesthetics and quality. 327 328 Once the Architectural Control Committee(ACC)has approved all signage,the merchant will be 329 responsible for submitting all signage with a Town of Snowmass Village Sign Application, 330 including all fees to the Town of Snowmass Village, Planning Department.A written approval 331 from both the Architectural Review Committee and the Town of Snowmass is required prior to February 15, 2007. 7 Signage Criteria Manual Snowmass Base Village Snowmass Village,Colorado First Amendment 2.15.07 332 installation of any sign. In addition, building permits may be required for certain signs, per the 333 Town's regulations. 334 335 336 337 Architectural Control Committee Disclaimer 338 Each and Every Tenant's signage application is subject to the review and approval of the 339 Architectural Control Committee.At any time,the Architectural Control Committee has 340 the authority and the power to deny approval of a signage application due to the application 341 not being aesthetically pleasing,non conforming with the over commercial village theme, 342 non functional,or because the Architectural Control Committee does not embrace the 343 design.The Architectural Control Committee reserves every right to deny a signage 344 application under any circumstance and exercise all purposes and powers as defined in the 345 Declaration of Design and Building Covenants, Conditions and Restrictions For Base 346 Village". 347 348 Applicants proposing ideas and sign styles and concepts not addressed or described in this 349 document will be considered on a case by case basis.The sign concept should be thoroughly 350 proposed in the design and specs prepared by the contracted sign designer/fabricator. 351 Creativity is welcomed and encouraged by the Architectural Control Committee. February 15, 2007 8 Signage Criteria Manual Snowmass Base Village Snowmass Village, Colotado First Amendment 2.15.07 Blade Signage r ilk?Aa February 15, 2007 9 Colorado Signage Criteria Manual Snowmass Base Village Snowmass Village, Window First Amendment 2.15.07 Flush Mounted Signage a,:.•-v.... .. r. i FARMHOUSE_,, Judt I.IxR Crnr v fJcsd to Ma . Umbrella Signage 5 A 11 10 O D I SN W A SS BASE VILLAGE SOGNAGE PROGRAM PHASE IA COMPREHENSIVE SIGN PLAN DESIGN, SPECIFICATIONS QUANTITIES AND LOCATIONS 1 st AmendmentRevised 3- 24- 07 12100 w. 52nd Ave. # 111, Wheat Ridge, CO 80033 // 303- 425- 6295// sdesign @mho. net Steve DePoyster Y Type Location OK Description AM 1 Garage entry sign/ 2" thick HDU sign face with sandblasted inline border and raised aluminum lettering. Exit Only w/ symbol- overhead, left side of parking garage opening. A2 2 Garage entry sign/ 2' thick HDU sign face with sandblasted inline border and raised aluminum lettering. Ban bar- clearance info/ raised co 12100 w. 52nd Ave. # 111 Bang copper lettering on stone header. PJ3 3 Garage entry sign l2 think HDU sign face with sandblasted inline border and raised aluminum lettering. Bang bar- clearance info/ raised copper lettering on stone header. Wheat Ridge, CO 80033 A/4 4 2' V& HDU sign face with sandblasted inline border and raised aluminum lettering" Buses and Deliveries Only" 303- 425- 6295 A/5 5 Cast Bronze Plaque/ wall mounted at secondary entrance. Copy TBD sdesign @mho. net A/B 6 Cast Bronze entry identification plaque I set into building ina stone frame/ illuminated along top edge with concealed led lighting A/7 7 Cast Bronze Plaque/ wall mounted at secondary entrance. Copy TBD A/8 g Cast bronze entry identification plaque/ set into building ina stone frame/ illuminated along top edge win concealetl led lighdng AI9 g Cast bronze entry identification plaque/ set into building ina stone frame/ illuminated along top edge with concealed led lighting AI10 10 Cast Bronze Plaque/ wall mounted at entrance to lockers. Copy: Lockers N11 11 Cast Bronze Plaque/ wall mounted at entrance to public restrooms. Copy: Restrooms N13 13 Cast bronze entry identification plaque/ set into building ina stone frame/ illuminated along top edge with concealed led lighting s B/1 14 Stop sign/ Hand hewed post with patina copper cap B/3 16 Stop sign I Hand hewed post with patina copper cap Date 10- 10- 06 B/4 17 Major Vehicular Directional Sign/ Double faced / Stacked stone with" bridge" lantern, ht iron arch, painted aluminum cabinet with reflective copy and LED reader board. Entrance for kind garage B/5 18 Stop sign/ Hand hewed post with patina copper cap B16 19 Stop sign/ Hand hewed post with patina copper cap BI7 20 Major Vehicular Directional Sign/ Double faced / Stacked stone with" bodge" lantern, wrought iron arch, painted aluminum cabinet with reflective copy. Entrance at guest check- in Revised 2- 12- 07 BIB 21 Stop sign/ Hand hewed post with patina copper cap e/9 22 Stop sign/ Hand hewed post with patina copper cap 2- 16- 07 6/ 10 23 Major Vehicular Directional Sign/ Double faced / Stacked stone with" bridge" lantern, wrought iron arch, painted aluminum cabinet with reflective copy. Entrance at Tree House- Conference Center B/11 24 Minor Vehicular Directional Sign I single faced on hewed post with patina copper cap. / final copy TBD. B/ 12 35 Stop sign/ Hand hewed post with patina copper cap 12 Street names: Lower Carriage Way & Woad Road B/ 13 36 Stop sign/ Hand hewed post with patina copper cap CIt 25 Pedestrian wayfnding sign I Hand hewed post and arched mber Lighting added, as these signs will replace village lighting. Double faced panel with dinectional strips and arrows. Final copy TBD e Cl2 26 Pedestrian wayf' ding sign I Hand hewed post and arched cross member. Lighting added, as these signs will replace villaUa lighting. Double faced panel with directional stip and arrows. Final wpy TBD S C/3 27 Pedestrian wayfnding sign I Hand hewed post and arched cross member. Double faced panel with directional strips and arrows Final copy TBD z° C14 28 Pedestrian wayf d' q sign/ Hand hewed post and arched cross member. Lighting added as these signs ill replace village fighting. Double faced panel with directional" strips and arrows. F' I py TBD C/5 29 Pedestrian wayfinding sign/ Hand hewed post and arched cross member. Lighting added as these signs will replace village lighting. Double faced panel with directional strips and arrows Final copy TBD S CI6 30 Pedestrian wayfnding sign/ Hand hewed post and arched cross member. Double faced panel with directional strips and arrows. Final copy TBD. CIS 41 Pedestrian wayfnding sign/ Hand hewed post and arched crass member. Lighting added. Double faced panel with directional strips and arrows. Final copy TBD. CI9 42 Pedestrian wayfnding sign I Hand hewed post and arched cross member. Lighting added. Double faced panel with directional strips and arrows. Final copy TBD. Dfl 31 Vilfage map and directory display/" you are here f Planter- Wall mount at base of stairway to village BASE ® 6I2 32 Village map and directory display/" you are here"/ Planter- Wall mount at village entrance from slope side, south of building 2a a D/3 33 Village map and directory display/' you are here'/ Planter- Wall mount in central village near south east corner of building 2a lC CA IIp J"NAG DI4 34 Village map and directory display/" you are here'/ Planter- Wall mount in central village across from escalator entry from building 7 J 9.Y US 43 Village map and directory display/" you are there" I Post mounted in landscaped area, north of gondola PHASE 1- A DI6 44 Village map and directory display/" you are here"/ Post mounted in landscaped area, at transportation drop off, along Lower Carriage Way at Transit Shelter DO 45 Village map and directory display/" you are here"/ Post mounted in landscaped area, stope side, north of building 3 E/1 46 Electronic- digital dsplay with mountain map and skier information FJ2 47 Electronic- digital display with mountain map and skier information COUNT &DESCRIPTION Fe-2147 A Type Loc. Note: on All 1 t z as© N2 2 A/3 3 1 r\ i.., r 1. _ qh. A' i JY i, ,\ ` Fn Q 4 vu • 3 C: i orz 8 A/5 5 NA/ 67 77 1 t A19 9 q O 6\3 f629G• , A110 10 a,.s'' r Nil 11 n r N13 13 a;D _ J 1 `•/ a . V f" t'. . ' 4\` P. aaa I.,r J Y Ad.. f ` c1 - y rk - ait 13 t'` tx' Y r, f Sl " i G' ata r - r t' T B/1 14 i y f ti ,.; •. 4/ r_ cra :,, as io 17 SY r y, t . l' 28 { o' O- r ce on L B/aB/5 18 V flu. 1q •`"( rte! /•, f'•`'\ ,. 33 •. 1* , r .`_+ + f01f —'-- B/7 zo ah a. L"` Jf y .\, jF` f}'. / e1 r. `/ fir,'• 3 r/ w ' o 7`"4+ , 1 ,``•' f J . 1, _ BIB 22 y 27 Handicap Parking B/ 10 23 ya: < y Sr~ f a y. f/ > (<' S 7 A e113 r B/11 24 36 xx 4:' 8112 36 f..- k ry . 1,- q`. ri{yi.=' 6 "^.` 7 & n .•. c. +..,, j 8113 36 Y 4.. 7{::._ 1 v I ^' s"_'°^ 7 t' il .. \ C`d A. i : i' t' 24 L„ C11 21 4 i r I. yll, 4', 1\ a '\ One Hour t '. v ' 1 C12 26 Y f f, J /' 1„ P, l v 7 } p _ JJJ` + T'• xs / Ar Parking p ers y •- erlo .-,: tea' C/3 27 IIjIJ 7:+ Zrt-\. i1\! J/ J YS p ky.>,.._. t y 1 r35.` crz y ryf. '` •'\ Y R yd y T •. t j• ''' i 22 g C/5 29229 C/6 30 8 c/B a1 28 z " a ail G p '\ y. ' `'/` ` y`. Ri}'t- .'\_ w1t 3 — :`. ii'j ,.: Y l. r'" t.' f _ hpt'':` a1 a ! 0 Aid 1 D D/1 31 s/ 6 TC. as D/2 32 D13 33 D14 34 ti Y'*- 1t _ 1 r- 3 D/5 43 1a ice• _ 7 + ti: i., i 1-, c - r,+ ': or / t ors as r `" ' 18 • V•. r ,. -.. f- are / Dl7 45 6, Y` Handicap, Panes IF V' Y ° as n e SNOWMASS KEY o o VILLAGE bps® mCOeW] 3 SIGNAGE a-^... cu i C/1 = SIGNTYPE&# m Mr 25 = SIGN LOCATION Data ^ 1010- 06 LOCApHA5ELIA- A Revisetl 2-12-D7 Ra.= ad X24- 07 LP- 1 2" Thick high density urethane. D A,/ 3 CLEARANCE BAR COPY Hammer textured background. 3 A/1 8" BLACK kAMMEREBTEXTURED LETTERING, 3/ 4" x 45 degree bevel edge. Q O PIN MOUNTED TO COLORADO BUFF STONE HEADER Sandblasted inline border. 4 A/4 14' 6" CLEARANCE 14' 6" Raised aluminum lettering w/ painted finish. When installed, face of signs will 12100 w. 52nd Ave. # 111 Q 4 k A/2 stand off from finished stone work. Wheat Ridge, CO 80033 Q', 2 303- 425- 6295 sdesign @mho. net LOCATIONS 288" This drawing is for visual and design intent only and not to be interpreted as a construction F±3 drawing unless specifically 1 o detailed 09 MUM Date 10- 10- 06 32" X24' WITH 12" LETTERS Revised 10- 20- 06 194" Revised 2- 11- 07 A/ 2 Public 1 64" Revised Village h Village Shuttle 30" x 16' WITH 7" LETTERING 158" Deliveries T A/ 4 1 All 48" x 64" 61, COPY r ppa ap A 30" x13' WITH 11" LETTERING J® I' tl® Ctlpl oASS BASE VILLAGE SIGNAGEGARAGE ENTRANCE GARAGE r f a.. w Lf.? T SIGNAGE j 0 El 12100 w. 52nd Ave. # 111 Y X Wheat Ridge, CO 80033 f. 303- 425- 6295 sdesign @mho. net A I° jr ` O V 1 C; This drawing is for visual and 4 design intent only and not to e `— '- be interpreted as a construction drawing unless specifically Set into wood faced wall ii detailed re s` MiY` tom{' i f= G= s f Date 10- 10- 06 Revised 2- 11- 07 iE? t• t—_ Revised r:Y f:. I yyypppp 4 1 R ' yy Lr 1 e Set into wood faced wall t° p- 4'-•--" _ SN® WM1 SS Set into wood faced wall BASE VILLAGE SIGNAGE Cast bronze plaques to identify residential and public access at LODGE BUILDING ENTRY entrances that are not considered " Commercial". IDENTIFICATION Z These 4 Plaques shown to be approx. 24x32" CAST BRONZEPLAQUES Cast in Bronze Set against a steel plate background and decorative timber or Approximate plaque size O stone molding. of 24 x 32 Set into stone faced wall Recessed into wall with minimum protrusion. Plaques will be illuminated with white" led" lighting, concealed behind the top and side moldings. Ac:: I3 i 00, c izoc may " Tim m. E-) Z 0 6 140 454 Ok - 0 e jg uEStatcro 3 till. Puhlic Parking i 12100 w. 52nd Ave. # 111 a er10 Day Skier Parking r a— Wheat Ridge, CO 80033 303- 425- 6295 1 ZB c'w'" wdgo Thel' lllleNell y sdesign @mho. net a- T This drawing is for visual and r" r/.- rah design intent only and not to Sign at location 17 will have an electronic reader be interpreted asaconstruction reader panel[ olet motorists know when , t iy v-_ drawing unless specifically parking garage isfull - .._ detailed 27" LIGHT: TO MATCH LIGHTING ON VILLAGE AREA BRIDGES. COPY TO BE CUT OUT& RAISED ALUMINUM. Date 10- 10- 06 PAINTED SATIN WHITE 6" THICK COLORADO BUFF, SANDSTONE CAP COPY PANELS TO BE PAINTED EGGSHELL OFF WHITE Revised 10- 20- 06 DUPONT"# 4296 2- 11- 07 1/4" THICK FORGED& TEXTURED STEEL BEAM. SATIN FINISHED POWDER COATTO PRESERVE 3- 23- 07 COLOR& PREVENT RUST. HORIZONTAL BEAM WILL CONTAIN HIDDEN LIGHT Lodging Check- In 1 — j- t SOURCE FOR SURFACE ILLUMINATION OF SIGN FACES. 1 "_? 9'/" CAST BRONZE PLAQUE- INLAID INTO N® 91911WmASS Skier Drop Off r[ = STONE SIGN BUTTRESS. p p pp^ STONE BUTTRESS TO MATCH 9 VSL./" sGE STONE OF AREA BRIDGES. STONEWORK Valet Parkin 1 b,,? COVERS INTERNAL STEEL FRAME WHICH Ell g IGNAGE SUPPORTS THE SIGN AND LIGHT. Vehicular Direction and SQUARETUBE FRAME WITH ALUMINUM Informational Sign. SIGN FACES. POLYURETHANE PAINTFINISH Copy vvill vary AND BLACK LETTERING. Final Copy TBD i j 45" VEHICLE DIRECTION& INFORMATION SIGN This isa double faced informational sign, giving direction to vehicular SCALE 1: 20 and pedestrian traffic. Overall sign size 15 sq. N and determined bye copy height of4" which has a maximum readable distance of 150". Sign would be installed perpendicular to entry road. Sign area would be B/4 B/7 B/ 10 ttae att vi` illuminated around perimeter from bridge style lantern on top of stone buttress. 7 20 23 LOCATION b Y a SIDE ELEVATION ELEVATION D Erin,Children's center 2/6 Cenferande [- 87111 2 J Ent to no m Glsal dhvadk n CHO. center 1=4 ey 19 F274 I F FB1121 12100w. 52nd Ave. # 111 Vt JoA B/3 35 Wheat Ridge, CO 80033 X 303425- 6295 T6 Carnage sdesign@mho. net Dropal This drawing is for visual and ttoChldrdd rare. den Center design intent only and not to h' [ Bg/9 Fait here 3=6 be Interpreted as a construction Guestchei k TLETTERING FOR ROAD NAME Z2 drawing unless specifically detailed 6" LETTERING Date 10- 10- 06 it Mardi 5- Requvedorrup, erparksg if Foje Revised 10- 20- 06 nin Revised 2- 16- 07 70 2- aluminum panels 3- 24- 07 ONE separated with Vispaca HOUR ONE between them Stud PARKING Is' B/ 1 [; B/3 Z8/ 5 mounted and ralectils' 9AM Is71' M WAY A- off post 4 Intersection 18 of Wood Road B/6 1318 B/9 Er Lower Carriage Rd 19 22 B2/12 13] 12 x 18 panel 12 x 18 panel 18 x 24 panel 35 Fw7 on 4x4 hardwood on 4x4 hardwood on 4x4 hardwood A] SNOWMASS post wl coreten post w/ coreten post w/ coreten steel cap 3T Stop sign 30' Stop sign steel cap. steel cap. Reflective copy on33' charcoal on33' charmed aluminum panel. aluminum panel. BASE VILLAGE bee hewed post Win 6x6 hewed post coreten steel cap wI coreten steel rap Aluminum steel name SIGNAGE panels w1relleml copy. Vehicular Regulatory Signs Quantity- 5 Quantity- 2 B/ 11 All signs installed along 24 minimum setback. 00 Side View 12 x 18" Regulatory signs Per: Tetra Tech 9= 2 7/ El 12100 w. 52nd Ave. # 111 Wheat Ridge, CO 80033 303- 425- 6295 C/ q C/C/ 5 Approved village light fixture sdesign @mho. net I will be utilized on these sign 95 o >, 9 posts. Conduit will be visible, G but recessed into post This drawing is for visual and 65" design intent only and not to Ell. Coreten steel cap be interpreted as a construction 4 !' - ' drawing unless specifically y 1 3" tall logo copy cut from 1/4" aluminum& pin mounted detailed to cross arms i C/ 2 C/ 6 QIITfF _•;— t- Bye,_ e:_ . d 2 curved, hand hewed Date 10- 10- 06 support arms, dadoed into f C O® both sides of post. Revised 2- 11- 07 Sig J T Lit Tickets rIrr T Llft Tickets® Hardwood plugs that conceal T Information 0? , e Information ? stainless steel hardware. Revised 3- 24- 07 E Restrooms® t '* E Restrooms 6M] ;- " Coreten steel decorative stripe. h E Restaurants Y _ f Restaurants E Public Lockers 4x34" copy strips with E Public Lockers® 21/ 4" lettering 8 symbol C/ 3 1 Copy- TBD C/ 8 a 35x40" aluminum sign 27 4• tp 36" panel to hold up to6 A, tl directional strips. pp gg //}}^^ BASE VILLLAi E 6x6 Hand hewed hardwood post. 59GNAGE C/ 1 C12 Note: All signs will be set back Primary Pedestrian t C/ 4 t C/ 9 2rJ 26a from any right away to prevent Wayfinding contact by vehicles. Hand Hewed Hardwood t \ C/ 4 C/ 5 C/ 6 Beams 28 t-, ,;( 42 j Sign messages are be a 1 ji S 2$ 29 3Q only. Final copy to be reviewed and approved by" operations" 7 41 42 27 DETAIL C- 1 LJ O y i• r::.--- 13 G p a D/ 1 ham 0 O 12100 w. 52nd Ave. # 111 Wheat Ridge, CO 80033 303- 425- 6295 a' 3, ',• i r.. 1".; r ` '"- £ y sdesign@mho. net s i J", rR t r5 e• t-f'r' K*y ., t>°{' ` ro--+ t - tom ti T*.- . e , This drawing Is for visual and ZD/ 2 ur " kr - btj G ' w g1 design intent only and not to 7 be interpreted as a construction s- drawing unless specifically J-` fir-• s ` y .'" , . 1 detailed i < Jr —_ 3 s - r'+ io-- z D/ 3 1 r - i: y„, ;''; Date 10- 10- 06 33 10- 20- 06 Revised v ors.»- —+. n,«--- w• Revised 3- 24- 07 D/ 4 D/1 D/2 D/3 D/a D/s D/7 To be installed directly on top of, or directly behind landscape retaining wall 31 32 33 34 43 45 34 Village map & directory display cabinets are internally illuminated and measure 24 x 30" s, They are attached to a black plate steel background that is suspended with- in a hewed hardwood r frame/ natural grey patina finish. All hardware will ll I a 1' 1p be forged and hammered steel with satin clear Slal® ClIR7 ASS r WD/ 5 powder coat finish. BASE VILLAGE SIGNAGfE sx Village directory at: Location# 44 is an E installation between sidewalk and landscaping, Village Map& Directory at transportation drop- off along Lower Carriage Way. Display D/ 6 Additional directional information will assist guests 44 with village entry decision. 0' Verbiage shown is for example only. Final copy TBD. D/ 7 1 44 UI 123" 12100 w. 52nd Ave. # 111 Wheat Ridge, CO 60033 6295 4sdesign @mho. net a This drawing is for visual and design intent only and not to 1 4j be interpreted as a construction i` • - c' r drawing unless specifically detailed t. k',.* r 4 TZw ' c_—. ACS R'-''+' iu- c-' a_.. ' +' ' ,';=-` 7- Date 10- 10- 06 IN IN Z7 F 10- 20- 06 Revised i r Revised 1- 18- 07 Z _. r F- pz SNOW MASS c u BASE VILLAGE SIGNAGE a... yF 5 Base Area Mountain v j 1 Display 8x8 Antique hardwood timbers with forged iron bracketing, supports a5%' x 10%' x4" thick display. The Mountain Information display will hold a 10" x6' LED reader board. The board will be programable with Face of display is for grooming reports, snow conditions, trail openings& closings, weather reports, road conditions warnings example only. All final or closures etc. Messages on the LED portion will not scroll or flash but will be changeable as conditions change. messages format and Mountain trail map, map legend and skier responsibility code are examples of what might also be displayed. layout TBD. s, j-.., - fir'"• - Over- all size, to include timber framework is 14' wide x 1l' tall y, q,- __ -- At location 46 the display will be installed in landscaped area with the backside against the retaining E/ 1 E/ 1 wall of the over road ski bridge next to Elk Camp Gondola At location 47 - the display will be installed in the vicinity of Village Express. Exact location TBD. o. rlwi4' 46 47 John Dresser S_ 7-C7 7 From: Mel D. Blumenthal [melpaull @earthlink.net] Sent: Saturday, May 05, 2007 8:11 PM To:Douglas (Merc) Mercatoris; Town Council; Arnold Mordkin; Sally Sparhawk; Reed Lewis Cc: Russell Forrest; Chris Conrad; John Dresser; Rhonda Coxon; Pat Smith ; Pat Smith ; Jeff Blau, Carey Shanks ; Brad Korzen Subject: Base Village-Viceroy Hotel Inasmuch as I will not be able to be present in person at Monday's Town Council meeting I would like to take this opportunity to weigh on the Base Village Hotel Discussion item on the agenda and request that this e-mail be read into and made a part of the official record of this meeting. I fully agree with the thorough analysis and recommendation contained in the Memorandum dated 5/7/07 from the Planning Dept. on this subject. From a pure legal review of the clear and unambiguous language set forth in Condition 7 of Ord 21 the proposed Viceroy Hotel does not meet the specific parameters set forth therein. As a result a building permit and any included aspect of a building permit such as an excavation permit, whether at risk or not, cannot and should not be issued unless and until all of the terms of Condition 7 are met. The underpinnings of Condition 7 are well entrenched in my mind as I assume they are in the minds of several members of the Town Staff and Town Council who were active participants in voicing the concerns, developing the rationale and crafting the specific language of Condition 7. The size, mass, scale and other essential elements of Bldg 13A&B were shown to be necessary in order for Base Village to achieve the degree of critical mass necessary to ensure its economic viability. It was in this context that the Town Council finally agreed to the necessary variances and approvals required for Bldg 13A&B. A critical element and condition of this approval was the specific language of Condition 7 requiring "a nationally-recognized hotel chain (such as a Westin Hyatt or Hilton". To emphasize the importance of Condition 7 the Town Council further conditioned any waiver or modification of Condition 7 on obtaining approval from a super majority of the Town Council. Having expressed my opinion and concerns with respect to the fact that the Viceroy Hotel does not meet the clear unambiguous requirements of Condition 7, and thus not appropriate or allowable for Bldg 13A&B, should not be taken to imply that I would not welcome and appreciate a Viceroy Hotel at some other more appropriate location in the Village, e.g. Snowmass Center or the West Village. I was given the opportunity several weeks ago to view the Viceroy Hotel in Santa Monica, Calif. (one of only two Viceroy Hotels currently in operation, the other being in Palm Springs, Calif.) and to sit with representatives of The Kor Group to learn about their operation and their vision for a Hotel in Snowmass. Their vision is impressive and would likely be a positive fit in the mix of various hotbed lodging properties anticipated and desired in the Town. It just does not meet the critical parameters necessary for the hotel envisioned and approved for Bldg 13A&B. Mel D. Blumenthal, Snowmass & Santa Monica, Calif. 5/7/2007 Dear Town of Snowmass Village: 5/07/07 The Homeowner's Association ofMeadow Ranch has recently become concerned regarding conduct related to the development ofthe open space above the Red Schoolhouse. On behalf of our own interests,and potentially those ofother concerned and effected members ofthe community,we submit this draft for public record. 1)After mutual concessions and having reached a satisfactory agreement with the Aspen Skiing Company/Interwest,terms were agreed to for easements and development features for the meadow. Most notably,those agreements contained stipulations related to an easement granted to The Aspen Skiing Company in exchange for: Consideration related to the placement of the skiing/walking/biking trail—with strict understanding of the need to minimize removal of trees and maintain maximum possible distance from Meadow Ranch buildings as a priority. Specific trail placement is reflected in a version of the plat produced for the purpose of our agreement. A preferred alternative routing,to the other side of the meadow development,was also to be sought with the town per agreement with Bill Kane Shifting and replacement of HOA parking areas Deeding of Out Lot 9 to Meadow Ranch(this was supposed to occur Dee '05,actually occurred April of'07) Landscaping provisions These and other provisions are specifically referred to both by plat and a written agreement between The Meadow Ranch HOA and The Aspen Skiing Company. With the conveyance of the property to a 3rd party,how do we ensure our rights&agreements are protected? For that matter, how do others in a similar situation ensure their rights&agreements? 2)The agreement referenced above specifically did not contain an agreement related to deadlines for completion of the developments because we were protected by aspects ofthe PUD that sought our interests intrinsically. Specifically,the provision in the PUD that prohibited the sale of Lots 1-17 prior to significant progress in the construction of the employee housing,contained a strong incentive for The Aspen Skiing Company to both start and finish the employee housing development(and therefore construction at our doorsteps). The apparent violation of both the letter and intent of that provision of the PUD nullifies this inducement for timeliness. What inducement exists now that the property has been conveyed? How do we ensure timely completion once work begins? Who owns the development, if it is bound in any case by the PUD, is possibly a moot point. However, ifthe PUD either has no enforcement, or if it is no longer valid with the transfer of ownership,that represents a concern to all ofus. 3)That we are uncovering plans with inconsistencies between our own agreements and the final versions being submitted by the developer for approval causes further concern. Building Height—it appears that the building height for Sinclair Meadows employee housing will be 10 feet higher than stated in the PUD due to changes in grade. Has this been approved? Will there be an approval process? We had agreed with the Aspen Skiing Company on placement ofthe new trail,which was on the final plat. We've recently become aware that the trail placement has changed,but we've had no visibility into the process,nor were we privy to those changes In summary,we're concerned not only for these specific changes to agreements,but what these changes(of which we've not been informed)signal for the broader development. So we ask, if supervision is required,who will provide it for our community? What is the process by which we hold all parties to the intent, if not the letter,of their agreements? We are not looking for a war,or to place obstacles or add cost to the pursuit of development honestly negotiated. We just want things above board,and intents honored for all parties that fought hard and came to the resolutions that resulted in the PUD and HOA agreements. Respectfully, Meadow Ranch Homeowners Association This letter was read aloud at today's TOSV Council Meeting, and expresses concerns of Meadow Ranch Homeowners, and the HOA Board. A similar letter was submitted at the TOSV Council Meeting of October 4th,2006 by Michael McNamara. We (Meadow Ranch HOA) are not aware of any response, action or change of course related to the prior submission,and submit this amended draft today in an attempt to surface the issues for review by the Town again- in hopes of reaching greater clarity and ensuring the community and HOA's preservation of rights,agreements and visibility into the ongoing development process. Kind Regards, Brad Stevenson Board of Directors Meadow Ranch Homeowner's Association CONSTRUCTION COORDINATION WEEKLY REPORT #8 Ending 05/05/07 Construction Activity Entryway Brush Creek Road/ Seven Star They continued receiving material from the Town Hall site this week. Traffic control is in place. Stops have been short,just long enough to allow haul trucks on and off the site. Tracking pads are in place and are monitored for effectiveness. There were no complaints with regards to this site this week. The detour through the seven star area will be in place next week. Employee Housing Work has started at this site. They are installing water line and foundation drain in the Bronco Ln. alignment. No complaints were received regarding this site. Town Hall Ongoing construction activity within project limits. Hauling to the visitor center site continues. A tracking pad is in place but needs additional washed rock to be completely effective. The traffic control plan is in place for hauling material from town hall to the visitor center site. I did not receive any complaints regarding the site this week. Base Village Lower Carriage Way: Haul trucks and construction vehicles are the only traffic allowed in the area. PCL/Gould has started working in the area. PCL feels they can maintain the schedule to have Lower Carriage completed on time. Wood Road: Traffic control is in place daily. I have not received any complaints regarding this area this week. Brush Creek Bridge: Anderson drilling is on site and continues to install caissons. Traffic control is in place. Stops are used to allow trucks on and off the site and when equipment or machinery is being delivered. I did not receive any complaints regarding this site. I observed a track hoe track an excessive amount of mud onto Wood Rd. and Brush Creek Rd. Friday morning. Jack Hughes with Shaw construction had it cleaned up within 10 minutes. Crestwood No site visits. The work at the Crestwood's will be on site and not affecting ROW. Woodrun Place I drove Wood road past the site every day. Hauling material off the site has been minimal. SVWS / Gould The asphalt in front of the Tamaracks was milled this week. They have started replacing water line. I have not received any complaints regarding this work this week. Traffic Control I am in contact with the TCS daily. No issues or complaints received regarding traffic control this week.