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04-06-09 Town Council PacketSNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL REGULAR MEETING APRIL 6, 2009 PLEASE NOTE THAT ALL TIMES ARE APPROXIMATE — ITEMS COULD START EARLIER OR LATER THAN THEIR STATED TIME TOWN COUNCIL CALL TO ORDER AT 3:00 P.M. Item No. 1: ROLL CALL - TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS CALL TO ORDER AT 3:00 P.M. Item No. 2: ROLL CALL - BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS BOCC AGENDA Item No. 3: SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL AND PITKIN COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS JOINT MEETING Item No. 3A: GENERAL ECONOMIC CONDITIONS Materials for this item will be provided when received Friday, April 3, 2009 via email and www.tosv.com) Item No. 313: FREE WINTER RFTA SVC BETWEEN SNOWMASS VILLAGE -ASPEN Page 1 (TAB A) Item No. 3C: BRUSH CREEK TRAIL Materials for this item will be provided when received Friday, April 3, 2009 via email and www.tosv.com) Item No. 3D: PUBLIC HEALTH REVITALIZATION ACT Materials for this item will be provided when received Friday, April 3, 2009 via email and www.tosv.com) Item No. 3E: WORKFORCE HOUSING Materials for this item will be provided when received Friday, April 3, 2009 via email and www.tosv.com) Item No. 3F: URBAN GROWTH BOUNDARY Materials for this item will be provided when received Friday, April 3, 2009 via email and www.tosv.com) Item No. 3G: ADJOURNMENT BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS MEETING 04-06-09 TC Page 2 of 3 SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL AGENDA Item No. 4: PUBLIC NON-AGENDA ITEMS 5-minute time limit) Item No. 5: COUNCIL UPDATES Item No. 6: RODEO PLACE PHASE II ALTERNATIVE(S) Time: 60 minutes) ACTION REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: Direct Staff to either move forward with Rodeo Place Phase II as approved or an alternative Russ Forrest, Mike O'Connor, Robert Kaufmann & Dan Rotner Page 15 (TAB B) Item No. 7. COUNTRY CLUB TOWNHOMES-REQUEST BY DEED RESTRICTED HOMEOWNERS Time 30 minutes) ACTION REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: Receive a proposal by the Country Club Townhome (CCTH) deed restricted owners to support 100% of the special assessment for exterior improvements occurring at this property. Deed Restricted Homeowners of CCTH ............. Page 60 (TAB C) Item No. 8: PUBLIC HEARING AND FIRST READING OF ORDINANCE NO. 04, SERIES OF 2009 - CONCERNING A MINOR PUD AMENDMENT AND REZONING REGARDING COUNTRY CLUB TOWNHOMES. Time: 60 minutes) ACTION REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: Open Public Hearing and approve, modify, or deny The First Reading of the ordinance. Bob Nevins.........................................................Page 62 (TAB D) Item No. 9: FIRST READING OF ORDINANCE NO. 05, SERIES OF 2009- CONCERNING A MINOR PUD AMENDMENT FOR BASE VILLAGE INTERIM BUILDING 7 Time: 45 minutes) ACTION REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: Approve, modify, or deny first reading of the ordinance Jim Wahlstrom............................................Page 108 (TAB E) 04-06-09 TC Page 3 of 3 Item No.10: DISCUSSION - CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT PLAN PROPOSED ADMINISTRATIVE MODIFICATION REGARDING BASE VILLAGE CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT PLAN (CMP) AMENDMENTS. Time: 60 minutes) ACTION REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: Direct Staff concerning an action or modification of related record of decision. Chris Conrad...................................................Page 130 (TAB F) Item No. 11: COMP PLAN REVIEW Time: 60 minutes) ACTION REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: Please provide direction as to next steps for review of plan Comp Plan Team (Russ Forrest, Chris Conrad, Lesley Compagnone, Jason Haber, David Peckler) Page 156 (TAB G) Item No. 12: CONSTRUCTION UPDATE Time: 15 minutes) ACTION REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: Receive 2009 Construction Update. Jason Haber............................................Page 274 (TAB H) Item No. 13: MANAGER'S REPORT Time: 10 minutes) Russell Forrest...............................................Page 278 (TAB 1) Item No. 14: AGENDA FOR NEXT TOWN COUNCIL MEETING Page 284 (TAB J) Item No. 15: APPROVAL OF MEETING MINUTES FOR: November 17, 2008 AND March 2, 2009 Page 286 (TAB K) Item No. 16: COUNCIL COMMENTS/COMMITTEE REPORTS/CALENDARS Page 312 (TAB L) Item No. 17: ADJOURNMENT OF TOWN COUNCIL MEETING NOTE: Total time estimated for meeting: Approx 5 hours and 40 minutes (excluding items 1-3 , 14-17 and the BOCC agenda) ALL ITEMS AND TIMES ARE TENTATIVE AND SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT FURTHER NOTICE. PLEASE CALL THE OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK AT 923-3777 ON THE DAY OF THE MEETING FOR ANY AGENDA CHANGES. MEMORANDUM TO' Snowmass Village Town Council FROM: David Peckler Transportation Director DATE: April 6, 2009 SUBJECT: Snowmass Village Town Council and Pitkin County Board of County Commissioners Joint Meeting — 36: Free Winter RFTA SVC Between Snowmass Village-Aspen I.PURPOSE AND ACTIONS REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: Staff is providing you with a draft report for the purpose of discussion concerning the free service between Snowmass and Aspen. No action is required at this time. II.BACKGROUND / NEED FOR COMP PLAN UPDATE This report was provided to staff by the consultant hired to study the cost/benefit of the service between Snowmass and Aspen for the EOTC. III. APPLICABLE REGULATIONS Appropriation of EOTC funds most be made by a unanimous vote of the three upper valley jurisdictions. IV. DISCUSION ITEMS / NEXT STEPS This information is provided for the purpose of discussion. The EOTC will be presented a more detailed report, discussing the subject of free service between Snowmass and Aspen at the next EOTC meeting on April 16'", 2009 at 4 pm, City of Aspen Council Chambers. Free service has been funded by the EOTC until early June. V. ACTION REQUESTED OF COUNCIL This is a discussion item only. WARNER TRANSPORTATION CONSULTING 177 Riverside Drive, Northampton, MA 01062 413 585-5026 www.wamertransportation.com To: John Krueger, City of Aspen From: Marc Wamer Date: March 19, 2009 Re: Rider characteristics of the Aspen to Snowmass fare free service This memo presents initial findings about the riders on RFTA's Aspen — Snowmass service. It reflects the responses to an on-board passenger survey that took place between Thursday, February 26 and Saturday, February 28. These results are only the first part of a broader assessment of the service. A further effort will include more digging through the survey data. It will also include an analysis of service and ridership over time. Together, these efforts should yield a clear picture of the effect of making the Snowmass to Aspen bus service free all day. We will document the findings in a final report which will be ready in early April. Survey response rate The survey generated 862 completed and useable responses. We will calculate a response rate when data on actual boardings for the surveyed trips becomes available. Our sense, however, is that the survey responses represent well more than half of all passengers. Survey staff sought participation from one person in each travel group that boarded the bus. Someone in most groups did take and complete the survey. Over the course of the three days of the survey, however, the response rate dropped; by Saturday, most people had already completed a survey and chose not to complete another one. The distribution of survey responses by day and time period is as follows: Completed surveys before noon to 4PM to after 9AM 9 to noon 413M 7PM 7PM Total Thursday 69 164 84 20 337 Friday 59 126 142 76 29 432 Saturday 20 34 29 10 93 Total 79 229 335 170 49 862 We did not begin the survey until 9:30 AM on Thursday, and we ended the effort at 5:30 PM on Saturday. The surveys covered 81 trips in either direction (Snowmass to Aspen, or Aspen to Snowmass). We did not survey the same bus (e.g., the 2:15 to Snowmass) twice. Aspen to Snowmass fare free service evaluation March 19 preliminary findings Market categories The survey provides extensive information on the trip and the traveler. Disaggregating the results according to a few general market categories seems helpful. We have identified six such markets based on whether the traveler is an area resident or visitor, and the place where the person is staying. These groups are: Aspen visitors Snowmass visitors Aspen residents Snowmass residents Down Valley residents Down Valley visitors These categories account for 99 percent of the total survey respondents. They account for the survey responses as follows: Market groups--respondents Market groups--weighted by travel group size Down Valley Down Valley Down Valley residents Down Valley residents msitors 6%visitors 9% 3% 3% Snowmass Snowmass Aspen visitors residents residents 33% 10% Aspen visitors 15% Aspen 39% residents 13% Aspen residents 17% Snowmass Snowmass visitors visitors 23% 29% The weighting reflects the stated size of the travel group. Visitors tend to travel in larger groups than do residents. By this measure, the visitors staying in Aspen and Snowmass account for over two-thirds (68 percent) of boardings on the Aspen to Snowmass service. V\RNHr TH.IVSPO RI v1 1(m' C(SSULI1yG, Inc.Page Aspen to Snowmass fare free service evaluation March 19 preliminary findings Travel group size Most visitors travel in larger groups; most residents travel alone People tend to go to work alone (the main trip purpose of area residents), but tend to go skiing or to dinner with company (the main trip purposes of area visitors). The results of this questions are not entirely reliable. Our intent was to ask about others traveling with the respondent on this bus trip. Some respondents, however, seem to have answered this about in terms of their full travel group—whether on the bus, or still on the slopes or elsewhere. What is the total number of people in your travel group 1 person more than one person All respondents 29 10 r Aspen visitors 38 13 10 Snowmass visitors 40 20 10 Aspen residents 13 9 Snowmass residents 25 Down Valley residents 21 Down Valley visitors 52 10 Weighted respondents 29 15 13 Aspen visitors 30 15 19MEMUME Snowmass visitors 29 22 18 Aspen residents 18 17 Snowmass residents 38 Down Valley residents 1 30 110 Down Valley visitors 52 14 01 02 3 4 p5 or more WARNER TPANSPORTArioN CONSULTING,INC. Page 3 Aspen to Snowmass fare free service evaluation March 19 preliminary findings Bus stops used Over half of all trips on the route are between central Aspen and central Snowmass. This is particularly true for visitors staying in Aspen Visitors staying in Aspen are generally taking the bus to ski at Snowmass; hence their trips are largely to the Mall. Most of the "other" trips are also for skiing—to Buttermilk or Highlands, although this group would also include trips such as from the Club Commons to the Little Nell. Central Aspen" stops are from Rubey Park to the Eighth Street. "Central Snowmass" stops are Snowmass Center and up. on / off pair Central Aspen—Central Snowmass.+— intermediate stops All respondents 19 Aspen visitors 29 9 14 Snowmass visitors 14 29 Aspen residents 15 11 39 15 Snowmass residents 14 7 50 Down Valley residents 8 21 8 18 Down Valley visitors 8 8 12 27 Weighted respondents 19 9 22 Aspen visitors 28 12 Snowmass visitors 13 NU 28 Aspen residents 15 34 15 Snowmass residents 15 1701 51 Down Valley residents 8 16 8 26 Down Valley visitors 6 10 28 Rubey Park / Mall o other central A/ central S o Aspen/ Int Lot Snowmass / Int Lot Aspen local Snowmass local other WARNER TRU NSPORTAnoN CONSULTING, IBC. Page 4 Aspen to Snowmass fare free service evaluation March 19 preliminary findings Trip purpose Most riders (61 percent of the weighted respondents) take the bus to go to or from skiing. A significant share of area visitors staying in Snowmass take the bus to shop or dine-out in Aspen, this is not true in the reverse. Trip purpose work trip non-work trip All respondents 51 8 Aspen visitors Snowmass visitors illipa 64 18 Aspen residents 23 Snowmass residents nnu12 12 Down Valley residents ESEL22 Down Valley visitors 54 Weighted respondents 61 8 Aspen visitors 86 Snowmass visitors 66 18 Aspen residents 28 Snowmass residents 14 16 Down Valley residents 22 Down Valley visitors 60 work o skiing/ recreation shopping/dining out other VX'ARNER TRANSPORTXMN CONSUI,rINC;,INC. Page 5 Aspen to Snowmass fare free service evaluation March 19 preliminary findings Trip purpose Most travelers—residents and visitors—are frequent bus riders. RFTA trip frequency infrequently most or all days All respondents 29 Aspen visitors 27 66 Snowmass visitors 29 46 Aspen residents 32 53 Snowmass residents 28 47 Down Valley residents 37 46 Down Valley visitors 19 76 Weighted respondents 28 56 Aspen visitors 27 66 Snowmass visitors 28 44 Aspen residents 30 55 Snowmass residents 23 51 Down Valley residents 32 55 Down Valley visitors 24 _ 71 infrequently most days all days W.\RN ER TRANSPORTATION CONSULTING,INC. Page 6 Aspen to Snowmass fare free service evaluation March 19 preliminary findings RFTA pass or punch card Almost two-thirds (64 percent) of residents of Down Valley communities have a RFTA pass or punch card. Do you have a RFTA pass or punch card? yes 4-- no All respondents 81 Aspen visitors 96 Snowmass visitors 89 Aspen residents 78 Showmass residents 67 Down Valley residents 36 Down Valley visitors 60 Weighted respondents 86 Aspen visitors 96 Snowmass visitors 91 Aspen residents 81 Snowmass residents 69 i Down Valley residents M 41 Down Valley visitors 61 yes no WARNER TRANSPORTATION CONSULTING,INC. Page 7 Aspen to Snowmass fare free service evaluation March 19 preliminary findings Increasing use of the service this winter Almost half of respondents (47 percent) who were in the region last winter have increased their use of the Aspen — Snowmass bus service. Among the 70 percent of Snowmass residents who were in the area last winter, 63 percent are taking more trips on the Aspen — Snowmass bus; 41 percent are taking "many more:" trips. Of those in area last winter, % using RFTA along the route between Aspen and Snowmass . . . in area last winter more frequently same or less frequently all respondents E 23 47 j55 Aspen visitors . 43 25 64 Snowmass visitors 038 23 58 Aspen residents • 77 22 36 Snowmass 070 22 33 residents Down Valley • 86 z5 35 residents Down Valley visitors • 42 27 55 much more frequently o more frequently o same frequency less frequently much less frequently WARNFI "Ili vnsN)R I cnr)n CO NSI T nnc,Inc. Page 8 Aspen to Snowmass fare free service evaluation March 19 preliminary findings Preferences for serving Base Village The current ridership prefers to serve the Mall before Base Village. Snowmass visitors feels the strongest about this. Next year, when RFTA buses begin serving Base Village, which location should RFTA buses stop at first? Snowmass Mall Base Village All respondents 29 Aspen Hsitors 3 Snowmass visitors 21 Aspen residents 35 Snowmass residents 36 Down Valley residents moons 29 Down Valley Hsitors 26 Weighted respondents 28 Aspen Hsitors 29 Snowmass visitors 23 Aspen residents 33 Snowmass residents 37 Down Valley residents 64 27 Down Valley visitors 22 Snowmass Mall Base Village WARNER TRINSPORTAIION CONSULTING,INC. Page 9 Aspen to Snowmass fare free service evaluation March 19 preliminary findings Rating the combined service The share of the riders with negative views about the combined service is almost negligible. How do you rate the way RFTA has combined the skier's shuttle and regular Aspen / Snowmass bus service this year? posrtrvely I---* negatively All respondents 17 1 Aspen visitors MML12 20 Snowmass visitors MMF15 21 Aspen residents 1 22 1 18 Snowmass residents MMMMMLMMMMMM22 9 Down Valley residents MMMMMMMME27 19 Down Valley visitors 8 13 Weighted respondents 17 18 Aspen visitors 12 20 Snowmass visitors 16 20 Aspen residents 25 19 Snowmass residents 21 9 Down Valley residents 34 15 Down Valley visitors 9 9 very positively o somewhat positively o neutral/ no opinion somewhat negatively o very negatively X'.1RNI]CI 1t.1NsN)R I A rlcl'v Ci wsul,rwc,IN(( . Page 10 Aspen to Snowmass fare free service evaluation March 19 preliminary findings Reasons why people take the bus The free service is clearly an important factor in prompting people to take the bus. Disaggregation by each of the six market groups appears on the next two pages. All respondents 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 I had no other ride or car 5 bus service is free all day 9 RFTA service frequency 17 travel speed / reliability in 8 bus lane convenient bus stop 3 locations avoids cost,difficulty of 12 parking it helps the environment 10 saves cost of gas 6 first second prefer to let someone else 8 do the driving 17 third WARNER TRANSPORTATION CONSULTING,INC. Page 11 Aspen to Snowmass fare free service evaluation March 19 preliminary findings Aspen visitors Snowmass visitors Down Valley visitors 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 no car 6 t5 f free service 11 10 19 service frequency 22 24 8 speed / reliability 6 7 12 stop locations 16 18 8 parking issues 10 11 12 environment 8 8 saves cost of gas 8 first second someone else drives 7 6 12 third WARNGR TRANSPORTATION CONSULTING,INC. Page 12 Aspen to Snowmass fare free service evaluation March 19 preliminary findings I Aspen residents Snowmass Down Valley residents residents 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 0 10 20 30 40 so so 70 ao 0 10 20 30 40 w so 70 80 no car 1 free service 8 8 service frequency 12 13 speed / reliability 12 12 8 stop locations 10 12 parking issues 18 14 1 environment r 13 18 11 saves cost of gas 9 7 10 first second someone else drives 7 10 15 O third WARNER TRnNSPORT:1I7oN CONSULTING,INC. Page 13 MEMORANDUM TO: Snowmass Village Town Council FROM: Housing Department/ Russ Forrest DATE: April 6, 2009 SUBJECT: Rodeo Place - Phase II I.PURPOSE AND ACTIONS REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: The Town Council is requested to provide direction on if, and how, to move forward with Phase II of the Rodeo Place Housing Project. On March 16th the Town Council was split between implementing the existing approved plan and a proposed alternative to add 7 additional dwelling units to the project. In addition, several members of the Council expressed concern moving forward with either option in this uncertain economic housing market. The Town Council requested that staff respond to the a variety of questions which staff has attempted to do in Section III of the memorandum. Council is requested to direct staff either to: Complete the design of Phase II as approved (Option 1) and request bids for the construction of Phase II or, Complete the design of Phase II per the Revised Exempt Plan (Option 2) and request bids for the construction of Phase II. In addition, staff requests that in either scenario the Town retain Rudd to be the general contractor for the project continue to utilize ROI as an owners representative for the project. II.BACKGROUND The table below summarizes the existing approved project for Rodeo Place Single Duplex units Triplex Units Total dwelling Family units Units Phase 1 11 4 0 15 Phase 2 10 0 3 13 Square Footage 50,200 4,844 3,900 Total Square Footage 1,636 — 1,211 1,300 Range for unit 2,967 type The Town has paid for the design (soft) costs, land costs, and infrastructure costs for phase I. In addition, the Town has completed the infrastructure for phase II as approved and described in the table above. It was originally contemplated that the perspective homeowners in phase I were to pay 100% of the hard costs. The Town choose Roaring Fork Custom Homes as its General Contractor in 2006 and utilized estimated pricing from this General Contractor for the lottery of phase I in the summer of 2007. The Town discontinued its relationship with Roaring Fork Custom Homes after the completion of lots 5, 6,& 7 and engaged Rudd Construction to complete phase I. The Town received new prices for lots 8 - 15, 2 (a & b), and 3 (a & b)that reflected a higher price than the original lottery price. The Town agreed to pay 90% of the increase in price or 25% of the total cost)that occurred for phase I. Phase 11 utilizes many of the same house designs from Phase I and the infrastructure (roads and utilities) are in place to build Phase 11 as approved. In December of 2008 the Town Council requested that staff evaluate whether additional units could be effectively integrated into the phase II development. Coburn Development, Inc. (CDI)has been the architect for the project and Resort Opportunities and Investments, LLC (ROI) have been the Owner's Representative for the Town on Phase I. Rudd Construction, Inc. (RCI) is completing the construction of phase 1. These three entities worked collaboratively to evaluate whether additional units could be added to phase 11 using the following criteria: Cost effectiveness in utilizing the current investment in both infrastructure and in the design of the homes. Maintaining a similar mass in scale to achieve a highly livable family oriented development. Maintain view corridors that were a consideration in the Rodeo Place project. Provide a variety of unit type and sizes. ROI has met with the Town's Planning and Building Departments, along with the Wildcat Fire Protection District, and Snowmass Water and Sanitation District. The Town Council directed staff at the February 2, 2009 meeting to look further into the opportunity for additional residential units in Rodeo Place. The Town Council authorized $28,000, which would be applied towards the Exemption Plat Budget, for CDI, ROI, and RCI (Project Team) to proceed with the following steps; Revise the site plan per council direction to develop one revised site plan Develop building character sketches for the individual building designs shown in the Exemption Plat Matrix Develop one 3 dimensional computer massing model of the scheme Refine Project Budget Develop a project Pro forma (Unit Pricing) PowerPoint presentation of the above materials Review revised site plan and character sketches with Rodeo Place, and Crossings Owners In addition to the above tasks, the Entryway Housing Survey was updated and sent out to evaluate current demand (See Exhibit K). Since the February 2, 2009 Council meeting, the Project Team has refined the Exempt (Revised plan referred to as Option 2 below) Site Plan, developed 3 new unit plans and exterior elevations, met with the two modular manufacturers involved in Phase I, refined Project Budgets, and held an open-house to review the project with the community. Attached are the Current Plat for 13 units (approved) and an alternative design Exempt Plat) for 7 additional units, for a total 20 units. Preliminary Project Budgets, Build-out Matrix, and Project Schedule, for both schemes, are attached. Building character Sketches and Floor Plans, along with a 3D Computer Massing Model is included for the Exempt Plat. ROI also reviewed with Council feedback from a public meeting that was held the evening of March 91". III. DISCUSSION POINTS A. Why move forward with either option now versus waiting —What are the risk and benefits of moving forward now? Resort Opportunities and Investments, LLC (ROI) attempted to respond to the question stated in III.A. ROI has attempted to outline the Benefits versus the Risks of proceeding with Phase 2 of Rodeo Place, with either the 13 unit 'Stay the Course' / Current Plat, or the 20 unit Revised Plat which adds 7 additional units (primarily using duplexes). The other alternative evaluated was whether to wait for 6 months to a year. It is important to note that further delays in making a decision, even as little as 30 days, will affect the information in the bullet points below. ROI's comments are based on proceeding under the negotiated contract format with the current general contractor and not a bid scenario. If this is not the case, the Project Budgets, Schedules, and Cash Flows would need to be revised. Some items may be included in both the Benefits and the Risk sections, as there are inherent challenges with some aspects of the schedules proposed. But ROI feels these challenges can be met with the cooperation of the Town and its departments in proceeding through the required steps with the common goal of providing the Town with the product that best meets their need of providing sustainable, affordable workforce housing. BENEFITS Current economic situation has presented the Town with an unprecedented opportunity to build. This window of opportunity, as it pertains to a lower cost of construction and the availability of contractors, is available now and may be gone in as little as six months. Long-term demand for affordable housing in Snowmass Village is inevitable and the cost to build a high quality product is now at an all time low. Current contractor market is the best it has been in years as it pertains to value per square foot. The current General Contractor is willing to build the project at an overhead of 5% and 5% profit. An industry range for overhead and profit can be from 5% to 11%. Current contractor is also willing to reduce fees on their labor and equipment an additional 5%. Subcontractor market is also the hungriest it has been in years, which will give the current GC an enormous pool of resources when pricing out all subcontracted scopes of this work. Current GC has already agreed to provide no less than 4 bids per trade, and it is ROI's belief that they will receive twice this number in unsolicited bids per trade once the decision is made for the project to proceed. It is our expectation that the estimated cost for the construction of the homes for phase II will be less then the estimates provided in this memorandum. The two modular builders, that were involved in Phase I, and who have been providing-current pre construction pricing, are willing to split up the project to achieve current schedule projections if needed. They also have a production slot open from April to August that would allow production to start on the first 4 homes almost immediately(which we can do regardless of which scheme is selected). The Town is in a unique position for Phase 2 to move through the entitlement and/or permitting process with less distractions than they've seen for the last 6 years. Being able to proceed immediately will allow the Town to take advantage of the upcoming building season reducing winter conditions costs if the project is delayed until the fall of 2009. By proceeding with Phase 2 now, the Town will not incur costs associated with demobilization and remobilization of a General Contractor. Completing Phase 2 of the project will prevent the Town from incurring additional costs of roughly$150,000 to $200,000 in site work - grading, topsoil, hydroseed, hay, matting and required irrigation to provide a completed, clean and safe environment. This is money lost, as all this work will have to be redone as part of Phase 2. Completing Phase 2 now will provide the Town with a successful affordable housing project and completed Entryway to their town. Completing Phase 2 will allow the Town to complete its trail network. Interest rates on residential mortgages are at an all time low. Local lenders are willing and able to provide financing for as little as 5% down and loans amounts as high at 42% of Gross Annual Income, for qualified buyers. Market risk can be mitigated to a significant extent by phasing the project as described below in III.B. RISKS Current pricing will only be available for a very limited time as subcontractors, vendors, and suppliers will only hold their prices typically 30-60 days, so as not to put themselves in significant risk. If the general economy starts to rebound qualified subcontractors will start to become less available. If the decision to proceed is delayed, there is significant risk of losing the production time slot and current pricing from the modular manufacturers. There is a real risk that commodities, such as oil and lumber, will increase. If Phase 2 is delayed, construction activity will extend through this summer to complete the Town's work for the remainder of the Entryway, and then resume when Council deems it appropriate thus extending the construction disturbance to those currently living in Rodeo Place. There is also the potential of additional costs to the Town due to Town work that was previously completed but may need to be removed to complete Phase 2 or may be damaged in the process. If there is a lack of market for housing in Phase II there will be an impact to cash flow in the excise tax fund which may prevent other projects from proceeding until phase II has sold out. Information provided from the 2005 Housing Survey may not be valid today in determining the number of buyers out there for this product, and what they can afford. Current updated Survey did not get nearly the number of respondents the first survey did. This survey raises the same questions as the previous survey and focused on what type of product would you like to see vs. the current question facing Council which is do we build now, is there demand and at what price? Town may be forced to provide additional subsidy, beyond soft costs and infrastructure, more inline with those provided in Phase 1 in order make the homes affordable. Could deplete the Town's Excise Tax Fund, for a period of time, if they have to hold onto unsold units for an extended period of time. Construction pricing is at all time low but may change in the near future. The question is will there be demand for what is built? Council needs to be aware of the information on pricing, phasing, demand, and cash flow to determine whether and what to build. B. How can we minimize our risk by phasing the project? In either"Stay the Course"/ 13 unit plan or the "Exemption Plat"/20 unit plan, dividing Phase 2 into three sub-phases can significantly reduce the risk to the Town. Each phase (4-8 units) would be preceded by a Lottery to gauge the true demand. Lottery participants would be required to provide a pre-qualification lender from a local lending institution, along with a completed application and required deposit. A nonbinding agreement between the Town and the Lottery Winner would be based on a schematic set of drawings &finish specifications, and give a price range (versus a specific cost)for the unit. A phase specific Lottery would be held about three weeks before signing a contract with the GC to start construction. Please see attached Abbreviated Development Schedules. Summary of Contract/Lottery Schedule OPTION 1-"Stay the Course" May 15th A 4,22,23, 24 4 SF June 4th June 18th B 16, 17, 18, 19 4 SF July 7th July 21st C 1,20, 21 S Tri,SF August 8th 13 OPTION 2-"Exemption Plat" May 15th A 4, 22,23, 24 4 SF June 4th June 18th B 16, 17, 18, 19 8 Duplex July 14th July 21st C 1,20, 21 8 Sm Duplex August 14th 20 If a Lottery did not provide enough Buyers for that phase, the Town could stop the project, and would have spent only a portion of the Soft Costs for that sub-phase. Please see attached Cash Flow Models (Exhibit M). C. What is the current status of the Excise Tax Fund-What can it afford? This Section was prepared by Marianne Rakowski, Finance Director The Finance Department has reviewed the Excise Tax budget taking into account the completion of the Rodeo Homes Phase I Project. At the end of Rodeo Homes Phase I Project (and taking into consideration the purchase of Country Club Townhome #25) the Fund Balance for the Excise Tax Fund is projected to be $5,507,000 +/-. The Finance Department was asked to review the financial impact on the Excise Tax Fund for Rodeo Homes Phase II. Bob Kaufman of ROI provided project numbers, a draw schedule and a sale schedule for Phase II for projects consisting of 13 units and 20 units. The Finance Department looked at these projects from a cash flow standpoint and the impact on the Fund Balance both during the project and at its completion. Staff reviewed the impacts of both projects under a scenario of using an additional 25% and 15% subsidy based on the hard costs. Excise Tax revenues in 2010 were projected conservatively at $250K. Any changes in the draws or sales of the homes will affect the attached scenarios. From a fund balance standpoint, the fund balance for all scenarios continues to decrease due to the funding of the soft costs and in the hard cost subsidy. Council needs to understand that in proceeding with Phase ll, the ability to fund other projects, i.e. Timbers, Draw Site significantly decreases in several of the funding scenarios. From a cash flow standpoint for a project this size, the Town would want to have cash on hand at a minimum of$1 M to offset any earlier/larger draws than the schedule shows, or to maintain the cash if a house doesn't close in the month as projected. In all of the 20 units scenarios, the cash flow shows several or more months where the cash drops significantly below $1 M, which raises a concern. A financial summary of the project is attached (See Exhibit M). D. What additional information is available on demand for housing?What is affordable in this market? A significant question Council had is what is the market for housing? There have been several sales of deed restricted housing recently, but all have been townhomes or condominiums. The market is unquestionably slow in all areas of the real-estate market. However, it should be noted that there is not a good comparison for either a single family or duplex product currently. Staff in consultation with others in the real-estate community, believe that real estate demand will remain soft in the next 1-2 years. However, long term, the Town will continue to face extremely high demand for affordable housing. It is most likely that the Town will loose ground on maintaining employee housing (if it maintains current polices) as free market units that house employees are sold to non workers in the next 10 to 20 years. The draft Comprehensive Plan has several strategies to address this issue. In 2008 as part of the Comprehensive Plan update, the Town engaged RRC Associates to evaluate the current demand for housing, number of employees in Snowmass, and the availability of housing in the community. Granted the market has changed in the last 4-5 months and a lottery may be the best way to evaluate demand.) RRC did several surveys of all employers in Snowmass and evaluated several sources of demographic information. RRC identified the Area Median Income for Snowmass Village and how that relates to affordability for a home. The graphic below provides a statistically accurate tool for determining an affordable price point for housing. For example, the average household in Snowmass Village consists of three people. The Area Median Income (100% AMI)for a three-person household in Snowmass Village is $87,000. This income can generally support a home of$306,852. This can be considered an affordable entry- level home. Area Median Income/Affordability of Homes 100%AMI Income$87,800 80%AMI 1206% AMI Income$57,400 Income$105,360 27.0%HH Rent$2,195. . Price$306,852 50%AMI 9.4%HH 0 9 140%AMI Income$43,900 Rant$1,435 Rent f3 0 J Prlce$200,607 r ce$471 866 Income$122,920 19.8%HH 243 H Rent$1,098 Rant Ovar$3.073 Price$153,426 Pllce Over 5431,866 Snowmass Households AMI for the Average 3-person household Assumes 20%property insurance,HOA,Taxes,5%Down,6.5%30-year loan RRC also looked at the Town's work force (they were also doing a similar study for the City of Aspen). This survey asked Snowmass Village employees that both lived in and outside of Snowmass their preferences on housing. The Table below summarizes responses from employees that work in Snowmass and live elsewhere. Applying survey responses to the total population of workers commuting into Snowmass, over 231 employees working and living elsewhere have interest in buying in Snowmass. Again the graphic above can be used to connect income to affordability for housing. For example 130 of the potential buyers were in the 100%-120% of AMI, which means they could afford approximately a home price up to 368,000. In addition, RRC looked at employees that currently work in Snowmass and rent in Town. Approximately 65 employees working and renting in Town have an interest in buying in Snowmass. Work in Snowmass Live Elsewhere (Total 1,780 ern tovees in 20081 Own Rent Tenure (Survey work in Snowmass live elsewhere) 56% 44% Work in Snowmass Village in Winter, Live Elsewhere 997 783 Want to Buy 17% 67% Want to Buy 169 525 First or Second Choice Snowmass 51% 70% First or Second Choice Snowmass 86 367 Total Potential Buyers between 80% to 140%AMI 67% 63% All Potential Buyers 58 231 Potential Buyers between 80% to 100%AMI 23 69 Potential Buyers between 100%to 120%AMI 10 130 Potential Buyers between 120%to 140% AMI 25 32 Median Income $96,000$65,000 Average Income $141,247$66,231 Most Important Factor in choosing a home Price 26% 50% Ownership 26% 30% Location 36% 15% Size 13% 5% Type 0% 0% In addition, RRC asked employees about trade-offs for living closer to work. Thirty-one percent of respondents indicated they would live in a smaller Townhome) versus a single-family home. What would you be willing to do to live closer to where you work? Work in Snowmass Own a townhome instead of a single-family house 31% Live in a deed-restricted unit 32% Live in a smaller home (priced the same) 36% Own a condo instead of a single-family house 28% Pay more for housing 22% Rent instead of own 15% None of the above 21% Other 7% Total 192% Note:multiple response question In addition, the Town conducted a non-statistical survey in 2005 and 2009 to gauge interest in the Rodeo Place project(See Exhibit K). These surveys were sent to individuals that either expressed an interest in participating in the Rodeo lottery or lived in Town deed restricted housing. In 2005 approximately 56 people responded to the survey. The clear preference in 2005 was for a single-family home (45 respondents) versus 5 for a duplex and 6 for a townhome. However 46 respondents anticipated paying less than $325,000 for a home. The desire from respondents was for a single family home but not for the price required for that type of housing. In 2009 an identical survey was sent to lottery participants and others in the Towns rental program. Approximately 31 people responded. The average income was between $50,000 to $75,000. In 2005, most respondents where also in this range. However, 18 respondents in 2009 made $75,000 to $100,000. In 2009 respondents were split between (15) Single Family units and (15)for Duplex/Condominiums. Twenty-one respondents wanted a home under $325,000. Ten respondents indicated an interest for a home over$376,000. Twenty respondents in the 2009 survey indicated they were interested in buying in 2009 and 10 indicated an interest in buying in 2010 and 2011. E. What subsidies has the Town provided for housing projects and what should be considered for Phase II? The Town did pay for approximately 25% of the hard cost of Phase I homes. In conferring with Joe Coffey the only other for sale project(he was aware of)that the Town helped pay for the hard (construction costs) of a project was the Daly Townhomes. After signing a contract with a general contractor it was discovered with the Daly Townhomes that an expensive retaining wall needed to be built and this caused a delay in the project that resulted in an increase of cost for the general contractor. The Town did help pay for these increases in cost. The Town has generally paid for the land cost and the soft costs associated with a housing project. In general, the perspective homebuyer has historically paid for the hard cost or construction cost of their units except when there was an unexpected increase in those costs. With regard to phase I of the Rodeo Place project the following table summarizes the actual cost (all lots except for 5,6,7) and the subsidy paid for by the Town. Sales Price and Subsidy for Phase I Acutal Cost Base Sales of Total Price at based on Price Subsidy Hard Cost Lottery in Rudd Approved by Paid by Paid by LOT# 2007 contract8/08 $Increase Council Town Town 8 384,657 $528,754 $144,097 $399,062 $129,692 25% 9 414,387 $569,621 $155,234 $429,906 $139,716 25% 30 384,657 $528,754 $144,097 $399,062 $129,692 25% 11 393,821 $541,351 $147,530 $408,570 $132,782 25% 12 351,855 $483,664 $131,809 $365,032 $118,632 25°% 13 320,027 $439,913 $119,886 $332,012 $107,901 25% 14 320,027 $439,913 $119,886 $332,012 $107,901 25% 1s 320,027 $439,913 $119,886 $332,012 $107,901 25% 2A 250,870 $344,849 $93,979 $260,265 $84,584 25% 2B 250,870 $344,849 $93,979 $260,265 $84,584 25% 3D 250,870 $344,849 $93,979 $260,265 $84,584 25% 3C 250,870 $344,849 $93,979 $260,265 $84,584 25% Total $3,892,938 $5,351,280 4,038,729 $1,312,551 As mentioned above, area median income is typically used as an indicator for what loan value a household can afford at a certain income level. Again several points of comparison for considering a subsidy include: The average median income of a 3-person household was $87,800 in Snowmass and that would support a home price of$307,000. This would be considered by RRC a price for an entry level home. At 140% of Average Median Income ($123,000 year)a home price ideally would be $430,000 to be affordable. This income level is generally reflective of a family that already has equity in a property and is looking to sell a property. Staff summarized two scenarios for a 25% subsidy and a 15% subsidy for each option in Phase II below: Staff would suggest that a subsidy might be needed if Option 1 is selected. However, if Option 2 were selected the costs for duplex units were more in an affordable range and there were fewer single-family units. Option 1: 13 Units (10 Single Family/3 units in a triplex) Unitrrype/Bedroo 15% ms Actual Price 25% Subsidy Sales Price Subsidy Sales Price n le 2B $341,133 85,283 $255,850 $51,170 $289,963 tb Tr lex 2BR $341,133 85,283 $255,850 $51,170 $289,963 le •2Bg $341,133 85,283 $255,850 $51,170 $289,963 4 BR 279,626 69,907 $209,720 $41,944 $237,682 ML"6,,rS--Fj---3 R+ 1 572,523 1 $143,131 $429,392 $85,878 $486,645 77 S 28 + 1 $512,526 $128,132 $384,395 $76,879 $435,647 9[L8,SFt j $572,523 $143,131 $429,392 $85,878 $486,645 512,526 $128,132 $384,395 $76,879 $435,647 20_SFJ38R+.t $572,523 $143,131 $429,392 $85,878 $486,645 S 3 506,325 $126,581 $379,744 $75,949 $430,376 22-5 2BR 459,571 $114,893 $344,678 $68,936 $390,635 28-5 3B 506,325 $126,581 $379,744 $75,949 $430,376 2'4TSF, BR+1 $512,526 $128,132 $384,395 $76,879 $435,647 X1}3 unfits;,, 6,030,393 1 $1,507,598 1 $4,522,795 1 $904,559 1 $5,125,834 Option 2: 20 units (4 SF/16 duplex) Unit/Type/Bedroo ms(Duplex=DP) Actual Price 25% Subsidy Sales Price 15% Subsidy Sales Price tAQP.121BR11 $ 311,596 $ 77,899 $ 233,697 $ 46,739 $ 264,856 B-UP 2 BR $ 311,596 $ 77,899 $ 233,697 $ 46,739 $ 264,856 6-D 2 311,596 $ 77,899 $ 233,697 $ 46,739 $ 264,856 U•DP- BR $ 311,596 $ 77,899 $ 233,697 $ 46,739 $ 264,856 a SJ.2B, $ 279,626 $ 69,907 $ 209,720 $ 41,944 $ 237,682 t. A-9 2 B _ t 1 $ 342,551 $ 85,638 $ 256,913 $ 51,383 $ 291,168 e -UP• B t $ 342,551 $ 85,638 $ 256,913 $ 51,383 $ 291,168 342,551 $ 85,638 $ 256,913 $ 51,383 $ 291,168 1 B-• 2 1 $ 342,551 $ 85,638 $ 256,913 $ 51,383 $ 291,168 BA-DP• B 342,551 $ 85,638 $ 256,913 $ 51,383 $ 291,168 8 -BP 2 B 1 $ 342,551 $ 85,638 $ 256,913 $ 51,383 $ 291,168 19 •BP2 1 $ 342,551 $ 85,638 $ 256,913 $ 51,383 $ 291,168 98-UP• B 342,551 $ 85,638 $ 256,913 $ 51,383 $ 291,168 0® $ 337,841 $ 84,460 $ 253,381 $ 50,676 $ 287,165 BTD.I?72TBR' $ 337,841 $ 84,460 $ 253,381 $ 50,676 $ 287,165 337,841 $ 84,460 $ 253,381 $ 50,676 $ 287,165 B•P2 337,841 $ 84,460 $ 253,381 $ 50,676 $ 287,165 22-SF• + $ 459,571 $ 114,893 $ 344,678 $ 68,936 $ 390,635 3-S 506,325 $ 126,581 $ 379,744 $ 75,949 $ 430,376 E'4!SBR1 $ 512,526 $ 128,132 $ 384,395 $ 76,879 $ 435,647 A i 1,774,050 $5,322,149 $ 1,064,4 IV. Summation of the Pros and Cons of Option 1 vs Option 2 Option 1-Stay the Course with 13 additional units The following are consideration for staying the course and building what has been approved for Phase II of Rodeo Place: Positives Phase II has been approved and can proceed ahead. This option meets the expectations that were set in original Rodeo Place housing lottery. However, it should be noted that Council on several occasions stated that Phase II might be modified and/or different than originally planned. A single family home is certainly desirable if can be afforded. No significant investment is required to add additional utilities for Phase ll. There is better cash flow with the Excise Tax Fund with Option 1. It has a lower infrastructure cost. Subsequent pricing received directly before this memorandum was prepared has indicated the Hard Cost for the single-family homes coming down between 7-8% because of a reduction in price from the modular factory. A home on Lot 16 is now around $526,721 (down from $572,523), and Lot 19 in now around $476,649 (down from 512,526). Using a similar comparison as above for subsidy it can create stronger argument for Option 1 and doing a 15% subsidy versus a 25%. UnitRypelBedroo 15/o ms Actual Price 25% Subsidy Sales Price Subsid. Sales Friee 1,6$F.(36R,*a1 $526,721 $131,680 $395,041 I$S7i9?008]t$447h71f3] 9•S 12B +476,649 $119,162 $357,487 II[$:7i1F4$7]t$:405[1I52] Negatives People want a single-family product but affording that unit is a challenge and beyond the reach of most 1s`time homebuyers. This option has a greater need for a subsidy from the Town. Without a subsidy there may be a limited number of homebuyers that can afford single-family homes. There is less diversity of product. The home prices for the single- family units are high given the area median income. There are no duplex units in the Town's housing inventory. From a long-term housing policy standpoint, the Town will inevidently have a strong demand for-sale housing. The Town has limited land and fully utilizing a housing site for its intended purpose will be critical in the future. The "American Dream" a single family home is not as efficient use of land as a duplex, which has many of the same attributes of a single family lot. Option 2-Implement the revised plan with 22 units Positives This option still maintains a strong family oriented community and provide a more affordable opportunity for new families to own a property in this neighborhood. It provides 7 additional units compared to Option 1 at an additional out of pocket cost to the Town of$81,411 per unit. When you add in the land value and the infrastructure cost the cost per unit is relatively affordable for the Town. From purely a housing policy stand point this provides the greatest long term impact for the Town's housing program by providing and additional 7 units. Additional duplex units may create opportunities for "empty nest" families to down size to a smaller deed restricted home and for new families to move into the vacated larger single family home (i.e. the Crossing). You may want to grant a current Rodeo Place owner a first right of refusal. Negatives The cash flow is lower than option 1. The net out of pocket cost for option 1 per unit is 66,340 per unit. The infrastructure cost(Town out of pocket cost) is $569,877 more than option 1. The 2 smaller duplex units (20 & 21 in option 2) may not be large enough for a family with children. Staff would recommend that based on the pricing we are now receiving that the Council choose either Option 1 or Option 2 on April 6 and that we continue to use Rudd Construction as the general contractor for the project and ROI as the owners representative. Staff would require Rudd to obtain 3- 4 competitive bids from each sub-contracting category (framing, electrical, plumbing etc.). We anticipate that the prices we have received will go down through a competitive process. A final contract with both Rudd and ROI would be reviewed with the Council as soon as they are available and would be the next step in this process if Council chooses to move forward. Staff would also recommend based on the concern on the market demand for housing that we phase the project and hold a lottery for each phase prior to ordering the modular units as described above in section III.B. It is important to note that phasing minimizes the Town's risk. However, the Town would still pay a significant portion of each sub-phase's design (soft) costs associated with the project. On the question of whether to implement option 1 (existing approved project) or option 2 there are several consideration to be made. Option 2 provides 7 additional units by replacing 6 single-family units with 6 duplex units and modifying a triplex to two duplexes. Although single-family units may be the ideal, it is also financially out of reach for most young families that are first time homebuyers. Option 2 still provides 4 additional single-family units. It has a greater diversity of product while still achieving a high quality family neighborhood. Option 2 is more affordable to more people looking for a family oriented for sale product. Staffs significant concern with Option 2 is low cash flow for the excise tax fund. This could be mitigated by phasing the project to reduce the potential exposure to risk of a slow market. However, it needs to be stated that Option 1 is the safest alternative from a cash flow standpoint because the total expenditure is lower. Option 1 if pursued most likely would require some form of subsidy to bring the prices into a more affordable range. Two options are described above including a 25% and a 15% subsidy on the hard cost. With recent modular numbers that were provided to staff right before this memorandum was completed it may be possible to utilize a 15% subsidy. If option 1 were pursued, staff would propose that the triplex (located on Lot 1) be converted to two duplex units. Two duplex units breaks up the mass better than a triplex and it most likely is a more marketable unit. Council also discussed not pursuing either option because of the uncertain financial and real-estate market currently. There is currently an opportunity to build either option 1 or 2 for a price that may not be realized again. Looking long term, the market demand for either duplex or single family affordable housing in Snowmass will exceed supply. There is softness across the board in the real-estate market now. Staff again believes the issue of near term market demand can be mitigated by breaking the project into 3 phases with a lottery for each phase. Attachments from March 18: Exhibit A: Current Plat - Site Plan Exhibit B: Current Plat- Build-out Matrix Exhibit C: Current Plat- Preliminary Project Budget Exhibit D: Exemption Plat - Site Plan Exhibit E: Exemption Plat - Build-out Matrix Exhibit F: Exempt Plat - Building Character Sketches and Floor Plans Exhibit G: Exempt Plat - 3D Computer Massing Model Exhibit H: Exempt Plat - Preliminary Project Budget Exhibit I: Preliminary Development Schedule— Bid vs. Negotiated Exhibit J: Current Housing Inventory/ Sizes Exhibit K: Updated Entryway Housing Survey and 2005 Survey Exhibit L: GC Procurement Process New Attachments Exhibit M Cash Flow Summary T:\Snowmass Projects\Housing\Rodeo Phase 11 proposal\April 6 2009\Phase II Memorandumfinal324.doc EXHIBIT A RODEO PLACE : CURRENT PLAT 03116109 I I 6RONC0 COURT xrvice 5751LLON C71PC78 4. i bT l" ON MM I P L N EXHIBIT B RODEO PLACE - Phase 2 Current Proposed Build Out Matrix March 16, 2008 PROPOSED PER SUBDIVISION APPLICATION O O G O G ELO 9 O 1A 2 2 2 Triplex 1, 211 0 1, 211 1, 300 0 1, 300 1- Attached Requires Council action 1B 2 2 2 Triplex 1, 211 0 1, 211 1, 300 0 1, 300 1- Attached Requires Council action 1C 2 2 2 Triplex 1, 211 0 1, 211 1, 300 0 1, 300 1- Attached Requires Council action 4 SD- 1 2 1 Small House 900 200 1, 100 1, 436 200 1, 636 1- Attached Requires Council action 16 9 3 + 1 2.5+ 1 Medium House 1, 792 522 2, 314 1, 868 913 2, 781 2- Attached 17 11 2 + 1 2+ 1 Medium House I 10486 1, 078 2, 564 1, 796 862 2, 658 2- Attached 18 1 9 3 + 1 2.5+ 1 Medium House 1, 792 522 2, 314 1, 539 805 2, 344 2- Attached 19 11 2 + 1 2+ 1 Medium House 1, 486 1, 078 2, 564 1, 637 1, 203 2, 840 2- Attached 20 9 3 + 1 2.5+ 1 Medium House 1, 792 522 2, 314 1, 796 862 2, 658 2- Attached 21 OD- 2 3 2.5 SF 1, 700 0 1, 700 1, 796 862 2, 658 2- Attached 22 12 2 + 1 Lt- 1 Small House 900 200 1, 100 1, 356 710 2, 066 1- Attached 23 DD- 2 3 2.5 SF 1, 700 0 1, 700 2, 031 936 2, 967 2- Attached 24 11 2 + 1 2+ 1 Medium House 2, 000 1, 000 3, 000 1, 637 1, 203 2, 840 2- Attached 13 Units 31 + 7 19, 181 5, 122 24, 303 20, 792 8, 556 29, 348 Total Bedrooms Exhibit C 3712009 Rodeo Place - Phase 2 Current Plat - 13 Units Preliminary - Project Budget Cost to Cost to CONSULTANTS Estimated Budget Date Complete 1 Architect-Planning 5,000 0 5,000 2 Architectural Building Design -CDI 180,576 0 180,576 3 Structural Engineer-Maggerf 47,500 0 47,500 4 Soil/Geotechnical Engineer-HP Geotech 21,850 0 21,850 5 Civil Engineer-SGM 3,680 0 3,680 6 Snow Shed Consultant 12,075 0 12,075 7 Specifications Consultant 5,000 0 5,000 8 Legal-HOA Documents- TBD 20,000 0 20,000 9 0 0 0 IIIIIIIII[Scitit-otall DEVELOPMENT CHARGES 10 Building Permits 0 0 0 11 Water and Sewer-Tap Fees 132,000 0 132,000 12 Water and Sewer 0 0 0 13 Electric -Holy Cross Energy 0 0 0 14 Telephone -Qwest 0 0 0 15 Gas -Source Gas 0 0 0 16 Cable -Comcast 0 0 0 17 0 0 0 S'ubtot'als IO=$32?O:tiO SITE AND CONSTRUCTION 18 Sump Pumps(Lots 22&23) 0 9,850 19 Unsuitable Soils(Lots 4,22,&23) 0 0 0 20 Fill Import/Export 0 0 0 21 Road Repair 0 0 0 22 Re-vegetation 0 7.600 23 Home Construction 6,030,393 0 6,030,393 24 Lot 1 -Storm Drain 25 Lot 1 -Relaina a Wall& Foam Blocks 0 148,722 Sutitotalsl 16b2;ti1!5651 10 I6{1:9:61565 OTHER 26 Builder's Risk Insurance 5,000 0 5,000 27 Warranty 13 19,500 0 19,500 28 0 0 0 Subtotals x$10=$12:4',50.0 Subtotals 6,663,746 0 6,648,746 29 Owner's Representative 2.75% 0 183,253 CONTINGENCY 30 Contingency-Consultants&Dev.Charges 7.5% 45,820 0 45,820 31 Contingency-Site&Construction 7.5% 465,867 0 465,867 32 0 0 0 Subtotals 694,940 0 694,940 686 0 3 Consultants, Development Charges , selected Site and Construction charges, Other charges, and Owner's 62,816 Per Unit File:Exhibit C and H-Preliminary Project Budgets 3-16-09.als Resort Opportunities&Investments,LLC Rodeo Place - Phase 2 3127/ 2009 Current- Hard Cost- Bldg& SF Upper Level 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Lower Level 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Finished 3, 633 900 1, 792 1, 486 1, 792 1, 486 1, 792 1, 700 1, 313 1, 700 1, 486 19, 080 Unfinished Basement 0 200 522 1, 078 522 1, 078 522 0 1, 226 0 1, 078 Gross Livible 3, 633 1, 100 2, 314 2, 564 2, 314 2, 564 2, 314 1, 700 2, 539 1, 700 2, 564 25, 306 Garage 1, 029 540 523 483 523 483 523 560 313 560 483 Gross Total 4, 662 1, 640 2, 837 3, 047 2, 837 3, 047 2, 837 2, 260 2, 852 2, 260 3, 047 31, 326 Hard Cost lRw) 1, 023, 399 $ 279, 626 $ 572, 523 $ 512, 526 $ 572, 523 $ 512, 526 $ 572, 523 $ 506, 325 $ 459, 571 $ 506, 325 $ 512, 526 $ 6, 030, 393 Hard Cost/ Unit 341, 133 $ 279, 626 $ 572, 523 $ 512, 526 $ 572, 523 $ 512, 526 $ 572, 523 $ 506, 325 $ 459, 571 $ 506, 325 $ 512, 526 1 SF Gross Livible 281. 70 $ 254. 21 247. 42 $ 199. 89 $ 247. 42 $ 199. 89 ' $ 247. 42 $ 297. 84 $ 181. 00 $ 297. 84 $ 199. 89 5238. 30 Avg. Price lava., m suamyi 288, 580 $ 262, 129 $ 551, 424 $ 610, 998 $ 551, 424 $ 610, 998 $ 551, 424 $ 405, 108 $ 605, 041 $ 405, 108 $ 610, 998 Subsidy 25 percent 72, 145 $ 65, 532 $ 137, 856 $ 152, 750 $ 137, 856 $ 152, 750 $ 137, 856 $ 101, 277 $ 151, 260 $ 101, 277 $ 152, 750 $ 1, 363, 308. 24 Price at 25% Subsidy $ 216, 435 $ 196, 597 $ 413, 568 $ 458, 249 $ 413, 568 $ 458, 249 $ 413, 568 $ 303, 831 $ 453, 781 $ 303, 831 $ 458, 249 Subsidy 15% 43, 287 $ 39, 319 82, 714 $ 91, 650 $ 82, 714 $ 91, 650 $ 82, 714 $ 60, 766 $ 90, 756 $ 60, 766 $ 91, 650 $ 817, 984. 94 Price at 15% Subsidy $ 245, 293 $ 222, 810 $ 468, 710 $ 519, 349 $ 468, 710 $ 519, 349 $ 468, 710 $ 344, 342 $ 514, 285 $ 344, 342 $ 519, 349 Resort Opportunities& Investments, LLC EXHIBIT D RODEO PLACE : PHASE 2 EXEMPTION PLAT REVISED 1---- III II II e I:I 03116109 BRONCO COURT i SZAL/! ON COPCLB y . 57/ IJJON C/ RL76 I PL N EXHIBIT E RODEO PLACE - Phase 2 Exemption Plat Matrix ( Revised) March 16, 2009 ROMEO O A O G O 1A New S 2 2.5 2000 Duplex 1, 125 0 1, 125 1- Attached Requires council action 1B New 5 2 2.5 2000 Duplex 1, 125 0 1, 125 1- Attached is New S 2 2.5 2000 Duplex 1, 125 0 1, 125 1- Attached SD New 5 2 2.5 2000 Duplex 1, 125 0 1, 125 1- Attached LOT 3000 FLOORAREA TOTAL REQ. 11000 TOTAL 4, 500 0 4, 500 AVAILABLE 11531 ALLOWABLE Subject to council decision 4 SD- 1 2 1 SF 900 200 1, 100 1- Attached Requires council action 16A New 2 2 + 1 2.5+ 1 2500 Duplex 1, 050 450 1, 500 1- Attached Lots 16, 17, 18& 19 combined 16B New 2 2 + 1 2.5+ 1 2500 Duplex 1, 050 450 1, 500 1- Attached 17A New 2 2 + 1 2.S+ 1 2500 Duplex 1, 050 450 1, 500 1- Attached 17B New 2 2 + 1 2.5+ 1 2500 Duplex 1, 050 450 1, 500 1- Attached 18A New 2 2 + 1 2.5+ 1 2500 Duplex 1, 050 450 1, 500 1- Attached 18B New 2 2 + 1 2.5+ 1 2500 Duplex 1, 050 450 1, 500 1- Attached 19A I New 2 2 + 1 1 2.5+ 1 2500 Duplex 1, 050 450 1, 500 1- Attached 19B New 2 2 2.5 2000 Duplex 1, 050 450 1, 500 1- Attache5 MIN. LOT AREA 3000 FLOORAREA TOTAL REQ. 22500 TOTAL 8, 400 3, 600 12, 000 AVAILABLE 22910 ALLOWABLE 8400 4800 12000 20A New 3 2 2.5 2000 Duplex 800 S00 1, 300 1- Attached Lots 20& 21 combined 20B New 3 2 2.5 2000 Duplex S00 500 1, 300 1- Attached 21A New 3 2 2.5 2000 Duplex 800 500 1, 300 1- Attached 21B New 3 2 2.5 2000 Duplex 800 500 1, 300 1- Attached LOT 3000 FLOORAREA TOTAL REQ. 11000 TOTAL 3, 200 2, 000 5, 200 AVAILABLE 11989 ALLOWABLE 4, 200 2, 400 6, 000 22 12( sim.) 2 + 1 2+ 1F 1, 313 1, 226 2, 539 1- Attached 23 DD- 4 3 2.5 1, 080 1, 080 2, 160 2- Attached 24 11( sim.) 2 + 1 2+ 1F 1, 486 1, 078 2, 564 2- Attached 20 Units 41 + 9 20, 8791 9, 184 30, 063 Total Bedrooms Exhibit COBURNV mil•: Elevation ILE 419t- 4- Basement Rodeo Phase Exhibit F2: Duplex 2, Lot 20, 21 COBU RN uealln99ee al Plac ee Elevation -- IT' 13 a N 1 1 Basement Main ;- Rodeo Phase 11 03. 16. 09 Exhibit COBURNV 91HtSS o::^ 1 rig. iii i i i Elevation 0 10 Basement Rodeo Phase t• Exhibit Small House, Lot 4 COBURN P J!, I• 1 Ili . , i, I4 E'• r i Elevation Basement Rodeo Phase 0• Exhibit F2: Medium House, Lot 23 COBURN crevtlnv p,e. toI es Elevation b`- b DI i I I Basement Main --- 0 Rodeo Phase 11 03. 16. 09 Y it Gl : Model Overall n I w ssl ggJJ 1yw i1.1 ' . ...._. LYE;, a. ' W MR';"•' rr.. q- Diu s 4.., y. . Iii iil Exhibit G3 : Model Southwest View i jr ' nu Inap_ p 11111 1 111 Vi L: 1 III Ni 1 I, II 1 1, s I I Ih IIIII 11111111 r Exhibit G4: Model View From Crossings der, ai, fl Exhibit H am/2009 Rodeo Place - Phase 2 Exemption Plat - 20 Units Preliminary - Project Budget Cost to Cost to CONSULTANTS Units Estimated Budget Date Complete 1 Planning&Entitlement- CDI 33,740 0 33,740 2 Architectural Building Design-CDI 238,752 0 238,752 3 Structural Engineer-Maggert 52,165 0 52,165 4 Soil/Geotechnical Engineer-HP Geotech 23,230 0 23,230 5 Civil Engineer-SGM 45,425 0 45,425 6 Snow Shed Consultant 12,075 0 12,075 7 Specifications Consultant- TBD 5,000 0 5,000 8 Legal-HOA Documents- TBD 25,000 0 25,000 9 Pre-construction Services-Rudd 26,000 0 26,000 litotals l! 10 L46;1!387, DEVELOPMENT CHARGES 10 Building Permits 0 0 0 11 Water and Sewer Tap Fees 225,874 0 225,874 12 Water and Sewer Relocates 54,308 0 54,308 13 Electric Relocates-Holy Cross Energy 21,000 0 21,000 14 Telephone Relocates- Owest 3,000 0 3,000 15 Gas Relocates-Source Gas 7,100 0 7,100 16 Cable Relocates-Comcast 5,500 0 5,500 17 0 0 0 S'ubtot'als I0 3;16!7,82 SITE AND CONSTRUCTION 18 Sump Pumps(Lots 22&23)0 9,850 19 Unsuitable Soils(Lots 4,22,&23) 0 0 0 20 Fill Import/Export 0 88,000 21 Road Repair(Included in Water&Sewer) 0 0 0 22 Re-vegetation 0 7.600 23 Home Construction 7,096,198 0 7,096,198 24 Lot 1 -Storm Drain 25 Lot 1 -Retains a Wall&Foam Blocks 0 198,296 Subtotals I!7/,4;19!944 t0 17,4399!944 OTHER 26 Builder's Risk Insurance 7,500 0 7,500 27 Warranty 20 30,000 0 30,000 28 0 0 0 S'utitotals 10$t371500 Subtotals 8,235,613 0 8,215,613 29 Owner's Representative 3.00% 0 247,068 CONTINGENCY 30 Contingency-Consultants&Dev.Charges 7.5% 76,893 0 76,693 31 Contingency-Site&Construction 7.5% 556,496 0 556,496 32 0 0 0 Subtotals 880,457 0 880,457 IEaXEMIP T P:L A T 201Units p a s 6.01710 3 0 3 9.-0.96.Oti0 CURRENT PLAT- 13 Units 7,358,686 Delta 1,757,383 Consultants, Development Charges , selected Site and Construction charges, 69,324 Per Unit Other charges and Owner's Representative Delta 569,877 81,411 /Additional Unit File:Exhibit C and H-Preliminary Project Budgets 3-16-09.xis Resort Opportunities&investments,LLC Rodeo Place - Phase 2 3/ 27/ 2009 Exempt - Hard Cost - Bldg & SF Upper Level 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1, 563 1, 563 1, 313 0 1, 486 Lower Level 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 989 989 0 0 0 Finished 2, 250 2, 250 900 2, 100 2, 100 2, 100 2, 100 2, 552 2, 552 . 1, 313 1, 080 1, 486 22, 783 Unfinished Basement 0 0 200 900 900 900 900 0 0 1, 226 1, 080 1, 078 Gross Livible 2, 250 2, 250 1, 100 3, 000 3, 000 3, 000 3, 000 2, 552 2, 552 2, 539 2, 160 2, 564 29, 967 Garage 622 622 540 294 294 294 294 574 574 312 560 483 Gross Total 2, 872 2, 872 1, 640 3, 294 3, 294 3, 294 3, 294 3, 126 3, 126 2, 851 2, 720 3, 047 35, 430 Hard Cost( Ruee1 623, 191 $ 623, 191 $ 279, 626 $ 685, 101 $ 685, 101 $ 685, 101 $ 685, 101 $ 675, 682 $ 675, 682 $ 459, 571 $ 506, 325 $ 512, 526 $ 7, 096, 198 Hard Cost/ Unit, 311, 596 $ 311, 596 $ 279, 626 $ 342, 551 $ 342, 551 $ 342, 551 $ 342, 551 $ 337, 841 $ 337, 841 $ 459, 571 $ 506, 325 $ 512, 526 SF Gross Livible 276. 97 276. 97 $ 254. 21 $ 228. 37 $ 228. 37 $ 228. 37 $ 228. 37 $ 264. 77 $ 264. 77 $ 181. 00 $ 234. 41 $ 199. 89 $ 236. 80 Avg. Price( av9., msvbsidy) 311, 595. 50 $ 311, 595. 50 $ 260, 480 $ 355, 201 $ 355, 201 $ 355, 201 $ 355, 201 $ 302, 157 $ 302, 157 $ 601, 236 $ 511, 489 $ 607, 156 $ 4, 628, 670 Resort Opportunities& Investments, LLC EKHIBR I RODEO PUCE PHASE 2 PRELIMINARY CE9F10PMENT SCNEDBJiE( BID) Mann IB 2009 F Maas M Jum t tmnW Ouapar Nwn ID o 1. Rama Duntlon SIdn Finnan PreddIns. 1228 1/11 1/25 Le 2112 3R 3?2 n9 x19 SO Yt7 331 Vla SN 7112 ] 26 69 823 99 I8' 20 ld4 1410 1111 1 Prusr4 Ptean 2 Opiwn b Canal O Ean Monty Mon 12YI9 2 . Q Dn' Mop Rnvinetl RaVGnaepa 31 deri MOn212/ 09 mon31aD9 1 3 Spry cost PmvoMI la COUMI 14 days Mon22/ W Thu Villm 1 6 -- Reliln POlorme ---- --— 10tlays Mon V2l08 TM1U 2/ 18109 1 ---- 5 .© SlpnilRmsetl SCaemnb Ca+ td ..-_ _ - Oderi Mon3' 16'08^ Mon11& T9 23, 6 . _ 6 6 ReaporbbC Cann. 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Q SNSmral Erl8waa0 Tlft, T)u U999 Fn724g9rZ3 27 ES - 6eebM9dr D9aumanu 7l days Tlu 4/ 899 Fd7INB9y 28 aR Omar Final AppmM t Oda, Tbu425N9 Tnu4? dA9+ 23 129 n Q Osr: er Final Appoval2 Oda, M.& 1/O9 Mon 611109+ 1 30 . Q v Oerer F'na' App ad Oda, Wad711/ 99` Wed]/ 1I08f 1 31 Blftlw said tenbeat 1 85 dsya Fd 4M09 Tku) 13G09 32 EQ Slamnbacmr BOdnp 85", Frt4 T1M7/ 3099' 33 Q Ma0ntlMe Corat 27 days Fn u3109' maq" 9'. 34 E3 Easiest Perms Subni0al( al ball) 9 fK Mon Yu09 Mon YU0912a 4 35 . Q— Fis ill UtlaK Ftl611& 09 Fd M12I08 --- 12 36 E3 Permit3 Oda, Tue V14W- TUe 7114M! W 114 37 Coieb: laorr l lFOlvtlabnPamli Stab) 1100x, Tue Y12N9 Mm 16112109' 31 3$ e© Concvuc4m 2 1FOUrmabn Permit Stall_---- — Mft Fnd1& 09 T IVIO9t3SFS. 5daye — 39 --- ComVUClion 3lFOUrtlation Permit SYr1) J -- 12p days Tue) 21 Mon 1IM1 F360 6. 5de, 40 Oerer D011reryl OdaN Mdrld26109 Mon 10/YB/ 09 3] FS. 10 daN 10.26 41 O rDelinry2 9dari TIm12117M' ] nu1NO109" MFSA0daN 121T 42 Ow+ er0. liv 2 0daK Mont/ 10110 Mont/ 10/10 MFSgOdaN 1/la pftp tlP w2 Esanpbn Pot Fast Teak Pm Summary ^ Ewarul Tasks Deac in Gale: MOn3flNe pit Mpaslom . Prajact Summary ^ EnarW MJeatMe . Pape I Exhibit J Snowmass Village Housing Inventory - March 2009 RENTAL UNITS Brush Creek 1 260 Brush Creek 10 300 Brush Creek 12 375 Brush Creek 3 490 Creekside 15 746 Creekside 30 917 Mountain View 40 892 Mountain View 18 505 Mountain View 8 757 Mountain View 21 1, 008 Mountain View 5 1, 358 Mt. View Phase II 18 448 Mt. View Phase II 4 878 Mt. View Phase II 4 936 Palisades 16 352 Palisades 10 781 Villas North 10 1 400 Villas North 8 892 Villas North 8 816 Villas North 6 1, 080 247 95 1 12 1 48 51 0 36 0 1 5 1 0 0 0 0 0 Total Bedrooms 344 DEED- RESTRICTED Base Village 3 474- 619 Base Village 1 739 Base Village 1 1, 154 Club Villas 1 1, 100 Creekside - 9 746 Creekside 18 917 Country Club 5 1, 208 Country Club 6 1, 530 Crossings 1, 500- 3, 000 Daly Townhome 10 1, 550 Daly Townhomes 6 1, 250 Mountain View 8 25 Mountain View 5 1, 008 Mountain View 19 1, 008 Mountain View i 5 1, 358 Rodeo Place- 1 4 1 5 1 2, 1442, 564 1471 3 1 0 1 18 1 5 1 20 1 34 1 5 10 1 6 5 0 6 50 3941 98 12 66 56 20 1 70 5 15 6 5 0 6 50 Rodeo Place- 2 C 1 3 2 4 3 13 Rodeo Place- 2 E 1 9 1 1 1 1 2 1 7 1 20 Resort Opportunities& Investments, LLC Exhibit K-1 SNOWMASS VILLAGE Town of Snowmass Village Entryway Housing Survey Results 5/16/2005 56 Surveys The information collected from this survey will be used to determine the potential market for additional single family homes proposed for the Entryway land parcel. This will be a Town of Snowmass Village deed restricted employee housing complex. All the homes will be subject to the rules and regulations of Chapter 17 of the Town of Snowmass Village Municipal Code. All information received will be held in strictest confidence. The results will be compiled and used in a Housing Demand/Market Report for the Town Council ONLY. Single 23 Number of dependents 4 Singles have 9 children ages:16,13,11,15,14.10,5,2X10mo. Married 24 Number of dependents : 12 married - 0 dependents 12 married -27 dependents ages: 18,15,2X14,11,9,3X8,6,2X5,2X4,3,3X31/2, 2X21/2,3X11/2,6mo,2 mo.,1mo., baby on the way Current type of residence: 10 Single Family Home 12 Condominium 24 Apartment 0 Duplex/Triplex 10 Townhome Monthly mortgage payment or rent amount $ Are you currently living in employee housing? Yes 43 No 13 Do you own your home? 24 Rent? 32 If you own your place of residence, what is the current value? $ Current number of bedrooms Number of bathrooms 4 -Studio 5-- 1 bdrm/1 bath 6- 2 bdrm/1 bath 4 - 2 bdrm/1.5bath 20 - 2bdrm/2 bath 2 - 3 bdrm/ 1.5 bath 3 - 3bdrm/2 bath 2 - 3 bdrm/3bath 2 - 3 bdrm/3.5 bath 1 - 4bdrm/3bath 6 - blank How long at this address? Place of employment Occupation Length of employment Are you a full time year round Snowmass Village employee? Full time is considered 8 months per year or 1400 hours per year.) 50 or Exhibit K-1 Are you a full time year round Pitkin County employee? Employed outside of Snowmass Village. (Full time is considered 8 months per year or 1400 hours per year.) 6 over- What is your approximate combined annual income? 6 Less then $ 50,000.00 27 $ 50,000.00 to $ 75,000.00 1 125,000.00 to $150,000.00 18 $ 75,000.00 to $100,000.00 1 150,000.00 to $170,000.00 3 $100,000.00 to $125,000.00 What size of home will best suit your housing needs? 10 1200 - 1300 sq. ft.9 1700 - 1800 sq. ft. 13 1300 - 1400 sq. ft.9 1900 - 2000 sq. ft. 11 1500 - 1600 sq. ft. 4 2000+ sq. ft. Number of bedrooms? Number of bathrooms? 3 - 2bdrm & Loft or den/2bath 1 - 4bdrm/2bath 3 - 1 bdrm/1 bath 21 - 3 bdrm/2 bath 5 - 4 bdrm/3bath 11 - 2 bdrm/2bath 10 - 3 bdrm/3bath 1 - 4 bdrm/4bath 1 - 3bdrm/3.5bath Please select the type of home you are most interested in purchasing. 45 single family 5 duplex 6 townhome What price range do you anticipate spending on the purchase of your home? Please note you must be able to qualify for a mortgage loan for the purchase price of the home you select below. 14 $175,000.00 - $199,000.00 3 $326,000.00 - $350,000.00 9 $200,000.00 - $224,000.00 1 $351,000.00 - $375,000.00 8 $225,000.00 - $250,000.00 3 $376,000.00 - $400,000.00 8 $251,000.00 - $275,000.00 1 $401,000.00 - $425,000.00 5 $276,000.00 - $300,000.00 2 $426,000.00 - $500,000.00 2 $301,000.00 - $325,000.00 If you had a choice would you purchase a larger sized multi family unit such as a townhome/duplex or, a single family home that might be 200 s.f. smaller for the same price? 45 Single Family Home 11 Townhome/Duplex When would you like to purchase you new home? 22006 462007 4 2008 4 2009 The housing regulations require that you must continue to work until you are eligible to receive social security benefits and you must continue to work for five years after the purchase of a deed restricted unit. Will you be able to comply with this regulation? Yes or No If you currently live outside Snowmass Village, why would you like to relocate to Snowmass Village? Exhibit K-1 Additional Comments: Exhibit K-2 SNOWMASS - Town of Snowmass Village Rodeo Place Phase If Housing Survey March 2009 3/13/2009 31 Surveys The information collected from this survey will be used to determine the potential market for additional single family, duplex or triplex units for Rodeo Place Phase II. This will be a Town of Snowmass Village deed restricted employee housing complex. All the homes/units will be subject to the rules and regulations of Chapter 17 of the Town of Snowmass Village Municipal Code. All information received will be held in strictest confidence. The results will be compiled and used in a.Housing Demand/Market Report for the Town Council ONLY. Single 15 Married 16 Number of dependents: 3 Singles have 3 dependents 14 Married have 19 dependents Address of current residence: Current type of residence: 2 Single Family Home 5 Condominium 17 Apartment 2 Duplex/Triplex 5 Townhome Are you currently living in employee housing? Yes 23 No 8 Do you own your home? 11 Rent? 20 If you own your place of residence, what is the current value? S Current number of bedrooms Number of bathrooms 10) 1 Bdrm 1 Bath 2) 3 Bdrm 2 Bath 3) 2 Bdrm 1 Bath 1) 3 Bdrm 2.5 Bath 10) 2 Bdrm 2 Bath 11) 3 Bdrm 3 Bath 1) 2 Bdrm 1.75 Bath 3) 4 Bdrm 3 Bath Are you a full time year round Snowmass Village employee? Full time is considered 8 months per year or 1400 hours per year.) 29 or Are you a full time year round Pitkin County employee? Employed outside of Snowmass Village. (Full time is considered 8 months per year or 1400 hours per year.) 2 What is your approximate combined annual income? 2 Less then $50,000.00 17 $ 50,000.00 to $ 75,000.00 4 $125,000.00 to $150,000.00 3 $ 75,000.00 to $100,000.00 150,000.00 to $200,000.00 4 $100,000.00 to $125,000.00 1 Variable What size of home will best suit your housing needs? 1— 260 - 450 sq. ft. 8— 1000 - 1250 sq. ft. Exhibit K-2 450 - 750 sq. ft.13 1250 - 2250 sq. ft. 2_ 750 - 1000 sq. ft. 3_ 2250+ sq. ft. 4_ No Answer Number of bedrooms? Number of bathrooms? 1) 1 Bdrm 1 Bath 2) 3 Bdrm 2.5 Bath 10) 2 Bdrm 2 Bath 5) 3 Bdrm 3 Bath 10) 3 Bdrm 2 Bath 3) 4 Bdrm 3 Bath Please select the type of home you are most interested in purchasing. 17_ Single Family_8_Duplex _5 Townhome _1 Condominium What price range do you anticipate spending on the purchase of your home? Please note you must be able to qualify for a mortgage loan for the purchase price of the home you select below. 3_$175,000.00 - $199,000.00 326,000.00 - $350,000.00 4_$200,000.00 - $224,000.00 351,000.00 - $375,000.00 4_$225,000.00 - $250,000.00 4_$376,000.00 - $400,000.00 7_$251,000.00 - $275,000.00 3_$401,000.00 - $425,000.00 1_$276,000.00 - $300,000.00 2_$426,000.00 - $500,000.00 2_$301,000.00 - $325,000.00 1_ Unable to afford these prices If you had a choice would you purchase a larger sized multi family unit such as a townhome/duplex or, a single family home that might be 200 s.f. smaller for the same price? 15_Single Family Home 15 Townhome/Duplex T 1 Unsure When would you like to purchase you new home? 20_ 2009 _5_ 2010 _5_ 2011 1_ Not interested to buy The housing regulations require that you must continue to work until you are eligible to receive social security benefits and you must continue to work for five years after the purchase of a deed restricted unit. Will you be able to comply with this regulation? Yes _ or No If you currently live outside Snowmass Village, why would you like to relocate to Snowmass Village? Additional Comments: Your name will be entered into a drawing for a chance at a $50.00 cash prize, to say thank you for your time and valued input on completing this important survey. If you wish to be anonymous please drop off the completed survey by Thursday March 12. 2009 at the Housing Department, located at 555 Deerfield Drive, Snowmass Village, CO. Exhibit K-2 Rodeo Place Phase II Survey Comments 1.Rodeo Place second phase should be duplex or Townhomes. 2.Loans are tougher to get. Even with good credit. —20% down—would-be tough. No matter want to stay in Snowmass Village— Important to me. 3.Snowmass is a great place to live, and I am sure I will always live here...probably will not be able to afford a SF home right now, but possibly 5 years from now. 4.Thanks for the opportunity to give this feedback! 5.Unaffordable for us. 6.I think it is unfair not to offer employee housing to Snowmass village employees working for town less than one year. 7.Make Rodeo second Phase Townhome/Duplex. 8.Phase II Townhome/Duplex 9.Phase 11 Duplex/Townhome 10. Make Rodeo Place second phase should be Townhome & duplexs 11. Phase II , Townhomes/Duplex 12. 1 feel that there are lots of condo's & twnhomes already and I would like to see more single family homes built. 13. We were very disappointed to hear that more duplexes were going to be built. There is a huge demand for single family homes. The Daly Townhomes can't sell!! Why build more of what people don't want. The free market seems to be closing in on the prices of the employee homes... the costs should come down. Phase I was VERY EXPENSIVE! 14. We are in a bind at this point of not being able to bid on anything because of the fact that there would he no way that we could sell our current home. We would have loved to have the opportunity to bid on the Daly unit that came up, but it would be a pipe dream to carry two mortgages and expect to sell our current home in the next 12 months. With phase two, we'd love the opportunity to bid on the lot and build the house with our own financing so we had some flexibility on the timing of selling our current place. Also, our concern is that if the economy improves and there are changes to residency requirements, we'll have even less of a chance bidding on homes. We're really itching to get into a home that is more than a 1000 sq ft., but it is a challenge right now! Thanks for everything you do for housing in our Town! 15. The Rodeo Place Housing was originally set up for Single Family Homes and that's the way it should remain, we think it is unfair of the Town Council to consider changing to multi-family midstream. There is a lot of interested folks—who entered the lottery for SF Homes in the original round and did not get a unit. It is unfair and wrong to change horse's in mid stream on this project. Please keep the SF homes in this Project. 16. We really love Snowmass, but price and assessments are very high. 17. "Affordable Housing" costs and maximum income/networth ratios do't work, don't match reality. Also costs are outrageously high. $600,000.00 for Rodeo Homes.... Get serious not to mention assessments. 18. Build more AFFORDABLE housing for the people who live and work here. Exhibit L Resort Opportunities & Investments, LLC MEMORANDUM TOSV Council Hearing March 16, 2009 Re; Rodeo Place General Contractor Procurement Process TOSV Council Members, Please accept this memo as Resort Opportunities and Investments, LLC (ROI) recommendations for the General Contractor(GC) procurement process for phase 2 of Rodeo Place. ROI understands very clearly the nature of public work and the requirements and opportunities which need to be provided to the bidding public in" projects of this nature. Therefore this memo is intended to outline your options as a public entity and to provide the pro's and con's associated with either a negotiated process or public bid process. Either process would lead to a Guaranteed Maximum Price contract agreement. Some of the variables that Council needs to keep in mind when reviewing this memo are time and cost factors. The sooner ROI and its team are allowed to secure a GC and their subcontractors, the better position we are in to take advantage of the current financial and economic situation and receive the best pricing possible. It is also important to note that being able to proceed quickly on phase 2 allows us again to take advantage of the current economic situation, but it also prevents a rather lengthy bid process which will add a minimum of 2 - 3 months to any schedules presented in this packet due to the time required to generate a full package of bid documents and Requests for Proposals, a minimum of one month for GC's to respond to the RFP, subsequent review and interviews of respondents and eventual selection and contracting of the selected GC. This is in comparison to a negotiated contract based on accurate and worse case budget numbers provided by a knowledgeable GC. It is also important to note that two modular contractors that we have engaged in the pricing exercises over the last month, and that have been involved in phase 1 are willing to take parts of phase 2 (some of the homes, if not all of them) and hold their individual costs per building regardless of how many homes they are contracted for. ROI feels this could be advantageous as we could have two factories working simultaneously on homes to try and make up some of the time lost due to the bidding process. For the sake of clarity and ease in which to review this memo, ROI is presenting both scenarios (bid vs. negotiated) in a pro/con format and look forward to.your comments as it pertains to both. Again ROI understands the nature of public work and will proceed with the direction we are given. Bid Process Pros Satisfy the requirement of public entities to provide fair opportunity for public work (technically this process has been satisfied twice, first in the initial offering and again when current GC was selected). Generates competition between GC's which in many instances provides value to owners via reduced fees and general conditions in order to be awarded the project. In some instances will generate bids from greater pool of subcontractors as relationships of multiple GC's will be greater than a single GC. Allows a greater opportunity for ideas and alternate processes due to varied experiences with projects. Only qualified GC's with this type of project experience will be solicited. May tap into GC's with a significant need for work which could equate into very reasonable bid. Cons Time to bring the documents, for all the units, to a level in which they can be bid on will add at the very least 2.5 months to the proposed project schedule. This will lead to additional winter conditions costs for the project. Inability to proceed immediately will increase project duration costs such as consultant fees and GC general conditions. Securing or proceeding with a GC that is in dire need of work may generate issues that are unforeseeable in the selection process and lead to a phase 1 scenario. Unfamiliarity with site and site conditions will lead to larger number of change orders due to the simple fact that not every bit of knowledge from a previous phase can be documented so it is captured in the bid process. Unfamiliarity with modular product and preferred vendors can lead to larger number of change orders and time delays. Lose all relationship value from previous phase which could lead to risk of added costs and time delays. Costs associated with demobilization and remobilization of existing and new GC's will be borne by Town. Risk associated with a new project team that may or may not provide the level of success that has been provided and proven in the second half of phase 1. Will not be able to take advantage of proposed time slots for modular fabrication from April to August unless Town is willing to enter into scenario like phase 1 where Town purchased modules. ROI does not recommend this approach! Lose single source of contact for bulk of project warranty issues by changing GC's at this point (this could be argued that this is already the case, but worth mentioning as it could become more cumbersome to mange down the road). Negotiated Process Pros No loss of time on proposed schedule(s). Ability to start negotiations immediately with modular builders and secure fabrication slots (this is critical to minimize project duration and general conditions costs). Retain proven project team Retain project knowledge and familiarity with site and product providing accurate costing from the start minimizing change orders. Team and current GC have proven track record for success, risk is minimal moving forward. Current project costing is able to be maintained if not bettered. Examples of this are eliminating middle man for purchase of modules as current GC will purchase direct (also allows current GC to implement their required warranty language and procedures). Current GC will also reduce its labor and equipment rates 5% in order to maintain relationship on this project. Current GC has excellent relationships with Town entities. Minimize demobilization and remobilization costs. Provide"open book"process in which all costs are open and available for Town to see(this can be secured in either process via a GMP contract format). Maintain warranty presence for phase 1 owner's onsite which will provide better response time. Minimize warranty contacts down the road for TOSV Affordable Hosing Staff. Can eliminate need for new contract negotiations as phase 2 can be change ordered into current contract. Current GC will also waive fees for phase 2 pre construction pricing exercise. Cons May not provide Town with process required for bidding public work. However it is very important to note that in bidding to GC's, they are brokers of subcontractors and in many instances do not self perform work. Therefore this aspect can be eliminated via request or requirement of a minimum of 3 —6 subcontractor bids for any given aspect or phase of the work. May generate some reservations among other GC's when it comes time to bid future work for Town, although ROI does not see this as being the case. Perception of comfort level with current GC and ability for them to provide the very best costing available to the Town. In closing, it is the recommendation of ROI to pursue a negotiated contract process for phase 2 of Rodeo Place in order to take advantage of the time challenges as well as fiscal advantages associated with the negotiated process. ROI and Coburn Development look forward to discussing this issue with you further on March 16'h and appreciate the opportunity to present this information to you. Exhibit M Rodeo Homes - Phase II In 2010, the Excise Tax Fund adds Note: Ending Fund Balance after Phase I w/ o Phase II ( 12/ 31/ 09) ______ 5, 507, 000 approx. $ 343, 000 in revenue) N901fif- D— acta Fund Balance on @ end of Homes Fund Net Cost Project Type- 13 units Soft Costs Hard Cost Total Cost Sales Balance Per Unit eroiect- 2010 Cash Flow Status 100% sold — 0% hard cost subsidy $ 1, 151, 043 $ 6, 030, 393 $ 7, 181, 436 $ 6, 030, 393 $ 1, 151, 043 ($ 1, 151, 043) ($ 88, 542) $ 4, 699, 911 Remains stable throughout project 100% sold — 25% hard cost subsidy $ 1, 151, 043 $ 6, 030, 393 $ 7, 181, 436 $ 4, 522, 795 $ 2, 658, 641 ($ 2, 658, 641) ($ 204, 511) $ 3, 192, 313 Remains stable throughout project 100% sold — 15% hard cost subsidy $ 1, 151, 043 $ 6, 030, 393 $ 7, 181, 436 $ 5, 125, 834 $ 2, 055, 602 ($ 2, 055, 602) ($ 158, 123) $ 3, 795, 352 Remains stable throughout project Project Type- 20 units There are several very low cash flow months' 100% sold — 0% hard cost subsidy $ 1, 798, 427 $ 7, 096, 198 $ 8, 894, 625 $ 7, 096, 198 $ 1, 798, 427 ($ 1, 798, 427) ($ 138, 341) $ 4, 051, 528 ( drops to between$ 1 OOK to$ 500K) There are several very low cash flow months 100% sold — 25% hard cost subsidy $ 1, 798, 427 $ 7, 096, 198 $ 8, 894, 625 $ 5, 322, 149 $ 3, 572, 477 ($ 3, 572, 477) ($ 274, 806) $ 2, 277, 479 ( drops to between$ 70K to$ 125K) There are several very low cash flow months 100% sold — 15% hard cost subsidy $ 1, 798, 427 $ 7, 096, 198 $ 8, 894, 625 $ 6, 031, 768 $ 2, 862, 857 ($ 2, 862, 857) ($ 220, 220) $ 2, 987, 098 ( drops to between$ 123K to$ 270K) Exhibit A As you know, we are in a unique position as owners of Country Club Townhome deed- restricted employee units. As mitigation for the Snowmass Club development these units were deeded to the Town Housing Authority at no cost. From the beginning The CCTH project was a well intentioned but flawed concept in mixed employee and free market housing. Because the employee units were "embedded" within the free market units and not built as stand alone clusters, these units were always at the mercy of The Country Club Townhome Association as far as assessments, rules, improvements and repairs. The 9 individually owned units that are now left have essentially no voice in any decisions made concerning how assessments will be levied against those units. All 11 deed-restricted homeowners unanimously voted against the current CCTH renovation project, but we are only 11 of 94 HOA member votes. We certainly appreciate the Town stepping up to assume 75% of the current special renovation assessment for this project and the support of the Town Council. However in the nearly year and a half since this plan was approved circumstances have changed and we feel that it would be in the best interest of both the Town and the CCTH deed-restricted homeowners to revisit this issue. In this current economic climate we feel that it falls short and puts undue financial hardship on the individual PMH homeowners to fund the remaining 25%. In the likely event that one or all of the PMH units were to be sold at free market value, the Town, as the ultimate owner of these units, would recoup a disproportionately greater return than the homeowner. The Town would realize the full free market value for the renovation improvements as opposed to the restricted increase that the PMH homeowner is subject to. At best, we the individual homeowners would merely be trading dollars. The addition of the 25% homeowner out of pocket expense to the unit's resale value, coupled with the current assessment schedule, would result in pricing these units out of the relative range of affordability to future potential Snowmass Village employee homeowners. Recently similar TOSV housing units priced significantly lower have gone unsold to a Snowmass Village employee. We see two potential options: Option 1: If the intent is to retain these units as viable "affordable employee" units then the Town should cover 100% of the cost of the renovation expense. We are currently within this figure with what has been budgeted by the Town if the renovation project comes in on budget. This would potentially keep the selling price within reach for the next deed-restricted owner. Once the resale value of these units has been increased how could it be adjusted back to an affordable range? In conjunction with maintaining a relatively affordable unit cost the issue of assessments needs to be addressed and/or regulated. The cost of assessments is an issue that we only expect to escalate in the future. Option 2: We believe the best solution would be for the Town to cover 100% of the cost of the renovation. Then, as the units become available, purchase them and in turn sell them as free market units. We hate to see the town lose valuable employee housing. The feeling however, among all of the PMH homeowners, is that this is a situation that will continue to require one band aid fix after another. The potential financial benefit to the town would certainly help fund many housing issues/projects. We see this as a win-win situation for both the CCTH deed-restricted owners and the Town Of Snowmass Village. Exhibit B 100% Funding Of CCTH Townhome Renovation By TOSV Renovation Window Unit Expense Expense* 4 $ 78, 890. 00 $ 13, 990. 00 26 $ 78, 890. 00 $ 13 990. 00 28 $ 78, 890. 00 $ 13, 990. 00 29 $ 78, 890. 00 $ 13, 990. 00 62 $ 78, 890. 00 $ 13, 990. 00 Sub Total $ 394, 450. 00 $ 69, 950. 00 5 $ 98, 464. 00 S 17 562. 00 16 S 96, 977. 00 5 17 562. 00 19 $ 96, 977. 00 $ 17 562. 00 59 $ 96, 977. 00 1 17 562. 00 Sub Total $ 389, 395. 00 $ 70, 248. 00 Total Total Over/ Under Renovation Window Total TOSV Original Expense Expense* Expense Budget Grand Total $ 783, 845. 00 $ 140, 198. 00 $ 924, 043. 00 $ 13, 457. 00 SX E 823, 037. 25 $ 140, 198. 00 $ 963, 23 $ 25, 735. 25 10% 1 $ 862, 229. 50 1 $ 140, 198. 00 1 $ 1, 002, 427. 50 $ 64, 927. 50 15% 1 $ 901, 421. 751 $ 140, 198. 00 1 $ 1 041, 619. 75 1 $ 104, 119. 75 Original Budget $ 937, 500. 00 Window cost will vary slightly depending on individual unit and owner options. Country Club Townhome Deed Restricted Unit Pricing Homeowner Square Budgeted Window Unit Price Sq. 10% Over 15% Over 20% Over 20% Unit Unit# Unit Type Footage Current Value. Assmnt. Cost" End Unit Value Ft. Budget Budget Budget Price S . Ft. 4 1 2 BDR 1 1326 1 $ 264, 704. 001 $ 19, 722. 50 $ 2, 875. 00 $ 287, 301. 50 216. 67 $ 289273. 75 $ 290, 259. 88 $ 291, 246. 00 $ 219. 64 26 2 BDR 1326 257, 344. 00 $ 19, 722. 50 $ 2, 875. 00 $ 279, 941. 50 211. 12 $ 281, 913. 7 $ 282, 899. 881$ 283, 886. 00 $ 214. 09 28 2BDR 1326 272, 016. 00 $ 19, 722. 50 $ 2875. 00 $ 294613. 50 222. 181 $ 298585. 75 $ 297, 571. 881$ 298, 558. 00 $ 225. 16 29 2 BDR 1326 1 $ 251, 740. 00 $ 19, 722. 50 $ 2, 875. 00 $ 274, 337. 50 206. 891 $ 276, 309. 751 $ 277, 295. 881$ 278, 282. 00 $ 209. 87 62 2 BDR 1 1328 1 $ 294, 576. 00 $ 19, 722. 50 S2, 875. 00 $ 317, 173. 50 239. 20 $ 3` 19. 145. 751 $ 320, 131. 881$ 321, 118. 00 $ 242. 17 5 2 BDR 1855 313, 703. 00 524, 616. 00 E4 OOD. 00 $ 342, 319. 00 206. 84 $ 344, 780. 60 $ 346, 011. 401$ 347, 242. 20 $ 209. 81 18 3 BDR 1830 353, 940. 00 524, 244. 25 $ 4, 000. 00 $ 382. 184. 25 234. 471 $ 384, 608. 681 $ 385, 820. 891$ 387, 033, 101 $ 237. 44 19 1 3BDR 1630 1 $ 339, 242. 001 $ 24, 244. 251 $ 4, 000. 001 $ 367, 486. 251 225. 451 $ 369, 910. 681 $ 371, 122. 891$ 372, 335, 1011 $ 228. 43 59 1 3BDR 1 1630 1 $ 362, 050- 001 S24, 244. 251 $ 4, 481. 501 $ 390, 775. 751 239. 741 $ 393, 200, 181 $ 394, 412. 391$ 395, 624MI $ 242. 71 Total 7/ 2009 Assessment $ 195, 961. 25 Avg. From Contractor Bids Some Values Are Estimates f MEMORANDUM TO: Mayor and Town Council FROM: Bob Nevins, Planner APPLICANT: Country Club Townhomes Corporation REPRESENTATIVES: Leslie Lamont, Lamont Planning Services, LLC Jeff Dahl, Green Line Architects David Myler, The Myler Law Firm SUBJECT:Country Club Townhomes Minor PUD Amendment & Rezoning DATE: 6 April 2009 I.PURPOSE Town Council to consider first reading of an Ordinance concerning the Country Club Townhomes Minor PUD Amendment and Rezoning application. Town Council shall conduct a public hearing and following closure of the public hearing, Council shall by Ordinance, approve, approve with conditions or deny the application. II. SUMMARY OF PROJECT DESCRIPTION The proposal seeks to provide a comprehensive, unified and orderly plan that will provide opportunities for future floor area expansion within the existing cave lines of the townhomes; enable loft areas to be converted into usable space in accordance with fire district, building and municipal code regulations; address the amount of allowable area for first floor, uncovered decks; formalize the supply of on-site parking; and update the project development summary table/PUD Guide. The application also requests rezoning of the parcel from Planned Unit Development (PUD), which is no longer considered to be a zone district, to Multi- family Residential (MF). This application does not affect the Buildout Chart as no additional new units are being proposed; the amount and percentage of open space remains unchanged. III. BACKGROUND A. Project Summary: The entire site contains approximately 27.4 acres and is zoned Planned Unit Development (PUD). Country Club Townhomes currently includes 90 townhomes with a mix of 2, 3, 4 and 5-bedroom units contained within 18 buildings. There are 79 free-market townhomes and 11 deed-restricted units with a total 253 bedrooms and 328 on-site parking spaces. A maintenance building containing 1,487 square feet is located between Phases 3-4, north of Snowmass Club Circle. The Snowmass Club Subdivision was originally approved pursuant to Town Council (TC) Ordinance No. 8, Series of 1980. Country Club Townhomes are located within Parcel One of the Snowmass Club Subdivision/PUD. The townhome project was developed in four (4) phases with the final phase being completed in 1989. The parcel was granted approval for a maximum of 100 dwelling units, 70 unrestricted units and 30 restricted units, a parking ratio of I space/bedroom, 32-foot height limit and 13.22 acres (49%) of open space. The PUD was amended by TC Ordinance No. 31, Series of 1983. In Section Two f) of the Ordinance, the permitted uses for Parcel One, Country Club Townhomes, was revised to read, "a maximum of 94 residential units, 80 unrestricted, 14 restricted and an associated maintenance facility not to exceed 800 square feet." In Section One (c), it was noted parenthetically that six (6) restricted units had been sold on the free-market pursuant to Town approval. Section Five (a) amended the Parcel One plan by the addition of a new section that read, "Maximum Floor Area-After Final Plan approval, no additional structures shall be added or constructed other than those approved by the final plat approval, except for on-grade uncovered decks which do not exceed ten percent 10%) of the square footage of the unit to which such deck is appurtenant." TC Ordinance No. 24, Series of 1989 approved a modification to the PUD that allowed a 432 square foot covered storage area addition to the previously approved 800 square foot building, amending the size of the maintenance facility to a maximum of 1,232 square feet. Since 1980, a number of modifications and expansions have occurred. There are now 90 townhome units as eight (8) individual units were combined into four (4) residences, two (2)4-bedroom units and two (2) 5-bedroom units. Other units were allowed to increase their floor area, utilize their loft area as an office or studio and/or expand their decks greater than ten percent (10%). In 2007, an Administrative Modification was approved allowing minor architectural exterior changes/up-grades to all of the residential units within Phases of the Country Club Townhomes. B. Recent Actions: At a regular meeting on March 16, 2009, Applicant's representatives gave a presentation to Town Council outlining the scope of the proposed project. To assist Council, Planning Commission's recommendations PC Resolution No. 09-6) were included in the packet. In discussion with the Applicant and Staff, Town Council raised the following questions: does the Floor Area Excise Tax (FAET) apply to multi-family units; are Community Purposes required; can impacts to the restricted units be minimized; why are there no bump-outs" proposed for the restricted units; how much larger can for first floor decks expand as proposed; and is conversion of crawl space prohibited? C. Public Notice Requirements: Minor Amendments to a Final PUD have a 15-day requirement for publishing, mailing and posting of the Notice; and Amendments to the Official Zone District Map have requirements of 30-days for mailing and 15-days for publishing and posting of the Notice. All of the public notice requirements have been met. IV. APPLICABLE REGULATIONS The proposal is being processed as Minor PUD Application in accordance with Table 5-3 Criteria for Classifying PUDs as Major or Minor and Section 16A-5- 390(1)b. Minor amendment of the Municipal Code. Applicable Sections of the Municipal Code that apply to this application include: 1) Section 16A-5-390(3) Review standards; 2) Section 16A-5-300(c) General Restrictions; 3) Section 16A-5-310 Review standards; and 4) Section 16A-5-220 Amendments to the Official Zone District Map. Town Council shall consider all relevant materials and testimony and shall consider the standards of Section 16A-5-390 (3) Review standards. An application for a Minor amendment to a Final PUD shall comply with the following standards: a. Consistent with the original PUD. The proposed amendment shall be consistent with, or an enhancement of, the original approval. b. No substantially adverse impact. The proposed amendment shall not have a substantially adverse effect on the neighborhood surrounding the land where the amendment is proposed, or have a substantially adverse impact on the enjoyment of land abutting upon or across the street from the subject property. c. Not change character. The proposed amendment shall not change the basic character of the PUD or surrounding areas. d. Comply with other applicable standards. The proposed amendment shall comply with the other applicable standards of this Division 3, Planned Unit Development, including but not limited to Section 16A-5-300(c) General Restrictions, and Section 16A-5-310, Review Standards. An application for an amendment to the Official Zone District Map shall comply with the following standards: 1) Consistent with Comprehensive Plan. The proposed amendment shall be consistent with the Town of Snowmass Village Compre- hensive Plan. 2) Consistent with purpose of zone district. The proposed amendment shall be consistent with the purpose of the zone district to which the property will be designated. 3) Compatibility with surrounding zone districts and uses. The development permitted by the proposed amendment shall be compati- ble with surrounding zone districts, land uses and neighborhood character and shall result in a logical and orderly development pattern within the overall community. 4) Necessary circumstances. The applicant shall demonstrate that the following circumstances exist: a. Error. There has been a technical error in the boundaries shown on the Official Zone District Map; or b. Changed conditions. There have been changed conditions affecting the subject parcel and the surrounding neighborhood that justify the proposed amendment; and c. Community need. The proposed amendment addresses and helps to resolve a community need that is documented in or is consistent with the intent of the Comprehensive Plan. Applicant's written responses to the Review Standards are contained within the land use application folder that was included in the March 16th Council packet: Section 16A-5-390(3) Review standards-see Pages 10-11; Section 16A-5-300(c) General Restrictions-see Pages 8-9; Section 16A-5-310 Review standards-see Pages 9-10; and Section 16A-5-220 Amendments to Official Zone District Map-see Pages 6-7. V. MAXIMUM BUILDOUT ANALYSIS According to the Snowmass Village Buildout Chart (existing as of 4-6-98), Country Club Townhomes included 94 units, 83 free-market units and 11 deed- restricted units with no future development allocations. The Chart did not acknowledge that certain units were combined so the project actually contained a total of 90 units, 79 free-market units and 11 deed-restricted units. Parcel One of the Snowmass Club Subdivision/PUD, Country Club Townhomes, is considered to be a "Fully developed parcel." Therefore, to evaluate the existing development and to establish the existing buildout unit amount and determine the future buildout units being proposed, the Unit Equivalency Chart (Municipal Code, Table 5-4 Unit Equivalency) was utilized. The Unit Equivalency analysis is summarized below: Existing Development: The current project includes 90 townhomes and contains 215,816.0 square feet of residential area, not including lofts, with a Unit Equivalency (UE) of 168.20 units, 159.85 free-market UEs and 8.35 restricted UEs. Garages have been excluded from the floor area and UE calculations to be consistent with other multi-family developments. Loft Areas: The conversion of loft areas to calculable/habitable space involves 57 units, totals 9,661.0 square feet and results in an additional UE of 14.9 units, 13.7 free-market UEs and 1.2 restricted UEs. Unit Expansions: The proposed expansion includes 69 units, totals 5;183.0 square feet and results in an additional UE of 9.55 units, 9.55 free-market UEs and 0 restricted UEs. Minor PUD Amendment Totals: If approved in its entirety, the Amendment results in the 90 townhomes having a UE of 192.65 units, a total increase of 24.45 UEs, 23.25 free-market UEs and 1.2 restricted UEs. The calculable floor area for the residential units including the lofts and expansion areas totals 230,660.0 square feet, an increase of 14,844.0 square feet or 6.9%, if and when, all of the unit owners actually construct the approved maximum allowable. Conclusion: Country Club Townhomes Subdivision/PUD was amended per TC Ordinance 31, Series of 1983 to contain 94 units, 83 free-market units and I I restricted units. The unit sizes included the habitable floor area and garages while excluding the loft areas. This resulted in the project having a UE of 204.8 units, 194.75 free-market UEs and 10.05 restricted UEs, with a total residential area of 245,973 square feet. The current proposal, enabling the loft areas to become calculable/usable space and allowing units to expand within certain limits, is consistent with the previously approved 1983 Amendment and results in the subdivision having 90 townhome units, 79 free-market and 11 restricted, with a potential total residential area of 230,660 square feet and UE of 192.65 units, 183.1 free-market UEs and 9.55 restricted UEs. Community Purposes do not need to be achieved as the Minor PUD Amendment does not result in a "Greater buildout" and there are no new residential units or structures. VI. PROPOSED AMENDMENTS AND ISSUES 1. Floor area expansion: The existing 90 townhomes contain a total floor area of 215,815 square feet, 199,494 square feet of free-market and 16,322 square feet of restricted area, excluding lofts and garages. In the past, owners have been able to increase their floor area by receiving Town approval of an Administrative Variance or issuance of a Building Permit. The proposed floor area expansion of 5,183 square feet (+2.4% increase) only pertains to 72 of the free-market units in Phases 1-4; no floor area expansions are proposed for 18 units, 11 restricted units and 7 free-market units. The expansion potential ranges from 25 to 152 square feet with the average increase being 72 square feet/unit. The expansion area is contained within the existing eave lines and does not increase the building footprint, mass or height. 2. Loft areas: There are 57 townhomes, 46 free-market and 11 restricted, with loft areas in Phases 1-2; there are no lofts in Phases 3-4. The lofts were originally approved as mechanical areas and not counted as calculable/habitable floor area. Over time, certain owners were allowed pursuant to a "Restriction for the Benefit of the Town" to use the lofts as habitable space if they had stairs that complied with Building Code standards, did not have closets and were not to be used for sleeping purposes. Sizes range from 89 to 290 square feet for an average of 169.5 square feet/unit. The request to convert the loft areas into calculable/habitable floor area would increase the total project floor area by 9,661 square feet (+4.5%) or 8,207 square feet of free-market and 1,454 square feet of restricted area. 3. Deck areas: The original approval of the Subdivision/PUD did not address the issue of decks. TC Ordinance No. 31, Series of 1983, established a standard that on-grade, uncovered decks not exceed ten percent (10%) of the square footage of the unit. Currently, deck areas range from 1.16% (30 square feet to 27.1% (885 square feet). The proposal seeks to amend the maximum deck area to 15% in order to bring a majority of the decks into conformance. 4. Crawl spaces: Two units have improved crawl space areas. The proposed amendment seeks to reaffirm that these areas are general common elements GCE) intended for mechanical and utility equipment only. The applicant is not requesting approval for the conversion of crawl spaces into habitable space so there is no change-in-use and no increase in the project's total calculable floor area. 5. Parking: Parcel One, Snowniass Country Club Townhomes, was approved with a minimum parking ratio of 2 spaces/unit and a maximum of 1 space/ bedroom. Presently, there is a total of 253 bedrooms and 328 parking spaces. The parking ratio of 1.3 spaces/bedroom includes tandem spaces and guest parking areas. There is an adequate supply of existing on-site parking to accommodate the potential conversion of all 57 lofts into bedrooms; parking would not be required for lofts used as offices, studios, dens and/or storage. Regardless, the supply of off-street parking meets or exceeds the parking requirement as set forth in the Subdivision/PUD. 6. Deed-restricted units: Each of the 11 deed-restricted units has loft area that varies from 89 to 225 square feet, the average size being 132 square feet. The proposal enables the owners the opportunity to convert their loft areas into usable/habitable space subject to the Town's Housing Guidelines and policies. No additional floor area expansion potential is proposed for these restricted units. 7. Floor area excise tax (FRET): The FAET, as it currently exists, only applies to a majority of the single-family subdivisions within the Town; it does not include Country Club Estates, The Crossings, Meadow Ranch, Duplex Zone Districts or Multi-family projects. In certain instances, owners within these exempt" areas or projects have been granted Administrative Modifications for up to 50 square feet or 2% of their allowable floor area whichever is less. 8. Rezoning: The townhome project was originally approved with a Final PUD Plan/Development Summary and zoned Planned Unit Development (PUD). Since the original Subdivision/PUD approval in 1980, there have been several PUD Amendments, a number of individual unit modifications and a cessation of the PUD zone district. This proposal to rezone the property to Multi-family Residential (MF) zone district is consistent with the original development intent, current land use and architectural character; it also provides an opportunity to update the Development Summary/PUD Guide and to create a unified, comprehensive expansion plan. VII. DISCUSION ITEMS: ALTERNATIVES AND IMPLICATIONS ALTERNATIVE A: Approve the proposed Minor Amendment to the Final PUD and the Amendment to the Official Zone District Map. Implications: The proposed floor area expansion, loft conversion, deck area, parking plan and rezoning appear to be reasonable while providing a comprehensive and unified fiuure development plan. However, the proposed PUD Guide may need slight modification to more accurately identify the existing development and clearly establish the expansion parameters for the residential units and decks. Rezoning from Planned Unit Development (PUD) to Multi- family (MF) would enable the development parameters to be updated. ALTERNATIVE B: Amend the proposed Minor Amendment to the Final PUD; and approve the Amendment to the Official Zone District Map. Implications: As stated above, the PUD Guide should be modified to more thoroughly identify previous Amendments and to ensure the development intent and parameters accurately incorporate this Amendment to the Final PUD. It may also be beneficial to define the permitted use as residential townhomes and not differentiate between restricted and free-market units to provide greater flexibility in the future. Revisions to the PUD Guide would be in conformance with MF zone district requirements. ALTERNATIVE C: Deny, citing the specific reasons therefore, the proposed Minor Amendment to the Final PUD and Amendment to the Official Zone District Map. Implications: This would maintain the status quo with the Town having to potentially deal with 90 individual owners on a case-by-case basis and without the benefit of an approved overall development plan. The existing development would continue not being in conformance with the previously approved Amendments to the PUD: and the zoning of the property would exist only as described on the Official Zoning Map dated August 2, 1999. VIII. STAFF FINDINGS AND RECOMMENDATION Staff finds the proposed Minor PUD and Zoning Amendments to Parcel One of the Snowmass Club Subdivison/PUD meet the Municipal Code requirements and review standards. Staff recommends Alternative B as outlined above and that Town Council approve with conditions first reading of the Ordinance concerning the Minor PUD and Rezoning Amendments for the Country Club Townhomes with direction that the PUD Guide be amended prior to second reading. An Ordinance is enclosed for Town Council to consider in accordance with the applicable standards; Town Council shall then approve, approve with conditions or deny the application. IX. NEXT STEPS If first reading of the Ordinance is approved by a majority vote at this meeting, second reading of the Ordinance will be scheduled for April 20. Enclosure: TC Ordinance No. 09-04 Previous Distribution (3-16-09): 1. Minor Amendment to the Final PUD and Rezoning Application/folder 2. Planting Commission Reso. No. 09-6, Recommendations to Town Council (s 3. Table 5-3 Criteria for Classifying PUDs as Major or Minor and Municipal Code Section 16A-5-390(3) Review Standards I TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE 2 TOWN COUNCIL 3 4 ORDINANCE NO. 04 5 SERIES OF 2009 6 7 AN ORDINANCE CONCERNING A MINOR PUD AMENDMENT AND REZONING 8 REGARDING COUNTRY CLUB TOWNHOMES. 9 10 WHEREAS, the Country Club Townhomes Corporation ("Applicant')submitted 11 a Minor Amendment to a Final PUD and an Amendment to the Official Zone District 12 Map land use application to the Planning Department on December 24, 2008; and 13 14 WHEREAS, Applicant submitted an Addendum to the application to the 15 Planning Department on December 31, 2008; and 16 17 WHEREAS, the Planning Department deemed the application complete for 18 review purposes pursuant to Town of Snowmass Village Municipal Code ("Municipal 19 Code") Section 16A-5-50; and 20 21 WHEREAS, Planning Commission reviewed the application at regular 22 meetings on January 21, 2009 and February 4, 2009; and approved (5-0) a 23 Resolution with recommendations that was forwarded to Town Council in accordance 24 with Municipal Code Section 16A-5-390(2)d. Action by Planning Commission; and 25 26 WHEREAS, Town Council at a regular public meeting on March.16, 2009, 27 listened to a presentation of the proposal by Applicant's representatives, reviewed 28 Planning Commission's recommendations and after discussion, directed Planning 29 Staff to draft an Ordinance for consideration; and 30 31 WHEREAS, all public notification requirements as set forth in Municipal Code 32 Section 16A-5-60 Notice of Public Hearings were satisfied; and 33 34 WHEREAS, Town Council at a public hearing on April 6, 2009 reviewed the 35 land use application, considered direction by Town Staff, received public comment 36 and (approved/approved with conditions/ or denied) First Reading of the 37 Ordinance; and 38 39 WHEREAS, Town Council at a public hearing on April 20, 2009 reviewed the 40 land use application, considered direction by Town Staff, received public comment 41 and (approved/approved with conditions/ or denied) Second Reading of the 42 Ordinance. 43 44 NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED, by the Town Council of the Town of 45 Snowmass Village, as follows: 46 47 Section One: General Findings. Town Council makes the following findings: TC Ord 09-04 Page 2 of 5 48 1) Submission: Applicant submitted an application for a Minor Amendment to a 49 Final Planned Unit Development (PUD) and an Amendment to the Official 50 Zone District Map, in accordance with the Municipal Code provisions as set 51 forth in Section 16A-5-300(b)(1) Major or Minor PUD and Section 16A-5- 52 220(c) Map Amendment Procedures. Supplemental information and materials 53 were provided during the review process to comply with application 54 submission requirements and to respond to Town Council, Planning 55 Commission and Town Staff comments, issues and concerns. 56 57 2) Content: The land use application contained the Minimum Contents as 58 required by Municipal Code Section 16A-5-40 Submission of application, 59 Section 16A-5-390(2)b. Minor amendment of final PUD, Submission of 60 application; Section 16A-5-220(d) Amendments to the Official Zone District 61 Map, Submission Contents; and included written and graphic materials of 62 sufficient detail that the submittal was deemed complete for review. 63 64 3) Public Process: Planning Commission held two public meetings, January 21, 65 and February 4, 2009, to review the land use application and to formulate its 66 recommendations to Town Council in accordance with the responsibilities and 67 procedures prescribed in the Municipal Code; Town Council held a public 68 meeting on March 16, 2009; and conducted public hearings on April 6 and 69 April 20, 2009. 70 71 4) Municipal Code Requirements: Subject to the Conditions in Section Three of 72 this Ordinance, Town Council finds the land use application (is/is not) in 73 compliance with the Criteria, Restrictions and/or Review Standards 74 established in the following Sections of the Municipal Code: 75 a) Table 5-3 Criteria for Classifying PUDs, criteria as a Minor PUD; 76 b) Section 16A-5-300(c), General Restrictions, including Subsection 16A- 77 5-300 (c)(4)c. Maximum buildout-Fully developed parcels; 78 c) Section 16A-5-310 Review standards, PUD; 79 d) Section 16A-5-390(3) Review standards, Amendment of final PUD; 80 e) Section 16A-5-220 (e) Review standards, Amendment to Official Zone 81 District Map. 82 83 5) Previous Approvals: This Minor Amendment to Parcel One of the Snowmass 84 Club Final Planned Unit Development (PUD)/Subdivision modifies the 85 following Town Council Ordinances (if approved): 86 a) Ordinance No. 8, Series of 1983, Final PUD Plan for the Snowmass 87 Club Subdivision; 88 b) Ordinance No. 31, Series of 1983, Amendment to the permitted uses 89 for Parcel One, Snowmass Club Subdivision; and 90 c) Ordinance No. 24, Series of 1989, Maintenance Facility Addition at Lot 91 12, Parcel One, Filing 4 of the Snowmass Club Subdivision. 92 TC Ord 09-04 Page 3 of 5 93 Section Two: Action. In accordance with the findings stated above in 94 Section One of this Ordinance, Town Council (approves/approve with 95 conditions/or denies)the Country Club Townhomes Minor Amendment to the Final 96 PUD and Amendment to the Official Zone District Map, subject to the Conditions set 97 forth in Section Three. 98 99 Section Three: Conditions. Town Council (approves/approves with 100 conditions/denies) the Country Club Townhomes Minor PUD Amendment and 101 Zoning Map Amendment, subject to the following: 102 103 A. Amendment to the Final PUD Subdivision 104 1. Overall development plan: (Approval/denial) of the amended PUD 105 Guide that specifies the Development Intent and Development Parameters 106 see Exhibit A). The project may include a maximum total of 91 107 condominiumized, townhome units, (presently 80 free-market units and 108 11 deed-restricted units), contained in 18 building clusters; and a 109 maintenance/storage facility having 1 ,487 square feet. (see Exhibit B). 110 Unit 74-75 is presently combined as one dwelling unit but may be 111 reconstituted as separate free-market units, Unit 74 and Unit 75, as 112 originally condominium ized. Units 82-83, 90-91 and 94-95 constitute three 113 3) single free-market condominium units with double unit numbers only 114 and said individual units may not be further divided without the approval of 115 the Town. Unit 56 and Unit 57 were never constructed and they are 116 hereby extinguished as permitted uses/dwelling units within Parcel One of 117 the Snowmass Club Subdivision/PUD. 118 119 2. Dimensional Limitations:(Approval/denial) of the building expansions, 120 loft area conversions, deck area maximums and parking supply. The 121 following dimensional limitations remain as originally approved: total lot 122 area of approximately 27 acres; parcel boundary; height limit maximum of 123 32-feet; building coverage maximum of 6.15 acres; and open space 124 minimum of 13.22 acres. See Exhibit G for Open Space Calculations. 125 126 3. Required Parking: (Approval/denial) of the layout and supply of 328 off- 127 street, parking spaces. The minimum parking ratio shall be 1 space/ 128 bedroom; tandem and guest parking spaces may be utilized to meet the 129 minimum requirement. No additional parking spaces are required by this 130 Amendment. The Parking Chart is included as Exhibit F. 131 132 4. Character. (Approval/denial) of the exterior floor area expansion in terms 133 of the overall architectural character, building materials and construction 134 details. See Exhibit D-Floor Plans/Elevations. 135 136 TC Ord 09-04 Page 4 of 5 137 B. Amendments to Floor Area 138 1. Floor Area: The maximum additional floor area allowed per this 139 Amendment totals 14,844 square feet: 5,183 square feet of floor area 140 expansion and 9,661 square feet of loft area conversion. 141 142 2. Free-Market Expansions: (Approval/denial) to expand 72 of the (free- 143 market) units in Phases 1-4 a maximum of 5,183 square feet; the 144 expansion area is contained within the existing eave lines and does not 145 increase the building footprint, mass or height. 146 147 3. (Free-Market) Lofts: Approval/denial) to allow the (46 free-market) 148 units within Phases 1-2 to convert the existing loft areas into 149 calculable/habitable floor area in accordance with applicable Municipal, 150 Building and Fire Code requirements; this increases the total free- 151 market floor area by a maximum of (8,207) square feet. See Exhibit C. 152 153 4. (Restricted) Lofts: (Approval/denial) to allow the (11 restricted) 154 units in Phases 1-2 the ability to convert a total of (1,454) square feet of 155 existing loft area to calculable/habitable space (Exhibit C) in accordance 156 with applicable Municipal, Building and Fire Code requirements and 157 conformance with the Town's Housing Guidelines and policies. No 158 additional floor area expansion potential is permitted for these deed- 159 restricted units. OR: Revise to 57 units/9,661 square feet instead of 160 differentiating between free-market and restricted. 161 162 5. Decks: (Approval/denial) to increase each unit's allowable deck and 163 porch area on the first floor to a maximum of fifteen percent (15%) of all 164 living space including garages, minor additions and legally converted loft 165 areas. See Exhibit E, Deck Area Calculations. 166 167 6. Crawl Spaces: Prohibit the conversion of crawl space into 168 calculable/habitable floor area; the areas are general common elements 169 GCE) are shall used solely for mechanical and utility equipment purposes. 170 171 C. Amendment to Official Zone District Map: 172 1. Rezoning: (Approval/denial) to re-zone Country Club Townhomes, 173 Parcel One of the Snowmass Club Subdivision/PUD, from Planned Unit 174 Development (PUD) to Multi-Family Residential (MF). The Parcel Legal 175 Description along with the Existing and Proposed Zoning Map is attached 176 as Exhibit H. 177 178 2. Development Summary:(Approval/denial)to revise the Snowmass Club 179 Final Planned Unit Development Plan for Parcel One as shown in the 180 Amended PUD Guide (Exhibits A-G). TC Ord 09-04 Page 5 of 5 181 Section Four: Severability. If any provision of this Ordinance or application 182 hereof to any person or circumstance is held invalid, the invalidity shall not affect any 183 other provision or application of this Ordinance which can be given effect without the 184 invalid provision or application, and, to this end, the provisions of this Ordinance are 185 severable. 186 187 INTRODUCED, READ AND (APPROVED/APPROVED AS AMENDED/ OR 188 DENIED) by the Town Council of the Town of Snowmass Village on April 6, 2009 at 189 first reading upon a motion by Council Member the second of Council 190 Member and a vote of _ in favor and _ against. Council 191 Member Wilkinson recused himself. 192 193 READ, APPROVED AND (ADOPTED/ADOPTED AS AMENDED/ OR 194 DENIED) by the Town Council of the Town of Snowmass Village on April 20, 2009 at 195 second reading upon a motion by Council Member the second of Council 196 Member and a vote of _ in favor and _ against. Council Member 197 Wilkinson recused himself. 198 199 TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE 200 TOWN COUNCIL 201 202 203 Bill Boineau, Mayor 204 205 ATTEST: 206 207 208 Donna Spaulding, Deputy Town Clerk 209 APPROVED AS TO FORM: 210 John C. Dresser, Jr., Town Attorney 211 212 Attachments: 213 Amended PUD Guide 214 Exhibit A-Development Intent and Parameters 215 Exhibit B-Site Plans 216 Exhibit C-Unit Area Calculations 217 Exhibit D-Expansion Plans/Elevations 218 Exhibit E-Deck Area Calculations 219 Exhibit F-Parking Chart 220 Exhibit G-Open Space Calculations 221 Exhibit H-Zoning Amendment Exhibit "A" TC Ord. No. 04, Series of 2009 DRAFT Page 1 of 2) 03/25/09 COUNTRY CLUB TOWNHOMES PUD GUIDE The following constitutes the PUD Guide (the "Guide") as described in Section 16A-5- 360 of the Snowmass Village Land Use Regulations for the Country Club Townhomes PUD. The Guide specifies the permitted uses and the limitations, restrictions and requirements associated with the uses that will guide the development, redevelopment and use of residential dwelling units within the County Club Townhomes PUD. The Country Club Townhomes PUD was approved by and is subject to the provisions of Ordinance No. 8, Series of 1980, which approved the Planned Unit Development Plan, as amended by Ordinance No. Series of 2009, which amended the Planned Unit Development Plan (collectively the "PUD Plan'). A. Development Intent. The Country Club Townhomes PUD contains approximately 27.2 acres of land on which 80 unrestricted condominiumized residential units and 11 restricted condominiumized residential units have been constructed. The restricted residential units are subject to the Housing Guidelines of the Town, the unrestricted residential units are not. The land within the Country Club Townhomes PUD is zoned MULTI-FAMILY RESIDENTIAL (MF). The use, development and redevelopment of the residential units within the County Club Townhomes PUD, including allowable building materials and color schemes, is subject to this PUD Guide, the PUD Plan and the Design Review Guidelines ("Guidelines") as adopted and from time to time amended by the Design Review Board ("Design Review Board") of the Country Club Townhomes Association (the "Association'). B. Development Parameters. 1.Permitted Uses: — a) 80 unrestricted residential units configured as follows: i) 19 two-bedroom units ii) 57 three-bedroom units ii) 2 four-bedroom units iv) 2 five-bedroom units b) 11 restricted residential units configured as follows: i) 5 two-bedroom units ii) 6 three-bedroom units 2.Minimum Open Space: 13.22 acres 3.Maximum Building Ground Coverage: 6.15 acres 4.Maximum Parking and Ground Coverage: 2.65 acres 5. Maximum Number of Parking_Spaces: 1 space—bedroom Country Club Townhomes —Draft PUD Guide 3/25/09 Exhibit A-PUD Guide Exhibit "A" TC Ord. No. 04, Series of 2009 Page 2 of 2) 6.Minimum Number of Parking Spaces: 2 spaces — Unit 7.Maximum Building Height. 32 feet above natural grade 8.Maximum Deck Area: See Number 11, below 9.Maximum Size of Association Maintenance Facility: 1,487 square feet 10. Allowable Floor Area: For the purposes of this Guide, "Floor Area" shall mean the sum of the horizontal surfaces of each floor of a residential dwelling unit, excluding garages and non-habitable lofts. The maximum Residential Floor Area of all units shall not exceed 262,304 square feet. a). Expansion of Unrestricted Floor Area. Unrestricted residential units 1-3, 6-17, 20-24, 30-58, 61 and 63-96 shall be entitled to expand their Floor Area up to a cumulative maximum of 5,183 square feet, provided that the - expansion area is contained within the existing eve lines and does not increase the building footprint, mass or height. The Floor Area available for such expansions shall be allocated on a unit by unit basis by the Design Review Board subject to the provisions of the PUD Plan and the Design Guidelines. b). Conversion of Lofts: Unrestricted residential units 1-3, 6-17, 20-24, 30-58, 61 and 63-96 shall be entitled to convert existing loft areas into habitable Floor Area provided that the cumulative total of such conversions does not exceed 8,207 square feet. Likewise, the 11 restricted residential dwelling units 4, 5, 18, 19, 25, 26, 29, 59, 60 and 62 shall be entitled to convert existing loft areas into habitable Floor Area provided that the cumulative total of such conversions does not exceed 1,454 square feet. No loft areas shall be converted to habitable Floor Area unless the unit owner obtains a building permit from the Town of Snowmass Village and satisfies all requirements associated therewith, including the requirements of the Fire Code and obtains approval of the Design Review Board pursuant to the Design Guidelines. Conversion of loft areas with the restricted residential units shall also comply with the Housing Guidelines and policies of the Town. 11. Decks. Each residential unit shall be entitled to deck areas attached to the first floor of the living areas up to a maximum of 15% of the Floor Area of the attached units, including garages, minor additions and legally converted loft areas. 12. Crawl Spaces. Crawl spaces beneath residential units shall not be converted into habitable Floor Area. Crawl spaces constitute General Common Elements pursuant to the Condominium Declaration for Country Club Townhomes and shall be used solely for mechanical and utility equipment purposes. Country Club Townhomes —Draft PUD Guide 3/25/09 Exhibit "B" TC Ord. No. 04, Series of 2009 Page 1 of 5) I 1 r i i i'l li Ill l\I 1 s immv>D >V J' ld i Exhibit B-Site Plans a Country Club Townhomes @s 5 (7 d Snowmass Club Circle Snowmass Village,Co 81615 —if t I A 8i Exhibit "B" TC Ord. No. 04, Series of 2009 Page 2 of 5) fY t i I I c I I I o l HW Y o Y eon. n+ MtG Alf Mxlx a e Country Club Townhomes o 0 g snowmass Club Circle snowmass Village,CO 81615r t Exhibit "B" TC Ord. No. 04, Series of 2009 Page 3 of 5) fig CM Aj Lj i i 1 aI r jig 1c 1 I e 1 f lOb L!FRUh 6i G 67 Country ClubTownhomes q i Snowmass Club Circle Snowmass Village,CO 81615 8 Exhibit "B" TC Ord. No. 04, Series of 2009 Page 4 of 5) Ln i L e wn m Cn 1 c to m z w diz CID 4 E 1 g I T is 4, 1]q]4 91EMNp: gfib a D fC Country Club Townhomes Snowmass Club Circle Snowmass Village,CO M15 _ F Exhibit "B" TC Ord. No. 04, Series of 2009 Page 5 of 5) a 1 I I t . I M1p 2 yt J I m p x 1 5 I ` i• p •W I b Q s i J G Country Club Townhomes k4s 0 Snowmass Club Circle Snowmass village,Co 81615 Q 1 9F I ATTACHMENT IV Exhibit «C„ proposed Floor Area & , TC Ord. No. 04, Series of 2009 Open Space Cal . Page 1 of 6) Existing Floor Area Calculations EXISTING BUILDING FLOOR AREA PHASE 1 1 17237 2 11043 3 10859 4 17747 5 16391 73277 PHASE 2 6 13649 7 13745 8 8538 9 16221 11 17238 69391 MAINT. BLDG 1487 PHASE 3 10 15734 12 11795 13 11767 14 15826 55122 PHASE 15 16248 16 9673 17 11131 18 11131 48183 TOTAL:247,460 SQ FT EXISTING SITE AREA FLOOR AREA FAR 1 193 867 247L460 20.73% note: "Existing Floor Area" INCLUDES garage area March 2009 Exhibit C-Unit Area Calculations Exhibit "C" TC Ord. No. 04, Series of 2009 Page 2 of 6) Proposed Floor Area Calculations EXISTING Existin Proposed BUILDING FLOOR AREA Loft Area new area PHASE 1 1 17237 1095 340 2 11043 730 203 3 10859 900 203 4 17747 1118 288 5 16391 1146 166 73277 4988 1200 PHASE 2 6 13649 836 272 7 13745 876 322 8 8538 669 180 9 16221 994 410 11 17238 1297 180 69391 4672 1364 MAINT. BLDG 1487 PHASE 3 10 15734 0 320 12 11795 0 424 13 11767 0 498 14 15826 0 126 55122 0 1368 PHASE 4 15 16248 0 413 16 9673 0 236 1- 11131 0 302 18 11131 0 300 48183 0 1251 New Total TOTAL: 247,460 9660 5183 262,303 PROPOSED PROPOSED SITE AREA FLOOR AREA FAR 1,193,867 262 303 21.97% note: "Existing Floor Area" INCLUDES garage area March 2009 Page 2 Phase 1 Area Calculations New Building Unit Number UnitType Existing SF Loft SF Front Ad SF Back Ad SF Total Ad SF Total SF 1 1 A 3266 178 48 0 48 3492 2 C 2446 99 22 48 70 2615 3 D 2574 170 48 36 84 2828 4 F 1566 93 0 0 0 1659 5 G 1889 133 0 0 0 2022 6 D 2554 176 54 36 90 2820 7 1 8 2942 247 48 1 0 48 3237 L7237 1096 340 18673 2 8 A 3266 168 48 0 48 3482 9 C 2379 14S 22 48 70 2594 10 D Z594 171 49 36 85 2850 11 B 2804 246 0 0 0 3050 11043 730 203 11976 3 12 B 2984 290 0 0 0 3274 13 C 2379 181 22 48 70 2630 14 D 2554 174 49 36 85 2813 0 15 S 2942 255 48 0 48 3245 C 10859 900 203 11962 G X V 4 16 A 3266 164 48 0 48 3478 o p a 17 C 2379 122 22 48 70 2571 c fn PO 18 G 1864 225 0 0 0 2089 N 19 G 1864 141 0 0 0 2005 4m 20 D 2554 161 49 36 85 2800 N o 21 D 2554 163 54 36 85 2802 v 22 A 3266 142 0 0 0 3408 p O tD 17747 1118 288 19153 5 23 B 2942 289 48 0 48 3279 24 C 2379 124 22 48 70 2573 25 G 1864 119 0 0 0 1983 26 F 1566 90 0 0 0 1656 27 F 1566 91 0 0 0 1657 28 F 1566 90 0 0 0 1656 29 F 1566 89 0 0 0 1655 30 B 2942 254 48 0 48 3244 16391 1146 166 17703 Phase 1 Total 73, 277 4989 1, 200 79466 March 2009 Page 1 Phase 2 Area Calculations New Building Unit Number Unit Type Existing SF Loft SF Front Ad SF Back Ad SF Total Ad SF Total SF 6 31 A 3345 155 0 0 0 3500 32 D 2554 154 48 36 84 2792 33 C 2379 150 22 48 70 2599 34 C 2379 157 22 48 70 2606 35 B 2992 220 48 0 48 3260 13649 836 1 272 14757 7 36 B 2992 253 48 0 48 3293 37 D 2554 174 48 36 84 2812 38 D 2554 166 54 36 90 2810 39 C 2379 143 22 30 52 2574 40 A 3266 140 48 0 48 3454 13745 876 322 14943 8 41 B 2992 259 48 0 48 3299 42 D 2554 164 48 36 84 2802 43 8 2992 246 48 0 48 3286 n O 8538 669 180 9387 1 C m 9 44 B 2992 254 48 0 48 3294 m O 45 D 2574 163 54 36 90 2827 OA Cr 46 C 1 2379 139 22 48 70 2588 47 D 2554 162 48 36 84 2800 O 0.* 48 C 2379 129 22 48 70 2578 a =, 49 A 3343 147 48 0 48 3538 y n O M 16221 994 410 17625 GO 11 58 B 2992 249 48 0 48 3289 O 59 G 1864 181 0 0 0 2045 60 G 1864 146 0 0 0 2010 61 F 1566 109 0 0 0 1675 62 F 1566 147 0 0 0 1713 63 F 1566 120 0 0 0 1686 64 D 2554 176 48 36 84 2814 65 A 3266 169 48 0 48 3483 17238 1297 180 18715 Phase 2 Total 69, 391 4, 672 1, 364 75, 427 March 2009 Page 2 Phase 3 Area Calculations New Building Unit Number UnitType Existing SF Loft SF Front Ad SF Back Ad SF Total Ad SF Total SF 10 50 A3s 3203 0 55 0 55 3258 51 B3s 2655 0 75 0 75 2730 52 C3s 2003 0 30 0 30 2033 53 C3s 2003 0 30 0 30 2033 54 133s 2655 0 75 0 7S 2730 55 A3s 1 3215 0 55 1 0 55 3270 15734 0 320 16054 12 66 A3n 3314 0 32 72 104 3418 67 133n 2585 0 49 35 84 2669 68 133n 2585 0 49 35 84 2669 69 A3n 3311 0 80 72 152 3463 11795 0 424 12219 13 70 A3n 3290 0 80 72 152 3442 71 RA 2585 0 49 48 97 2682 72 2585 ' 0 49 48 97 2682 73 3307 0 80 72 152 3459 11767 0 498 12265 14 74/ 75 s 5920 0 0 0 0 5920 0 76 2045 0 25 0 25 2070 a 77 2003 0 0 0 0 2003 oZ K 78 B3s 1 2655 0 28 0 28 2683 m = r 79 A3s 3203 0 25 48 73 3276 m A ly 15826 0 126 15952 tn'y ( 9 Phase 3 Total 55, 122 0 1, 368 56, 490 O =• to N o N O O 10 I March 2009 Page 3 Phase 4 Area Calculations New Buildinq Unit Number UnItType Existing SF Loft SF Front Ad SF Back Ad SF I Total Ad SF I Total SF 15 8o A3n 3301 0 80 0 80 3381 81 133n 2585 0 49 48 97 2682 82/ 83 B/ C3n 4915 0 48 36 84 4999 84 On 2163 0 0 0 0 2163 85 A3n 3284 0 80 72 152 3436 16248 0 413 16661 16 86 A4s 3544 0 0 48 48 3592 87 B4s 2723 0 60 44 104 2827 88 A45 3406 0 36 48 84 3490 9673 0 236 9909 17 89 A4s 3359 0 60 48 108 3467 90191 C4s 4413 0 36 50 86 4499 92 A4s 3359 0 60 48 108 3467 11131 0 302 11433 18 - 93 A4s 3359 1 0 60 48 108 3467 94/ 95 C4s 4413 0 36 48 84 4497 96 A4s 3359 0 60 48 108 3467 7 11131 0 300 11431 0 i7 ase o a 2 Xk m p S o m A 0 U rh 1 Total Area Calculations 0 New N Existing SF Loft SF Add. SF Total SF G W Phase 1 Total 73, 277 4, 989 1, 200 79, 466 Phase 2 Total 69, 391 4, 672 1, 364 75, 427 Maintenance Bldg 1, 487 0 0 1, 487 Phase 3 Total 55, 122 0 1, 368 56, 490 Phase 4 Total 48, 183 0 1, 251 49, 434 Grand Total 247, 460 9, 661 5 183 262, 304 note: " Existing SF" INCLUDES garage area I March 2009 Page 4 Exhibit "D" TC Ord. No. 04, Series of 2009 Page 1 of 10) ATTACHMENT II - TYPICAL SKETCHES i i i I 48.00'sq! itl I I I I Type A I I L I I I I I N Unit A- 1 Plan 118" = T-0° Country Club Townhomes-PUD Gu'de Attachment 11 - March 2009 Page 1 Exhibit D-Expansion Plans/Elevations Exhibit "D" TC Ord. No. 04, Series of 2009 Page 2 of 10) f 9 I ADDED AREA Unit A - 1 Front Elev. vs° = r-0° Country Club Twenhonnes-PUD Guide Attachment 11 - March 2009 Page 2 Exhibit "D" TC Ord. No. 04, Series of 2009 Page 3 of 10) I I aC LE-91 E9 X f I II I I lop.O.sq ft M Type B Unit B-1 Plan Ira° = V-0° Country Club Townhorn s- PUD Guide Attachment 11 — March 2009 Page 3 Exhibit "D" TC Ord. No. 04, Series of 2009 Page 4 of 10) h q n uwennREA Unit B - 1 Elevation ve° = r-0° Country Club Townhomes- PUC GLne Attachment 11 - March 2009 Page 4 Exhibit "D" TC Ord. No. 04, Series of 2009 Page 5 of 10) I v T"-R I sq ft TypeC = I I I 35.00 sq ft-1 Unit C - 1 Plan Country Club Townhomes- PUO Guide Attachment 11 — March 2009 Page 5 Exhibit "D" TC Ord. No. 04, Series of 2009 Page 6 of 10) nooeonn Unit C - 1 Front Elev. 1;8° = r-0° Country Club Townhom s-PUO Guide Attachment 11 - March 2009 Page 6 Exhibit "D" TC Ord. No. 04, Series of 2009 Page 7 of 10) ADDED APEA Unit C - 1 Back Elev. Country Club Townhomes-PUD Guide Attachment 11 - March 2009 Page 7 Exhibit "D" TC Ord. No. 04, Series of 2009 Page 8 of 10) 1T_--- - - - - — - - - - 1-F 48.00 sq k ki Y Type D 36.00 sq ft Unit D - 1 Plan 1181, Country Club To•wnhomes-PUD Guide Attachment 11 - March 2009 Page 8 Exhibit "D" TC Ord. No. 04, Series of 2009 Page 9 of 10) ir K s ? ADDEDAnEA i i>v y$rEfl9 r •nas`,' kt ",<sc- ra u, „}, M Unit D - 1 Front Elev.ua° = r-0° Country Cluh Townhomes-PUC Gude Attachment II - March 2009 Page 9 Exhibit "D" TIC Ord. No. 04, Series of 2009 Page 10 of 10) ULLUIL r ADDED AREA Unit D - 1 Back Elev. 1/8" _ r-0" Country Club Townhomes-PUD Guide Attachment It - March 2009 Page 10 Exhibit "E" iII TC Ord. No. 04, Series of 2009 1ATTACHMENT111 - Deck Ar- Page 1 of 4) Phase 1 Deck Area Calculations Exist. Buifdinq JUnit Number Unit Type Txi ting SF Deck Area Deck 1 1 A 3266 530 16.2% 2 C 2446 335 13.7% 3 D 2574 295 11.5% 4 F 1566 221 14.1% 5 G 1889 273 14.5% 6 D 2554 257 10.0% 7 B 2942 431 14.7% 17237 2341.6 13.58% 2 8 A 3266 885 27.1% 9 C 2379 333 14.0% 10 D 2594 476 19.4% 11 B 2804 645 23.0% 11043 2339.26 21.18% 3 12 B 2984 544 18.2% 13 C 2379 412 17.3% 14 D 2554 418 16.40/a 15 B 2942 1 649 22.1% E2379 2023.1 18.63% 4 16 A 650 19.9% 17 C 376 15.8% 18 G 247 13.3% 19 G 256 13.7% 20 D 443 17.30/6 21 D 2554 482 18.9% 22 A 3266 1008 30.9% 17747 3461.6 19.51 0/0 S 23 B 2942 486 16.S% 24 C 2379 445 18.7% 25 G 1864 327 17.5% 26 F 1566 116 7.4% 27 F 1566 206 13.1% 28 F 1566 1 203 13.0% 29 F 1566 1 203 13.0% 30 B 2942 399 13.6% 16391 2385.0 14.55% Phase 1 Total 73,277.0 12,550.6 17.1% note: "Existing SF INCLUDES garage area Exhibit E-Deck Area Calculations March 2009 Page 1 Exhibit "E" TC Ord. No. 04, Series of 2009 Page 2 of 4) Phase 2 Deck Area Calculations Exist. Building Unit Number Unit Type Existing SF Deck Area Deck 6 31 A 3345 853 25.50% 32 D 2554 485 18.99% 33 C 2379 487 20.49% 34 C 2379 392 16.47% 35 B 2992 665 22.22% 13649 2882.03 21.12% 7 36 B 2992 578 19.33% 37 D 2554 440 17.24% 38 D 2554 592 23.19% 39 C 2379 388 16.29% 40 A 3266 452 13.84% 13745 1 2450.9 17.83% 8 41 B 2992 551 18.43% 42 D 2554 491 19.21% 43 B 2992 455 15.20% 8538 1496.61 17.53% 9 44 B 2992 578 19.33% 45 D 2574 441 17.12% 46 C 2379 1 472 19.86% 47 D 2554 505 19.77% 48 C 2379 493 20.70% 49 A 3343 613 18.35% 16221 3102.3 19.13% 11 58 - B 2992 474 15.65% 59 G 1864 287 15.39% 60 G 1864 1 254 13.63% 61 F 1566 1 230 14.67% 62 F 1566 1 228 14.56% 63 F 1566 1 233 14.88% 64 D 2554 391 15.32% 65 A 3266 660 20.21% 17238 2757.15 15.99% Phase 2 Total 69,391 12,689 18.29% note: "Existin SF" INCLUDES qaraqe area March 2009 Page 2 Exhibit "E" TC Ord. No. 04, Series of 2009 Page 3 of 4) Phase 3 Deck Area Calculations Exist. Building jUnit Number Unit Type Existing SF Deck Area Deck 10 50 A3s 3203 523 16.33% 51 Bas 2655 453 17.06% 52 C3s 2003 312 15.58% 53 C35 2003 45 2.25% 54 B3s 2655 559 21.05% 55 A3s 3215 672 20.90% 15734 2564 16.30% 12 66 A3n 3314 737 22.24% 67 B3n 2585 32 1.24% 68 133n 2585 1 30 1.16% 69 A3n 3311 526 15.89% 11795 1325 11.23% 13 70 A3n 3290 43 1.31% 71 83n 2585 32 1.24% 72 B3n 2585 346 13.38% 73 A3n 3307 54 1 1.63% 11767 475 4.39% 14 74/7S A/133s 5920 1045 17.65% 76 C3s 2045 431 21.08% 77 C3s 2003 255 12.73% 78 B3s 2655 304 11.45% 79 A3s 3203 631 19.70% 15826 2666 16.52% Phase 3 Total 55,122 7,030 12.75% note: "Existing SF" INCLUDES qaraqe area March 2009 Page 3 Exhibit "E" TC Ord. No. 04, Series of 2009 1 Page 4 of 4) Phase 4 Deck Area Calculations Exist. Building Unit Number Unit Type Existing SF Deck Area Deck 15 80 A3n 3301 508 15.39% 81 B3n 2585 400 15.47% 82/83 B/C3n 4915 724 14.73% 84 C3n 2163 284 13.13% 85 A3n 3284 570 17.36% 16248 2486 15.30% 16 86 A4s 3544 467 13.18% 87 B4s 2723 63 2.31% 88 A4s 3406 83 2.44% 9673 613 6.34% 17 89 A4s 3359 80 2.38% 90/91 C4s 4413 31 0.70% 92 A4s 3359 156 4.64% 11131 267 2.40% 18 93 A4s 3359 81 2.41% 94/95 C4s 4413 36 0.82% 96 A4s 3359 152 4.53% 11131 269 2.420/c Phase 4 Total 48,183 3,635 7.54% note: "Existin SF" INCLUDES qaraqe area March 2009 Page 4 Exhibit "F" i TC Ord. No. 04, Series of 2009 Page 1 of 4) ATTACHMENT V - Parking count Phase 1 Parking Chart Buildin Unit Numbe UnitType # Bedrooms # Parkin 1 1 A 3 4 2 C 2 2 3 D 3 2 4 F 2 2 5 G 3 2 6 D 3 2 7 B 3 4 6 Guest Overflow 19 24 2 8 A 3 4 9 C 2 2 10 D 3 2 11 B 3 4 5 Guest Overflow 11 17 3 12 B 3 4 13 C 2 2 14 D 3 2 15 B 3 4 3 Guest Overflow 11 15 4 16 A 3 4 17 C 2 2 18 G .. 3 2 19 G 3 2 20 D 3 2 21 D 3 2 22 A 3 4 6 Guest Overflow 20 24 5 23 B 3 4 24 C 2 2 25 G 3 2 26 F 2 2 27 F 2 2 28 F 2 2 29 F 2 2 30 B 3 4 4 Guest Overflow 19 24 Phase 1 Total BO 104 Exhibit F-Parking Chart March 2009 Page 1 Exhibit "F" TC Ord. No. 04, Series of 2009 Page 2 of 4) Phase 2 Parking Chart Building Unit Number Unit Type # Bedrooms # Parkin 6 31 A 3 4 32 D 3 2 33 C 2 2 34 C 2 2 35 B 3 4 4 Guest Overflow 13 18 7 36 B 3 4 37 D 3 2 38 D 3 2 39 C 2 2 40 A 3 4 6 Guest Overflow 14 20 8 41 B 3 4 42 D 3 2 43 B 3 3 3 Guest Overflow 9 12 9 44 B 3 4 45 D. 3 2 46 c--2 2 47 D 3 2 48 C., 2 2 49 A--3 4 5 Guest Overflow 16 21 11 58 B 3 4 59 G 3 2 60 G 3 2 61 F 2 2 62 F 2 2 63 F 2 2 64 D 3 2 65 A 3 4 5 Guest Overflow 21 25 Phase 2 Total 73 96 March 2009 Page 2 Exhibit "F" TC Ord. No. 04, Series of 2009 Page 3 of 4) Phase 3 Parkin Chart tBuilding Un it Numbe Unit T e # Bedrooms # Parkin 50 A3s 3 4 51 63s 3 2 52 Cis 2 2 53 Cis 2 2 54 63s 3 2 55 A3s 3 4 3 Guest Overflow 16 19 12 66 Ain 3 4 67 B3n 3 2 68 B3n 3 2 69 A3n 3 4 12 12 13 70 A3n 3 4 71 B3n 3 2 72 B3n 3 2 73 A3n 3 4 12 12 14 74/75 NB3S 5 6 76 Cis 2 2 77 C3s 2 2 78 B35 3 2 79 A3s 3 4 0 Guest / Overflow 15 16 6 Guest Overflow Phase 3 Total 55 65 March 2009 Page 3 Phase 4 Parkin Chart Emma M. Exhibit "G" TC Ord. No. 04, Series of 2009 Page 1 of 1) Open Space Calculations DEVELOPED BUILDING AREA PHASE 1 1 13870 2 11018 3 10924 4 15026 5 13155 63993 PHASE 2 6 11889 7 11202 8 6980 9 13244 11 13269 56584 MAINT BLDG 1487 10 12463 PHASE 3 12 9216 13 8798 14 12783 43260 PHASE 4 15 12741 16 8614 17 8755 18 9012 39122 TOTAL: 204,446 OPEN SITE AREA DEV. AREA SPACE 1,193,867 204 446 82.88% March 2009 Exhibit G-Open Space Calculations Rnal Planned Unit De oe lcpmentPla 1 aRVSN o2¢ er Po, VICINITY ZONING MAP Psrsuua a walsaem m. serlss of ew. xws ee me. mu rlt e, tarye. THE SNOWMASS CLUB Jf/ PUD r f PUD PUD s 4 z RCEL ONE`+, PUD S e L` r ITE) SPA- 2 PUD SF- 6 PUD Ewa_ 4a9; c;- n- c _ Lk ZONING AMENDMENT MAP PARCEL DESCRIPTION O a m o PARCELI THEE IXNET6V9I. OPg3 oSUBDIVIBION I CE 1 SNO Ct BSUBDIVISION IO G 3 A TRACTOFLAND BEING PARCEL I OF THE SNOWMASS CLUB m A Ir SUBDIVISION SITUATED IN THE NW I/4 SECTION 6, TOWNSHIP IO SOUTH. RANGE 85 WEST, AND THE SWIM SECTION 31, TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH, RANGE y UI /' f 85 WEST OFTHEO PRINCIPALMERIDIAN. MONTY OFPDTCIJ AS SHOWN J1 PUD ON THE PLAT RECORDED AT BOOK 9, PAGES 32-35 AND BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: n m COMMENCING AT THE WITNESS CORNER TO THE SW CORNER OF SECTION y K 31, TOWNS" 9 SOUTH, RANGE 85 WEST; THENCE NI4. 57'23' T3A DISTANCE Z OF 1511. 90 FEET TOTHE POINT OF BEGINNING OF BEGINNING' O PUD 6 t---, PARCEL ONE( SRE) o THENCE THE FOLLOWING 16 COURSES: EXISTING: PLANNED UNIT DEVELOPMENT( PUD) 3• r - a / I a PROPOSED: MULTI- FAMILY( MF) N B Tx'. tr`6 a0P NI 1. N90° DO'W' Ti Ti 302. W FEET 6 auaviasPa3 P 2. S66° 09' 43' 420A7FEET 3. S16° 11' 5WE 360. 0D FEET O IE 4. S55° 23W W 611. 41 FEET II 5. S75° 00171W 189. 45 FEET 6. N83- H' IVIV247. 48FEET E __--- 7. S56° 76' 28" W 606. 01 FEET 8. SnTS'"' W 218. 53 FEET D 9. N55. 19' 4TW 145. 91 FEET PUD a 10. NISTI' 51' E620. 63FEET o? i' c= 4s i iv=•= 11. MM' OD' E 450. 00 FEET rcrr} 9' C9aJa. s- 12. N90130' 00 E 260. 00 FEET 3 a 13. SOD° 00' 00" 79. 3 FEET CL t1! 14. NOO• E 215. 17 FEET 6t IS N43- W00" E91. 68 FEE[ r ' v r3 ; T 16. N00° OT& M 765. 00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEG ++ 4. M SAID PARCEL i CONTAINING 2]. 22 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. Iscomwsm MEMORANDUM TO: Town Council members FROM: Planning Department DATE: April 6, 2009 meeting SUBJECT: FIRST READING OF ORDINANCE NO. 5. SERIES OF 2009 — CONCERNING A MINOR PUD AMENDMENT FOR BASE VILLAGE INTERIM BUILDING 7. This meeting is for purpose of beginning the review of the proposed changes in Building 7 related to the proposed interim conditions on the affected site via a Minor PUD Amendment application dated March 5, 2009, pursuant to Municipal Code Section 16A-5-390, Amendment of Final PUD. Building 7 is proposed on Lot 3 of the original Base Village P.U.D. Final a Plat, recently re-designated as Lot 3B via a subdivision exemption, and generally situated toward the southeast of the intersection of Wood Road and Lower Carriage Way. Applicant: Base Village Owner, LLC, as consented by Related WestPac, LLC, represented by: Scott Stenman, Vice President of Development Planner: Jim Wahlstrom I. PURPOSE AND ACTIONS REQUESTED. The purposes of the meeting are to: a. Hear a presentation from the applicant concerning the proposed changes to Building 7 related to its planned interim conditions; b. Begin review of core issues related to the proposed amendment; c. Consider the comments and recommendations of the Town Staff in this report; d. Consider the recommendation from the Planning Commission per the attached Resolution No. 8, Series of 2009; and e. Provide direction to staff in crafting or refining the draft findings and conditions for placement in the attached ordinance. II. BACKGROUND. During the recent review of the Building 8 Minor PUD Amendment pursuant to Ordinance 09-2, the applicant proposed a development agreement to ensure Town decision makers of a timely completion for Building 7 as a whole together with the completion of interim vertical circulation connections between the transit level and the village level by November 2009. The application for Building 7 includes a copy of the development agreement and exhibits. On February 11, 2008, the Building 7 Minor PUD Amendment application for the proposed interim conditions was referred to Town Council and Planning Commission members, the Town Manager's Office, the Town Attorney's Office, the Town Clerk, Planning Department staff, the Building Department, Transportation, Public Works, and the Snowmass-Wildcat Fire Protection District. As of the writing of the report, the Planning Department, per the information in this report, responded with comments and recommendations. The Transportation Department and the Fire District responded with review comments in time for the Planning Commission review on March 18`h (see Attachment 1). III. SUMMARY DESCRIPTION OF PROJECT. The Building 7 Minor PUD Amendment in summary generally proposes: An interim Building 7 (Arrival Center) arrangement; A request to preserve the vesting granted via Ordinance 04-21; An interim facade treatment for the enclosure of the vertical components within Building 7; An interim landscape plan; Changes to the transit garage, to include a transit office, parking garage management office, and employee break room and other items identified in the scope of work outline (see page 1 of 7, Exhibit A of the development agreement in the application materials) See Section 2 of the application notebook for a detailed breakdown of all the changes or elements proposed for each level between the transit center on the arrival level and the village pedestrian level, intended as the top level for the building in the interim arrangement. IV. APPLICABLE REGULATIONS. Amendment to Final PUD. For the proposed changes to qualify as a minor amendment pursuant to Code Section 16A-5-390(1)b, the amendments must comply with the review standards outlined below per Section 16A-5-390(3): a. Consistent with original PUD. The proposed amendment shall be consistent with, or an enhancement of, the original PUD approval. b. No substantially adverse impact. The proposed amendment shall not have a substantially adverse effect on the neighborhood surrounding the land where the amendment is proposed, or have a substantially adverse impact on the enjoyment of land abutting upon or across the street from the subject property. c. Not change character. The proposed amendment shall not change the basic character of the PUD or surrounding areas. d. Comply with other applicable standards. The proposed amendment shall comply with the other applicable standards of this Division 3, Planned Unit Development, including but not limited to Section 16A-5-300(c), General Restrictions, and Section 16A-5-310, Review Standards. 2 See Section 1 of the application notebook for the applicant's proposed justification of the amendments against the Municipal Code criteria. Town Council should be satisfied that the above criteria have been met and state as such as findings in their ordinance. V. DISCUSION ITEMS: ALTERNATIVES AND IMPLICATIONS TOGETHER WITH SUMMARY OF STAFF FINDINGS AND RECOMMENDATIONS Staff finds that for a Minor PUD Amendment level of review, the following core issues should be reviewed: CORE ISSUES— Pedestrian Circulation: The application indicates that elevator#2 will open on both sides on the arrival level, but the application's floor plans seem to show such opening on east side as a wall or window versus a door, also per the legend. Staff comments / recommendations: Staff previously had concerns about how the elevator doors would be accessed on both sides per the drawings provided. At the Planning Commission meeting on March 18`h, the applicant further explained that the two door openings would be for the elevator cab only, intended for future use, and that only one door opening for elevator#2 within the interim vertical circulation would be utilized at this time. Planning Commission findings / recommendations: In addition, the review comments dated March 16, 2009 from the Snowmass-Wildcat Fire Protection District should be addressed by the Applicant to the satisfaction of the Town Council prior to action on an ordinance involving the Minor PUD Amendment. Traffic Impacts: The Base Village Transportation Analysis and Parking Management Strategy of March 2004 assumed a reduction of the residential traffic trip generation rate by 40% and the commercial traffic trip generation rate by 50% to reflect the captive market and the central location of Base Village with the understanding that it also affects the parking demand. This would be in addition to the thought that Base Village is a mixed use, transit oriented project. In addition, Table 1 of the 'Base Village Vehicular Trip Generation Estimator Peak Season Day,' from the Base Village Traffic Impact Analysis (TIA) dated March 2004, estimated 1,800 vehicular daily trips to and from Base Village for buses, shuttle, taxis and limos. Many of these trips exist today, especially during peak times according to the traffic analysis. Staff comments/ recommendations: A traffic impact analysis was not provided with the Minor PUD Amendment for the proposed Building 7 amendment, since the amendment proposes an interim condition of vertical elements previously planned within the building. Staff believes there should be possible consideration at this time of allowing private vehicles to enter the driveway in front of Building 7, with a hallway access to the vertical circulation, in efforts to also better access the village pedestrian plaza above and to lessen interference with public transportation vehicles. 3 However, the related development agreement submitted with the recent Building 8 amendment via Ordinance 09-2, does state in subsection 1.7 that, "the Metro District and the Town will enter into an intergovernmental agreement (or'Joint Operating IGA) providing for the Town to have the right to administer the use of the Transit Office, the Transit office utility infrastructure, the bus lanes, the pedestrian areas, and the other areas within the Transit Center designed and reasonably necessary for use by the Town for public transportation purposes." Further the agreement explains that, "the Joint Operating IGA will provide for priority use by the Town of the Town Transit Facilities and may allow, subject to such terms and conditions as the Town may determine, for additional use of the Town Transit Facilities for private valet, shuttle, limousine, charter bus, or other transportation services." Planning Commission findings / recommendations: The interim closure or gating of the driveway in front of the Building 7 for construction access and fire lane purposes without a drop off area for private shuttle/vans/taxis/limos seems appropriate only as an interim plan. An appropriate location(s)for the arrival of non-Town Village Shuttles or non-RFTA vehicles (e.g., coaches, vans, limos, taxis, etc.) that provides the least amount of impact upon the transit center operations is a serious issue that ought to be further addressed to Town Council's satisfaction. The transit center was originally intended to serve Town Shuttles and RFTA vehicles only in order to achieve efficient public transportation operations. In addition, Planning Commission recommended that the screening of the light sources from the transit center, such as the use of a valance above the garage entrances, ought to be explored and provided to the satisfaction of the Town Council. i Base Village Parking Management Plan: According to the 'Check-In Parking /Van Drop off section of the PMP, "A total of 24 parking spaces are being provided under Building 2C and in front of Building 7 to allow short-term parking for guest arrival and check-in. The Bell Staff located at the entry to Building 7 will monitor these spaces. Bellman will offer to valet park vehicles for guests/owners after they have checked in or the guests may choose to self park in the designated residential space using their room key for access. Vans transporting skiers from other hotel properties from either Snowmass Village, Aspen or down valley will utilize the area directly in front of Building 7 to drop off and pick up skiers other than The Little Nell which will exclusively use the Building 8 entry area. Ski groups using coaches for transportation to the Base Village will be managed to utilize the arrival area of Building 7, but one of the below grade bus stops directly behind Building 7 may be utilized as available space permits, but priority will be given to public transit. Overnight coach parking for groups staying in the village will be offsite utilizing the Rodeo, Two Creeks or Intercept lots." The parking below Building 2C was previously removed by amendment. The proposed plans show the front entry driveway for construction access and a fire lane that would be gated on both sides without any adjoining parking. Adjoining perpendicular parking was originally shown in the plans. 4 Staff comments /recommendations: Based on the previously understood arrangement for usage of vans, shuttles and coaches in front of Building 7, perhaps the front entry drive ought to be considered available for usage by private vehicles in order to also provide access to the temporary vertical circulation or by way of temporary access to the village plaza from this area at this time. Without the front driveway, such private vehicles may inhibit the priority for public transit vehicles in the transit garage if they use that facility, subject to the provisions of the development agreement and a subsequent joint operating intergovernmental agreement (IGA) between the Metro District and the Town. If it is determined that the driveway should be used by private shuttles/vans, then construction access should not be granted through the area until the commencement of construction of the permanent Building 7. Another option would be to provide an acceptable designated area for these private vehicles to arrive and drop off day skiers. Planning Commission findings / recommendations: The removal of the parking for the front driveway entrance, as an interim condition only, seems acceptable. Such interim condition would not affect the previous approvals concerning the parking arrangements in front of Building 7. See the recommendation above concerning the locations for private vehicles. Interim Building Facade: The application proposes an interim facade treatment to enclose the vertical circulation components and the concrete support structure. Exterior finishes proposed include cultured stone as a wainscot treatment, painted hardie board in both a horizontal and vertical siding arrangement, asphalt shingles for the main roof, metal accent roofs, and minaret type metal cap features to finish off the exposed concrete support columns on the top level, together with a light brown and olive green color scheme for the temporary facade. Staff comments / recommendations: The building elevation drawings should note that the exterior finishes and color schemes would match materials on adjoining buildings. Staff questions why the painted hardie board on the west end edge of Building 7 over to Building 2C could not be cultured stone to match the cultured stone treatment on the east side of Building 7, but as further explained by the application at the March 18'" Planning Commission meeting, additional construction or structural components would need to be installed in this area in the future. In addition, perhaps the translucent plastic panels on the village plaza elevation could be enhanced by window trim or mullion details. The drawing should specify the interim window design on the other elevations as well. Lastly, the proposed interim facade treatment, exterior finishes, color schemes and intent should be described in more detail in the 'summary of changes' outlined in the application materials. Planning Commission findings / recommendations: Samples of the translucent plastic panels for the window type treatment for the temporary structure on the Village Level, or other examples such as frosted glass, ought to be submitted for review to the satisfaction of the Town Council. 5 Grading: The application indicates the need for a temporary wall for the fire lane in front of Building 7 on the Village Level. As further clarified by the applicant, the temporary wall would be located on the Village Level on the back side of temporary Building 7. There were bolder walls and a water feature proposed below the fire lane in front of Building 7 earlier. The interim condition proposes a seeded surface treatment with grading sloping up from street level to the north edge of the fire lane. Staff comment/ recommendation: Any interim retaining wall treatment should be designed with materials to match or complement the exterior finishes on the temporary building. Planning Commission findings/ recommendations: Planning Commission expressed no concerns on these matters in their review of the interim conditions proposed. Interim Landscape Plan: The temporary landscape plan shows 10, four-inch caliper Aspen trees and 7 regular sized Blue Spruce trees ranging from 8'-10' for five and 12'-14' for two evergreen trees among a native grass treatment for the surface areas in front of Building 7. Staff comments/ recommendations: If different sized plantings are proposed for the Blue Spruce trees, they should be designated by location on the plan. Staff recommends a few more evergreen trees near the corners of the building versus only one tree per building corner to provide a more significant buffer treatment for the proposed interim facade work by clustering the trees. The proposed interim landscape treatment should be described in more detail the 'summary of changes' outlined in the aRplication materials, including a means for temporary irrigation. At the March 18 Planning Commission meeting, the applicant verbally confirmed that temporary irrigation would be provided for the interim planting plan. Planning Commission findings / recommendations: Planning Commission found that the proposed temporary landscape plan for the Building 7 site would not affect the previously approved landscape plan for this area, and therefore, appears acceptable as the interim planting plan that also includes temporary irrigation. Fencing f Gates: An 8-foot tall fence is proposed on the village level next to the Phase 3 area. A 3'-6" high fence is proposed northwest of the building. Metal gates for the entry and exit area for the drive lane in front of Building 7 are shown on the drawings. Staff comments/ recommendations: The type of fencing and screening (if for a non-opaque fence) should be specified on the drawings via a typical detail(s) as described per the text. The type of 3'-6"fence along the northwest side of the building should also be specified. A detail showing the proposed type of metal gate for the front access driveway should be provided to determine the acceptability of the design. At the Planning Commission meeting on March 18`h, the applicant further explained that the metal gates for the fire lane in 6 front of Building 7 would be a tubular-formed non-opaque type of gate. No information was provided on the type of design intended for the 3'-6" fence. In attempts to address the Planning Commission recommendation below, staff suggested other fencing examples in Base Village, such as the fencing along the bridges, next to Building 2B or 2C, and the deck railings to provide some ideas for a fencing type that might be viewed more complementary. Planning Commission findings/ recommendations: The split rail fencing around the outside perimeter of the front side of the Building 7 site appears incompatibly rustic. The Applicant should explore other more complementary fencing alternatives for interim conditions on the site. Timing / Phasing. In accordance with the development agreement and the amendment application, the final, permanent Building 7 would be the next building completed after Phase 1, Building 13B and Building 8. The 2007 Construction Management Plan envisioned Building 7 as a whole being completed by November 2009. The 2008 Construction Management Plan was only granted approval up until April 2009. As of March 18`h, the day of the Planning Commission meeting, the applicant submitted a complete amendment application for the Base Village Construction Management Plan for 2009. In it, the CMP amendments state that start dates of buildings from April 11, 2011 to the end of the project are currently unknown. Staff comment/ recommendation: The CMP amendments will be scheduled as a separate item before the Town Council in April at which time staff will provide comments or recommendations. Planning Commission findings / recommendations: The timing or phasing of the permanent Building 7 seems inconsistent with the 2007 Construction Management Plan amendment as it called for the completion of Building 7 as a whole by November 2009. However, the amendment for the interim conditions seem consistent with the current Development Agreement submitted with the recent Minor PUD Amendment to Building 8 via Ordinance No. 2, Series of 2009. There appears to be a need to amend the current 2008 Construction Management to modify the timing or phasing for the completion of the permanent Building 7. IV. OTHER HEADINGS RELATED TO THE TOPICS Attachments: 1. Review comments received from referral agencies as of the writing of this report, including comments dated March 16, 2009 from the Snowmass-Wildcat Fire Protection District and comments dated March 17, 2009 from the Transportation Department; 2. Signed Planning Commission Resolution No. 8, Series of 2009; and 3. Ordinance No. 5, Series of 2009. Separate Handout: Applicant's supplemental packet of replies and drawings dated March 25, 2009 in response to staff comments and Planning Commission recommendations. 7 Separate Handout Previously Issued: Application notebook dated March 5, 2009 together with 11" x 17" drawing set illustrating the proposed changes that were previously referred as of March 11, 2009. V. NEXT STEPS Review, consider and act upon first reading of Ordinance No. 5, Series of 2009, as may be modified at the meeting; or Continue the item to the next meeting to allow for further review or follow up if needed. 8 ATTACHMENT 1 TC Report 04-06-09 Interim Building 7 Review comments received from referral agencies as of the writing of this report Includes Comments dated March 16, 2009 from the Snowmass-Wildcat Fire Protection District and Comments dated March 17, 2009 from the Transportation Department 3-16-09 To: Jim Wahlstrom, Senior Planner RECEY r r,D From: John T. Mele, Fire Marshal MAR 17 2009 Re: Base Village Building 7- Minor PUD Amendment Snowmass wiage Community Development The Snowmass-Wildcat Fire Protection District has reviewed the Building 7 Application with the following comments. 1. Exhibit A, page 1 of 7 (item #14) suggests that fire sprinklers would be located only within the work boundary areas. This is inconsistent with Fire and Building Codes (IFC 901.5.1) states that, "It shall be unlawful to occupy any portion of a building or structure until the required fire protection, alarm and suppression systems have been tested and approved". The 2003 IFC Fire Code Commentary further supports that the installation of many fire protection systems and the associated code trade-offs permitted for a given occupancy assume complete building protection and not iust the occupied areas. We strongly maintain that the entire building have all required fire and life safety features installed and fully tested before partial occupancy. 2. Ordinance 21 Series of 2004 states that Building 7 will be classified as a Type IV, Heavy Timber building. This was adopted by the Town Council to further insure the fire resistance capabilities of building 7 within Base Village. This in itself may require an administrative review as the temporary structure proposed is not of this construction type. 3. We further believe that Building 7 (technically a four story building) will see significant occupancy and traffic that warrants a higher rated exit stairwell design than the proposed batt insulation and 5/8 drywall on both sides. This stairwell will be the only fire escape provided to occupants in this building as the elevators and escalators are not viable emergency exits. Furthermore it has been suggested that this temporary structure may be in use for quite some time. The IFC and the IBC ( IFC 1019.1 Enclosures required) both state that " Interior exit stairways and interior exit ramps shall be enclosed with fire barriers. Exit enclosures shall have a fire resistance rating of not less than 2 hours where connecting four stories or more..." In our opinion the proposed design does not meet the required exit enclosure ratings required for fire and life safety. We remain available to discuss these matters with the Applicant and the Planning Department. TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE TRANSPORTATION DEPARTMENT CIMED TO: Planning Department MAR 2 QUA09FROM: David Peckler RE: Base Village Building 7 — Minor PUD Amendment Snowmass Village DATE: March 17, 2009 co y " , Development The application seems to be about the same as the previous drafts that I have reviewed. I am appreciative of the efforts to date to address the issues I have raised regarding the transit operations with the facility, most notably the amenities for the transit facility. It is also positive that the formalization of a number of previous understandings between the applicant's predecessor and Town have been documented in the Development Agreement. Still, little is changed in the core issues I have concerning the transit facility. My issues are: 1 do worry about the quality of service being provided by the one way escalators. To me this is an aesthetic issue as much as a practical issue. I worry that the customer's view of the one way escalator could keep us from becoming the 'world class" resort that we aspire to be. The agreement allows for an experiment to test the practicality of the vertical conveyance. However, it will not be a test of the vertical conveyance under the full demand of a completed PUD. We seem to perceive the vertical conveyance is for the movement of skiers, much like an escalator at an athletic stadium. The truth is that the conveyance should provide for the movement_required of a residential and retail core for a community_. I am willing to take the Wait and see approach; so long as it will not preclude correcting the situation should the need arise before the final application for Building 7. 1 do worry about the ambience in the transit facility when we limit the heating elements to one heater per bay, It is my opinion that the environment will be extremely Spartan, leaving many customers in a less than satisfactory environment. Pedestrian queuing space has been reduced with various changes, so passengers will be spread across the length of the pullouts. I am also concerned about the long term effects of using deicers to control ice buildup in the facility (scabbing of the concrete). I think that more radiant heaters focusing on the pedestrian walkways would be better alternative for both the ambience.and maintenance of the facility. I am concerned about the Town's ability to practically restrict the use of the transit facility to public mass transit. There seems to be growing concerns about accommodating alternative transportation services identified in the memorandums. The memorandums and agreement reference that the Joint Operating IGA "may allow, subject to such terms and conditions as the Town may determine, for additional use of the Town Transit Facilities for private valet, shuttle, limousine, charter bus, or other transportation services." I reference this because the facility_ was designed and built to the minimum recommended standards in the Comprehensive. Plan, Chapter 7, Table 7.6 for the TOSV and RFTA services only. The "Other needs—identified in the table were not specifically addressed in the transit facility. I am concerned that the referenced list of additional uses could become a daily request. During the winter operations, it will be problematic to accommodate the requests in the transit facility. The following are my observations on the application for amendment concerning the interim conditions. 1. Section 2, Page 2 6. C: As stated above, the seven heaters are less than desirable for the pedestrian spaces in the transit facility. The propsed'unitti most likely donotfit'in two of the bays on the south side of the transit facility, or will be located in an unusual location. 2. Section 2, Page 3 6. F: Configuration of office space makes_the98 feet not entirely useable. We have been requesting 100 sq It of usable_ interior space. 3. Section 2, Page 3-6'"G—. Tfiis appears Co be a new room. I don't doubt that the parking managers/employees need office space to manage program. I am not sure how the three doors accessing the rooms in the passenger queuing area will function during busy periods. 4. Appendix A, Page 2 1 .2 (a) (1): The radiant heaters are identified, but a number not listed. My issue is the same as mentioned above. 5. Appendix A, Page 2 1.2 (b) (i): Office space is mentioned again and dimension is stated as "no less than 96 square feet." I would like to know that the space is interior space and usable space. 6. Appendix A, Page 2 1.2 (b) (ii): In Exhibit A one of the camera locations is missing in the exhibit. I have spoken to Mak concerning this, so he is aware of E. There were clearance issues with the original proposed location on the entry door. One should be mounted inside the door. 7. Appendix A, Page 3 1.2 © (i): See my previous comments on two escalators above. 8. Appendix A, Page 4 1.2 (e): The Transit Office is being conveyed to the Base Village Metropolitan District No. 1. In this section it references the rights of ft.Tqwn in Section_ 1.7. Are the Town's rights covered by the statements in Section 1.7? 9. Appendix A, Page 5 1.6: 1 am glad to see that there is a review and assessment of the adequacy" of the one way escalators. My concern is that you will not see the full demand for up and down circulation until the PUD is completed. Not sure how to determine the movements of the residential and commercial elements of the PUD relative to determining the Adequacy" for the one way escalators. 10.Appendix A, Page 5 1.7: There are a number of agreements referenced in the section: existing easements and agreements with BVO," "the tax-exempt bonds," "Consolidated Service Plan for Base village Metropolitan District Nos. 1 & 2 ... October 17, 2006." Will the Town's objective of managing the transit services to Base Village be impacted by anything in these agreements? 11.Appendix A, Page 5 1.7: The statement "The Joint Operating IGA will provide for priority use by the Town of the_ T wn _Transit_Facilities and may allow, subject to such terms 'and conditions as the Town may determine, for additional use of the Town Transit Facilities for private valet, shuttle, limousine, charter bus, or other transportation service." I am worried that by default, the Town will be compromised into providing access for other services because there spay be no other alternatives; much like we are being pushed into providing services to Base Village for events prior to the completion of the Town Transit Facilities. Given that the facility was designed for the minimal requirements that staff thought should be provided for Village Shuttle and RFTA service, I am worried that pressure could be great to start giving access to bays for other transportation providers. 12.Exhibit A 1 General #4: 1 have covered the escalator issues above. 13.Exhibit A 1 Arrival Level #8: 1 have covered the "seven overhead radiant heaters above, 14.Exhibit A 1 Transit Related Needs #3: The square footage of the office space should be consistent with the rest of the text, and should refe nercethe "usable interior space. 15.Exhibit W-2. Transit Office is constantly moving and changing. The final space should be shown as consistent in all documents. 16.Appendix B Memorandum 2/5/2009, Pages 2-3: Under the section on the Town's Right to Use, Operate and Control the Transit Center After Completion and the references therein to the Shared Use Agreement, is the Town's authority to control the access to the Transit Facility adequately protected? The statement "and to open the Transit Center as a fully operational facility to valet, shuttle and bus service and other authorized uses, may be considered by District No. 1 and BVO consistent with the Shared Use agreement?" 17.Appendix B Memorandum 2/11/2009, Page3: Is the_Town's_authority to control the services being accommodated in the Transit Center covered by the statement "The JointOp jating I'GA will provide, amongother things, for priority use by the Town _and _Roaring Fork Transit Authority of the Transit Center and allow additional use of the Transit Center for valet, shuttle, limousine, charter bus or other transportation services for the benefit of+thepublicasthe Town aydetermine?", 18.Attachment, Page 1 Summary of Changes 2. A.: Same issues concerning escalators as mentioned above. 19.Attachment, Page 1 Summary of Changes 6. C.: Seven radiant heaters issues as mentioned above. 20.Attachment, Page 1 Summary of Changes 6. F.: Make sure the transit office space square footage is consistent throughout the documents. 21.A tachment;`Page-24'P3 Garage Plan: A camera is not shown at the entrance to the Transit Center on the Lower Carriageway entrance. I have spoken to Mak that the unit needs to monitor bus bays and can be pulled inside the building to be clear of the minimum height requirements. 22.Attachment, Page 25 P3 Transit Office, Break Room, Parking Office: The configuration of the transit office as presented is less than we had previously discussed, and I don't think will meet the requirements we will have to manage the operations from here. I would like to get to 100 sq It of usable interior space, not loose 10 sq ft to a door access. RECE D MAR 2 0 2009 nowmass Village Community Development ATTACHMENT 2 TC Report 04-06-09 TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE Interim Building 7 PLANNING COMMISSION RESOLUTION NO. 08 SERIES OF 2009 A RESOLUTION PROVIDING THE PLANNING COMMISSION RECOMMENDATIONS REGARDING THE BASE VILLAGE MINOR PUD AMENDMENT APPLICATION FOR BUILDING 7 INTERIM CONDITIONS. WHEREAS, the Base Village Final Planned Unit Development ("BV PUD") was approved by Town Council Ordinance No. 21, Series of 2004 ("Ordinance 21"); and WHEREAS, the Base Village Planned Unit Development Guide ("PUD Guide"), attached as Exhibit "B" of said ordinance, sets forth the zoning and development -- parameters for the individual buildings and lots within the BV PUD; and WHEREAS, the Base Village Owner, LLC ("Applicant"), as consented by Related WestPac, LLC ("Owner"), submitted a Minor PUD Amendment application concerning certain modifications to Building 7 proposing interim conditions, as determined to be complete on March 6, 2009, including in summary: a) an interim Building 7 arrangement; b) a request to preserve the vesting granted via Ordinance 04-21; c) an interim fagade treatment for the enclosure of the vertical components within Building 7; d) an interim landscape plan; e) changes to the transit garage, to include a transit office, parking garage management office, and employee break room and other items identified in the development agreement scope of work outline (see page 1 of 7, Exhibit A' of the development agreement of the application notebook dated March 5, 2009); and WHEREAS, said application is more fully described within the application notebook and supplemental 11" x 17 drawings and information dated March 5, 2009, incorporated herein by reference; and WHEREAS, a public meeting was scheduled before the Planning Commission on March 18, 2009 to receive an initial presentation by the Applicant and to begin review of the application, to hear the recommendations of Town Staff, and to consider and act upon this resolution; and WHEREAS, said application was considered by the Planning Commission pursuant to Section 16A-5-390 of the Municipal Code. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED by the Planning Commission of the Town of Snowmass Village, Colorado; Section One: General Findings. The Planning Commission generally finds: PC Reso.09-08 Page 2 of 4 1. The Applicant has submitted sufficient information pursuant to Section 16A-5-390 of the Municipal Code to permit the Town Staff and the Planning Commission an adequate review of the proposed Minor PUD Amendment. 2. Except as noted within Section Two below, the application seems compliant with the applicable review standards specified within Section 16A-5-390(3) of the Municipal Code. Section Two: Specific Findings and Recommendations. The Planning Commission specifically finds and recommends as follows: 1. Consistent with the original PUD. Given the special circumstances, the proposed modifications must be found to be consistent with, or an enhancement of, the original PUD approval. The proposed amendments to Building 7 for the planned interim conditions are consistent with or an enhancement to the original BV PUD as additional enhancements are proposed within the vertical circulation area and the adjoining transit center. 2. Buildout / Unit Equivalency / Unit Re-configuration. The buildout, unit equivalency or unit configuration is not being affected by the amendments for the interim conditions. 3. Employee Housing. Employee housing requirements or mitigation thereof is not being affected by the amendments for the interim conditions. 4. Total Floor Area / Maximum F.A.R. The floor area or maximum F.A.R. at buildout of the permanent Building 7 would not be affected at this time by the proposed amendments involving the interim conditions. The interior floor plan of Building 7 appears to be affected by a stairwell, a mechanical room, future impacts upon a fireplace location, and reorientation or relocation of ski locker spaces and circulation/corridors/lobby areas at this time which as a whole appear acceptable. 5. Building Architecture. The interim facade exterior to enclose the vertical circulation components within Building 7 in the interim would not affect the previously approved building elevations for Building 7 and therefore appears acceptable. 6. Landscape Plan. The proposed temporary landscape plan for the Building 7 site would not affect the previously approved landscape plan for this area and therefore appears acceptable as the interim planting plan also includes temporary irrigation. 7. Circulation / Access: The interim closure or gating of the driveway in front of the Building 7 for construction access and fire lane purposes without a drop off area for private shuttle/vans/taxis/limos seems appropriate only as an interim plan. PC Reso.09-08 Page 3 of 4 8. Parking. The removal of the parking for the front driveway entrance, as an interim condition only, seems acceptable. Such interim condition would not affect the previous approvals concerning the parking arrangements in front of Building 7. 9. Timing / Phasing. The timing or phasing of the permanent Building 7 seems inconsistent with the 2007 Construction Management Plan amendment as it called for the completion of Building 7 as a whole by November 2009. However, the amendment for the interim conditions seem consistent with the current Development Agreement submitted with the recent Minor PUD Amendment to Building 8 via Ordinance No. 2, Series of 2009. There appears to be a need to amend the current 2008 Construction Management to modify the timing or phasing for the completion of the permanent Building 7. 10. Other Review Standards. In addition to addressing the criteria above for consistency or enhancement of the original PUD, the proposed interim condition - amendments to Building 7, (a) should not have a substantially adverse effect on the neighborhood surrounding the land where the amendment is proposed, or have a substantially adverse impact on the enjoyment of land abutting upon or across the street from the subject property, (b) should not change the basic character of the PUD or surrounding areas, and (c) should comply with other applicable standards or as generally addressed per the core issue findings and recommendations stated above. Section Three: Action. Based upon the fundamental condition that a completion date be determined for permanent Building 7 as approved, or as may be amended, to the satisfaction of the Town Council, and pursuant to the findings and recommendations in Sections One and Two above, the Planning Commission hereby recommends that Town Council approve the Minor PUD Amendment to Building 7 interim conditions, as further described within the referenced application documents listed below, subject to addressing the following recommendations: Section Four: Recommendations. The Planning Commission offers the following recommendations for consideration by the Town Council: 1. The split rail fencing around the outside perimeter of the front side of the Building 7 site appears incompatibly rustic. The Applicant should explore other more complementary fencing alternatives for interim conditions on the site. 2. Screening of the light sources from the transit center, such as the use of a valance above the garage entrances, ought to be explored and provided to the satisfaction of the Town Council. 3. Samples of the translucent plastic panels for the window type treatment for the temporary structure on the Village Level, or other examples such as frosted glass, ought to be submitted for review to the satisfaction of the Town Council. PC Reso.09-08 Page 4 of 4 4. The review comments dated March 16, 2009 from the Snowmass-Wildcat Fire Protection District should be addressed by the Applicant to the satisfaction of the Town Council prior to action on an ordinance involving the Minor PUD Amendment. 5. An appropriate location(s) for the arrival of non-Town Village Shuttles or non-RFTA vehicles (e.g., coaches, vans, limos, taxis, etc.) that provides the least amount of impact upon the transit center operations is a serious issue that ought to be further addressed to Town Council's satisfaction. The transit center was originally intended to serve Town Shuttles and RFTA vehicles only in order to achieve efficient public transportation operations. INTRODUCED, READ, AND ADOPTED, as amended, on the motion of Planning Commission member Gustafson and the second of Planning Commission member Faurer by a vote of 6 in favor and 0 against, on this 18`" day of March 2009 Commissioner Sirkus absent). TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE PLANNING COMMISSION Bob Purvis, Chairman ATTEST: Kris i Holliday, PlanninV Commission Secretary Reference Material: Application Notebook and 11" x 1 T' drawing set dated March 5, 2009. ATTACHMENT 3 TC Report 04-06-09 Interim Building 7 1 TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE 2 TOWN COUINCIL 3 4 ORDINANCE NO. 05 5 SERIES OF 2009 6 7 AN ORDINANCE REGARDING THE BASE VILLAGE MINOR PUD AMENDMENT 8 APPLICATION FOR INTERIM BUILDING 7. 9 10 WHEREAS, the Base Village Final Planned Unit Development ("BV PUD") was 11 approved by Town Council Ordinance No. 21, Series of 2004 ("Ordinance 21"); and 12 13 WHEREAS, the Base Village Planned Unit Development Guide ("PUD Guide"), 14 attached as Exhibit "B" of said ordinance, sets forth the zoning and development 15 parameters for the individual buildings and lots within the BV PUD; and 16 17 WHEREAS, the Base Village Owner, LLC ("Applicant"), as consented by Related 18 WestPac, LLC ("Owner"), submitted a Minor PUD Amendment application concerning 19 certain modifications to Building 7 proposing interim conditions, as determined to be 20 complete on March 6, 2009, including in summary: a) an interim Building 7 21 arrangement; b) a request to preserve the vesting granted via Ordinance 04-21; c) an 22 interim facade treatment for the enclosure of the vertical components within Building 7; 23 d) an interim landscape plan; e) changes to the transit garage, to include a transit office, 24 parking garage management office, and employee break room and other items 25 identified in the development agreement scope of work outline (see page 1 of 7, Exhibit 26 'A' of the development agreement of the application notebook dated March 5, 2009); 27 and 28 29 WHEREAS, said application is more fully described within the application 30 notebook and supplemental 11" x 17 drawings and information dated March 5, 2009, 31 incorporated herein by reference; and 32 33 WHEREAS, a public meeting was scheduled before the Planning Commission 34 on March 18, 2009 to receive an initial presentation by the Applicant and to begin review 35 of the application, to hear the recommendations of Town Staff, and to consider and act 36 upon Resolution No. 8, Series of 2009, providing their recommendations to the Town 37 Council; and 38 39 WHEREAS, on March 25, 2009, the applicant submitted a supplement packet of 40 written replies and modified drawings in response to staff comments and Planning 41 Commission recommendations, incorporated herein by reference; and 42 43 WHEREAS, a public meeting was scheduled on April 6, 2009 for the Town 44 Council to review the application, consider staff and Planning Commission 45 recommendations, and consider first reading of this ordinance; and, a public hearing TC Ord 09-05 Page 2 of 5 46 was scheduled on April 20, 2009 to hear comments from the public and to consider 47 second reading and action upon this ordinance; and 48 49 WHEREAS, a public hearing notice was arranged for publication in the 50 Snowmass Sun on April 1, 2009 for the scheduled Town Council meeting on April 20, 51 2009; and 52 53 WHEREAS, said application was reviewed and considered by the Town Council 54 pursuant to Section 16A-5-390 of the Municipal Code. 55 56 NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED by the Town Council of the Town of Snowmass 57 Village, Colorado: 58 59 Section One: General Findings. The Town Council generally finds that: 60 61 1. The Applicant has submitted sufficient information pursuant to Section 16A-5-390 of 62 the Municipal Code to permit the Town Staff and the Planning Commission an 63 adequate review of the proposed Minor PUD Amendment. 64 65 2. Public hearing notification requirements were scheduled to be met for this 66 application pursuant to Municipal Code Section 16A-5-60, including the Applicant's 67 submittal of the signed affidavits for the mailing and posting of the hearing notice. 68 69 3. Except as noted within Section Two below, the application seems compliant with the 70 applicable review standards specified within Section 16A-5-390(3) of the Municipal 71 Code. 72 73 4. The applicant's supplemental package and modified drawings in response to staff 74 comments and Planning Commission recommendations are acceptable for review 75 purposes. 76 77 Section Two: Specific Findings. The Town Council specifically finds that: 78 79 1. Consistent with the original PUD. Given the special circumstances, the proposed 80 modifications must be found to be consistent with, or an enhancement of, the 81 original PUD approval. The proposed amendments to Building 7 for the planned 82 interim conditions are consistent with or an enhancement to the original BV PUD, as 83 additional enhancements are satisfactorily proposed within the vertical circulation 84 area and the adjoining transit center. 85 86 2. Buildout / Unit Equivalency / Unit Re-configuration. The buildout, unit 87 equivalency or unit configuration is not being affected by the amendments for the 88 interim conditions. 89 TG Ord 09-05 Page 3 of 5 90 3. Employee Housing. Employee housing requirements or mitigation thereof is not 91 being affected by the amendments for the interim conditions. 92 93 4. Total Floor Area / Maximum F.A.R. The floor area or maximum F.A.R. at buildout 94 of the permanent Building 7 would not be affected at this time by the proposed 95 amendments involving the proposed interim conditions. The interior floor plan of 96 Building 7 appears to be affected by a stairwell, a mechanical room, future impacts 97 upon a fireplace location, and reorientation or relocation of ski locker spaces and 98 circulation/corridors/lobby areas at this time which as a whole are acceptable as an 99 interim condition. 100 101 5. Building Architecture. The interim fagade exterior to enclose the vertical 102 circulation components within Building 7 and the partially completed super structure 103 in the interim would not affect the previously approved building elevations for 104 Building 7 and therefore is acceptable as an interim condition. 105 106 6. Landscape Plan. The proposed temporary landscape plan for the Building 7 site 107 would not affect the previously approved landscape plan for this area, and therefore 108 is acceptable as the interim planting plan also includes temporary irrigation. 109 110 7. Circulation / Access: The interim closure or gating of the driveway in front of the 111 Building 7 for construction access and fire lane purposes without a drop off area for 112 private shuttle/vans/taxis/limos is acceptable as an interim plan condition only. 113 114 8. Parking. The removal of the parking for the front driveway entrance, as an interim 115 condition only, is acceptable. Such interim condition would not affect the previous 116 approvals concerning the parking arrangements in front of Building 7. 117 118 9. Timing / Phasing. The timing or phasing of the permanent Building 7 is 119 inconsistent with the 2007 Construction Management Plan amendment as it called 120 for the completion of Building 7 as a whole by November 2009. However, the 121 amendment for the interim conditions is acceptably consistent with the current 122 Development Agreement submitted with the recent Minor PUD Amendment to 123 Building 8 via Ordinance No. 2, Series of 2009. 124 125 10. Other Review Standards. In addition to addressing the criteria above for 126 consistency or enhancement of the original PUD, the proposed amendment for 127 interim Building 7, (a) shall not have a substantially adverse effect on the 128 neighborhood surrounding the land where the amendment is proposed, or have a 129 substantially adverse impact on the enjoyment of land abutting upon or across the 130 street from the subject property, (b) shall not change the basic character of the PUD 131 or surrounding areas, and (c) shall comply with other applicable standards or as 132 generally addressed per the core issue findings and recommendations stated above. 133 TC Ord 09.05 Page 4 of 5 134 Section Three: Action. Based upon the fundamental condition that a completion date 135 be determined for permanent Building 7 as approved, or as may be amended to the 136 satisfaction of the Town Council, and pursuant to the findings and recommendations in 137 Sections One and Two above, the Town Council approves the Minor PUD Amendment 138 for interim Building 7, and modifications thereto, as further described within the 139 referenced application documents listed below, subject to complying with or 140 implementing the following conditions below in Section Four of this ordinance. 141 142 Section Four: Conditions. As conditions of the final approval granted herein, the 143 Applicant shall comply with or implement the following: 144 145 1. Fencing. In lieu of split rail fencing around the front perimeter of the interim Building 146 7 site conditions, the applicant shall consider installing fencing that complements the 147 fencing or railing installations in Base Village, such as the fencing along the bridges, 148 next to Building 2B or 2C, and/or the deck railings on the existing buildings. 149 150 2. Window treatment on interim facade. The applicant shall consider that installation 151 of frosted glass or other similar examples as feasible, in lieu of translucent plastic 152 panels for the window type treatment for the temporary structure on the Village Level 153 to the final satisfaction of the Planning Director prior to issuance of a building permit. 154 155 3. Parking. The interim condition of no parking in front of interim Building 7 shall not 156 affect the previous approvals concerning the parking arrangements in front of 157 permanent Building 7. 158 159 4. Non-public transportation vehicles. The transit center was originally intended and 160 shall continue to serve Town Shuttles and RFTA vehicles only in order to achieve 161 efficient public transportation operations. Prior to operation of the transit center, the 162 applicant shall provide an appropriate location(s) for the arrival of non-Town Village 163 Shuttles or non-RFTA vehicles (e.g., coaches, vans, limos, taxis, etc.) that provides 164 the least amount of impact upon the transit center operations to the satisfaction of 165 the Town's Transportation Director. 166 167 5. Screening of the light sources. The applicant shall consider the installation of a 168 valance at both entries/exit points to the transit center, perhaps in the form of black 169 vertical blinds that would not interfere with transit vehicles, in efforts to screen the 170 light sources from the transit center to the satisfaction of the Planning Director and 171 the Transportation Director prior to opening the transit center for operations. 172 173 6. Fire District comments. The applicant shall satisfactorily address the comments 174 dated March 16, 2009 from the Snowmass-Wildcat Fire Protection District prior to 175 issuance of a Certificate of Occupancy to the satisfaction of the Town's Chief 176 Building Official. 177 TC Ord 09.05 Page 5 of 5 178 7. Timing / Phasing. By separate application, the applicant shall complete the 179 amendment process to modify the current 2008 Construction Management for the 180 proper or planned timing or phasing of the completion of the permanent Building 7 181 prior to issuance of a building permit for interim Building 7. 182 183 Section Five: PUD Enforcement. The terms and conditions of this Ordinance and the 184 Minor PUD Amendment Application and modifications thereto approved hereby, are 185 enforceable by the Town without restriction in accordance with the provisions of Section 186 16A-5-380(a), Enforcement of approved PUD plan, of the Municipal Code. 187 Enforcement in favor of residents, as contemplated in Section 16A-5-380(b) of the 188 Municipal Code is hereby limited to fee simple owners and the master association. 189 190 Section Six: Severability. If any provision of this Ordinance or application hereof to 191 any person or circumstance is held invalid, the invalidity will not affect any other 192 provision or application of this Ordinance which can be given effect without the invalid 193 provision or application, and, to this end, the provisions of this Ordinance are severable. 194 195 INTRODUCED, READ, AND APPROVED on first reading on the motion of Town 196 Council member and the second of Town Council member 197 by a vote of_ in favor and _against, on this 6h day of April 2009. 198 199 READ, APPROVED, AND ADOPTED on second reading on the motion of Town Council 200 member and the second of Town Council member by a 201 vote of_ in favor and _against, on this 201h day of April 2009. 202 203 TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE 204 205 206 207 Bill Boineau, Mayor 208 ATTEST: 209 210 211 Rhonda B. Coxon, Town Clerk 212 213 APPROVED AS TO FORM: 214 215 216 John C. Dresser, Jr., Town Attorney 217 218 Reference Material: 219 Application Notebook and 11" x 17" drawing set dated March 5, 2009; and 220 Supplement package dated March 25, 2009 with written replies and modified drawings 221 in response to staff comments and Planning Commission recommendations. MEMORANDUM TO: Snowmass Village Town Council FROM: Planning Department MTG. DATE: April 6, 2009 SUBJECT: DISCUSSION - CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT PLAN PROPOSED ADMINISTRATIVE MODIFICATION REGARDING BASE VILLAGE CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT PLAN (CMP) AMENDMENTS. APPLICANT: Related WestPac, LLC on behalf of Base Village Owner, LLC PLANNER: Chris Conrad, Planning Director I. PURPOSE AND ACTION REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: This meeting is for purpose of reviewing the application, pursuant to Municipal Code Section 16A-5.250, Administrative modifications, for the proposed 2009 Base Village CMP and Phasing amendments. The action requested of Council would be to provide comments and direction to Staff concerning action or modification of the attached Record of Decision ("ROD") (See Attachment 1). 11. SUMMARY OF DESCRIPTION OF PROJECT. According to the Applicant's cover letter dated March 3, 2009, the Applicant's purpose of the administrative modification application is to, "update the CMP due to the inherent changes associated with a lengthy construction project as certain refinements and modifications have been made to the schedule and the narrative to reflect the latest Town Ordinance No. 12, Series of 2007 (CCIMP) and to reflect the Applicants latest thinking based on speed of construction weighed against community impact" A summary of the changes is listed in more detail in the attached draft Record of Decision. The application is not very complex; however, Staff suggests council may wish to discuss some core issue concerns or potential discussion topics: 1. The extensive amount of land being designated and fenced for "construction staging" and whether it would be more appropriate for these areas to be reduced as reasonably needed for the intended projects occurring within the CMP timeframe. 2. The existing surface area of Lot 2 (above the parking structure) may be used as a staging area for Interim Building 7 and Building 8 construction. If not, should discussion occur regarding some potential clean up due to the uncertainty of when construction within that are may occur. 1 3. Staff recommended changes to the "Storm Water Management and Erosion Control" portion of the plan (see Conditions 7 & 8 of the ROD). 4. Moving the construction fencing away from the road surface edge along Wood Road to provide for separation and moderate landscape buffer. 5. Whether some accommodation could occur to enable the ski back trail to be used for summer trail use. III. BACKGROUND According to Condition No. 14, Construction Management Plan, of the Base Village Final PUD Ordinance No. 21, Series of 2004, it states: The hours during which construction activities occur will be in conformance with the provisions contained in Chapter 18 of the Municipal Code. Due to the phasing and lengthy development construction period, certain refinements, modifications, or amendments to the Construction Management Plan may be required in the future by the Town to mitigate impacts which were not apparent at the time of adoption of this Ordinance. The Planning Director is authorized to require reasonable amendments to the plan as determined to be reasonable and necessary to mitigate an unforeseen impact. The Applicant will either amend their plan accordingly or request that the matter be reviewed by Town Council for final determination." Staff believes an administrative modification application is required to either document the authorization of the proposed changes, or if denied, to document the reasons why such changes are not permissible pursuant to the review criteria in the Municipal Code. IV. APPLICABLE REGULATIONS Municipal Code review criteria, which regulate the review and approval of Administrative Modification applications are included in Section 16A-5-250. The final decision making authority needs to be comfortable in stating the following findings in a Record of Decision per the Code: Activities that shall not be considered administrative include: 1. changes to the overall character of the project; 2. changes that substantially increase trip generation or the demand of public facilities; 3. changes that are inconsistent with a condition or a representation of the project's original approval; or 4. that requires granting a further variation from that granted in the original approval. The proposed modification shall be the result of circumstances that could not have been reasonably anticipated by the applicant prior to or during the original approval process; and 2 Any adverse impacts on surrounding properties from the proposed modification shall be insubstantial. V. DISCUSSION ITEMS: Please review the attached Record of Decision and provide comments for consideration prior to completing the ROD> VI. NEXT STEPS Direct Staff to finalize the Record of Decision for the administrative modification application, as may be amended at the meeting; or Table the item to the next meeting to review supplemental information, as may be desired by the Council in reviewing the application. Attachments: Draft Record of Decision. Separate Handouts: 2009 Base Village Construction Management Plan (CMP) dated March 3, 2009 3 ldX7n f' SNOWMASSW E 0 AG are 2 DRAFT Record of Decision DRAFT 3 Planning Director Administrative Modification #33 4 2009 Base Village Construction Management and Phasing Changes 5 6 The Applicant, Related WestPac, LLC, applied on March 18, 2009 for changes to the 7 Base Village Construction Management Plan (CMP) as required in Ordinance No. 21, Series of 8 2004, (Ordinance 21) Section Three, Condition No. 14 which states: 9 10 The hours during which construction activities occur will be in conformance with 11 the provisions contained in Chapter 18 of the Municipal Code. Due to the phasing 12 and lengthy development construction period, certain refinements, modifications, or 13 amendments to the Construction Management Plan may be required in the future 14 by the Town to mitigate impacts which were not apparent at the time of adoption of 15 this Ordinance. The Planning Director is authorized to require reasonable 16 amendments to the plan as determined to be reasonable and necessary to mitigate 17 an unforeseen impact. The Applicant will either amend their plan accordingly or 18 request that the matter be reviewed by Town Council for final determination." 19 20 Pursuant to the final approvals for Base Village, a "Planning Director Administrative 21 Modification" is allowed pursuant to the review criteria and standards established in the Final 22 PUD Guide of Ordinance No. 21, Series of 2004 ("Ordinance 21"), regarding the approval of the 23 Base Village Final PUD (the "Project'), and pursuant to Municipal Code Section 16A-5-250, 24 Administrative Modifications. 25 26 The proposal is for the purpose of amending certain provisions in the text, the time frame 27 or phasing schedules, and the colored phasing diagrams for the construction of infrastructure 28 and buildings and other physical development, such as staging areas and access points for 29 construction, in the Base Village CMP and Phasing schedules, attached hereto and 30 incorporated herein as Exhibit "A". 31 32 At the meeting on April 6, 2009, Town Council directed certain edits to this Record of 33 Decision as well as further directives concerning future reviews of construction management 34 plan and phasing changes, which are further reflected in this Record of Decision. 35 36 General Changes: In summary, the Applicant has determined that it is necessary to focus 37 their construction efforts from April 2009 to April 2011. Projects anticipated to occur within this 38 timeframe involve: 39 40 1. Complete and asphalt Wood Road between Wood Road Bridge (drive over/ski under) 41 and the Building 13AB driveway. This will involve controlled access along Wood Road 42 between April 13 — November 26, 2009; 43 Planning Director Adm. Mod. Record of Decision No. 33 2009 Base Village CMP & Phasing Amdts. Page 2 of 6 44 2. Construct the snowmelted entrance to the garage from Wood Road between April 13— 45 November 26, 2009. It is anticipated that the covered driveway bridge would be 46 removed and access to the parking structure would be limited to Carriageway Road only 47 until the snowmelting installation is completed; 48 49 3. Commence construction of the Interim Building 7 and Transit Facility for completion in 50 December 17, 2009; 51 52 4. Continue construction of Buildings 13A, 13B and 8 anticipating completion of Building 53 13A by April, 2010, Building 8 by November, 2010 and Building 13B by April, 2011; 54 55 5. Continue to make the Lot C parking area, involving 150 spaces, available each ski 56 season through April, 2011; 57 58 6. Identified construction staging areas and construction fencing locations for the subject 59 period; 60 61 7. Requested authorization for the construction fencing to be either chain link with 62 screened mesh or wood with the type of fencing being at the applicant's discretion and 63 to place graphics on the fencing with Planning Director approval; 64 65 Proposed changes beyond April 11, 2011: The applicant indicates that the exact start date of 66 improvements from April 11, 2011 to the end of the Base Village project is currently unknown. 67 When construction does start up on future improvements it will follow the last approved Phasing 68 sequence identified within this CMP. 69 The Wood/Brush Creek Road roundabout is intended to be completed (pursuant to item 2.1.e of 70 the Funding Agreement dated November 4`h, 2004) prior to the issuance of a certificate of 71 occupancy for Buildings 5, 9AB & 9C. The completion of the Upper Wood Road improvements 72 to Fanny Hill Cabins are proposed to be phased with the openings of the Buildings along Wood 73 Road (Buildings 10, 11, 12 & the Fanny Hill Town Homes). 74 75 76 Section One: Findings. Pursuant to the criteria in the Final PUD Guide referenced by 77 Ordinance No. 21, Series of 2004, the proposed changes to the Base Village Construction 78 Management and Phasing plans are permitted for administrative review as can be authorized 79 for approval by the Town's Planning Director and as permitted by Municipal Code Section 16A- 80 5-250, Administrative modifications. After evaluation, the Town's Planning Director has found 81 the requested changes to be generally consistent with the applicable review standards and with 82 the previously approved Final PUD, with the exception of the inconsistencies noted during the 83 review, comments and directives provided by Town Council at a meeting on April 6, 2009. 84 Specifically, it was found that: 85 86 1. The Applicant has indicated that only Interim Building 7 and Buildings 8, 13A and 13B 87 are currently planned to be under construction during the period through April, 2011. 88 The CMP identifies considerably more area identified for construction staging than will 89 be needed to support these projects. The CMP permits the location of construction 90 materials, storage, construction staging, site offices, necessary construction vehicles, 2 Planning Director Adm. Mod. Record of Decision No. 33 2009 Base Village CMP & Phasing Amdts. Page 3 of 6 91 construction apparatus within the construction fencing. The applicant must satisfactorily 92 demonstrate that Lots 4-7 (the lots containing Buildings 10AB, 11, 12 and Aqua Center) 93 are required for construction staging in conjunction with the projects identified to occur 94 through 2011. 95 96 In addition, permitting Lot 2 (area above the parking structure) to remain as a repository 97 for material storage not directly needed for on-going construction for an unknown period 98 of time would have a substantially adverse effect on the neighborhood surrounding the 99 lot. 100 101 2. Record of Decision No. 16 ("ROD 16"), approved on October 10, 2006, granted approval 102 of a construction trailer site within Lot 7 (Building 12). Construction staging should be 103 limited within the lot to the area authorized by ROD 16, as shown on Exhibit "B", only for 104 use in connection with the Building 13B project. 105 106 3. The staging area for Building 13B shows a gate along the Assay Hill side of the project 107 area. No approval should be granted without additional information identifying how that 108 gate will be accessed and that authority has been granted from the affected property 109 owner. 110 111 4. Construction fencing along Wood Road above Lot 5 (Building 11) should be outside of 112 the Town right-of-way unless it is demonstrated to the satisfaction of the Planning 113 Director that it is not reasonably practical due to site constraints. A 20' planting buffer 114 shall be placed along roads when practical and where space allows. The applicant shall 115 submit a construction landscape plan by no later than May 15, 2009 for these areas to 116 be approved by the Planning Director. 117 118 5. Prior to commencing work to remove the covered scaffold bridge at the Wood Road 119 access to the parking structure, the applicant should demonstrate that the Carriage Way 120 Road access through the Transit Center may safely be used in light of the work that will 121 be occurring as part of the Interim Building 7 construction. 122 123 6. Except as noted in Findings 1 and 3 above, the modifications do not have a substantially 124 adverse effect on the neighborhood surrounding the affected lot(s) or have a 125 substantially adverse impact on the enjoyment of land abutting upon or across the street 126 from such lot(s). 127 128 7. The amendment does not appear to change the basic character of the Project or 129 surrounding areas; 130 131 8. The revisions appear to demonstrate compliance with all applicable standards and 132 provisions of the Municipal Code; and 133 134 9. The modifications comply with all other applicable provisions of the Municipal Code 135 Section 16A-5-250, including that: 136 137 a. The proposed modifications are a result of circumstances that could not have been 138 reasonably anticipated by the Applicant prior to or during the original and Final PUD 139 approval process; 140 3 Planning Director Adm. Mod. Record of Decision No. 33 2009 Base Village CMP & Phasing Amdts. Page 4 of 6 141 b. Any adverse impacts on surrounding properties from the proposed modifications 142 would seem insubstantial; and 143 144 c. The proposed modifications seem to promote the public health, safety and welfare. 145 146 Section Two: Decision. The CMP and Phasing modifications and updates, as generally 147 described above and in more detail within the amended construction management and phasing 148 plans dated March 3, 2009 as received on March 18, 2009, attached and incorporated herein as 149 Exhibit "A," are hereby granted on this _ day of April, 2008, subject to the following 150 conditions: 151 152 Section Three: Conditions of Approval. The approval granted within Section Two above 153 shall be subject to the following conditions: 154 155 1) Future amendments to the Base Village CMP beyond April 11, 2011, including time frame 156 changes for buildings beginning and completing construction, revisions to phasing or 157 phasing areas, and/or development sequencing modifications, shall be submitted as a PUD 158 Amendment for review and recommendations by the Planning Commission and follow up 159 consideration by the Town Council. Said amendment request shall be submitted no later 160 than January 15, 2011. 161 162 2) Construction staging within Lot 7 shall be limited to the area authorized by ROD 16, as 163 shown on Exhibit "B", for use in connection with the Building 13B project. 164 165 3) The existing surface area of Lot 2 (above the parking structure) may be used as a staging 166 area for Interim Building 7 and Building 8 construction only. All unrelated material and 167 debris shall be cleared by no later than November 1, 2009. 168 169 4) No trailers may be located within any staging areas unless needed for use by contractors 170 engaged in construction activities under permit within Base Village. 171 172 5) No wood fencing is authorized without prior color, material and design review and approval 173 by the Planning Director. 174 175 6) The second sentence of Paragraph 1)C under "Construction Hours" shall be amended to 176 read: "A minimum 7 day prior written notification to and approval of the Town Manager, or 177 approved designee, will be required for any construction activities beyond the Standard 178 Hours of construction." (Underline to show amended language) 179 180 7) Paragraph F of Section 8, Storm Water Management and Erosion Control, shall be 181 amended to read: "An environmental consultant will periodically review the project site for 182 toxic or hazardous materials during the course of construction." 183 184 8) Section 8, Storm Water Management and Erosion Control, shall be amended to add: 185 Hazardous or toxic contaminants, to include copper, lead, fuels or solvent residue, will be 186 prevented from entering Brush Creek or the Snowmass Water & Sanitation District sewer 187 system." 188 189 4 Planning Director Adm. Mod. Record of Decision No. 33 2009 Base Village CMP & Phasing Amdts. Page 5 of 6 190 9) The gate along the Assay Hill side of the Building 13B project area is not approved at this 191 time. No approval will be granted without additional information identifying how that gate will 192 be accessed and that authority has been granted from the affected property owner. 193 194 10)Construction fencing along Wood Road above Lot 5 (Building 11) shall be outside of the 195 Town right-of-way unless it is demonstrated to the satisfaction of the Planning Director that it 196 is not reasonably practical due to site constraints. 197 198 11)A 20' planting buffer shall be placed along roads when practical and where space allows. 199 The applicant shall submit a construction landscape plan by no later than May 15, 2009 for 200 these areas to be approved by the Planning Director. 201 202 12)Prior to commencing work to remove the covered scaffold bridge at the Wood Road access 203 to the parking structure, the applicant shall demonstrate to the satisfaction of the Planning 204 Director that the Carriage Way Road access through the Transit Center may safely be used 205 in light of the work that will be occurring as part of the Interim Building 7 construction. 206 207 13)All work within Town rights-of-ways are to occur under the authorization, supervision and 208 control of the Public Works Director and Town Engineer as may be directed by the Town 209 Council. 210 211 14)As directed by the Town Council at a meeting on March 18, 2008, the Applicant shall 212 coordinate civil plan designs and shared cost implications with the Town Engineer and the 213 Public Works Department for the purpose of installing a sidewalk connection on either side 214 of Brush Creek Road between Upper Kearns Road and Brush Creek Lane. 215 216 15)The Applicant shall comply with Resolution No. 6, Series of 2009, concerning the 217 improvements proposed in Wood Road in 2009. In addition, the Applicant shall maintain the 218 opening of at minimum one traffic lane at all times along Wood Road. The Applicant's Traffic 219 Control Coordinator shall continue to work with the Town's Construction Coordinator and 220 mitigate construction traffic and other related impacts where needed pursuant to Town-wide 221 construction mitigation efforts. 222 223 16) Extended hours for emergency situations shall mean that such extensions are for the benefit 224 of the general public's health, safety and welfare. 225 226 17)Alternative routes for trails shall be considered by the Applicant, coordinated with the Public 227 Works Director or his designee and shall be provided as reasonably possible during the 228 course of construction. Should disagreements arise that cannot be resolved at an 229 administrative level, they shall be referred by either party to the Town Manager who may 230 refer the matter to Town Council for final determination. 231 232 18)This approval is subject to the recording of this document, at the Applicant's expense, in the 233 Real Estate Records of the Clerk and Recorder of Pitkin County, Colorado. Some 234 documents referenced in Exhibits "A" are colored exhibits and shall be retained for review in 235 the records of the Town Clerk's office. A color copy will also be on file with the Town's 236 Planning Department. 237 5 Planning Director Adm. Mod. Record of Decision No. 33 2009 Base Village CMP & Phasing Amdts. Page 6 of 6 238 19)This Record of Decision is based on the application for Administrative Modification, and the 239 supporting documents thereto, submitted by the Applicant to the Town of Snowmass Village 240 Planning Director as of the date of this Decision, including the plans and supporting 241 documents of the Base Village application that was approved by the Town Council of 242 Snowmass Village by Ordinance 21 and the authority vested in the Planning Director 243 thereby. This Record of Decision pertains only to the subject matter contained in it and 244 supersedes all prior and contemporaneous approvals, representations, and understandings 245 of the parties. No supplement, modification, or amendment of this Decision shall be binding 246 unless executed by the Planning Director. No waiver of any of the provisions of this 247 Decision shall be deemed, or shall constitute, a waiver of any other provision, whether or not 248 similar, nor shall any waiver constitute a continuing waiver. No waiver shall be binding 249 unless executed by the Planning Director. 250 251 252 253 254 Chris C. Conrad, Planning Director 255 6 Exhibit "A" Administrative Modification #33 Page 1 of 16) CONSTRUCTION 1MANAGEMENTA PHASING PLAN SNOWMASS BA'SE'VILLA'GE & FANNYHIL'L CABINS October 12, 2004 (REV 2 Feb 2007) (REV 3 March 12, 2007) (REV 4 March 10, 2008) (REV 5 March 3, 2009) I. GENERAL PROJECT CONSTRUCTION: 1) Construction Hours A. Standard Hours for exterior activities a. Monday through Saturday (Unless under special request and approval by the Town Manager or designee). b. 7:00am to 6:00pm or as otherwise approved or requested by the Chief Building Official of the Town of Snowmass Village. c. With prior Town Manager authorization, the applicant may extend working hours for work in the Right of Way for emergency situations as necessary to complete work. B. Activities occurring inside buildings that are not disruptive to the general public a. 7 days a week b. Unlimited hours C. To achieve the proposed schedule in this plan and in order to facilitate the execution of certain portions of the construction, variations from the standard hours of operation need to be considered. A minimum 7 day prior notification to the Town Manager, or approved designee, will be required for any construction activities beyond the Standard Hours of construction.The following construction methods and materials will require variation of construction hours to achieve an acceptable level of quality and efficiency. a. Cast in place concrete construction. b. Exterior work that does not violate the Town noise ordinances. c. Steel erection and delivery d. Roadway grading and asphalt work e. Other work in the Right of Way D. Prior to commencement of construction, the owner shall designate responsible parties to provide direct communication with the appropriate TOSV Personnel (TOSV Construction Coordinator)and provide responses to complaints. E. The contractor shall be responsible for providing information of general construction activities and schedules. Public Meetings will be held to inform the public on construction issues and information sources. An Email and Facsimile construction notice list will be developed and regularly scheduled construction updates will be distributed by the appropriate TOSV personnel -TOSV CC. F. The TOSV Police Department will be notified of major material deliveries and concrete pours. Regularly scheduled construction updates will be distributed to the Police Department. G. If construction of the project is interrupted, Applicant will work with the Planning Department to establish interim landscaping plans for the affected areas. H. Extended Hours for emergency situations—In the event of an emergency situation the Town Manager, Chief Building Official, or their designee may approve work to occur outside of permitted work hours at their discretion. Related WestPac,LLC. Snowmass Base Village I Exhibit "A" Administrative Modification #33 Page 2 of 16) CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT & PHASING PLAN 2) Construction Traffic Management on Town Roads A. Brush Creek Road a. Traffic flow to be reduced by shuttling employees to the construction site from external parking areas. The primary parking area will he the Intercept lot at Brush Creek Road and SH 82. b. In addition to Brush Creek Passing Lane, existing pullouts are to be used along Brush Creek road by trucks that are not able to maintain reasonable speed up the road. This will allow for vehicles backing up behind the trucks to pass at these locations. Specifically designated non bus stop areas may also be used for temporary truck stacking during large material deliveries at times when limited staging on site is available. c. Peak traffic times of 7 AM to 9 AM (10 AM during ski season)and 3:00 PM to 5:00 PM are to be reasonably avoided, whenever possible for major material deliveries during the ski season and summer season. d. Lighted roadway information signs will be maintained at key entrances to the village. These signs will alert motorist of detours and construction activities that could affect travel. e. A Traffic Control Coordinator will be designated for the project. The Traffic Control Coordinator will develop a written delivery plan, manage all deliveries to the site, develop and enforce a policy that all deliveries must be coordinated through the Traffic Control Coordinator, limit deliveries during peak skier traffic times, conduct a traffic control meeting at the end of each shift identifying deliveries and traffic control issues for the next day, personally dispatch all delivery vehicles to the site from the designated staging area, be in continuous radio contact with the site, and continuous radio contact with the site concrete superintendent who will be in direct telephone contact with the batch plant. The Traffic Control Coordinator will ensure identified and established guidelines are complied with and consistent throughout all projects. B. Wood Road and Lower Carriage Way a. No staging of trucks or other construction vehicles is allowed along these roadways. Accommodations will be made within staging areas for vehicles except for work required within the Right of Way. b. If parking is not available in the staging areas for construction vehicles, they will be directed to other off site vehicle parking areas provided by the Contractor. 3. Public Access Closure Notification A. Public Trails a. Public notice shall be provided a minimum of 1 week in advance of all public trail closures. Signs shall be placed for trail closures, including alternative route signage, in advance of the closed sections so alternate routes can be used. Prior to trail closure, Contractor must gain approval of a way finding plan to reroute the closed trail from the Public Works Director or his designee, who may refer the matter to the Town Council. b. A functional, well-defined ski back trail through or around the Base Village shall be preserved and operational during the ski season. Alternate routing of affected trails Related WestPac,LLC. Snmi ass Base Village 2 Exhibit "A" Administrative Modification #33 Page 3 of 1IS) CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT & PHASING PLAN during non-ski season timeframes will be provided and coordinated with the Public Works Director or his designee. B. Public Roads a. Contractor shall coordinate all road closures with the TOSV Construction Coordinator. b. Public notice will be required a minimum of 1 week prior to all roadway closures. c. Single lane closures will be used as much as possible instead of closing entire road sections. d. All closures shall follow Manual of Uniform Traffic Control Devices. e. Full closure of Brush Creek Road(between Upper Kearns Road and Brush Creek Lane) will be required during the installation of improvements necessary to construct the roundabout. 4. Construction Fencing A. Site fencing a. Site fencing shall be 8' and can either be chain link with screened mesh or wood. The type of fence used shall be determined at the discretion of the applicant. b. 20' planting buffer along roads when practical and where space allows.The applicant shall submit a construction landscape plan for these areas to be approved by TOSV staff. c. Permanently installed on posts,except some areas that require movable fencing for construction activities. d. Maintained by the contractor to remain in tact and neat to outside appearance. e. The fence line depicted on the Construction Management Plan drawings (CM-1 through CM-14) represents the outermost extent of where the construction fence can be located. The developer may move the construction fence inside of the extents shown on the CM drawings without issuing an Administrative Modification, provided that all areas outside of construction fencing shall be safe to the general public. f. All graphics desired by the applicant are subject to the approval of the Planning Director prior to installation. 5. Construction Waste Management A. Reduction and reuse of waste material on the site through a specific site waste management and separation program. B. Recycling of all applicable products. C. All food waste must be disposed in specified receptacles to prevent access by bears and other wildlife.The construction site will be maintained and kept clean of trash and debris by the contractor. 6. Minimization of Construction Impacts on Wetlands A. Specific measures shall be employed during site construction in and around wetlands and the Brush Creek Riparian zone. These measures are intended to provide additional protective measures beyond a standard Erosion and Sediment Control plan to the natural resources Related WestPac,LLC. Snouonass Base Village 3 Exhibit "A" Administrative Modification #33 Pape 4 of I CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT & PHASING PLAN onsite and of Brush Creek. The Brush Creek Enhancement Plan (BCEP) shall be used for further detail on this issue. B. All construction shall comply with the Army Corps of Engineers 404 permits for the project area. C. All wetlands and existing sensitive riparian zones that are to be preserved shall be clearly identified and approved by the environmental consultant prior to the initiation of any site disturbance activities: D. All wetland areas to be preserved shall be protected with 2 lines of silt fencing as described in the BCEP, and shall be maintained by the Contractor throughout the construction period. ` E. No machinery, equipment or other construction materials shall be allowed within the delineated wetland areas designated to be preserved. F. Wetland areas to be preserved shall be inspected on a weekly basis, or after significant storm events to insure that all protection devices are operational. Any devices that are deficient shall be replaced or repaired. G. No cleaning of equipment, tolls, machinery, concrete trucks, vehicles,etc shall be conducted where runoff may enter erosion control measures or protected wetland areas. H. All protection devices shall remain in place until all adjacent uphill areas of the construction site have been revegetated or completed. Revegetation is considered re-established once 70% of overall ground coverage is achieved. These devices shall not be removed until approved by the environmental consultant. 1. In the event of an accidental placement of fill material within the wetland areas, the Contractor shall immediately cease operations in or adjacent to the affected wetland area and notify the wetland consultant. 7. Limits of Disturbance A. All trees and other native areas to be protected shall be delineated with fencing to prevent damage B. Tree preservation areas and the surrounding tree crown line area must be left intact. C. All tree and native vegetation areas to be preserved shall be fenced off and approved by the landscape architect prior to the commencement of any site disturbance. D. The contractor will repair all disturbed areas. 8. Storm Water Management and Erosion Control A. The Contractor shall follow the Storm water Management Plan and Erosion Control plans for control of water quality and erosion from the site disturbance during the construction period. B. A Storm water discharge permit is required by the State of Colorado and is required prior to the start of any construction. C. Detailed engineering plans for Final Erosion Control Plan and Storm water Management Plan shall be submitted for and approved by the Town Engineer prior to Building Permit approval. D. All silt fence,erosion control structures and water quality devices shall be installed and approved by the engineer prior to any site disturbance. The Contractor throughout the duration of the project shall maintain all of these devices implemented. E. All erosion control and water quality structures shall be inspected on a weekly basis,or after significant storm events to insure that all protection devices are operational. Any devices that are deficient shall be replaced or repaired by the Contractor. Related WestPac,I.I.C. Snmvnwss Race Village 4 Exhibit "A" Administrative Modification #33 Pape 5 of 16) CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT & PHASING PLAN F. An environmental consultant will review the site for hazardous materials at the beginning of the project construction. G. The offsite diversion drainage piping shall be constructed at the beginning of the construction phasing in order to intercept offsite runoff at upstream of the construction area in order to reduce contamination of this water from construction activities. H. Temporary settling ponds will be constructed with each phase of construction for control of water quality. Locations and design shall be detailed in final grading, drainage and erosion control plan. L All hazardous and toxic materials must be disposed and/or treated as per the manufacturer's recommendations. J. All concrete trucks and concrete pumps are prohibited from disposing any excess concrete material or washout at the construction site unless a plan for such disposal is submitted to and approved by the Town via a formal Administrative Modification. The contractor is responsible for the proper disposal of any excess concrete material. K. All fueling of vehicles and machinery must be conducted in a designated area to prevent accidental leakage or spills. The fueling area shall be designed to contain spills and a typical plan shall be submitted for approval through the TOSV Construction Coordinator, &the town's Environmental Consultant, if deemed necessary. The excavation contractor shall meet with the Public Works Department staff and Planning Department representative on site prior to commencement of construction of any of the buildings to: a. Clearly describe the spill containment plan for the construction sites and/or staging areas and resolve any concerns with respect thereto to the reasonable satisfaction of the Planning Director; and b. Identify specific ways the contractor(s) will be responsive to street sweeping and erosion control to the reasonable satisfaction of the Planning Director. 9. Dewatering A. Details of dewatering pond locations and designs will be completed with final grading, drainage and erosion control plans. The Contractor shall implement all measures in accordance of these plans. B. Dewatering ponds as per Corps of Engineers standards C. Dewatering treated discharge as per Corps of Engineers standards 10. Fugitive Dust Control and Air Quality A. Run out areas from excavation sites will be made as long as possible and recycled asphalt will be rolled and oiled to create a tire"spin-off area". B. Tire Anti-Tracking Devices (ATDs) will be used at all construction exits. In some cases, these may be comprised of a gravel or cobbled roadbase. In areas of heavy excavation greater than 30,000 cubic yards), and for any multi-year construction project, heavy steel plates with large steel angles welded to the plate will be required to create lire mud knockoff areas.These ATDs will be cleaned regularly during the day. C. In cases of heavy excavations and/or multi-year construction schedules, or at the discretion of the Town's Construction Coordinator, a tire wash may be required and the trench must be cleaned regularly during times that tires must be washed. D. Runoff shall be collected and treated in accordance with the Storm Water Management Plan before being discharged from the site. Related Woswac,L.L.C. Snon,mass Rase Village 5 Exhibit "A" Administrative Modification #33 Page 6 of 16) CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT& PHASING PLAN E. A street sweeper with an internal vacuum and wash pot will be required to clean all project— adjacent roadways and intersections and to prevent airborne dust from being created by sweeping operations. F. Truck speed limits will be monitored and kept to a level that does not create excessive dust during dry periods. G. A water truck will be used during dry periods to wash down streets,control on-site dust, and minimize airborne dust on haul roads. H. Chemical stabilization (magnesium chloride) may be used on haul roads to mitigate dust during dry periods. 1. Tracking of soil onto Town streets will be minimized by on-site mitigation measures. When tracking of soil occurs onto Town streets the Contractor shall effectively high pressure wash, flush and clean the roadways with a street cleaner. 1. A real time air monitoring station shall be installed near the construction site in order to monitor air quality throughout the construction period. A baseline analysis will be conducted prior to major construction and the data shall be used to provide immediate response if air quality standards are exceeded. K. All exposed soil areas where grading operations are continuing shall be watered as required to reduce fugitive dust. Disturbed soil areas shall be revegetated as soon as possible after grading operations are complete. L. Vehicle engine pre-heaters will be used to reduce warm up times of vehicles on site for the purpose of minimizing vehicle idling time. M. All vehicles and machinery must be in good working order and comply with all necessary environmental legislation. N. A primary water truck shall be designated on site for the purpose of dust control. Remainder of Page lntemionally Blank] Related WestPac,LLC. Snoiwnass Base Village 6 Exhibit "A" Administrative Modification #33 Pape 7 of 16) CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT & PHASING PLAN H. PROJECT PHASING: This schedule represents the most likely schedule of development for the Base Village and Fanny Hill Cabins projects. It is directly dependent on timely approvals and permits. Related WestPac reserves the right to modify this schedule at any time. The dates used on all drawings(CM-9 through CM-12) are meant to represent the start/end of ski season and Thanksgiving. On the drawings and in the following narrative "completing construction" is intended to mean that the building, landscaping, hardscaping, lighting, signage, etc. shall potentially be under construction until the final date in the date range. 9.9. April 13,2009 through November 26,2009— Refer to map CM-9 A. Infrastructure a. Upper Wood Road between Wood Road Bridge (drive over/ski under) and the Building l3ab driveway. b. Snowmelted entrance to garage from Wood Road. B. Buildings Phase Starting Construction a. Interim Building 7 C. Buildings Phase Continuing Construction a. Bldg 8 b. Bldg 13ab D. Buildings Phase Completing Construction a. Interim Building 7 E. Construction Staging and Hording a. Residential and commercial are on-line and operating. b. Construction fencing line to allow for: i. Operation of residential ii. Operation of commercial iii. Fire access as per local fire authority requirements F. Construction Fencing Line to Enclose: a. Areas as delineated on the plan b. Temporary fire access will need to be kept clear for fire access to all buildings under construction. c. All construction staging (construction materials, storage, construction staging, site offices, necessary construction vehicles,construction apparatus,etc.)occurs within construction fencing. G. Parking a. Construction Parking i. Limited areas within staging limits for some trades, inspectors and visitors ii. Worker parking at off-site lots and shuttled in to site for work day Related WestPac,I.L.C. Snowmass Base Village 7 Exhibit "A" Administrative Modification #33 Page 6 of 16) CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT & PHASING PLAN b. Guest Parking i. Guest Parking(residential and commercial) in the Village Parking Structure will be opened to meet space requirements described in the PUD. ii. Guest Parking (residential and commercial) in the Viceroy Parking Structure will be under construction to meet the future space requirements for l3a described in the PUD. r Related WestPac,L.I.C. Snownrass Rase Village 8 Exhibit "A" Administrative Modification #33 Page 9 of 16) CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT & PHASING PLAN 10. November 26, 2009 through April 12,2010—Refer to map CM-10 A. Infrastructure a. None at this time B. Buildings Phase Starting Construction a. None at this time C. Buildings Phase Continuing Construction a. Bldg 8 b. Bldg 13b 1). Buildings Phase Completing Construction a. Bldg 13a 154 Units Total 154 Residential Units E. Construction Staging and Hording a. Residential and commercial are on-line and operating. b. Construction fencing line to allow for: i. Operation of residential ii. Operation of commercial iii. Operation of Ski Operations iv. Fire access as per local fire authority requirements F. Construction Fencing Line to Enclose: a. Areas as delineated on the plan b. All construction staging (construction materials, storage,construction staging, site offices, necessary construction vehicles,construction apparatus,etc.) occurs within construction fencing. G. Parking a. Construction Parking i. Limited areas within staging limits for some trades, inspectors and visitors ii. Worker parking at off-site lots and shuttled in to site for work day b. Guest Parking i. Guest Parking(residential and commercial) in the Village Parking Structure will be opened to meet space requirements described in the PUD. The 150 spaces required for Day Skier parking will be located in Lot C. ii. Guest Parking(residential and commercial) in the Viceroy Parking Structure will be opened to meet the space requirements for 13a described in the PUD. Related WestPac,LLC. Seawmass Buse Village 9 Exhibit "A" Administrative Modification #33 Page 10 of 16) CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT & PHASING PLAN it. April 12,2010 through November 25,2010—Refer to map CM-11 A. Infrastructure a. Snowmelted entrance to garage from Wood Road will be necessary if construction activities are not completed between 4/13/2009 & 11/26/09. B. Buildings Phase Starting Construction None at this time C. Buildings Phase Continuing Construction a. Bldg 13b. D. Buildings Phase Completing Construction a. Bldg 8 29 Units Total 29 Residential Units E. Construction Staging and Hording a. Residential and commercial are on-line and operating. b. Construction fencing line to allow for: i. Operation of residential ii. Operation of commercial iii. Fire access as per local fire authority requirements F. Construction Fencing Line to Enclose: a. Areas as delineated on the plan b. All construction staging (construction materials, storage, construction staging, site offices, necessary construction vehicles,construction apparatus,etc.) occurs within construction fencing. G. Parking a. Construction Parking i. Limited areas within staging limits for some trades, inspectors and visitors ii. Worker parking at off-site lots and shuttled in to site for work day b. Guest Parking i. Guest Parking(residential and commercial) in the Village Parking Structure will be opened to meet space requirements described in the PUD. 1. The Residences at Little Nell will be opening and guest parking(club, valet, commercial and residential)on P1, P2 and P3 will be opened to meet space requirements described in the PUD. ii. Guest Parking(residential and commercial) in the Viceroy Parking Structure will be opened to meet the space requirements for 13a described in the PUD. Related WestPac,L.I.C. Snmrieass Base Village 10 Exhibit "A" Administrative Modification #33 Page 11 of 16) CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT& PHASING PLAN 12. November 25,2010 through April 11,2011 —Refer to map CM-12 A. Infrastructure a. None at this time B. Buildings Phase Starting Construction a. None at this time C. Buildings Phase Continuing Construction a. None at this time D. Buildings Phase Completing Construction a. Bldg 13b 80 Residential Units Total 80 Residential Units E. Construction Staging and Hording a. Construction fencing line to allow for: i. Operation of residential ii. Operation of commercial iii. Fire access as per local fire authority requirements iv. Fencing to enclose areas delineated on plans F. Construction Fencing Line to Enclose: a. Areas as delineated on the plan b. All construction staging(construction materials, storage, construction staging, site offices, necessary construction vehicles,construction apparatus, etc.)occurs within construction fencing. G. Parking a. Construction Parking i. Limited areas within staging limits for some trades, inspectors and visitors ii. Worker parking at off-site lots and shuttled in to site for work day b. Guest Parking i. Guest Parking(residential and commercial) in the Village Parking Structure will be opened to meet space requirements described in the PUD. The 150 spaces required for Day Skier parking will be located in Lot C ii. Guest Parking (residential and commercial) in the Viceroy Parking Structure will be opened to meet the space requirements for 13a and 13b described in the PUD. Related WestPac,LLC. Snowmass Base Village 1/ Exhibit "A" Administrative Modification #33 Page 12 of 16) CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT & PHASING PLAN April 11, 2011 to the end of the project: The exact start date of improvements from April 11, 2011 to the end of the project is currently unknown. When construction does start up on future improvements it will follow the last approved Phasing sequence as described in Ordinance No. 3, Series of 2007. In addition to this ordinance (per the development agreement approved by Town Council on February 17th, 2009) Building 7 will be the next building to achieve final certificate of occupancy. Phase Lots Buildings Phase 1 B 3 Final Building 7 13 surface parking spaces on Lot 3 Phase 1B 3 6 Phase 2B 2 & 4 4AB, 5, 9AB, 9C With underground parking in main parking Structure, and The Aqua Center Phase 3 5 & 8 11 With underground parking Phase 4 6 10AB with underground parking Phase 5 7 12 with underground parking The exact wording of the Phasing paragraph from Ordinance No. 3, Series of 2007 is as follows: 6. Phasing. The project will be developed in accordance with the Phasing Plan with no building permits being issued for a subsequent phase until building permits have been issued for each building in the previous phase and substantial construction has been begun on each such building in the previous phase, except that (a) building permits may be issued and construction may begin on Phase 2A prior to the issuance of building permits for any of the buildings in Phase 1B and (b) Building 136, on Lot 8, may be construction as part of Phase 2A." In addition to this table of Buildings there are two remaining public improvements that need to be completed, the roundabout and the completion of the Upper Wood Road improvement. The upper Wood Road improvements will be phased with the openings of the Buildings along Wood Road (Buildings 10, 11, 12 & the Fanny Hill Town Homes) and the roundabout will be completed (pursuant to item 2.1.e of the Funding Agreement dated November 4th, 2004) prior to the issuance of a certificate of occupancy for Building 5, 9AB & 9C. No permit for Fanny Hill Townhomes will be issued until Phase 2B is completed. Related WestPac,LLC. Snowntass Rase Village 12 struction Start Date Q umr[ nu! Bldg 4ab Idg 5 I s Idg 6 Idg 7( final building) Bldg 9ab r: Bldg 10a Bldg 10b Bldg 11 Idg 12 I Fanny Hill Town Homes l OL e 3 o m i fii .. gym I J yr t f.. rn W CD G Y) W C I` wJ Fiat.;, i•. 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Once Interim Building 7I mdpieteaa' tall spllvall lenm will sepaom this area/ rortlBro nod. landscaping Inside the leme will beIn accontance Wds the IN Interim 801dmg7 m1c, nn landscapeplan We_ wn A ^ e . i yyi' P 1`', i 1f' tL•O Lot C( 150 spac Pia ` .: O t•. u //~ , V { 1 Bldg4ab Bldg 5 Bldg 6 Bldg 7( final building) Bldg Slab c ws, ina Bldg 10a 1` Bldg 10b Bldg 11 Bldg 12 Fanny Hill Town Homes r Q b,•. d-: erarr• will r 0 a gX m o su n' '. f t : / a etf7 '- z{ Art y a 1L t Q ( A Z ` »RELATEDRELATED L , teflm Id qto the Gara ! I a.C-'•'-`; i&- Le end 4/ 12/ 10- 11/ 25/ 10 b m m Access[ o plaza hom the Transit Center nuul [ Building Under Construction Interim Bldg? 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L4- 1 1 1 MEMO To: Town Council From: Russ Forrest, David Peckler, Susan Hamley, Lesley Compagnone,Jason Haber,Chris Conrad Date: April 6, 2009 Re: Schedule and Review Expectations for Update to the Comprehensive Plan 1.PURPOSE On February 16`h Town Council agreed upon a rough timeline and criteria for reviewing the Update to the Comprehensive Plan. Today, Council will review Chapters 1 and 2 —Introduction to the Comprehensive Planning Process and Community Character and Vision. Also today, Council needs to review the proposed schedule and either agree to it or make necessary adjustments. 2.TODAY'S REVIEW 1. Chanter 1: Introduction to the Comprehensive Planning Process Focus on: The Process—Make sure you're comfortable that the entire process has been captured and that no group and/or course of action have been omitted. Policies—Carefully review the Policies of Use for this document. Of Note—Please refer to Chapter 10: Actions and Implementation any time you need during this chapter review. 2. Chapter 2: Community Character and Vision Focus on: Aspiration Statement—The Town of Snowmass Village Aspiration Statement was added by Planning Commission in its review. Character and Goals—This is important because these traits and goals are the umbrella under which all other chapters live. The Policies in chapters 3 through 9 are aligned with the Character and Goals set forth in Chapter 2. They should not compete with each other. Of Note - Please refer to Chapter 10: Actions and Implementation any time you need during this chapter review. 3.PROPOSED REVIEW SCHEDULE April 6'h—Chapter 1: Comprehensive Planning Process and Chapter 2: Community Values and Vision (45 minutes) April 201h—Chapter 8: Transportation (45 minutes) May 4'h—Chapter 9: Housing(45 minutes) May 18'h—Chapter 7: Built Environment(60 minutes) Junelst—Chapter 4: Regional and Community Economics and Chapter 5: Community Services, Facilities and Amenities (60 minutes) June 15'h— Chapter 6: Environmental Resources and Chapter 3: Community Arts 60 minutes) July 6'h—Chapter 10: Actions and Implementation (60 minutes) 4. FORMAT FOR FINAL The primary medium for the final version of the Comprehensive Plan Update will be digital. The goal is to have a user-friendly and interactive document that can be burned on to a disk and/or downloaded from the Web. Traditional hard copies will be available, but there will be fewer of them as we will rely on several new technologies to deliver this information. The economic and environmental savings of using this medium are unmatched. Staff is working with Winston and Associates to determine costs, and if our technical infrastructure can host such a large and interactive document. olupdflup OAISUOtIOJ 6 ItA nnous JoumoZ 2009 Comprehensive Plan Update Table of Contents Chapter 1 Introduction to the Comprehensive Planning Process Chapter 2 Community Character and Vision Chapter 3 Community Arts Chapter 4 Regional and Community Economics Chapter 5 Community Services, Facilities and Amenities Chapter 6 Environmental Resources Chapter 7 Built Environment Chapter 8 Transportation Chapter 9 Housing Chapter 10 Actions and Implementation 1 Chapter 1 Introduction: The Comprehensive Planning Process 2 3 4 December, 2008) 5 6 The Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan articulates a common vision for the 7 future of the Town. The Plan balances community values and vision with policies for 8 land use, economics, environment, housing, transportation and the arts. Both short-term 9 and long-term actions are required to implement the Plan. The residents of, and visitors 10 to, the Town of Snowmass Village are integral in planning the future of the community. 11 Our collective and individual responsibility is to work together to identify common issues 12 and needs and to pool resources in order to improve the community. 13 14 The Process 15 Just as with past planning documents, the ideas, concepts and input gained from planning 16 experts, technical professionals, the general public and others, contributed to this update 17 of the Comprehensive Plan. Public officials and citizens were interviewed and a series of 18 public meetings were held to gather the best information and most current ideas about the 19 Town's present condition and future opportunities. 20 21 The process began with stakeholder interviews with the following groups: 22 TOSV Planning Commission 23 Citizens for Snowmass Village & Citizens for Responsible Growth 24 community focus groups 25 Related Westpac and Chaffin Light 26 lodges and merchants 27 marketing/sales 28 The Aspen Skiing Company 29 Infrastructure and utility providers 30 Part-Time Residents Advisory Board 31 32 Topics discussed included: 33 Housing 34 Employment 35 Transportation 36 Services and infrastructure 37 Carrying capacity 38 Economics 39 Vitality 40 Community, character and culture 41 Growth and development 42 The Base Village, West Village and Village Center nodes 43 The environment 44 Process 45 Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 1: Process December, 2008 Page 1 1 Town staff initiated the process with a presentation of the State of the Comprehensive 2 Plan to the Planning Commission. The report identified specific areas of concern to 3 address in the update. 4 5 Public meetings then followed: 6 Public Meeting#1 —Vision 7 Public Meeting#2—Values 8 Public Meeting#3 —Validate Vision and Values 9 Workshops— Specific to the redevelopment of the West Village 10 11 Common categories formed after these public meetings, they were assigned a chapter: 12 The Built Environment 13 The Natural Environment 14 Regional and Community Economics 15 Transportation 16 Housing 17 Arts and Culture 18 Facilities and Amenities 19 20 Policies 21 The Town of Snowmass Village shall: 22 23 Use the Comprehensive Plan as a regulatory document to guide Town elected 24 and appointed officials, staff, businesses, developers, property owners, and 25 other entities in implementing our goals and objectives. 26 27 Ensure that the Comprehensive Plan remains current and reflective of our 28 community values. 29 30 Ensure that implementation and updating of the Plan continues to be a 31 community-wide effort. 32 33 Provide opportunities for continued citizen involvement in implementation 34 decisions and in the land use planning process. The Plan will continue to 35 designate appropriate future land uses, activities and services, the protection 36 of the environment and the enhancement of the economy based on the 37 community's preferences. 38 39 Communicate and work with counties and municipalities in the region to 40 implement shared regional goals. 41 42 Authority 43 All municipal governments in the State of Colorado derive authority to enact land use 44 control measures from the general municipal authority granted in the Colorado 45 Constitution and by State Legislation. The specific authority for a statutory municipality Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 1: Process December, 2008 Page 2 1 to plan and zone is contained in Title 31, Article 23, Colorado Revised Statutes (C.R.S.). 2 These statutes clearly specify the provisions pertaining to planning and zoning activities 3 for municipal governments and also extend to home rule municipalities. In addition, the 4 jurisdiction of the Comprehensive Plan, pursuant to §31-23-212, C.R.S., includes land 5 within three miles of the boundaries of the Town located in unincorporated areas of 6 Pitkin County. 7 8 As a Home Rule Municipality, the Town may enact legislation that conflicts with state 9 legislation provided that the Town's legislation is of a purely local concern. The 10 authority of the Snowmass Village Town Council to adopt a Master Plan arises 11 specifically from Section 1.7 of the Town of Snowmass Village Municipal Charter, which 12 states, "The council shall adopt and maintain a comprehensive master plan of the Town." 13 In addition, the Planning Commission is charged with conducting a review of the Plan 14 according to Code. Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 1: Process December, 2008 Page 3 1 Chapter 2 Community Character and Vision 2 3 December, 2008) 4 5 6 Introduction 7 Tucked high in the Brush Creek Valley, Snowmass Village is an extraordinary place to 8 live, work and visit. While creating this resort, the founders of the Town Snowmass 9 Village also created a strong community. The community's Comprehensive Plan, and the 10 land use code adopted to implement that plan, helps define parameters for decision 11 making and articulates a future vision. The characteristics described below are essential 12 to create and maintain the character of the community and provide for the quality of life 13 enjoyed by residents and guests alike. The principles embodied in these characteristics 14 were derived from direct public input, and are the foundation of this Comprehensive 15 Plan. 16 17 Aspiration Statement 18 "We aspire to be the leading multi-season, family-oriented inclusive mountain resort 19 community. We will do this by creating, marketing, and delivering distinctive choices for 20 fun, excitement, challenge, learning, and togetherness. All this is done amidst our 21 unique, natural splendor...as part of a memorable Aspen/Snowmass experience. 22 Further, we wish to be seen by others as welcoming, dynamic, convenient, and 23 successful. We will always be responsible stewards of our environment, economy, and 24 society. When successful, Snowmass Village will have achieved the quality of life and 25 economic vitality that will assure our future as a sustainable resort community." 26 27 Vision: Snowmass Village in 2025 28 If we are successful in reaching our Aspiration, in the year 2025 the Town of Snowmass 29 Village will be characterized as follows: 30 31 The Town of Snowmass Village possesses a high quality of life with an intimate village 32 atmosphere. The Snowmass resort community is one of the premier, multi-seasonal 33 family- oriented resorts in the world. First class programs and public facilities have been 34 developed to broaden the seasons, provide a high level of customer service, strengthen 35 business activity, provide community and visitor amenities, and increase employment 36 opportunities. It has done this while maintaining a full-time residential community without 37 exceeding its carrying capacity. 38 39 The completion of Base Village has successfully linked activity areas with pedestrian 40 trails and transit, and enhanced pedestrian connections to the Mall and the Snowmass 41 Center. The Center has expanded its role in meeting the convenience needs of the 42 community and guests. Development over the past 20 years has complemented and 43 even improved the resort and community, helped existing business, provided beneficial 44 recreational and cultural facilities, and added needed infrastructure. With the addition of 45 new, diverse commercial uses, more of the residential and visitor retail sales have been 46 captured in Snowmass Village. 47 48 Improved transit services and parking facilities has reduced dependence on the car and 49 maintained adequate Levels of Service (LOS) on our roads. Our road system is safe and 50 efficient while remaining mostly rural in character. On entering and leaving Snowmass 51 Village, the understated, open feeling of the Brush Creek Valley continues to be Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 2: Community, Character and Vision December, 2008 Page 1 1 preserved and enhanced. At the entrance to Snowmass Village, parking facilities, new 2 housing, the recreation center and the rodeo grounds have been sensitively integrated 3 into the natural environment. 4 5 The Town aspires to provide housing to all full-time employees — as defined in the Land 6 Use and Development Code (LUDC) — who desire to live in here with requirements that 7 can be reasonably met. The proximity of housing to jobs allows employees to 8 conveniently walk or use transit to commute to work. By providing an aggressive 9 housing program, there is adequate housing to support a high level of customer service 10 throughout the community without exceeding the Town and region's transportation 11 carrying capacity. 12 13 Snowmass Village embraces sports and athletics which provide substance for the soul 14 of a community. Snowmass Village offers multiple sporting activities for all ages and 15 abilities and takes pride in its array offerings. The Village provides facilities that 16 encourage athletic programs of all types and hosts several world class athletic events on 17 a yearly basis. 18 19 Snowmass Village is attractive to those seeking to enhance their education. The visual 20 and performing arts continue to draw guests from around the world. Our expanded year- 21 round development of arts programs promotes cultural consciousness, stimulates 22 economic viability, and fosters a sense of community pride. Easy access to a diversity of 23 cultural offerings and institutions exemplify our arts programming. Our public art 24 program is an ongoing vehicle for expression of the Village's character. 25 26 27 Challenges 28 The community is approaching buildout. This places a high priority on ensuring the 29 remaining development and redevelopment complement the existing conditions to 30 solidify the Town's sustainability and competitiveness far into the future. Carrying 31 capacity is limited by the transportation infrastructure which is also approaching 32 capacity. This challenge is magnified by the fact that a significant portion of our 33 workforce commutes from down valley. With increasing costs of commuting and 34 competition from down valley employers, we must provide workforce housing in, or 35 closer to, Town. Another challenge is the fact that the Town captures only 38 percent of 36 potential expenditures of guests, many of whom stay in Aspen or down valley at night. 37 Maximizing the Town's economic capture rate (making the economic engine more 38 efficient) will help the community financially thrive within its carrying capacity for growth. 39 40 41 Character and Goals 42 In response to these challenges, our key goals are to: 43 44 Live within the constraints of natural and man-made systems (environment and 45 traffic) 46 Maintain or create a multi-faceted workforce that is essential to sustain the resort 47 and community economy 48 Capture a greater share of guest expenditures, 49 Attract more guests/visitors, especially by broadening summer and strengthening 50 winter seasons Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 2: Community, Character and Vision December, 2008 Page 2 1 2 If we are successful in reaching our Aspiration and goals, by the year 2025 the Town 3 of Snowmass Village will be characterized as follows: 4 5 A premier winter sports mountain with a wide variety of terrain that attracts all 6 levels of sports enthusiasts 7 A resort that benefits from its proximity to Aspen, but has its own individual 8 identity 9 A strong connection to the natural environment 10 Clean air, clear skies and a healthy, invigorating atmosphere 11 Significant opportunities for a variety of recreational and cultural activities 12 A clustered, low density development pattern that allows the openness and 13 connection to the mountains to dominate valley views 14 A town core that has an intimate, village feel 15 A traffic system that allows convenient circulation and mobility 16 Physical separation from other communities that allows Snowmass to be isolated 17 in a dramatic valley setting 18 Friendly interactions with fellow community members and guests 19 The presence of a vital, permanent community of residents that take an active 20 role in governance 21 A casual lifestyle 22 Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 2: Community, Character and Vision December, 2008 Page 3 1 Chapter 3 Community Arts . 2 3 February, 2009) 4 Strategic Objectives 5 6 The Town of Snowmass Village values the richness and diversity of its cultural 7 resources. The community seeks to be a place where individuals and families can enjoy 8 the visual and performing arts and learn more about the integral role they play in our 9 society. Snowmass shall have a unique cultural identity based on the belief that the arts 10 contribute to the resort's transformative nature and its strong economic base. 11 12 Background 13 There are three main categories that comprise community arts in the Town of 14 Snowmass Village: Visual Arts, Performing Arts and Other Events, Entertainment and 15 Festivals. 16 17 Visual Arts 18 The visual arts are a key ingredient of Snowmass' cultural life. The beauty and 19 sweep of the natural environment provide a compelling backdrop for the exploration 20 of these tangible elements of our artistic community, which is served by several key 21 resources. 22 23 Anderson Ranch Arts Center. In 1966, the historic property known as Anderson 24 Ranch was earmarked for use as an arts center. In 1972, the Snowmass 25 Corporation, which owned the site, turned over its operation to a board of 26 community leaders charged with developing a nationally prominent summer art 27 school. The Snowmass Corporation conveyed ownership to the non-profit 28 Anderson Ranch Arts Center in the early 1980s. Now, the Ranch "is a learning 29 community dedicated to creativity and growth through the making and 30 understanding of the visual arts." Its vision is to be a world leader in the growth 31 and development of the visual arts, in the international dialogue that inspires 32 common humanity through art making, and in the creation of a campus imbued 33 with a spirit of community, challenge, support, exploration, innovation and 34 discovery. 35 36 Public art program. When the Snowmass Arts Advisory Board (SAAB)was first 37 established in 1993, its initial charge was to manage the solicitation and 38 placement of public art, funded by a small appropriation from the Town's 39 budget. Although the SAAB's mission has grown, the public art program 40 remains a key element of the Board's work and of the community's cultural life. 41 42 Art Walk. Snowmass Village's Art Walk also falls under the auspices of the 43 SAAB, and is a specific subset of the Town's public art program. An Art Walk 44 Master Plan was adopted in 2002. The Walk's purpose is to showcase local 45 and national artists and their work; to establish places of beauty, stimulation 46 and reflection throughout the Village; and to provide connectivity between 47 existing and proposed physical amenities. 48 49 50 Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 3: Community Arts and Culture February, 2009 Pagel 1 Performing Arts 2 Snowmass also enjoys a rich menu of cultural events produced by several local arts 3 organizations. The Town supports such efforts, both philosophically, and in specific 4 cases, through the generous deployment of its resources. Through the SAAB, the 5 Town continues to seek opportunities to host such events to aid in the realization of 6 its vision as a vibrant community and successful resort. 7 8 Jazz Aspen Snowmass (JAS). This internationally renowned producer holds its 9 annual Labor Day Festival in Snowmass. The Village also plays host to the 10 Thelonius Monk Institute of Jazz, which is run by JAS. 11 12 Fanny Hill Concert Series. Programmed with the help of JAS and run by the 13 Town's Marketing and Special Events Department, this weekly series of concerts 14 has become a mainstay of the Roaring Fork Valley's summer schedule of events. 15 16 Community Cultural Series. New to the Town's offerings is the Community 17 Cultural Series, sponsored by the SAAB and the Snowmass Chapel. The Series 18 incorporates both music and theater and includes performances throughout the 19 winter months. 20 21 Aspen Film. Aspen Film produces the annual Aspen Filmfest and Shortsfest in 22 Aspen. The organization has also offered several Snowmass-based programs 23 and has expressed an interest in exploring additional, similar activities in the 24 future. These encompass both educational programs (i.e., animation workshops 25 produced in cooperation with Anderson Ranch), and a short series of films 26 screened in the Cabaret Room of The Silvertree Hotel. 27 28 Theatre Aspen. Theatre Aspen is an organization that offers professional, equity- 29 based theatrical performances in Aspen's Rio Grande Park during the summer 30 season. In 2008, one of its family-friendly productions traveled to Snowmass with 31 the help of underwriters and was shown on the Fanny Hill stage. This non-profit 32 has also expressed interest in additional activity in Snowmass if the appropriate 33 facilities could be found. 34 35 Other Entertainment, Events and Festivals 36 In addition to the Fanny Hill Concert Series, the Town's Marketing and Special 37 Events Department produces a comprehensive series of programs throughout the 38 calendar year. Such events are intended to attract visitors to Snowmass and to 39 augment activities for local residents as well. 40 41 Existing Conditions 42 43 Snowmass Arts Advisory Board (SAAB): The SAAB was established in 1993 by a town 44 ordinance. Its mission is to demonstrate how the arts can contribute to the unique 45 cultural identity of Snowmass Village. It is the Board's belief that the arts are intrinsic to 46 the values, culture and heritage of the community. It is the Board's hope that enhanced 47 arts programming will promote a cultural consciousness, stimulate economic viability and 48 foster a sense of community pride. 49 50 51 Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 3: Community Arts and Culture February, 2009 Page 2 1 The Snowmass Arts Advisory Board's objectives are to: 2 3 Provide direction and leadership for arts initiatives, particularly as they impact the 4 Town's funding 5 Act as an arts advocate in promoting awareness and education 6 Provide information and expertise on arts-related issues 7 Function as the primary arts liaison between the Town Council and the 8 community 9 Make recommendations to Council on arts-related issues, propositions and 10 funding proposals 11 Review and evaluate progress of the arts strategic plan 12 Oversee the Town's public art program 13 Work in cooperation with the Town's Marketing and Special Events Department 14 and other arts organizations that present cultural events in Snowmass to meet 15 the goals of the strategic plan 16 Seek and evaluate methods of providing stable funding for the arts 17 Assist in developing a user-friendly cultural information source for local citizens 18 and visitors 19 Support and assess proposals for a year-round facility with appropriate 20 performance, exhibit and teaching space 21 22 Policies 23 The Town of Snowmass Village shall: 24 25 Improve and maintain a successful resort in balance with the cultural and artistic 26 needs of the community. 27 28 Plan for and support development of the visual and performing arts within the 29 community. 30 31 Seek to provide the necessary facilities to support the community arts. 32 33 Seek to provide sustainable, dedicated funding for arts programs and associated 34 facilities. 35 36 Examine each development proposal for inclusion of proposed cultural elements 37 during development review of all new projects, and propose commitments to 38 support these elements. 39 Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 3: Community Arts and Culture February, 2009 Page 3 1 Chapter 4 Regional and Community Economics 2 3 December, 2008) 4 Strategic Objectives 5 The fundamental economic structure of the resort community of Snowmass Village is a 6 bi-nodal resort commercial core which achieves "critical mass." A third "local needs 7 serving" node is required at the Snowmass Center. "Critical mass" is defined as that 8 commercial space which, when effectively tenanted and programmed, is sufficient to 9 create the vibrancy necessary to meet and exceed the expectations of our guests. 10 Sufficient revenues would be generated by guests of the appropriately sized lodging 11 properties, day visitors, non-resident employees and full/ part-time residents. 12 13 Background 14 (Note – An extensive 11-page document addresses the background conditions in 15 greater depth, with accompanying charts, graphs, statistics and research findings. It can 16 be found in Appendix IV. The following is a synopsis of the Background information.) 17 18 While many of the issues from the 1998 Comprehensive Plan are still relevant, as the 19 community evolves, so have the concerns. From a market perspective, the critical land 20 use issues for this update surround the changing role and function of Snowmass's three 21 commercial nodes—where both retail and nonretail amenities will play a significant role. 22 How these three mixed-use development nodes can be oriented and integrated in a way 23 that is both economically sustainable and reflective of the Town and stakeholders' 24 desired vision is one of the primary goals of the Comprehensive Plan update. 25 26 The strengths of the Town of Snowmass Village economy include the following: 27 Surrounded by unparalleled scenery and offers access to world class hiking, 28 mountain biking, fly fishing and other outdoor adventures 29 Among the largest ski resort in Colorado in terms of acreage 30 The largest share of skier days in the Roaring Fork Valley 31 Consistently ranked in the top 5 in skiing publications 32 Benefits from its prestige, image and national recognition, particularly as a 33 family-oriented resort 34 Offers a variety of accommodations and activities which appeal to a wide 35 range of visitors 36 Strong potential markets for restaurant, retail and commercial/lodge spending 37 Proximity to internationally known Aspen (9 miles) 38 Closest airport to a destination resort in the country (6 miles) 39 High level of real estate activity and value on a per capita basis 40 High sales tax per capita 41 Well known for its relaxed and intimate atmosphere 42 43 The potential and relative weaknesses of Town of Snowmass Village economy include 44 the following (The majority of which have been addressed in the planning of Base 45 Village): 46 47 A lack of an up-to-date critically massed resort commercial core 48 A sufficient amount of competitive lodging as necessary to support the 49 economic sustainability of our commercial core Chapter 4: Economics Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Pagel December, 2008 1 A somewhat underperformance in occupancy rates, accompanied by a more 2 significant underperformance in retail capture 3 Heavy dependence on the four-month winter season 4 Opportunities to improve less than optimum facilities and amenities for the 5 skier, visitor and resident 6 7 The Town has the potential to grow into a stronger year-round resort and to provide a 8 broader range of public facilities and services. Snowmass Village could also 9 substantially increase summer and fall visitors by providing more attractive infrastructure 10 and amenities. 11 12 Existing Conditions and Guiding Principles 13 The visitor oriented nodes (West and Base Villages) are agreed to provide the 14 necessary "critical mass" when each contains 65-75,000 sq. ft. of primary Food, 15 Beverage, Retail and Entertainment offer (FBRE). The roles and offers of each of the 16 commercial nodes were addressed in the Town's Marketing Strategic Plan 2008 (MSP) 17 as influenced by the analysis of RRC 2008 and Thomas Associates International 18 2002/2007 (TCI). These nodes complement, rather than replicate each other, for a total 19 of 130-150,000 sq. ft. The Base Village modeling work (Economic Planning Systems 20 [EPS] 2003) assumed this sizing with another 50,000 sq. ft. at the Center. Diversity of 21 FBRE offer and price points, as well as the significant presence of "locally 22 owned/operated" businesses, creates a resort"personality" favored by locals and visitors 23 alike. As such, it is a point of competitive differentiation which should be assured by the 24 Town in support of economic vitality. 25 26 As expressed in the Town's community forums (2007-8), most still see this sizing as a 27 maximum, recalling the "just big enough" mantra of the earlier Base Village discussions. 28 The MSP found this "minimizing" approach preferred for both the commercial nodes and 29 appropriately diverse lodging. This was seen as more likely to provide the desired quality 30 of life for the community while creating a differentiated, more welcoming and convenient, 31 guest experience. 32 33 Connectivity, providing a level of highly convenient mobility between the nodes, has 34 been, and continues to be seen, as critical within a bi/multi-nodal system. TCI, as well as 35 the MSP, introduced and re-enforced this necessity. 36 37 Diversity of offer and price point across the Lodging and FBRE product should be 38 required. While "legitimate" high-end lodging product, larger units (3+ bedrooms) and 39 fractional ownership should play a role, each should be limited. Such limitation would 40 avoid the negative impacts of over-supply, diminishing rental pool participation below our 41 80 percent goal and/or undermining our strategic intent to be an inclusive resort 42 community. 43 44 Seasonality is consistently an opportunity as well as a problem for mountain resort 45 communities. The MSP, as well as RRC 2008 and TCI, conclude that we should 46 continue to strengthen winter, significantly grow summer and push the edges of the 47 shoulder seasons. However, the "off-season" is seen by many locals to be a necessary 48 period of renewal, especially in the spring. 49 Chapter 4: Economics Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Page 2 December, 2008 I Group and conference business has been, and is expected to be, an essential element 2 within the resort. Over time, the group share of total overnight visitation might be 3 somewhat lower than the historical estimate of 40-45 percent (MSP). However, ADR 4 might well be strengthened by such a transition as somewhat smaller groups and higher- 5 value incentive group targets are pursued. Appropriate conference facilities and 6 associated amenities will be increasingly important as will smaller, non-fractional lodging 7 required by such guests. The MSP elaborates as to the quantity of this 8 "conference/group attendee" friendly lodging. It foresees not less 45-50 percent of total 9 "hot bed" units should be conference and group attendee as required, or approximately 10 1000 of the "hot bed" units anticipated in EPS Economic Modeling 2003. 11 12 The West Village Re-Development Plan should assure the continuity of necessary 13 conference facilities and associated lodging. The MSP concludes that a combined 14 Conference/Performing Arts Center design may present opportunities for programming 15 synergy and operating efficiency. However, a design study needs to precede any final 16 decisions. Its location is seen as most likely in the West Village, associated with the 17 anticipated condominium hotel as provided by the Hotel Development Agreement 18 between Related WestPac (RWP) and the Town. As to lodging, a significant portion of 19 the "conference/group attendee' friendly units mentioned above should be conveniently 20 located to the conference facilities, preferably providing interior access. 21 22 The growth in overnight visitation resulting from the Town's Comparative Demand 23 Analysis (CDA) 2004 and the later RRC 2008 work were consistent with one another at 24 an annual rate of 3.7 percent. In accordance with comments above regarding future 25 seasonality, it is expected that the winter growth will be somewhat less than this and the 26 summer/shoulder will be somewhat higher. Skier days will likely track the winter growth 27 but may be higher given the robust forecast for local and regional population growth as 28 well as the inclusion of additional segments of the populace as "new" skiers. The 29 international market continues to be seen as a strong element in our winter 30 programming, especially given our proximity to Aspen. Market, competitive and regional 31 perspectives were provided by Winston & Associates, supported by TCI and others, 32 during 2008. This work is included in the 2008 Comprehensive Plan Archive for use and 33 reference. The perspective of municipal impact is included within the archived Winston & 34 Associates work. 35 36 Economic Performance Indicators were agreed during the Base Village 37 analyses/approval process as primarily represented in the 2001 Town Baseline 38 Economic Indicators, EPS Economic Model, the EPS Fiscal Impact Analyses and the 39 CDA. Later RRC 2008 economic analysis employed essentially the same measures. The 40 MSP agreed that these indicators remained valid. The following table presents the 41 Economic Performance Indicators accompanied by their historical/current values as well 42 as the targets anticipated by the EPS Economic Model for the Town as a whole. It also 43 includes subsequent Planning Commission consensus views (2008 Minor PUD Amend. 44 Bldgs. 1313/12 Resolution): 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 Chapter 4: Economics Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Page 3 December, 2008 1 ECONOMIC PERFORMANCE INDICATORS 2 Performance Historical Historical Goalffaruet Goal/Target Indicator Hotel/Core Fractional Hotel/Core Fractional Condo/ 3BR/4+BR Condo/ 3BR/4+BR Overall Overall Occupancy Frequency 48/39/445 55 ° tbd/tbd/46 7 57 6 Occ. Intensity Persons/Occ./ BR 1.5 2.6 1.0— 1.1 ° 1.5 2.6 1.3/1.2 6 Rental Pool Participation % 99.6/75/83 ' na tbd/75 6/80 2.3 TBD Capture Rate % 38 2 na 55 55 Spend/Day/Overnight Visitor $ 1002 na 1102.3 1104 ADR/Unit ($) 161 — 228 0 300 TBD 5 sq. ft. Mall/Core Primary FBRE 313 na 4002.8 na 3 4 Sources (refer to superscripts): 5 6 1. 2001 Baseline Economic Indicators 7 2. EPS Economic Model and studies 2003 8 3. EPS Base Village Fiscal impact Analyses (FIA) 2003, 2004 9 4. EPS Snowmass Center FIA, 2006 10 5. RRC 2007 data 11 6. Planning Commission Parameter Consensus Minor PUD Amend. Bldg. 12 2008 12 7. Derived from BV FIA as adjusted per CDA 13 8. TOSV Comparative Demand Analysis (CDA) 2004 14 15 The forecasted capture rate change to 55 percent, from 38 percent, is the single largest 16 contributor to improved economic performance in the post-Base Village era. Increases in 17 occupancy frequency and ADR will also contribute, but to a lesser extent. The most 18 significant "downside' risk is the potential failure to sustain the 80 percent rental pool 19 participation levels. 20 21 22 Policies 23 The Town of Snowmass Village shall: 24 Decrease our dependence on a four-plus winter season by broadening visitor 25 seasons, focusing on the expansion of the summer season into the shoulder 26 seasons. 27 28 Increase the diversification of commercial offerings (types of retail as well as 29 price points) to reach a broader segment of visitors. 30 31 Balance resort and community interests when considering future projects and 32 budget operations. Chapter 4: Economics Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Page 4 December, 2008 1 2 Encourage appropriate critical mass to ensure economic sustainability, but 3 not build in excess of that critical mass. 4 5 In the commercial nodes, preserve and increase facilities, businesses, 6 employee housing, amenities and events that will attract and retain guests 7 and give everyone more reasons to stay in Snowmass Village. Ensure vitality 8 by: 9 o Strongly encouraging employee housing 10 o Concentrating high-occupancy lodging 11 o Enhancing employment opportunities for local employees 12 13 Target an 80 percent rental pool of wholly-owned condominiums 14 15 Encourage an appropriate presence of locally-owned and operated 16 businesses which provide a unique and differentiated offer. -do we need to 17 define local? TOSV and/or RFV? What actions are appropriate to defend this 18 statement? 19 20 Maintain an appropriate presence of community-serving businesses oriented 21 to providing for the daily or regular needs of residents. 22 23 Strengthen the Town's commercial base through differentiating the identity of 24 three nodes; and then uniting them through cooperative strategies, and 25 convenient physical connections. 26 27 Support expanded conference facilities and services. 28 29 30 In Summary 31 32 While many of the stakeholders (community, resort, developer, and rental guest and 33 property owner) may share significant commonality of objectives, there will inherently be 34 conflicting interests, differing opportunities and varying rewards potential amongst and 35 between them. In order to assure economic sustainability of the resort and thus, the 36 quality of life desired by the community, this chapter of the Comp. Plan is intended to 37 provide an economic framework for decision making which appreciates the various 38 views, recognizes the rights of private property and fully represents the interests of the 39 Snowmass Village Community. 40 Chapter 4: Economics Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Page 5 December, 2008 1 Chapter 5 Community Services, Facilities and Amenities 2 3 February, 2009) 4 Strategic Objectives 5 6 The Town of Snowmass Village community values the services, amenities and facilities 7 provided by both the public and private sectors. The community also values the 8 amenities and facilities provided by the natural environment and the ski mountain. In 9 order to complement commercial and business enterprise with the appropriate 10 community services, facilities and amenities, a solid understanding of community values 11 and service deficiencies in the Town of Snowmass Village is important. The Town must 12 evaluate future growth in relationship to whether adequate public services, amenities 13 and facilities always exist. 14 15 Background 16 17 Carrying Capacity of Services, Facilities and Amenities 18 Snowmass Village residents recognize that the Town must live within the Town's 19 carrying capacity which applies to community services, facilities and amenities. The town 20 should function within its ability to adequately and properly service its population without 21 exceeding water supplies, overuse of roads and compromising education and health 22 facilities. 23• 24 The Role of Aspen and the Roaring Fork Valley 25 The City of Aspen and the Roaring Fork Valley (RFV) provide complementary lodging, 26 dining and shopping opportunities to the Town of Snowmass Village. Snowmass' sense 27 of community extends into Aspen and RFV with schools, recreational facilities, cultural 28 amenities and sources of employment. Many Snowmass residents enjoy the relative 29 small town feel of Snowmass Village while having the option to also enjoy Aspen and 30 RFV amenities. Community facilities are divided into three categories in relationship to 31 Aspen and RFV: 32 33 Unnecessary Duplication: There may be no need to duplicate Aspen 34 facilities in Snowmass Village. For example, the Aspen Valley Hospital and 35 the Aspen and Roaring Fork School Districts service Snowmass Village. 36 37 Required Duplication: Some facilities continue to be necessary in 38 Snowmass Village regardless of whether Aspen has similar facilities, such as 39 childcare facilities, post office, grocery store, gas station, etc. 40 41 Optional Duplication: Aspen has some facilities that Snowmass Village may 42 want to duplicate. For example, Aspen emphasizes its summer performing 43 arts facilities. Snowmass Village may want to develop its own performing arts 44 facilities which could have year-round use. 45 46 Existing Conditions and Guiding Principles 47 The Town of Snowmass Village provides trash collection, road maintenance, police 48 protection, public transportation, affordable housing and administrative services to the Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 5: Services, Facilities and Amenities February, 2009 Page 1 1 community. Other agencies provide fire and emergency medical services, water and 2 sewer services, electricity, telephone, cable and natural gas. 3 4 Community Amenities 5 . The community yearns for areas where there can be repeated spontaneous encounters 6 with neighbors. The ability to do this not only creates a sense of community and a safe, 7 small town feel, it creates vitality and energy. Non-retail amenities are vital in generating 8 added drawing power and a more well-rounded year-round Snowmass community. For 9 the Town's three commercial nodes to be truly complementary, the inclusion of desirable 10 non-retail amenities should be planned. 11 12 Snowmass Ski Area 13 The Snowmass Ski Area is owned and operated by the Aspen Skiing Company 14 and includes 3,100 acres of terrain. In addition to skiing, snowboarding and 15 other traditional winter sports, the ski area offers year-round recreational 16 opportunities. The Snowmass Ski Area is the main economic driver in the 17 community providing jobs, generating revenue and contributing to the viability of 18 other businesses linked to the ski resort and tourism. 19 20 Parks, Trails & Open Space 21 Parks and trails are significant community assets and provide passive and active 22 recreation opportunities for residents and visitors. Snowmass Village has an 23 extensive trail system with 5.9 miles of paved trails and 46.5 miles of unpaved 24 trails. Open space areas secure wildlife habitat and preserve visual character. 25 Including the Snowmass Ski Area, over 8,700 acres are dedicated to public open 26 space/conservation and recreation. 27 28 Town Park 29 The Snowmass Village Town Park offers year-round recreational opportunities 30 and consists of: the recreation center and indoor gym, tennis courts, soccer field, 31 softball field, playground, skate park, sand volleyball courts, basketball court, 32 active wetlands area and the Rodeo events arena. 33 34 Community Services 35 Community services play an important role in determining carrying capacity and 36 development should not cause a decrease in the level of service provided. These 37 services and capacities need to be evaluated periodically to establish carrying 38 capacity, and then addressed at the time of land use or development application 39 submittal. To expand and best leverage services with surrounding districts and 40 government entities the Town should work with local and regional districts and utility 41 providers. 42 43 Current List of District Service Providers (for a more detailed description of 44 services provided, see Chapter 5 appendix.) 45 Snowmass Water and Sanitation District 46 Snowmass-Wildcat Fire Protection District 47 Aspen Publics School District 48 Roaring Fork School District 49 Aspen Valley Hospital District 50 Colorado River Conservation District Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 5: Services, Facilities and Amenities February, 2009 Page 2 1 Colorado Mountain College 2 Telecommunication and Transmission Services 3 4 Community Facilities 5 : Community facilities are also crucial in regard to carrying capacity. New development 6 should not result in a strain to our facilities. 7 8 Current List of Facilities in the Town of Snowmass Village(for a more detailed 9 description of all facilities and the services provided, see Chapter 5 appendix.) 10 Such as: 11 The Little Red Schoolhouse 12 The Snowmass Village Recreation Center and Gym 13 Town Hall 14 Snowmass Village Conference Center 15 The Snowmass Chapel and Community Center 16 Anderson Ranch 17 18 Policies 19 The Town of Snowmass Village shall: 20 21 Provide for a variety of parks, trails and recreational facilities that meet resident 22 and visitor needs, and that enhance the community's quality of life. 23 24 Provide public services in an efficient, responsible and financially viable manner. 25 26 Create incentives for the provision and / or development of essential community 27 services and facilities, such as professional community-based service office 28 space and public space. 29 30 Ensure that land use decisions maintain and enhance the Town's ability to 31 provide services, facilities and amenities for the community and the resort. New 32 development shall assist in providing these in a fair and equitable manner and 33 adequately compensate for its impact on public services and infrastructure. 34 35 Provide incentives for providing community-wide cellular coverage, wireless or 36 other technology. 37 38 To evaluate future growth to the Town's carrying capacities in relation to facilities, 39 services and amenities. 40 41 Examine each development proposal for opportunities to create, enhance and/or 42 maintain the Town's facilities, parks and trails infrastructure. 43 Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 5: Services, Facilities and Amenities February, 2009 Page 3 I Chapter 6 Environmental Resources 2 3 December, 2008) 4 Strategic Objectives 5 The natural environment is a primary asset to the community and positively influences the 6 continued success of the resort. The environmental resources of the Town of Snowmass Village 7 have played a significant role in attracting people to the area, as well as in stimulating and 8 regulating the Town's growth and development. The community supports the conservation and 9 preservation of unique lands, wildlife habitat, stream corridors, sensitive hillsides, important view 10 corridors, and other significant natural features. The Town promotes long-term stewardship of 11 clean water and air, energy efficiency, and ongoing opportunities for residents and visitors to 12 explore, learn and enjoy the natural beauty of the area. 13 14 Background 15 Recognizing that the quality of our environmental resources are directly tied to the health of our 16 citizens, our resort competitiveness, and our economy, the community initiated a number of 17 efforts aimed at improving environmental sustainability during 2008. 18 19 The concept of environmental sustainability speaks to the preservation of an ecological system in 20 its naturally occurring state, that it may continue providing life-supporting resources such as food, 21 water and oxygen over a very long period of time. Ecological sustainability is integrally linked to 22 our resort economy by virtue of global warning's predicted impact on winter recreational 23 activities. It has been predicted that in the next 25 years, winters will become shorter and there 24 will be a 3 to 4 degree increase of average temperature, resulting in more rain and less snow. 25 (Source: Aspen Global Change Institute). Preserving the quality of our natural environment and 26 taking action to minimize local contributions toward global climate change is expected to 27 positively affect our resort competitiveness and long-term economic stability. 28 29 Land development, and its associated energy consumption, can negatively impact the natural 30 environment by consuming resources faster than they are able to be regenerated. Consideration of 31 impacts to ecological sustainability can be applied to several aspects of development review. By 32 considering the characteristics of a site in its natural condition (soils, drainage ways, slope, solar 33 access, etc)and those of a proposed development's impacts to the surrounding environment(view 34 sheds,air quality, wildlife, etc) environmental quality can be preserved. 35 36 Protection of wildlife has long been a value in the Town of Snowmass Village. Development 37 should be located and designed so as not to diminish wildlife habitat or the existence and diversity 38 of species. Wetland and riparian communities are especially significant in this regard because 39 they have the highest density and diversity of wildlife species. 40 41 Scenic views and air quality are also highly important. Air quality is an environmental resource 42 that has been periodically and narrowly measured (primarily during periods of heavy 43 development activity) through PM-10 monitoring, designed to measure particulate matter 44 important to public health and safety. Air Quality Monitoring Plans are required on a project-by- 45 project basis, in order to ensure that the quality of our air is protected. Quality public views 46 contribute greatly to the uniqueness and attractiveness of this valley, and significantly contribute 47 to the desirability of our resort, and the value of local real estate. While the quality of public Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 6: Environmental Resources December, 2008 Pagel I views has no direct impact on environmental carrying capacity, it is highly valued from a quality- 2 of-life perspective. 3 4 The Snowmass Water and Sanitation District recently conducted a review of its water rights 5 inventory and its ability to serve future development and service requirements generally in the 6 Snowmass Village area. The review considered the treatment capacity of the Water Treatment 7 Plant, the priority and diversion availability of its water rights, raw water and potable water 8 storage capacities, peak demand requirements, projected growth and raw water storage for system 9 reliability. The limiting factor to the ability of the District to provide potable water service was 10 determined to be the legal and physical availability of raw water of satisfactory quality for 11 treatment at peak demand times. The District currently is serving a demand of approximately 12 4,900 equivalent residential units (EQRs). The District's analysis estimates that approximately 13 1,100 EQRs will be added upon completion of Base Village, Sinclair Meadows, Entryway, 14 Snowmass Center (assuming a project similar to the 3rd Amendment), and West Village 15 (assuming a 20 percent increase in EQR's, i.e. bedrooms & bathrooms). This falls within the 16 District's anticipated ability to reliably serve 6,200 EQRs. On the basis of the planning the 17 District determined that a reasonable estimate of its ability to reliably serve potable water is 6,200 18 EQR. The District determined that treatment capacity of the Waste Water Treatment Plant is 19 adequate and can treat the anticipated associated influent from 6200 EQR potable water usage. 20 21 Existing Environmental Conditions 22 Detailed descriptions and discussions on the following environmental resources are included in 23 the Chapter 6 Appendix: 24 25 Elevation 26 Slope 27 Aspect 28 Geology/Soils 29 Vegetation 30 Hydrology 31 Wildlife 32 Water 33 Open space 34 Environmental sensitivity 35 36 Policies 37 The Town of Snowmass Village shall: 38 39 1. Promote renewable energy generation, conservation of natural resources, and energy 40 efficiency. 41 42 2. Employ smart growth strategies and land use policies that limit development to the 43 minimum amount deemed necessary for the community to achieve economic 44 sustainability. 45 46 3. Provide essential community-oriented goods, services and housing with an aim to 47 reducing our dependency on other communities. 48 Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 6: Environmental Resources December, 2008 Page 2 1 4. Promote community stewardship for the Town's natural resources, and for those of the 2 Brush Creek and Owl Creek Valleys, by supporting land use policies and regulatory 3 processes that acknowledge an understanding of our environmental carrying capacity. 4 5 5. Ensure that development review processes include consideration of the community's 6 environmental values and an understanding of potential impacts to environmental 7 resources. 8 9 6. Protect significant public views and view corridors, and enhance the visual quality of 10 open space, national forest, wilderness and agricultural lands of the Town, Brush Creek I I and Owl Creek Valleys. 12 13 7. Protect riparian habitat and ensure that riparian vegetation and streambeds are maintained 14 in a naturally functioning state. 15 16 S. Prohibit development in critical wildlife habitat areas, including but not limited to elk 17 calving, severe winter range and migration corridors mapped by the Colorado 18 Department of Wildlife (CDOW), in order to maintain ecosystem integrity, and preserve 19 the existence and diversity of species within the Town. 20 21 9. Require new development to incorporate appropriate mitigation measures and 22 ecologically sound design principles that protect wildlife and wildlife habitat in 23 Snowmass Village. 24 25 10. Update, adopt and reference the following reports , as such reports may be deemed 26 pertinent to the specific project under development review: 27 a. Greenway Master Plan, (2000). 28 b. Two Creeks and the Pines Wildlife Enhancement and Management Plan (1994) 29 c. Snowmass Ski Area Wildlife Enhancement and Management Plan(1994) 30 d. Snowmass Ski Area 1994 FEIS Mitigation and Monitoring Plan 31 e. Snowmass Wildlife Committee Report(1991) 32 f. Pitkin County Wildlife Taskforce and Report(1989) 33 34 11. Evaluate all proposed development and redevelopment against the Town of Snowmass 35 Village Environmental Sensitivity Map. 36 37 12. Require a site-specific review for any proposed development that appears to penetrate 38 any part of designated sensitive lands. 39 40 13. Prohibit construction on slopes greater than 30%, unless approved by a supermajority 41 vote of the Town Council, and subject to specific findings, exceptions and/or 42 circumstantial criteria. 43 44 14. Encourage new development to restore degraded reaches of Brush Creek located adjacent 45 to, and/or within their projects. 46 47 15. Encourage new development to help fund bridges and culverts necessary to preserve the 48 Town's waterways located adjacent to, and/or within their projects. 49 Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 6: Environmental Resources December, 2008 Page 3 1 16. Prohibit any new development that is determined to cause an exceedence of the 2 Snowmass Water and Sanitation District's stated maximum treatment capacity (currently 3 defined as 6,200 EQR's). 4 5 6 Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 6: Environmental Resources December, 2008 Page 4 1 Chapter 7 Built Environment 2 3 February, 2009) 4 Strategic Objectives 5 The Snowmass Village community values the open, natural and rural character of the 6 Brush Creek and Owl Creek Valleys. The Town seeks to preserve the beauty of the 7 landscape by ensuring that the image, scale and development patterns of the Town are 8 harmonious with its natural setting. The Town values the separation afforded by the 9 undeveloped open space along Brush Creek and Owl Creek Roads; and wants to preserve 10 the sequence of open views that unfold along Brush Creek Road. The Town is committed 11 to creating a vital, distinctive town core with a Rocky Mountain flavor and a defined 12 center of activity (`sense of place') that reflects the appropriateness of its intended 13 setting. 14 15 Background 16 The Built Environment incorporates key concepts from other sections of the 17 Comprehensive Plan, particularly those related to land use and built form, and describes 18 in an inclusive way how land should be developed, or not developed, and preserved; and 19 what actions must be taken to achieve the community's Aspiration. 20 21 The Built Environment inter-relates with all of the elements of this plan from how 22 something is built (energy efficiency, character, footprint), to what is built (housing, 23 infrastructure, amenities, businesses) to the impacts of what is built (traffic and parking 24 demand, and services). The community understands these inter-relations and realizes that 25 criteria and guidance applied at the time of development application review truly shapes 26 the community and can be used to reach several of our goals. 27 28 A major expansion is underway at the Base Village that departs from the 1998 29 Comprehensive Plan vision for the site. However, in 2004, the community, through a 30 referendum, upheld the approval of a Planned Unit Development for Base Village. It 31 consists of a mixed-use (commercial and residential) resort development. It will 32 significantly increase the mass, and scale of the Base Area, as well as increase the 33 commercial and residential offerings of Snowmass Village. Its architectural style will 34 also change the character of Snowmass Village. And yet, not being completed, the full 35 impact of the development has not been experienced. 36 37 Influence Areas 38 39 There are three influence areas adjacent to the Town: Lower Brush Creek Valley, Owl 40 Creek Valley and Divide. 41 42 i. Lower Brush Creek Valley Influence Area 43 Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 7: Built Environment February, 2009 Pagel 44 The Lower Brush Creek Valley is located along Brush Creek Road between 45 Highway 82 and the Rodeo Grounds. It is the main entrance into Snowmass 46 Village and is a critically important scenic resource to the Town. Lower Brush 47 Creek provides the first significant view of the Village's ranching heritage. 48 Approaching the Town, ranch lands and stables introduce the Town's heritage. 49 The open character of undeveloped lands emphasizes Snowmass Village as a 50 separate community, distinct from other communities in the Roaring Fork Valley. 51 The Lower Brush Creek Valley is a picturesque, high quality visual and wildlife 52 resource. Existing development is low residential density and does not add 53 significantly to the traffic on Lower Brush Creek Road. Preserving the area's 54 open character is a priority in the lower Brush Creek Valley. The Highway 82 55 Intercept Lot is under Pitkin County jurisdiction and managed by the City of 56 Aspen. It provides a strategic parking and transit site for both Aspen and 57 Snowmass. This site may provide the opportunity to increase remote parking in a 58 location that is already a major transit and intermodal transfer stop. Furthermore, 59 the Town may explore opportunities for creating transit oriented development, 60 particularly affordable housing at this location with Pitkin County. 61 62 The key objectives for the Lower Brush Creek Valley Influence Area are: 63 64 A natural entry approach including a gateway sign at the Brush Creek Road/ 65 Highway 82 intersection, 66 67 Preservation of open space which typifies rural character of the natural and 68 agrarian landscape of the Lower Brush Creek Valley, 69 70 Limit future development to no higher use than allowed by the Estate 71 Residential land use category, 72 73 ii. Owl Creek Valley Influence Area 74 75 Owl Creek Road serves as an alternative access to Snowmass Village. The Owl 76 Creek Valley's rural character provides an important separation between 77 Snowmass Village and Aspen. It also supplements the Lower Brush Creek's goal 78 of emphasizing Snowmass Village as a distinct and separate community. 79 Maintaining the Nordic skiing easements is an important goal in the winter. 80 81 iii. Divide Influence Area 82 83 The Divide Influence Area lies at the far west end of Snowmass Village, in the 84 vicinity of the upper Brush Creek drainage area. It is accessed on Town roads. 85 86 Comprehensively Planned Areas 87 88 There are seven Comprehensively Planned Areas (CPA's) in the Town of Snowmass 89 Village, and specific land uses and objectives are designated for each of those areas. The 90 main purpose of CPA's is to discourage piecemeal consideration of individual parcels and Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 7: Built Environment February, 2009 Page 2 91 projects and give Town officials the ability to require applicants to plan comprehensively. 92 The Comprehensively Planned Areas are created to make sure that any development 93 proposed for these areas is consistent with the goals, objectives, uses and circulation patterns 94 in the Comprehensive Plan. A Comprehensively Planned Area does not imply rezoning nor 95 does it preclude rezoning. Site specific studies were conducted of the potential land uses, 96 relationships with surrounding land uses and circulation patterns in these areas. Maps of 97 each of the CPA's are included at the end of this chapter. 98 99 Underlying land uses can be expanded within the CPA boundary if a determination is 100 made that a specific community benefit will result. CPAs include: 101 102 In the lower valley: 103 104 Rodeo Grounds/Entryway CPA, 105 Faraway Ranch South CPA, 106 Faraway Ranch North CPA; 107 108 In the Town Core: 109 110 Faraway Ranch North CPA (including the Snowmass Center) 111 West Village-Mixed Use CPA, and 112 Base Village, and the 113 Multi-family Residential CPA. 114 115 Lower valley 116 117 a. Rodeo Grounds/Entryway 118 119 The Rodeo area is the gateway to the Town of Snowmass Village and is located at the 120 intersection of Brush Creek and Highline Road. The rustic, western appearance of 121 the Rodeo Grounds and surrounding open land is a significant element of the 122 community's rural character. This area currently is a primary summer recreational 123 activity area and includes the community park, skateboard and basketball facilities, 124 the rodeo grounds, the golf course and softball field. The Town "welcome" 125 information booths and the major vehicle intercept parking facility are located just 126 west of Brush Creek/Highline intersection. Northwest of the Town Park there is a 127 site referred to as the School Site. This site with proximity to the Town Park Bus 128 Depot has also the potential for public amenities such as a school and affordable 129 housing. 130 131 b. Faraway Ranch South (Parcel K &N) 132 133 Faraway Ranch South straddles Faraway Road south of and immediately adjacent to 134 Brush Creek Road. This property has employee housing and a condominium project 135 The Timbers at Snowmass) with ski-in/ski-out access to the Snowmass Ski Area. Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 7: Built Environment February, 2009 Page 3 136 Though development of this CPA has been completed, the key objectives for the area 137 should be preserved in the future. 138 139 c. Faraway Ranch North (Parcels 1A, A, B, C, D, F, G, H, H-1, I) 140 141 Faraway Ranch North includes the areas north of the Snowmass Center and a number 142 of parcels north of the Woodbridge Condominiums. (Note: The Snowmass Center 143 itself is located in the Snowmass Center CPA below). This area has spectacular 144 views of the ski area and Mount Daly. 145 146 The preferred plan for this area recommends low-density, multi-family development 147 would be considered in the base of the draws as part of a Comprehensive Plan, to take 148 advantage of the area's proximity to public transportation, the ski area and shopping. 149 150 The Town Core 151 152 The Town Core area includes the West Village-Mixed Use CPA (including the Mall 153 commercial area and surrounding residential properties), Base Village CPA and the 154 Snowmass Center (a portion of Faraway Ranch North CPA). Prior to the 155 development of the Base Village, the West Village commercial area was historically 156 the primary resort-commercial area in the Town—with an intimate, small village 157 character. Base Village is a larger scale center, with a tourism focus and an intensely 158 developed mixed-use area, intended to add vitality to the Town Core throughout the 159 year. The Snowmass Center, including grocery store, gas station, post office and 160 office functions, serves many of the local, functional needs of the community. The 161 mix of uses in the new Base Village has added a new dynamic to the Town Core, 162 creating three nodes with different characters and roles. (Chapter 4 and the 2008 163 Strategic Marketing Plan outline broad directions for the amount and type of 164 development and redevelopment to be targeted for each node). 165 166 Integrating the two resort commercial nodes and community commercial node, while 167 retaining their distinctive character and roles can strengthen Snowmass Village's 168 sense of place' as well as add many positive features to the Town Core. Effectively 169 connecting Base Village, the Snowmass Center and West Village will create a 170 functional Town Core serving the community and its visitors. 171 172 The preferred plan for the Town Core represents a cohesive plan for linking the three 173 sites together. Important to the effective integration of these three nodes is the 174 circulation and access to, through and from the area for mass transit, private vehicles, 175 pedestrians and skiers. 176 177 a. Town Core: Snowmass Center CPA 178 179 The Snowmass Center includes offices, grocery store, post office, gas station, 180 restaurants and other community-oriented commercial uses. This area has 181 spectacular views of the ski area and Mount Daly. The preferred plan for the Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 7: Built Environment February, 2009 Page 4 182 Snowmass Center CPA include: redevelopment of the site to include mixed use 183 community commercial uses, parking, and strong transit connections to the other 184 two resort commercial nodes. "Community Commercial" includes uses such as 185 the post office, grocery store, pharmacy & general store, professional medical 186 facilities, locksmith, laundry, restaurants, banks, and local apparel shops. 187 188 b. Town Core: West Village—Mixed Use CPA 189 190 West Village includes the West Village commercial area (the "Mall") as well as 191 the surrounding residential and other properties located between Fanny Hill and 192 the Numbered Parking Lots, between Fall and Campground Lanes. The West 193 Village includes a high concentration of short-term accommodations, commercial 194 retail, and restaurant uses. 195 196 In the West Village, revitalization and redevelopment are encouraged—so long as 197 the intimate character of the place is preserved, and transportation and other 198 carrying capacity limits are not exceeded. 199 200 The design of the West Village should distinguish itself as a unique commercial 201 center. Design guidelines to allow design review will be an important component 202 of this achieving this character and assuring it is complementary to the overall 203 Town Core character of reflecting our mountain setting. (For general design 204 objectives, see Preserving Community Character and Sense of Place below.) 205 206 c. Town Core: Base Village CPA 207 208 Upon buildout in 2011, the Base Village will compliment and be in balance with 209 the existing Mall as part of the bi-nodal resort commercial plan. A transit facility 210 and courtyard are also located in the development. The transit facility was sized 211 assuming that the primary transit facility would remain at the West Village. 212 213 d. Multi-family- Residential CPA 214 215 Multi-Family - Residential CPA includes the older (25 years and older) multi- 216 family residential properties held in condominium ownership that are located 217 within the Town. 218 219 The preferred plan for the Multi-Family - Residential CPA area encourages and 220 facilitates the revitalization and reinvestment of multi-family properties that are 221 aging enough to require capital reserve expenditures. The plan's intent is to 222 remove regulatory obstacles that have acted as barriers to condominium 223 associations seeking revitalization upgrades. 224 Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 7: Built Environment February, 2009 Page 5 225 226 The Future Land Use Plan 227 228 The community continues to deal with the need to balance the aspects of resort and 229 community, transportation and housing, and creating a `sense of place.' The 230 strengthening and completion of a vital and vibrant Town Core is still an issue for the 231 community. At the same time, we need to ensure that we live within the Town's carrying 232 capacity. It is important not to exceed resources or strain the abilities to serve the 233 community adquately and in a responsible manner. We wish to be sensitve to the natural 234 environment and not force negative impacts. An important question for our future is the 235 level of development that is "just big enough" to keep the economy stable but not exceed 236 the community's carrying capacity. For the remaining areas subject to development, our 237 intension is to find an appropriate balance between the impact of growth and quality of 238 life and community character; protect the integrity and character of the community while 239 accommodating some level of growth but within our carrying capacity. The Future Land 240 Use Plan was created around our community thresholds and expresses our expectations 241 for new development and redevelopment 242 243 Several factors were identified during the Comprehensive Plan process and analyzed to 244 determine their limitation to growth. These factors include: 245 Transportation Sewer Education/Childcare 0 Public Safety Environment Emergency Services Housing Public Health Water Utilities and Infrastructure 246 247 The key limitations to growth for Snowmass Village are: 248 Roads (discussed in Chapter 8), a net increase in vehicular traffic can not 249 be accommodated without a decline in the level of service. 250 Water -especially raw water availability & storage (discussed in Chapter 251 6), and 252 Affordable Housing for the Employee Base (discussed in Chapter 9). 253 Just Big Enough" Philosophy 254 255 Development within the Town has caused us to quickly approach the thresholds levels for 256 these elements. Physical limitations and policy parameters influence how quickly we 257 reach the threshold for each. The community acknowledges that we need to understand 258 the limits for growth as the remaining areas subject to change are developed or 259 redeveloped. When reviewing any future development or land use proposal, our elected 260 and appointed officials must consider the limitations to growth before a decision is made. 261 262 Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 7: Built Environment February, 2009 Page 6 263 Existing Conditions and Guiding Principles 264 Commercial Nodes 265 The Town of Snowmass Village will have three interconnected commercial nodes (two 266 resort oriented commercial nodes and one community oriented commercial node) that 267 jointly have a small "mountain town" feel characterized by: 268 269 a Public gathering places that allow personal interaction & "people- 270 watching," 271 a Sunlight to public areas, 272 a Easy pedestrian or mechanical connections between nodes, and 273 a Building placement that preserves long views from key public areas. 274 275 Comprehensively Planned Areas 276 277 The key objectives for the Rodeo Grounds/Entryway include: 278 279 a Visitor Welcome Facility 280 Enhancement of the rodeo grounds and arena, 281 a Preservation of the open pastures/open setting, 282 a Increased recreational use including playing fields, pedestrian and bike trails and 283 a recreation center, 284 a Expansion of public parking, 285 Enhancement of the pond and Brush Creek, 286 287 The key objectives for the Faraway Ranch South include these elements: 288 289 a Employee housing, 290 Low-density, high occupancy, multi-family residential housing, 291 A mixed-use ski recreation and community center at the base of Assay Hill, 292 a Enhancement of skier and pedestrian trails, 293 Faraway Road/ Brush Creek Road intersection improvements, 294 a Clustered development coupled with maximum preservation of open space, and 295 a Connections to the Town Core, specifically the Snowmass Center and the Base 296 Village area. 297 298 The key objectives for the Faraway Ranch North (outside of the Snowmass 299 Center) include: 300 301 a Employee housing, 302 a Preservation of open space in the draws behind the Snowmass Center, 303 Clustered residential at the base of the draws, and 304 Preservation of trails and other recreation areas. 305 306 The three key objectives for the Town Core include: 307 Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 7: Built Environment February, 2009 Page 7 308 Effectively integrating the two resort commercial nodes and community 309 commercial node (Base Village, West Village and Snowmass Center) through 310 improved transit and pedestrian connectivity and mobility; 311 Maintaining the individual, yet complimentary and mutually enhancing, 312 character and roles of the two resort commercial nodes and community 313 commercial node to provide diversity of amenities and services for guests and 314 residents. 315 Provide "just enough" critical mass at a pace that doesn't exceed the 316 absorption rate of the community with regard to construction impacts and 317 possible interruption of construction due to outside circumstances. NOTE: 318 Restated in Policy section. 319 320 Key objectives of the Snowmass Center CPA include these elements: 321 322 Improved mass transportation/pedestrian connectivity and mobility to Base 323 Village and the Mall as well as surrounding properties, 324 Continued community-oriented commercial, office, public uses (post office, 325 grocery, Town Hall) and residential, 326 Employee housing, 327 Maintain local owned/locally serving businesses in the Snowmass Center, 328 Redevelopment of the Snowmass Center buildings, 329 Creating informal gathering places for community, and 330 Future commercial development should strive to retain existing business 331 owners in the Center and to minimize, to the extent possible, the impact to 332 these businesses during construction. 333 334 Key objectives of West Village—Mixed Use CPA include these elements: 335 336 In the commercial areas maintain an intimate "small village" character by 337 generally maintaining a 2 to 3 story average height, while preserving 338 flexibility to consider taller elements in site specific plans. 339 340 Provide a diversity of commercial (retail/restaurant) experiences (and prices) 341 that complement (not compete) with the other nodes. 342 343 Integrating with Base Village and the Snowmass Center via seamless 344 pedestrian and transit connections. 345 346 Improved transit. 347 348 Improve the entry or `sense of arrival' to Base Village and West Village. 349 350 More efficient use of existing surface parking and consider reconfiguration 351 and increase in capacity through parking structures. 352 Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 7: Built Environment February, 2009 Page 8 353 Promotion of Town greenway and riparian enhancement goals through 354 completion of Benedict Park and Trail system and further enhancement of the 355 Brush Creek corridor 356 357 Incorporation of sustainable and "green"building. 358 359 Creation of public spaces and amenities that expand the winter and summer 360 seasons, such as: 361 Plazas, 362 Ice rink, 363 Movie theater, 364 Water features, 365 Performance space, 366 Public spaces for festivals 367 368 Special attention should be given to features attractive to children that will 369 augment Snowmass' appeal as a family-friendly destination. 370 371 Ensure that conference/convention capabilities and functions continue to exist 372 in West Village, by: 373 o Providing an appropriately sized conference center accessible to the 374 entire community 375 o In addition, provide a"conference hotel" 376 o The ability of these two facilities to function together in a 377 complementary fashion 378 379 Ensure that there is not a net loss of"hotel-like" or high occupancy turn over 380 rooms (H.O.T. Beds) in West Village. 381 382 Buildings, spaces and activities that will expand both the summer and winter 383 seasons. 384 385 Maintain a strong mix of uses—commercial, office, food and 386 beverage/retail/entertainment, residential, and public uses. 387 388 Residential uses can include a variety of unit types but should focus on 389 maintaining high-occupancy uses. 390 391 Encourage locally-owned, "non-chain" types of businesses that preserve 392 unique shopping experiences. 393 394 Recognize and encourage timeless "Mountain Architecture". 395 396 Organize service and delivery to minimize conflicts with transit and 397 pedestrians in order to function effectively. 398 Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 7: Built Environment February, 2009 Page 9 399 Encourage revitalization and reinvestment in existing properties. 400 401 402 Key objectives of the Base Village CPA include these elements: 403 404 Tourism oriented commercial uses, 405 Resort oriented uses, 406 Resort administration, 407 Adequate parking for short-term, commercial and residential, 408 Adequate transit facilities 409 Restaurants, bars, cafes and 410 Overnight accommodations 411 412 Key objectives of the Multi-Family- Residential CPA include: 413 414 o Encourage revitalization and reinvestment in properties, including 415 general upkeep and maintenance, remodels and minor redevelopment 416 oriented commercial uses, 417 418 o Encourage revitalization and reinvestment in properties, including 419 general upkeep and maintenance, remodels and minor redevelopment. 420 421 o Facilitate the improvement and/or addition of amenities, including 422 meeting spaces, fitness and/or spa facilities, lobby, outdoor gathering 423 spaces, pools and/or hot tubs, landscaped areas, and fire pits and/or 424 barbeques. 425 426 o Facilitate the improvement and/or addition of building improvements, 427 including exterior cladding, window and/or door upgrades, roof 428 replacement, entry and arrival features, decks and/or porches. 429 430 o Provide the ability to offset revitalization and reinvestment costs by 431 adding a nominal increase in floor area. 432 433 Future Land Use Plan 434 435 Lower Brush Creek Valley is to remain in its natural, open condition. Only a minimal 436 amount of residential development may occur. A new informational center should be 437 built at the Rodeo/Entryway. In addition alternatives should be explored to expand 438 public parking. In addition, a master plan should be completed for the rodeo site to 439 complete the planning for the entryway. Preserve the Brush Creek Corridor's open 440 pasture and ranching land uses. Horse stables and the newly renovated rodeo arena 441 enhance the ranching heritage of the Town. Maintain the primary intercept parking 442 lot at the Rodeo/entryway. Encourage visitors to use public transit in the Village. The 443 Town Core should create a "sense of place" by developing a concentration of 444 recreation, shopping, dining, entertainment, living and working opportunities. Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 7: Built Environment February, 2009 Page 10 445 Development of the Town Core should include an easy and effective way for people 446 to move to, from and within the area. The Plan will be updated continually by the 447 Planning Commission and Town Council and implemented over a twenty year time 448 period. 449 450 Annexation Policy 451 452 Existing and future land use in the Influence Areas could have significant impacts on 453 Snowmass Village. Governing jurisdictions should evaluate land use decisions and 454 mitigate their impacts in a way that is consistent with this plan. The goal is to 455 establish a cooperative process for review of future land uses in the Influence Areas. 456 457 Portions of the Influence Areas may be considered for annexation. In the Divide 458 Influence area there are pocket parcels that could be considered for annexation, 459 however the land lying west of the ridgeline (as determined by the Town), between 460 the Snowmass Creek drainage and the Brush Creek drainage, shall not be considered 461 for annexation. Should it be determined that a public benefit could result from 462 annexation, annexation may be considered. At this time, there does not appear to be 463 any public benefit to the annexation of land in the Lower Brush Creek Valley 464 Influence Area below the Seven Star Property, nor the Owl Creek Valley.Influence 465 Area. Consideration for annexation in these areas should require a determination of 466 public benefit for Snowmass Village. Annexation outside of the influence boundaries 467 should not be considered. Annexation limits should be consistent with property 468 boundaries whenever possible. 469 470 471 Telecommunication and Transmission Devices 472 473 As technology advances, there will be greater demand for locating new 474 telecommunication reception devices. These devices must be carefully sited to 475 mitigate visual impacts and impacts to environmentally sensitive areas. 476 477 Guidelines for Preserving West Village's Character & Sense of Place 478 Note from Winston & Assoc. - graphics will be inserted to illustrate concepts) 479 480 There are a number of urban form characteristics that are present in Snowmass 481 Village, and are typical of successful, enjoyable pedestrian villages universally, 482 that we wish to perpetuate in West Village. The following is a preliminary list of 483 parameters for future development review. 484 485 Village Scale 486 487 Pedestrian areas are "outdoor rooms" whose walls are formed by the surrounding 488 buildings. The shape and feel of these rooms is created by the height, character and 489 variety of the facades that enclose them. Very general rules about the perception of Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 7: Built Environment February, 2009 Page 11 490 exterior spaces have been derived from evaluating many different public spaces: how 491 much and how long they are used (the lingering factor), people expressed reaction to 492 spaces, and general observations. 493 494 Height-to-width relationships. When the height of the enclosing buildings is Y< or 495 less than the width of the space, it does not seem enclosed, and pedestrians tend to 496 feel exposed. When the height of surrounding buildings is equal to, or greater 497 than the width of the space, it feels like a `canyon'. The most comfortable 498 proportions seem to be when the height of the buildings is approximately V2 the 499 width of the space they enclose. 500 501 In actuality, buildings along a street or plaza seldom have a uniform height, nor is 502 it desirable. Therefore, some latitude is appropriate. A range of.4 to .7 can be a 503 general guide to "comfortableness". 504 505 In some instances, the `canyon' effect is acceptable, or even desirable—for 506 example as a short connecting link between two larger spaces. Due to sun-shade 507 considerations it is preferable to orient any relatively longer `canyon' conditions 508 in a north-south direction. 509 510 In some circumstances, the total height of the building may exceed the ratio 511 amount provided the upper-floors are stepped-back so that the street level visible 512 fayade satisfies the preferred height to width ratio. 513 514 When exceptions to the height ratio cannot be avoided, special attention should be 515 given to creating a well-defined ground floor emphasis through awnings, 516 canopies, setback of upper floors, etc. 517 518 Serial Discovery 519 520 When streets are straight, and the end is visible, pedestrians tend to turn back sooner, 521 putting the shops at the ends at a disadvantage. Village streets are more interesting, 522 and there is a sense of discovery that draws pedestrians onward, when the view 523 continually disappears around a bend or a corner. Link activity areas and destination 524 points so they easily attract a critical mass of people, creating vitality. Sequence 525 views to pull people into activity areas and lead them from one feature to the next. 526 Elements should be organized to lead people to the front door and invite them in. 527 528 Irregular Street Edge 529 530 On West Village streets the buildings form the edge of the street. A strong street 531 edge is important, but perfectly aligned facades tend to be monotonous. Features that 532 give interest to streets include: slightly irregular facade lines, varied setbacks, small 533 plazas, planters and large flower pots, and changes in texture of the street materials. 534 535 Building Height Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 7: Built Environment February, 2009 Page 12 536 537 Building heights vary greatly in the West Village commercial areas. While zoning 538 prescribes a maximum height, it is undesirable to evolve to a uniform "buzz cut" look 539 for the Village. Consistent with the Height Ratios above, buildings along pedestrian 540 areas should be a mixture of 2 to 3 stories, with higher building masses stepped back . 541 from view. 542 543 To give life and visual variety to the West Village, towers, cupolas, chimneys and 544 other features not useable as living areas are encouraged (not to exceed 25% higher 545 than the supporting building). 546 547 Building Materials 548 549 Stucco is a dominant material in West Village, and one that distinguishes Snowmass 550 from other mountain resorts. To provide variety, lesser amounts (proportionately) of 551 other materials should be used, including: varied colors of stucco, heavy timbers, 552 stone, horizontal lap siding, glass. 553 554 Transportation Mode Priorities 555 556 Pedestrian mobility is the highest priority in the West Village followed by transit, 557 vanibuses for lodges, and finally vehicles. Vehicular traffic is to be discouraged and 558 conflicts between pedestrians and cars or service vehicles are to be avoided. Transit 559 is the second highest priority in the West Village and should have optimal access to 560 ski portals and commercial areas 561 562 Given the hillside location of West Village, and an altitude that is challenging for 563 many visitors, a secondary system of relatively easy pedestrian connectivity is 564 desirable. This may consist of mechanical means (escalators, elevators, or tram) 565 combined with horizontal walkways. If retrofitting the existing buildings proves 566 unfeasible, consideration should be give to incorporating this level of mobility into 567 any development on the numbered lots. This system will also provide accessibility for 568 the disabled, which is important to serving all the guests attracted to Snowmass. 569 570 Climate/Solar Orientation 571 572 Due to Snowmass' alpine climate, sun is an important comfort factor. Shaded areas 573 have ambient temperatures substantially below those of sunlit areas, which is 574 especially significant in winter, fall and spring. All pedestrian areas should have 575 significant periods of sun during the year. Due to the low winter sun angle, the 576 amount of sun will be less, be some sun should be allowed. 577 578 Lighting 579 580 Visually attractive night lighting is important to enhance the magic of the visitor's 581 experience as well as for safety and way finding. However, light `pollution' obscures Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 7: Built Environment February, 2009 Page 13 582 views of the night sky that are important to the Snowmass experience. All lighting 583 should be sharp-cutoff type, and directed downward or at solid surfaces. 584 585 Signage 586 587 Signage designed to be complementary to the building fagade and architecture 588 enhances the appearance of our commercial areas. At the time of development 589 review, criteria should be developed to address the appropriate size(s), design and 590 lighting and made a condition of the redevelopment. 591 592 Integrating the Natural Environment 593 594 Preserve and enhance natural areas and water features such as Benedict Creek 595 and Benedict Park. Modifications and impacts should be minimized. 596 597 Use interpretive information and signage to draw attention to nature, mountain 598 ecology and the effects of time, natural processes and change. 599 600 Make connections with nature. Use views, vegetation and water as details to 601 the design and to transition between the man-made environment and nature. 602 Building massing should be porous enough to let nature penetrate and be a 603 part of it, both visually and physically. 604 605 Take advantage of views and view corridors. Site buildings and adjust 606 building massing to preserve views from public places of overlooks and 607 landmarks. 608 609 Use natural features, trail corridors, buildings and other spaces to direct 610 visitors and reinforce the connection with the natural mountain environment. 611 612 Building architecture must be adapted for the specific mountain site. 613 Structures should not overwhelm our connection to the mountain 614 environment. 615 616 Policies 617 The Town of Snowmass Village shall: 618 619 Maintain the Town of Snowmass Village's distinct community identity by 620 preserving existing open space areas between the Town and other communities. 621 622 Maintain the open character of the lower Brush Creek Valley as the entryway to 623 Snowmass Village. Focus development away from this critically important visual 624 and natural resource corridor. 625 Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 7: Built Environment February, 2009 Page 14 626 Minimize the negative environmental and visual impacts of development and 627 preserve open space for scenic, recreational and wildlife uses. 628 629 Annexation should be limited to areas where a public benefit can be shown. 630 Consideration of any potential annexation should be limited to the west by the 631 ridgeline into the Snowmass Creek drainage, and otherwise by designated 632 Influence Areas. 633 634 Comprehensively address cumulative impacts and community objectives when 635 making specific land use decisions, for example: 636 637 o Increase the capture of pass-through guests, and yet make sure that new 638 development doesn't diminish roadway levels-of-service, 639 o Incorporate on-site local workforce housing, 640 o Provide remote parking, and/or contribute to the transit system—on both a 641 local and regional basis. Make decisions that best serve the resort and the 642 community over the long-term 643 644 During development or land use review, fully understand the limitations to growth 645 for our community (our carrying capacity) and how the proposal impacts these 646 limitations. 647 648 Complement and integrate new development into the existing character of 649 Snowmass Village, reflecting a compact, pedestrian/village-scale environment 650 based on a high-quality alpine resort experience. 651 652 Create a compact, clearly defined and well-connected Town Core with services 653 and housing in proximity to each other. Density and growth should be 654 concentrated in the Town Core area and land uses should support a place where 655 visitors and locals can interact. 656 657 Preserve the community character of Snowmass Village through intelligent land 658 use; sensitive design; compatible mass, scale and density; and full evaluation and 659 mitigation of impacts caused by new development. 660 661 Encourage new development and/or redevelopment that serve visitor's recreation, 662 dining, shopping, apres-ski and basic service needs. 663 664 Ensure that new development includes appropriate employee housing onsite or in 665 Town. 666 667 Encourage more amenities that enhance business, minimize vehicle trips and 668 generate local sales tax revenues. 669 670 Encourage Transit Oriented Development (TOD) ideas within the Town Core and 671 regionally, to provide housing in close proximity to jobs. Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 7: Built Environment February, 2009 Page 15 672 673 Closely examine commercial development in areas outside of the Town Core, 674 ensuring that such development is consistent with overall Town goals and there is 675 a significant public benefit. 676 677 Provide "just enough" critical mass at a pace that doesn't exceed the absorption 678 rate of the community with regard to construction impacts and possible 679 interruption of construction due to outside circumstances. 680 681 Critical elements of the Town infrastructure and necessary community facilities 682 should not be eliminated until a suitable replacement is constructed. Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 7: Built Environment February, 2009 Page 16 1 Chapter 8 Transportation 2 3 January, 2009) 4 Strategic Objectives 5 The Town of Snowmass Village supports continued improvements to an integrated 6 mobility system that minimizes vehicle traffic, increases pedestrian options and links 7 land use and urban form with sustainable transportation. The goal is a transportation 8 system that serves residents, guests, employees and visitors quickly and effectively with 9 minimum impacts on the quality of life. 10 11 The Town of Snowmass Village shall be served by convenient, effective and attractive 12 transit service between local commercial and residential nodes, and work with the 13 Roaring Fork Transportation Authority (RFTA) to improve transit services throughout the 14 greater Roaring Fork Valley. A major objective for the community will be to minimize 15 increases in single-occupant vehicle (SOV) use and to increase the use of transit, 16 pedestrian, and other non-SOV modes of travel in the town. Sustainable land use, 17 urban design and employee housing strategies that create vibrant, mixed-use nodes that 18 encourage walking and transit use are design elements for achieving these goals. 19 20 Background 21 Traffic is the significant carrying capacity limit to the town's growth and continued 22 success. Recognizing that approved development will push traffic up to, or beyond, 23 maximum desirable levels, future development must address traffic in their land use 24 decisions to not increase current levels. The transportation issues we face today and into 25 the near future include: 26 27 Local roadways will exceed previously established Levels of Service (LOS) 28 thresholds during peak periods while congestion exists on Highway 82 for even 29 longer periods, 30 The current local and regional transit systems are approaching peak period 31 capacity, 32 Remote parking lots are at or exceed capacity during peak days of peak season, 33 and 34 More commuting-oriented sidewalks are needed (topography & other constraints 35 aside), and grade separated crossings when feasible. 36 37 Existing Conditions & Guiding Principles 38 (Note — An extensive 13-page document addresses these areas in greater depth, with 39 accompanying charts, graphs, statistics and research findings. It can be found in 40 Appendix #. The following is a synopsis of the Existing Conditions and Areas of 41 Significance information.) 42 43 1. Measurement of "Person Trips:" Create a useful tool to measure and 44 understand the ramifications of (re)development on the transportation system. It 45 is important to understand the future impacts of (re)development on all the 46 various modes of travel. Modeling of "person trips will not replace the LOS 47 measurements of traffic volume, but would incorporate LOS standards for the 48 other modes of transportation as well. We are approaching critical mass in the 49 three current key transportation areas: parking, traffic and mass transit. It is Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 8:Transportation January, 2009 Pagel 1 becoming difficult to make changes in one area without having a negative impact 2 on another. For example, it is possible to say that no employees of a 3 re)development will be parking in the Village. This would have a favorable 4 impact on traffic volume, but it could have a negative impact on parking in 5 another location and add to the demand for transit services. It will be important to 6 know that adequate capacity and funding exists to accommodate and support the 7 re)development. This is a new concept for measuring mobility needs. Further 8 study is needed to develop review standards and mitigation measures that will be 9 reasonable, consistent and applicable. 10 2. Traffic Volume: In the review of Base Village it was stated that the "Cumulative 11 total of future projected traffic, including the Base Village and other outparcel's 12 traffic projections at full build out indicate that one-way peak hour volumes along 13 Brush Creek Road are projected to exceed the Town's established limits." It was 14 projected that the cap of 925 one-way trips would be exceeded roughly 15-20 15 times, at approximately 1,145 one-way trips. This would be considered LOS D. 16 LOS D is described as being congested to the point of "approaching gridlock." It 17 is important to note that this is projected to occur on 15-20 times in the peak 18 season. The Transportation Plan recommends the community continue to apply 19 Transportation Demand Management (TDM) and alternatives to strive to 20 preserve the LOS C standard of 925 into the future. Alternatives that are realistic 21 and financially sustainable will need to be developed to achieve this goal. 22 3. Parking Inventory and Distribution: The Base Village land use application and 23 Entryway projects have changed the parking inventory in the Village. 24 Development upon the base area lots A-C will result in a parking structure 25 containing public parking with the capacity in the AM peak hour for 200 day 26 skiers and 175 commercial parking spaces. Adding this to the 1,000 parking 27 spaces in the Numbered lots results in 1,375 public parking spaces above the 28 Wooden Skier Bridge. This is an increase of 175 parking spaces over the 1,200 29 spaces recommended in the original Comprehensive Plan. This increase in 30 parking would not have a significant impact on the LOS on Brush Creek Road. 31 The Entryway project is designed to have 325 surface parking spaces upon 32 completion. In the Entryway planning process it was contemplated that additional 33 parking could be added by decking over of the surface parking to achieve some 34 600 parking spaces. The Comprehensive Plan had recommended 650 parking 35 spaces at the Entryway site. The decking over of the surface parking may not be 36 a practical political/economic alternative for the community. Alternatives to 37 providing the 650 parking spaces will most likely push parking further from the 38 community. This will have impacts on other jurisdictions and the regional transit 39 services. 40 4. Transit Carrying Capacity: The existing regional and local transit services are 41 reaching their carrying capacity in the AM and PM peak hours. The local service 42 Village Shuttle) is operating at 6,000-7,000 passengers a day during peak 43 periods. The regional services (RFTA) are at 2,500 — 3,000 for valley wide 44 services and 3,500 — 4,000 for day skier services. The existing facilities for both 45 regional and local transit services are at their practical limits in the peak periods 46 for both bus bays and queuing space for passengers. To make significant 47 increases in the carrying capacity of transit services will require investments in 48 infrastructure, rolling stock and personnel. The original Comp Plan and the Base Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 8: Transportation January, 2009 Page 2 I Village land use submission both contemplated a redeveloped Mall area with a 2 transit station. This was tied directly to the Bi-Nodal commercial goal stated in 3 both studies. If redevelopment of the West Village and the reconfiguration for the 4 existing transit facilities are put off significantly into the future, then interim 5 solutions may be necessary to continue quality transit services. 6 5. Alternative Technologies: Cable technologies, aerial guide ways and 7 pedestrian improvements have been incorporated into the Base Village 8 development plan to help mitigate traffic impacts. Long range planning that 9 preserves corridors for alternatives are still recommended in the Transportation 10 Plan. 11 Policies 12 The Town Snowmass Village shall: 13 14 Measure transportation performance in the context of "person trips," rather than 15 only in vehicle trips. It has become increasingly clear that using a roadway/car- 16 based LOS metric leads to roadway-based mitigation measures. Given current 17 realities, this creates a conflict with the community vision for a "rural" Brush 18 Creek Road. Shifting the metric to "person trips" allows a more complete context 19 of moving people through town, and expands the toolkit of strategies to use. This 20 approach allows for new development only by mitigating traffic through other 21 strategies: remote/intercept parking, parking fee-in-lieu/shared use measures, 22 transportation demand management strategies, mixed land uses, on-site 23 employee housing, attractive pedestrian environments, and other measures to 24 address traffic. The amount of development, therefore, is restricted by the cost of 25 the mitigation. This involves measuring the use (volume/ridership) of each travel 26 mode, the capacity or availability of each mode, and the associated costs of 27 expanding each mode. 28 29 Require new development and redevelopment to project the number of "person 30 trips" generated by their application, and present alternatives that strive to 31 achieve a zero growth rate in traffic volume in the peak periods. The approach 32 must be realistic and not overtax any one of the components of the overall 33 transportation system. Developers are to demonstrate how alternative modes of 34 transportation will be encouraged through traffic mitigation such as: 35 36 o Design and configuration of the development or redevelopment 37 o Amenities 38 o Roadway design 39 o Parking (on site and / or off site) 40 o Transit 41 o Pedestrian corridors 42 o Alternative mobility devises (Gondolas, escalators, etc) 43 o Additional employee housing in town 44 o Funding or construction of intercept parking 45 o Long-term commitment to private transit (shuttle) system 46 o Contribution to a mass transit system 47 Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 8: Transportation January, 2009 Page 3 I Uphold the following performance standards as a base line for measuring the 2 impact of future development: 3 4 o Upper Brush Creek Road (above Woodbridge): no significant (equal 5 or greater than five percent of current PM peak hour, peak direction 6 phpd) roadway traffic) net increase in vehicle trips during the PM peak 7 travel period (3:00 to 5:00 pm) 8 o Lower Brush Creek Road (below Woodbridge): maintain existing LOS 9 standard/threshold of 925 phpd trips 10 o Owl Creek Road: maintain existing LOS standard/threshold of 650 11 phpd; 12 o Intersections: maintain existing LOS C standard/threshold 13 o Non-auto travel modes: monitor usage and capacity to ensure that 14 capacity is not to exceed more than the 10 busiest days of peak season 15 16 Comprehensively link land use/employee housing decisions with mobility options. 17 Increase the availability of affordable housing in the town core to reduce 18 workforce commuting along Brush Creek Road. 19 20 Address future parking needs primarily through off-site parking and fee-in-lieu 21 programs, limiting the amount of new on-site parking provided in town. Require 22 development to provide adequate parking per the Land Use Code but at a Town 23 approved location that does not cause a net increase of vehicles on the critical 24 sections of Brush Creek Road during peak hours. 'Parking may be built off-site 25 with proven ability to move people from the parking lots to the town core and 26 base of the ski area. Additional parking may be allowed in Two Creeks Lot, the 27 Rodeo Lot or other town approved location if parking offsets traffic volume on 28 Brush Creek Road. 29 30 Maintain a maximum of 1,375 spaces for public parking in the town core (1,000 in 31 the Numbered Lots and 375 in Base Village). Make space at Two Creeks and 32 the Rodeo Lot available for day skier parking and limit 200 of the 1,375 spaces in 33 the Town Core to day skier parking. Continue to ensure that the objective of 34 achieving 85 percent utilization of day parking through pricing (Ordinance 49 35 series of 1994) remains in balance with this plan's goal to control traffic volumes 36 within the community. 37 38 For existing multi-family development, increase the use of mass transit in the 39 Brush Creek corridor to reduce individual automobile use. The use of personal 40 vehicles may be lessened by providing effective transit, intercept parking, traffic 41 demand management, courtesy van service, enhanced pedestrian/bicycle 42 opportunities, and improved amenities such as ski lockers near transit stations. 43 44 Develop a fully integrated commuter-oriented trail, bike and pedestrian system 45 for summer and winter use that connects to regional trail systems and transit 46 stops. 47 48 Work with RFTA and other transportation stakeholders to provide an integrated 49 premium mass transit system for the Roaring Fork Valley. 50 Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 8: Transportation January, 2009 Page 4 1 Maintain the "village feel' and character of Brush Creek Road from Highway 82 2 to the town core, but plan for future premium transportation technologies in the 3 Brush Creek corridor. 4 5 Develop seamless links between Base Village, Snowmass Center and West 6 Village so guests and workers will be able to travel back and forth without cars. 7 Ensure that the capacity and speed will meet expectations. 8 9 Reduce conflicts between pedestrians, buses and delivery services. Encourage 10 limited underground parking and/or underground service and delivery in the West 11 Village. 12 13 Support and encourage the use of alternative fuels in Town-owned vehicles. Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 8: Transportation January, 2009 Page 5 1 Chapter 9 Workforce Housing 2 3 January, 2009) 4 5 Strategic Objectives 6 The Town of Snowmass Village, as a resort community, considers the provision of affordable 7 employee housing (workforce housing) to be a critical element of our success. We aspire to 8 provide such housing to all full-time employees - as defined in the Land Use and Development 9 Code (LUDC) — who desire to live in Town with requirements that can be reasonably met. 10 Achieving this objective will assure an adequate workforce, create a diverse, vibrant community 11 and lessen the environmental impact of commuting. 12 13 Background 14 The Town of Snowmass Village has historically been a leader in providing workforce housing for 15 employees. However, the demand for affordable housing remains a pressing issue in 16 Snowmass and the region. The median income of a three-person household in the Town of 17 Snowmass Village is $87,800. This income, based on a 2008 housing study from RRC 18 Associates, can afford a home valued at approximately $350,000. The median sales price of a 19 free market single-family home in Snowmass Village in 2007 was $3.96 million and $950,000 for 20 a multi-family unit (Coates, Reid, and Waldron, 2007): Resort communities including 21 Snowmass have increasingly found the issue of work force housing challenging considering the 22 income levels supported by the resort service industry and the escalating price of free market 23 housing. The Town of Snowmass Village and Aspen have historically depended on employees 24 finding affordable housing down valley (Basalt to Rifle). However, with the oil and gas industry 25 in the area growing at a rapid pace, employees are finding jobs closer to home. In addition, 26 home values from Rifle to Snowmass are now out of reach for many service employees. 27 Maintaining both a quality work force, and a strong community, has required an aggressive 28 housing policy and these needs have only grown with additional job opportunities up and down 29 the Roaring Fork Valley. 30 31 It should be recognized that there are cycles in the labor and housing market. The policies 32 reflected in this chapter reflect long-term observations and trends in the labor and housing 33 market in Snowmass Village. 34 35 Existing Conditions and Guiding Principles 36 The critical issues associated with workforce housing include: 37 38 Total Jobs: In 2007 and 2008, RRC Associates was hired to determine how many 39 jobs and employees exist in Snowmass Village and where they live. They were also 40 asked to evaluate how many jobs Snowmass businesses generated. RRC concluded 41 that in the winter (06/07) there were 3,914 peak winter jobs and 2,474 summer jobs. 42 Each employee, on average, works 1.35 jobs in the winter and 1.3 jobs in the 43 summer (See Table 1). Based on the number of jobs in the Town of Snowmass 44 Village, there are 2,900 employees in the winter and 1,903 employees in the 45 summer. Based on the information in Table 2 there appears to be 1,740 full time 46 year round employees working in the Town of Snowmass Village. 47 Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 9: Workforce Housing January, 2009 Pagel 1 2 3 Table 1: Current makeup of iobs/workers Winter 2006107 Summer 2006 Year-round jobs 1,659; 42.4% 1,6591 67.0% Seasonal jobs 2,256 57.6% 815; 33.0% Total jobs 3,914; 100.0% 2,474; 100.0% 1 Average jobs/worker 1.35 1_31 Employed persons 2,900! 1,9031; 4 Source: Colorado Dept. of Labor and Employment QCEW employer address files; 2008 5 TOSV Employee Housing survey by RRC Associates. 6 7 Historical Policy: Over the history of Snowmass Village, housing goals and polices 8 have fluctuated. The 1998 Comprehensive Plan stated policy was to house 60 9 percent of Snowmass Village employees. In addition, the 1998 Plan included a 10 policy to "increase employee housing mitigation requirements for developers so that 11 they mitigate 100 percent of their housing impact." The Land Use Code in 2008 12 requires that developers provide housing for 45 percent of new employees generated 13 from a project. 14 Where Employees Live: Table 2 summarizes where Snowmass employees live. Of 15 note, 49 percent or 852 people of Snowmass Village's full time (work summer and 16 winter) employees (1,740 people) live within Town. Of the roughly 2,900 persons 17 employed in Snowmass Village in the winter, approximately 1,100 (39 percent) are 18 Snowmass Village residents, while approximately 1,800 (61 percent) commute from 19 elsewhere.). This adds significantly to the daily traffic volume on Brush Creek Road. 20 It also should be noted that 23 percent of workers that live in Snowmass Village in 21 the winter out-commute to other communities such as Aspen. If hypothetically, all 22 these out-commuters worked in Snowmass Village, the Town would house 50 23 percent of its total winter peak season workers. 24 Table 2: Summarizing Where Employees Currently Live 25 EMPLOYEES WORKING IN SV IN WINTER Work in SV in TOTAL work In BOTH winter 8 Work in SV in SV In winter summer winter ONLY W Live in TOSV 1,119 852 267 Live elsewhere 1.780 887 893 z Total 2,900 1,740 1,160 Z Live in TOSV 39%49% 23% W Live elsewhere 61%51% 77% a Total 100% 100% 100% 26 Source: Colorado Dept. of Labor and Employment QCEW employer address files; 2008 27 TOSV Employee Housing Surveys by RRC Associates. Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 9:Workforce Housing January, 2009 Page 2 1 2 e Regional Housing: In the last 10 years, housing prices have risen sharply in down 3 valley communities. The average single-family home sales price has risen from just 4 above $200,000 to over $500,000 in both Glenwood Springs and Carbondale. Even 5 in traditionally affordable locations such a Rifle and New Castle home prices can be 6 out of reach for many employees. The average single-family homes sales price in 7 2007 was $301,739 and $372,000 respectively (Garfield County Assessors Office, 8 2007). 9 10 a Housing Supply: Current housing supply is summarized in Table 3. Approximately 11 1,453 employees are housed in 563 restricted units (either by deed or zoning) and 12 360 non-restricted units (free market homes and dwelling units provided by 13 employers). It is difficult to determine how many units are occupied by seasonal 14 versus full time employees, and it should be noted that some households contain 15 both residents who work in Snowmass on a seasonal basis and residents who work 16 in Snowmass on a full-time year-round basis. However, it is estimated that most of 17 the Aspen Skiing Company units (68 units/154 employees), and some of the 18 dedicated units by lodging (150 units/179 employees) are utilized by seasonal 19 employees. This roughly equates to minimum of 23 percent of the total occupied 20 employee housing stock being occupied by primarily seasonal employees. The Town 21 has historically focused on providing housing to full time employees. 22 23 Table 3: Housing Supply- Employee Units in the Town of Snowmass Village 24 25 Percent of S resident Total employees employees Housing units housed housed EMPLOYEE HOUSING UNITS IN TOSV: TOSV Housing Office units 374 558 38% County deed restricted(Fairway 3)30 48 3% Other restricted(e.g.by zoning) 35 45 3% Accessory Employee Units 7 7 0% Accessory Caretaker Units 43 43 3% Skico restricted(Club Commons) 68 154 11% Dedicated but not restricted mostly lodges 150 179 12% Total affordable/employee units 713 1,034 71% FREE-MARKET UNITS IN TOSV: Free-market units occupied by employees 210 419 29% TOTAL UNITS HOUSING EMPLOYEES IN TOSV 923 1,453 100% HOUSING UNITS OUTSIDE OF TOSV 890 1,780 n/a GRANDTOTAL 1,8131 3,2331 n/a 26 27 Source: Town of Snowmass Village housing records; Dec. 2007 State of Snowmass; SV 28 employee surveys; RRC 29 30 Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 9:Workforce Housing January, 2009 Page 3 I Housing Demand in 2008: Based on the 2008 Snowmass Village employee 2 housing survey conducted by RRC Associates, of the 887 full time year round 3 employees that commute to Snowmass Village, approximately 33 percent are renters 4 who would prefer to live closer to work. Assuming 2 workers per household, this 5 yields a demand for approximately 146 units, of which all would need to be 6 subsidized. The potential demand for the peak number of 1,780 commuters (887 7 year round + 893 winter seasonal employees) using the same methodology would be 8 294 units. Additionally, approximately 50 employee-housing units would be needed 9 to accommodate unmet housing demand associated with unfilled jobs in the winter. 10 Demand from unfilled jobs may or may not to be added into our demand forecast, 11 since this may reflect typical unemployment in the Village. It is estimated that 164 12 full time year round employees would like to live in Snowmass Village. Another 13 indicator on current demand is that the Town of Snowmass Village Housing 14 Department in December of 2008 had the following wait list for deed restricted 15 housing: 80 people for studio unit; 86 people for a 1 Bedroom; 60 people for a 2 16 bedroom, and 3 people for a 3 bedroom. 17 18 Table 4: Housing Demand Persons Total persons working In TOSV Persons working working in in both winter 9 in TOSV in winter TOSV in winter summer only DEMAND ASSOCIATED WITH IN-COMMUTERS: In-commuters 1,780 887 893 of in-commuters who rent&prefer to live closer to 33% 33% 33^/ If of in-commuters who rent&prefer to live closer to Y 588 293 295 1 Average workerslHH 2_0 2_0 2_0 Housing units demanded by in-commuters 294 146 147 DEMAND ASSOCIATED WITH UNFILLED JOBS: Unfilled jobs in TOSV 136 48 88 1 Average jobs per worker 1.35 1.35 1.35 1 Average workers per household 2.0 2.0 2.0 Housing units required to fill unfilled jobs 50 18 33 TOTAL HOUSING UNITS DEMANDED: 344 164 180 19 Source: 2008 TSV employer and employee surveys; RRC Associates 20 21 22 RRC Associates was asked to project future housing demand for both full time and 23 seasonal employees. It should be noted that this prediction may reflect a worst case 24 scenario based on market forces for future demand of housing and assumes the 25 town does not implement polices to prevent the erosion of housing. The following 26 predictions do not include new development at the Center or West Village. They 27 made the following predictions: 28 29 30 31 32 Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 9:Workforce Housing January, 2009 Page 4 1 Table 5: Future Housing Demand Forecast 2 Units Assumption 164 Current unmet demand for housing in Snowmass Village of full time employees See Table 4 189 90% of free market units occupied by full time employees would be lost over time. 85 Dedicated unrestricted housing scattered through Snowmass Village if lost Assume 100% seasonal 36 Potential loss of 28% of owner occupied for-sale TOSV housing from retirement 474 Total demand for units assuming 2 employees per unit. 3 4 Policies 5 The Town of Snowmass Village shall: 6 7 The Town of Snowmass Village shall, as its primary housing goal, provide housing for 65 8 percent of the full-time year round employees (60 percent of total employees). Recent 9 studies of historical patterns (RRC 2008 and Pathways 2003) indicate that 50 percent of 10 our current full-time employees live in the Village and an additional 10 percent wish to do 11 so under reasonable requirements. This suggests a total apparent demand of 60 12 percent. Full time employees represent 60% of total employees. An additional 5 percent 13 is added to the mitigation ratio in response to forecasted changes in the future 14 environment. These changes foresee reduced affordability of "down valley' alternatives, 15 increased cost and inconvenience of commuting, retired employee residency and a 16 reduced contribution of Town free-market employee housing. 17 18 The Town of Snowmass Village shall establish as a secondary goal to provide housing 19 to seasonal employees. This inventory could be allocated, on a priority basis, to small 20 Town businesses (as defined in the LUDC), which are owned and operated by 21 Snowmass Village residents. However, it is recognized that such projects would be a 22 lower priority within the Town's housing program and addressed only after the primary 23 goal has been achieved. 24 25 The Town of Snowmass Village shall require private developers to provide housing for 26 65 percent of total employees generated by a development. This housing should first be 27 provided for full time year round employees generated by development and then, at the 28 discretion of the Town, for seasonal employees generated by new development. 29 Seasonal employees represent 40% of total employees. 30 31 32 The developer should provide the land for affordable housing and shall maximize (on 33 sites deemed suitable by the Town) the location of affordable housing on the 34 development site. If physical constraints (in the Town's opinion) limit the location of 35 housing on the development site, affordable housing required by developers should be Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 9: Workforce Housing January, 2009 Page 5 1 located either within walking distance of the development site or located to minimize the 2 use of commuting in personal vehicles. 3 4 The Town shall ensure that employees are housed in close proximity to transportation 5 nodes to minimize vehicular traffic and the.demand for parking for affordable housing 6 projects. In addition, the Town shall explore design alternatives for auto-free employee 7 housing. 8 9 The Town shall develop policies and actions to maximize the long-term efficiency of its 10 housing stock. The Town of Snowmass Village shall implement actions to provide 11 housing for retiring homeowners in deed restricted housing to maximize the efficiency of 12 larger deed restricted homes. In addition, the Town shall develop programs to incent 13 free market employee occupied housing from being lost from the employee housing 14 supply. 15 16 Encourage and facilitate the development of workforce housing on Town-owned and 17 other public lands where appropriate within land use considerations as necessary to 18 close the gap if any between existing full time employee demand and current supply. 19 20 Work regionally, in partnership with other public and private entities, to bring about a 21 wide variety of affordable housing types, sizes and price ranges to serve the needs of all 22 employees, including those that choose to live outside of town limits. Regional housing 23 solutions should focus on sites that have close pedestrian access to mass 24 transportation. Increasing density around transportation nodes (transit oriented 25 development) to maximize housing at transportation nodes regionally, should be 26 encouraged and complement RFTA's Bus Rapid Transit program. 27 28 Every 3 to 4 years the Town of Snowmass village shall review and assess housing 29 needs for both full-time and seasonal employees to ensure housing supply is meeting 30 demand for full time year round employees. 31 32 Award higher priority in the tenure-based housing process for critical Snowmass Village 33 and essential regional service providers (day care, teachers, medical personnel, public 34 servants, community service). Award families priority on future sales of affordable units 35 of three bedrooms or more. The developer mitigation requirement may need to be 36 increased at the discretion of the Town, to accommodate regional employees that 37 service the Snowmass community. 38 39 Support energy efficient housing. 40 41 The long-term affordability of deed restricted units integrated with free market 42 units needs to be maintained when considering a new condominium development. 43 The economic effect created by potential assessments, both common and special, 44 should be considered, as they would affect the long-term affordability of the 45 employee units. Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 9:Workforce Housing January, 2009 Page 6 Chapter 10 Actions and Implementation February, 2009) Introduction This chapter summarizes the actions and implementations in the individual Comprehensive Plan chapters. Actions are chosen to best apply the Town of Snowmass Village's key policies of the Update to the Comprehensive Plan: Live within the constraints of natural and man-made systems (environment and traffic) Maintain or create a multi-faceted workforce that is essential to sustain the resort and community economy Capture a greater share (leakage) of guest expenditures, Attract more guests/visitors, especially by broadening summer and winter seasons Actions are grouped according to the chapter topic. The column adjacent to the action shows which department/person is responsible for the implementation. Next to that is a prioritization column. Though it is understood that Town Council will prioritize the implementation actions, a suggested timeframe to complete the action is suggested.. This is a working document and completed and/or outdated items should be deleted and new items added and prioritized. Comprehensive Plan Actions Table begins on Page 2. Regional and Community Economics Responsible Priority De artment 1. Develop a joint retail management strategy to secure a mix of Marketing 1-2 years tenants that optimizes retail potential (as is done in most regional shopping malls). The management strategy should include: Selection of a mixture of uses to ensure a certain degree of vibrancy both in summer and winter seasons; Balance in terms of price points; Healthy balance between local/national tenants; Retail mix that will cater to locals as well as tourists. 2. Maintain the existing location of ski lift sales at the Snowmass Planning Ongoing Mall. 3. Consider adaptive reuse opportunities for problematic retail Marketing 1-2 years locations at the Snowmass Mall. 4. Establish system to monitor progress towards the implementation Planning Annually of policies of the Comprehensive Plan. If policies are not being effectively implemented by market forces, or voluntarily, identify necessary establish remedial action. 5. Formally adopt and implement the 2008 Snowmass Village Marketing 1 year Strategic Marketing Plan. 6. Challenge existing partners (Anderson Ranch, Aspen Music Fest, Marketing Ongoing Jazz Aspen Snowmass, ACES, ASC, Aspen Film, Rodeo, etc.) to expand their programs and events in the Village. 7. In order to provide conference-attendee friendly accommodations, Planning Ongoing require 45-50 percent of core Village HOT bed units be non- fractional, hotel, studio or one-bedroom units. 8. Do an annual assessment of construction to assure a necessary Marketing Annually quantity of commercial space and HOT bed accommodations remain available. Community Arts Responsible Priority De artment 1. Develop a detailed plan for the arts that: Marketing 2 years Analyzes how to best leverage programs with surrounding communities,organizations, and government entities; Identifies and prioritizes desired amenities; Includes a strategy for the expansion of events to allow for an active and vital environment for all age groups, addressing both public and private funding of events; and Provides a market and financial analysis of a permanent perforating arts facility, with recommendations on the ongoing funding, management, and operation of such a facility. Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 10: Actions and Implementation February, 2009 Page 2 2. Support the enhancement of Anderson Ranch Arts Center's SAAB Ongoing presence throughout the Village. 3. Establish an arts focus for West Village redevelopment, including Planning 2-3 years or the possibility of a performance facility; rehearsal, classroom, sooner if PUD studio, exhibit spaces; and public art. is submitted Community Services, Facilities& Amenities Responsible Priority De artment 1. Develop a communications master plan policy, including but not Community 2 years limited to, providing incentives for providing community wide Relations Officer cellular coverage, wireless and other technology that keeps abreast of the times. 2. Establish system to monitor the carrying capacity of our Economic 1 year community amenities, services and facilities to ensure adequate Resources levels, establish thresholds. Director(ERD) 3. Modify review criteria to include community services, facilities Planning I year and amenities "carrying capacity" in all development and land use reviews in order to avoid exceeding our capacities. Environmental Resources Responsible Priority De artment 1. Pursue the Goals identified in the Town's Environmental ERD Ongoing Sustainability Plan. 2. Adopt and execute an annual Environmental Implementation Plan. ERD Ongoing 3. Establish a Town advisory committee or task force dedicated to ERD 1 year those issues concerning environmental sustainability. 4. Establish a dedicated funding source for programs, projects, and ERD 1-2 years other initiatives designed to help the Town achieve it environmental goals. 5. Prepare a biannual report on environmental performance indicators ERD Ongoing to inform future updates to the Town's Environmental Sustainability Plan, and to help prioritize items to be included in future Environmental Implementation Plans. 6. Prepare Land Use and Development Code amendments to add ERD, Planning 1-2 years clarity and achieve consistency among Town policies related to preservation of the natural environment, sustainable development and energy conservation. 7. Prepare Land Use and Development Code amendments to ERD, Planning 1-2 years strengthen review standards concerning environmental impact analysis and the consideration ofl carrying capacities. Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 10: Actions and Implementation February, 2009 Page 3 8. Prepare Land Use and Development Code amendments requiring ERD, Planning 1-2 years new development to demonstrate no negative impact, or mitigation of any unavoidable impact upon scenic and natural resources within the Town and its influence areas. 9. Pursue stream restoration projects through public funding and ERD Ongoing community partnerships, and require new development to incorporate stream restoration measures (including construction of new bridges and/or culverts) in reached adjacent to their projects. Built Environment Responsible Priority Department 1. Develop detailed design guidelines to implement the concepts in Planning 2 years this Chapter. 2. Modify design review process to consider a physical or virtual Planning 1 year model that encompasses a significant portion of the surrounding context. 3. Create standards, and means of measuring compliance, for Planning 1 year increased energy efficiency and `green' building practices. 4. Study the feasibility of creating a continuous (weather protected) Planning 4-5 years pedestrian connection between the various levels of the West Village. 5. Re-evaluate and update the Build Out Allocation Chart. Planning 2 years 6. Modify development review criteria to require applicants to Planning 1 year address carrying capacity at the time of development or land use submittal and require analysis of carrying capacity in Staff review of the project. 7. Revise the definition of `community benefit' to assure that it Planning 1 year encompasses public gathering areas, employee housing and / or other amenities that help realize the Aspiration. 8. Create standards to evaluate the pace and phasing of a Planning 2 years development proposal with regard to construction impacts and possible interruption of construction as it would affect the community as a whole. 9. Establish guidelines to fully implement the "Just Big Enough" Planning 1 year philosophy of the Comp Plan and the Strategic Marketing Plan. 10. Develop guidelines to incentivize transit oriented development to Planning I year provide employee housing in close proximity to Village jobs. 11. In conjunction with any significant development or redevelopment Planning 2-3 years Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 10: Actions and Implementation February, 2009 Page 4 proposal of the West Village 'and Snowmass Center, include analysis of: Underground parking, Central delivery, including eastern edge delivery connections Consolidated transit facilities Transportation Responsible Priority Department 1. Create (and require all development to utilize) a single traffic Planning 1 year model to standardize the analysis of traffic impacts. Establish a mechanism for determining the amount of person trips to be created by a proposed development. Modify development review criteria to require traffic impact assessments of new development to include both capital and operating costs. 2. Prior to any new development or redevelopment in West Village, Planning 1 year modify development review application to require the developer address a check list to assure that the policies are consistent with policies of this chapter. 3. Evaluate the effectiveness of the commercial delivery access in the Transportation 2-3 years Base Village redevelopment. Incorporate a revised transit center that removes pedestrian/bus conflicts and consolidates bus services. 4. Conduct detailed pedestrian linkage analysis of Base Village, West Transportation 2-3 years Village and the Snowmass Center. 5. In conjunction with RFTA, commission a detailed transit analysis Transportation 1-2 years that identifies the potential bus requirements for several scenarios for various combinations of lodging at build-out, commercial and employee housing. Expand current monitoring of transit ridership and parking utilization. 6. Determine the feasibility of alternative transit modes for the Brush Transportation 1 year Creek Corridor from Highway 82 to the Town Core. 7. Establish a monitoring system to track the potential transportation Transportation 1 year impact of new development, including appropriate data on intersection LOS. 8. Determine transportation improvement priorities. Identify what Transportation 1 year developments trigger improvements. 9. Develop comprehensive sub-area plans for the Rodeo Grounds and Transportation 5 years the Highway 82 intercept lot that address parking, information, bus transfer, employee housing,baggage transfer, bus types, etc. 10. Expand the capacity of potential traffic fee-in-lieu to fund Transportation 1-2 years Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 10: Actions and Implementation February, 2009 Page 5 programs that meet parking demand, not just increased supply. 11. Improve pedestrian trail linkages in the Town Core, including Transportation 1-2 years overlay of the trails network and access to bus infrastructure. Housing Responsible Priority De artment 1. Establish regular monitoring and report annually to Council on Housing Every 2 years Snowmass Village's Work Force Housing of Snowmass Village employees. 2. Update Land Use Code as necessary to implement the Housing, 6 months recommended policies of this chapter, including a Work Force Planning Housing mitigation of 65 percent. 3. Evaluate, and increase if necessary, incentives for the creation of Housing 1-2 years caretaker or accessory dwelling units on single family homes. Adjust regulations and enforcement to assure that accessory dwelling units are rented to Snowmass Village employees. 4. Discontinue the practice of giving "credits" in-lieu of actual Housing 1 year housing units to satisfy development mitigation requirements. 5. Explore the possibility of meeting additional workforce housing Housing 2-3 years needs through purchase or lease of the existing free-market housing stock. 6. Conduct site planning "capacity analysis" study of potential Housing 6 months workforce housing, including a supply-demand balance forecast. Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 10: Actions and Implementation February, 2009 Page 6 Chapter 10 Actions and Implementation February, 2009) Introduction This chapter summarizes the actions and implementations in the individual Comprehensive Plan chapters. Actions are chosen to best apply the Town of Snowmass Village's key policies of the Update to the Comprehensive Plan: Live within the constraints of natural and man-made systems (environment and traffic) Maintain or create a multi-faceted workforce that is essential to sustain the resort and community economy Capture a greater share (leakage) of guest expenditures, Attract more guests/visitors, especially by broadening summer and winter seasons Actions are grouped according to the chapter topic. The column adjacent to the action shows which department/person is responsible for the implementation. Next to that is a prioritization column. Though it is understood that Town Council will prioritize the implementation actions, a suggested timeframe to complete the action is suggested. This is a working document and completed and/or outdated items should be deleted and new items added and prioritized. Comprehensive Plan Actions Table begins on Page 2. olupdflup OATSUOtIOJ 6 j nnous jounnoZ Appendix — Chapter 2, Community Character and Vision Challenges To Achieving Our Vision While we hold our values true, we recognize that, at the same time, Snowmass Village is facing a number of challenges: The community is approaching buildout. There are relatively few areas for additional growth. This places a high priority on making sure the remaining development, and any redevelopment, complement the existing conditions, and provide essential services, accommodations and amenities that will help assure Snowmass Village's sustainability and competitiveness far into the future. The traffic system is reaching carrying capacity. Brush Creek Road, the principle vehicular access in and out of the valley, exceeds desirable traffic levels at peak periods. In order to avoid congestion in the future, careful attention must be paid to spreading out traffic usage, and broadening the use of alternative transportation modes in order to decreasing the use of single occupant vehicles. A significant portion of our workforce commutes into Snowmass from downvalley. Though we make an effort to accommodate as many employees in town as we can, it is important to our viability that those that we cannot house can reach Snowmass Village efficiently and safely. With increasing costs of commuting, and competition from down valley employers, if we are to continue to provide a high quality of guest services we must find ways to provide workforce housing in, or closer to, the community. A large portion of the skiers on Snowmass Mountain pass through the Snowmass Village going back to Aspen or down valley lodging locations. We "capture" only about 45% of the potential expenditures represented by this pass through traffic—which is a missed opportunity for local businesses. The location of the Town Core on a relatively steep hillside makes pedestrian connectivity a physical challenge. The strong, two season nature of our economy provides a low utilization rate for the off- seasons. This prevents us from spreading the costs of amenities, facilities and our workforce over a longer period of time and higher utilization rate—which discourages some investment and reinvestment. Our overriding vision is to maintain, and increase the sustainability of Snowmass Village as a leading mountain resort and livable community for its property owners and business people. Values to Vision Statements for each chapter During the update of the 2008 Comprehensive Plan the Town developed, based on the public input during the process, the following vision statements: Economy The Town of Snowmass Village will be the leading multi-season, family oriented mountain resort with distinctive locally owned commercial businesses that provides conference facilities and a unique and diverse shopping and dining experience across a range of price points for guests and residents. Recreation & Amenities The Town of Snowmass Village shall enhance the community's enthusiasm toward sports and athletics and increase the recreational health and vitality by providing year-round attractions and amenities that foster opportunities to be active for all ages. Community Arts The Town of Snowmass Village shall expand its role as a provider of culture and arts for the Roaring Fork Valley as well as provider of expansive educational opportunities. Visual and performing arts amenities and venues shall compliment Aspen's and create a strong identity and economic base for the community. Community The Town of Snowmass Village shall strike a healthy balance between community and resort. Creating and preserving areas where community members can meet formally as well as spontaneously to gather and socialize will be critical to the Town's success. The Town of Snowmass Village shall be dedicated to the safety of all its residents, employees and guests. Environmental Resources The Town of Snowmass Village shall create an ecologically sustainable community through energy independence, protecting open space and other natural resources such as water, and preserve critical view corridors. Built Environment The Town of Snowmass Village will have three interconnected commercial nodes (two resort oriented commercial nodes and one community oriented commercial node) that jointly have a small "mountain town" feel characterized by: Public gathering places that allow personal interaction & "people-watching," Sunlight to public areas, Easy pedestrian or mechanical connections between nodes, and Building placement that preserves long views from key public areas. Transportation The Town of Snowmass Village shall be served by convenient, effective, and attractive transit service between local commercial and residential nodes and work with the Regional Transportation Authority (RFTA) to improve transit services throughout the greater Roaring Fork Valley. A major objective for the community will be to minimize increases in single-occupant vehicle (SOV) use and to increase the use of transit, pedestrian, and other non-SOV modes for travel to/from and within the town core. Sustainable land use, urban design, and workforce housing strategies that create vibrant, mixed-use nodes and encourage walking and transit use are also an important component. Housing A significant amount of affordable housing in Snowmass Village is essential to providing a high level of service for residents, employees and guests, creating a sense of community and giving the Town and businesses an advantage in attracting and retaining qualified employees. Appendix - Chapter 3, Community Arts Synopsis of Public Input A sense of community is highly valued in Snowmass Village. Participants expressed a desire for liveliness and energy. Snowmass Village was envisioned as a place where residents, guests and employees could work, retreat and exist; a healthy place with diversity of age. Services, facilities, and amenities build the framework for a healthy, energetic community. Participants supported local-oriented services such as medical and dental offices and more gathering places where our residents can encounter the same people consistently and serendipitously. The expansion of cultural offerings was also strongly expressed. Vitality and age diversity can be created by meeting other goals of this plan. One prime method is allowing the workforce to live in the community. This brings a broader, younger group into the village to support retail and restaurants year-round. Below are community values and key issues conveyed during the public process for this update: Vitality:' Lively place to live, work, retreat and exist, Promote health, In town/on site employee housing, Gathering places (errands, events, recreation) provided with development or by the Town, Create a "Snowmass fun" identity. Culture: Multi-purpose facility (for movies, concerts, conferences, theater, other cultural events), Increased cultural opportunities—music, arts, film, Increased and expanded educational opportunities, Establish Snowmass Village as the "Arts Education Center of the Valley." Cohesiveness: Small population, Safe, Social involvement/know neighbor, Family friendly, Community events. Performing Arts Venues— Facility Inventory Facili Location Seating Capacity Condition Comments Aspen HS Black Box Theatre Aspen 100 Excellent Anderson Ranch Meeting Hall Snowmass 100 Good Theatre Aspen Tent Aspen 150 Fair Improvements possible Snowmass Chapel Snowmass 200 Good New sanctuary=300 The Cabaret Room Snowmass 250 Good Status questionable Paepcke Auditorium Aspen 350 Good Renovations planned Belly Up Nightclub Aspen 450 Excellent Harris Concert Hall Aspen 500 Excellent State of the art Wheeler Opera House Aspen 500 Excellent Addition in discussion The District Theatre Aspen 550 Good Conference Center Ballroom Snowmass 1,100 Fair Status questionable Benedict Music Tent Aspen 2,085 Excellent Town Center Park Snowmass 8,000 Good Appendix—Chapter 4, Regional and Community Economics Background Competitive Position within Colorado Ski Country Colorado Ski Country draws over 12 million skier visits per year and is among the most desired Alpine tourist destinations in the world. Snowmass is but one of over a dozen other resort villages in the region. In order to remain competitive, Snowmass seeks to further differentiate itself and build on its unique identity. Seasonality The issue of seasonality is more pronounced at Snowmass than at some competing resort destinations in Colorado Country. Developing a commercial land use strategy that strengthens business activity year-round is an important stakeholder concern that is addressed in this update of the Comprehensive Plan. Integration and Connectivity The Town goal is to develop an appropriate balance between the number of skiers we serve at the Snowmass Ski Area and the available short-term accommodations. The development of high-occupancy units and employee housing in the Town Core will bring vitality to both the resort and the community. This goal must be balanced with competing goals to minimize traffic impacts and maintain the character and integrity of the community. The Base Village project will go a long way in helping to accomplish this goal. Base Village could also create direct competition for existing retailers at the Snowmass Mall. The development of Base Village can contribute to a better economy for existing business in a number of ways and can be managed as an opportunity to achieve this goal. In working with geography of the Snowmass Valley itself and in order to ameliorate previous land-use design flaws, the need for integration relates to both physical connectivity as well as to the creation of three clusters that are distinct, yet serve complementary functions. The success of Snowmass Village from an economically sustainable commercial/retail perspective will depend in large part on the evolution of distinctive characters and primary functions for each of the commercial nodes: Base Village, Snowmass Center and West Village. Retail Leakage It is clear that a significant proportion of local shopping, food & beverage and entertainment spending potential is being captured by outside markets, notably Aspen and Glenwood Springs. The relatively small size of the resort and community, its seasonality and the draw of Aspen — largely explain our inability to capture more retail sales revenue. The local economy in Snowmass Village is strong, but the Town is "leaking" sales tax potential. By acting to stop this leakage and to capture more secondary revenue from the ski and tourism industry, the Town could generate revenue to build needed community facilities, support affordable housing and provide services to the Snowmass Village community. Lively Public Realm A lively public realm is a vital component of an economically sustainable alpine resort village. Hosting and properly servicing a variety of tourist cohorts (including conference, group and social guests) is vital to maintaining a vibrant and healthy resort community and village. 2. Snowmass Village Economic Setting Table 4.1 Skiing and tourism, including the spin-offs iwmrrw, of retail goods and services, are the cornerstones of the Snowmass Village economy. a. Ski Industry Skiing is by far the most dominant economic activity in the Snowmass Village economy. Three-quarters of 9 all sales tax revenue are collected during the ski season. The Snowmass Ski Area is a primary contributor to the growth in year- 900.WB T*A6 round and part-time residents. I R At 3,100 acres, Snowmass is the largest of the four mountains (a total 9111 --- 91 0 0 9 9S 9L 91. 9L W M 01 W 01 pL OS OL of 3,100 acres) owned and operated 92 99 M 95 99 97 " W W 01 Q W 01 M M 01 by the Aspen Skiing Company and one of the largest in Colorado. However, during the 2006-7 season, Snowmass Village ranked eighth in Colorado for total skier visits (770,000) (see Table 4.1 —note that the Park City resort is not in Colorado). Besides being one of the larger ski areas in the state, the Snowmass Ski Area is the second largest, ranking first among Colorado ski areas with the lowest number of skiers per acre. The Snowmass Ski Area is the most important of four areas operated by the Aspen Skiing Company. Among the four Aspen Skiing Company ski areas, Snowmass Ski Area captures over 50 % of the total skier days (as shown in Table 4.2). Table 4.2 Percentage of Aspen Area Skier Days by Ski Area Ski Area 1996-1997 2006-7 Snowmass 54.6% 53.2% Aspen 23.9% 22.7% Buttermilk 10.9% 10.6°/a Aspen Highlands 10.7% 13.0% LIYn a(01UrpQ0 A Cq/gn'.LS1,.11e1,I ShIAg COweN) Table 4.3 i. Aspen/Snowmass Skier Demographics aspen skiing Company Demographics provided by Aspen Skiing Company— atso see Table 4.3) Gender Uale 6a female dn'. 56% percent of Aspen/ Snowmass skiers Agderzs lsa have household incomes of$100,000 or more. 2544 350. 45.64 40'. Households with children represent 28% of 165 l° Aspen/Snowmass skier population. This Household lneomr compares to 49.3% in 1998. Singles represent 550.9 -$99. 18% P Singles Sn,000-$99,YY9 I'°n the largest component (36%), but singles tend 100,000-s249,999 34% to ski Aspen Mountain more than Snowmass. 9.00.000- ssnu.00u u Family StatusAspen/Snowmass attracts older visitors, Single,no rhildren 36% with 40%between 45 and 64 years of age. Caaple,no rhildren 18% Household with children 28% Households w/children no longerathome 19% Approximately 50% of Aspen/Snowmass lunation Stars New Customers 2'% skiers are over age 45. Nationally, 7.4% of t Visited one or more rimes 13% skiers are 55 or older. For destination resorts. Visited 20 or more rimes 26% 10.3% of the skiers are over age 55. Camjn.,;rion Destination 62% More so than other resorts the Aspen/ carafe r zn vas•skies w c Snowmass customer base is fairly even In second Hamo"nen distribution among the four census regions of the country. Foreign visitors represent approximately 17% of the Aspen/Snowmass customer base with the top three origins being Australia, United Kingdom and Brazil. u Overall, the top domestic origins for guests are the Tri-state New York area, followed by Chicago, Los Angeles, and Denver. 62% of the skier composition are destination visitors, 20% are locals, 8% second homeowners and 10%day visitors. Snowmass Overnight Skiers: Long stays,Flyers,Repeat guests.Intermediates, Affluent.Older,From distant locations, 27% of visitors in 2007 were new customers, 73% have visited one or more Snowmass Lodeers: Strong family the H srgnd, mire in a1- times and 26%have visited 20 or more times.60 ages,from the Heartland,Ski in Snowmass,Intermediates 84% of peak season Snowmass visitors arrive by plane. Source:Aspen Skiing Company,RRC Assmiatcs Overnight visitors to Town are primarily middle-aged, affluent and well educated, and close to 40%of groups arrive with children. Table 4.4 Ski Magazine Reader Resort Ratings: Snowmass vs. 18 Competitors to B 1 8 7 1 1 r. 5 mow. y N @• t@•\ ,1 0, fie\ ^•\ n\ @5 a° f o4'r' E6, _Ar °r •9° , bgr A' y .9'° 'i` ` p', f` 3R , e Ipwrpr MpvWOMrw ral ii. Ski Market Trends (Source: Aspen Skiing Company, RRC Associates) Nationwide there has been a decline in skier visits of 6.9% over last season, to 54.8 million visits. (this represents a decline of 1.5% compared to the 10-year average). The primary reasons were warm weather in the East and California. Within this national decline, Colorado narrowly set another record with 12.6 million visits, primarily due to a rebound in the southern resorts. Major destination resorts Table 4.5 showed slight declines with National Skier Participation by Age, Gender Beaver Creek, Breckenridge and Whistler being the exceptions. In competing ski resorts across the country, over the last 15 years there have been E major investments in infrastructure, retail and lodging. M.YM rp The "baby boom" generation, which powered the ski industry in the 1980s, is skiing less. Table 4.6 National Skier Participation by Age Group and Ethnicity Under M 29 to 9 2$ 0 Post- Baby Baby 42 ro OR12 Boom Boom Bust 59 Q er at or or Baby Pre- Gen Y Gen X Boom Boom n4w •u.,,M M 3.5% o YMr! yY 2.6%g aa% Aa 1.1% 1qx 6 0A% 4 1 13 16 30 24 n 02 X 40 M M 02 00 00 N N 72 70 10 sroy.nrrlM The number of people on the slopes with incomes of $50,000 or less is in sharp decline. The percent of skiers that are female declines dramatically after age 40 -- suggesting a need for more things for women to do while men are skiing. Baby boom" families are heavily involved in work and raising children. They have less leisure time and are more likely to travel to a destination resort than day ski. This trend is affecting Front Range skiers as well. Table 4.7 Summer Visitor Interests-Rocky Mountain Region vs. Snowmass Village Rocky Mountain-bound Past Snowmass Winter* Past Snowmass Summer(n=80) n=154) n=211) Age 5-44 5+(47 median) 5+(48 median) Income over S100K 13%3% (77%among overnight) 4%(62%among overnight) Education Some College Gmduate School Graduate School Length of Stay 9 days 10 days(median 7 nights) 5 days(median 5 nights) Means of Travel 64%drive(1,000 miles or 58%fly (85%fly)570/a drive(<300 miles)(57%fly) less) Summer Less expensive,camping Upscale Hotel or condo in Snowmass Village Accommodations Type of Summer Relaxing,family-oriented Active,upscale Active Vacation Sought Activities Natural beauty Hike,golf,fine dining Hike,bike,golf,fine dining fight-seeing Events Family events—arts and 'Sophisticated,cultural events— "Sophisticated,cultural events—jazz concerts, rafts fairs,rodeo jazz concerts,wine and food wine and food festivals festivals 10 Extreme sports—as a spectator Past Snowmass Winter guests mean those people who have visited in winter and resumed in summer. b. Conferences and Tourism Conferences are a significant contributor to the Town's economy. The Conference Center is used extensively in both ski and non-ski seasons and may be responsible for up to 45% of Snowmass Village guests outside the ski season. As shown on the following chart (Table 3.7), during the period 10/06-09/07, the Snowmass Conference Center was utilized 84 days with seven of those days utilizing the entire Ballroom as one unit. Half of the days had no activity while just less than 20% of this period had less than half of the total space in use. The summer special events calendar has grown to include at least one program every weekend as well as several activities, most of which are free. Summer events such as Chili Pepper& Brew Fest, Jazz Aspen Snowmass, mountain bike races, Balloon Fest and many others bring guests to town who generate additional revenues to carry businesses through the summer season. While summer visitor volumes are significantly lower than those in winter, visitor preferences have historically tended to be very similar across seasons. Table 4.8 Snowmass Conference Center Usage iom.wmw...IuN. p1,Y i 'NiY:IIp».ke11Y.M1sObs.k,I.Yl4sn 1MR IMnP FW 14W 41MIObn Ne»s!w•a„W Ia» rrlrr.Pw a,rr... aaV3m4Nl,mn I.n.wIM ON- o M.IUFP onM WltlaWTNn. Comoletalvused 23%of days rMq uMPT IInr+Mm emM+4P aer IMPN Partially used 27%of days sbl.y,ban I,N- 1»y[lie 11 used days1n1sIRIY,a llurl,Mn W pt 1 Mit. W.n,44 n,M NPN F MM4M u45MPN c. Lodging Quality of Bed Base Many Snowmass Ski Area skiers choose to spend Observations of RRC customer survey; their nights in Aspen. Visitors are attracted to Aspen because of the wider variety of eating and Drop in lodging satisfaction year ove entertainment opportunities and by Aspen's popular year and high variability in performance by property.image, Of our list of 28 lodges 5 ranked Good/Excellent"category, only 1 of Skiers and other visitors spending the night in those properties was in Snowmass. Snowmass Village are likely to purchase more food, drink, clothing, and other goods here. In addition, Of our list of , lodges 7 ranked Poor the length of visitor stay helps establish the critical category, of those%were located in Snowmass; 18%of total. mass of buyers and users needed to support retail stores and civic amenities. Only 25%of Snowmass Village's annual lodging revenue occurs in May To gain a broader understanding of the Town's potential peak capacity, there are 2,878 total residential units in Snowmass Village including single-family, multi-family, lodging and employee units). Within these units, Snowmass Village can accommodate about 11,000 residents and guests in the peak season. Approximately 8,000 skiers are actually skiing in Snowmass Village durin In the combined Aspen/Snowmass Outside of Aspen and Snowmass Village, the Roaring market, Snowmass has 42% of the Fork Valley has a significant number of tourist beds total lodging units and 53% of skier and a large resident skier population. Snowmass Ski visits, but only 17% of retail sales. Area currently hosts the majority of these local skiers.SnnrCP.f Snnunnacc Strategic.Plnn According to RRC Associates occupancy report generated on behalf of Aspen/Snowmass partners, Snowmass Village's annualized occupancy is about 45%. During the peak season, December 20 to March 31, occupancy averages 84%. Between 2004 and 2006, sales tax on lodging represented between 45% and 49% of total sales taxes, the largest single contributor of sales tax revenues to the Town. While the revenue potential of the Snowmass Village lodging industry is closely related to the number of available accommodation units and occupancy rates, it is also affected by the type and quality of accommodations available in the Town. Higher quality units generally translate into higher revenues per skier night. d. Seasonal Economics The Snowmass Village economy is extremely seasonal, spanning the relatively short ski season at the Snowmass Ski Area. A typical season lasts 140 days. Other ski areas seasons may extend up to 157 days. This seasonality is reflected in the Town's sales tax receipts. Seventy-five percent of all lodging and other economic activity in the Town occurs in the four-month winter ski season. The economy is made up of mostly small businesses. It is particularly hard for small businesses to make long-term investments based on the revenue from a four-month business season. This is also true of their willingness to make long-term commitments to joint or public marketing strategies, or taxes and assessments to build community facilities. Anything that can be done to spread business activity over a longer period of time will have a beneficial impact on the stability of the.Town's economic base and its ability to accomplish long-term objectives. Because of the large size of the Snowmass recreation area and its substantial lodging base in the Town, Snowmass Village could expand its number of summer visitors substantially. This extra revenue could help pay for improvements and facilities that benefit the Town's year-round residents and visitors. Table 4.9 Bookings between November 2006-April 2007 A.Wn'blomna.k.W.MY Rx.aN-Y 1!,=7 Rm, enarma.RauR M- ,D H RSVb' yAlblbsodigr MV.aMw All6kA dL] R.vbbM1 m l5{TSe4al n^naM 1130] IDh Mea OV:NST11 I I mmn. jI j i...._..... ............!_. _ .-_-------- y.....{._...I._...,_. .p.._.j I _.q_.._{ _p.....{ t I ___ r 1_ f Ti Sy ' Y._... I.i i I I I i i i i I .._ ._.L.. .; -•-•l--_---__. f-..- i..- I ' I 4 g 0 0 0 9 9 g = ! = g 0 4 0 4 4 4 0 0 0 4riQ..+b.dnM Sal+Y.I e. Retail, Commercial and Restaurant Retail shopping is a price of entry in resorts and we need to have it to remain competitive. While such trends are difficult to project, it is clear that retail expenditures per visitor in Snowmass Village (and the Aspen area as a whole) have been increasing during recent years. While the skier visits the Snowmass area increased about 15% between the 2001-2 and the 2006-7 seasons, sales taxes grew about 20%. (Resident incomes represent a small portion of the increase, since resident expenditures are limited to 10 to 15% of total sales tax revenues; the balance is due to visitors.) L Current Retail Inventory The current retail inventory in Snowmass Village is concentrated in one.primary node and one local-serving needs node with additional uses (e.g. food & beverage) also included in various lodges. The Mall/"West Village" is presently the primary comparison and food & beverage retail node, offering 91,823 square feet of floor space. The Snowmass Center serves as the primary convenience node with 24,741 square feet of retail floor area plus office space. Outside of these two primary retail commercial nodes, retail and related floor area totals 18,083 square feet. The total retail inventory in Snowmass Village is 134,647 square feet including 16.8% of convenience retail, 51.0% of comparison retail goods, and 32.2%dedicated to food & beverage/entertainment. The West Village Mall displays a distinct seasonality, with nearly 75% of sales occurring during the four-month winter season. This amount of retail, is proportionately low compared to other ski resorts. This can primarily be explained by Snowmass Village's proximity to Aspen, which has a large and highly successful retail sector. During the past two years, businesses have displayed average sales performances typical of Mall venues (in the range of$250 to $300 per square foot gross leasable area). The mix of retailers in the Mall responds to the visitor-oriented demand, with emphasis upon sporting goods, clothing, restaurants, and skiing-related services, but without a very well balanced mix or offering. There is no formal effort to manage tenant diversity among the properties and there are no national retailers. ii. Market Issues The potential effects of additional retail development on the local economy can be understood by analyzing current expenditure patterns, business performance and future demand projections for specialty shopping, eating and drinking and services. Most expenditures by Snowmass Village residents and guests occur in Aspen, the Roaring Fork Valley and elsewhere. Capturing a portion of this leakage" as well as attracting new residents and guests will expand and improve the retail sector in Snowmass Village. Potential retail business and restaurant expenditures by Snowmass residents and visitors are currently (2006) estimated to equal nearly $131 million annually (medium of the possible range estimated). Actual sales in Snowmass Village were $57 million, roughly 42 percent of total expenditures. The difference between the above numbers ($74 million) equals the amount of sales "leaking" (purchases occurring elsewhere). Most of the visitor leakage" goes to Aspen; a significant portion of resident expenditures is occurring down valley or in other localities. iii. Retail Market Demand Capturing increased sales from skiers passing through Snowmass as well as residents and lodges in Snowmass should support higher income levels and some additional retail space in Snowmass Village. Retail market demand in Snowmass Village is based primarily upon visitor expenditures, although permanent and seasonal residents also contribute to demand. Lodging/living elsewhere guests constitute the largest expenditure, a combination of lodging, restaurant, skiing, and retail expenditures. Lodging/living elsewhere guests account for approximately 71% of total expenditure potential. Day-skier guests spend less money, principally because they are lodging elsewhere. Although these guests represent approximately 30% of the visitors to Snowmass Village, their expenditure potential is about 16% of the total. The increases in visitors, general price inflation and changing expenditure patterns have contributed to growth in retail market demand over the years. Seasonal variations will continue to occur, and our economy remains subject to national economic trends and local conditions. Key observations of the retail demand forecast include: Numbers of overnight guests during the winter are not assumed to increase significantly, although the demographic composition may continue to evolve. There will remain intense competition for the destination skier mountain resort market. Day-use guests, especially from an increasing down-valley population base, should continue to be a growing source of visitors. Residential expenditures will be limited by relatively small increases in resident population and the small resident base, (e.g., Snowmass Village is and will remain too small to support a typical community-scale shopping center). Food and beverage sales are an important economic sector in Snowmass Village. During the 2004-2005 seasons, local spending in restaurants, food stores, drug stores and liquor stores averaged over $10 million per year. The range and variety of restaurants and the presence of unique restaurant/entertainment concepts can be a factor in the skier/visitor choice of where to spend the night. Convincing more people to stay and eat at local restaurants will also ease peak traffic patterns up and down the Brush Creek corridor. Synopsis of Public Input The community is highly aware of the importance of keeping Snowmass Village economically sustainable by establishing a critical mass and mix of commercial uses. However, with this in mind, it is also important to balance the economic potential with other values of the community such as village character and a small town feel. Therefore, during conversations of the economy, the built environment often was discussed concurrently. An important question expressed was the appropriate amount of future development that is "just big enough" to keep the economy stable but not exceed the community's carrying capacity or change its village character. The participants also emphasized the need for community-oriented businesses so that the community could become more self-sustaining over time. The summary of the public comments follows: High level of local ownership ("no chain stores"); Maintain and expand types of community-oriented businesses; Increase diversification of commercial offerings: Types of retail, Broader price points (from reasonable to true high-end), Differentiate 3 nodes and their personalities (to be complementary and not competitive with one another), o Improve the "product image" (maintenance, quality of buildings, ADA-accessibility?); Maintain total commercial quantities, re-allocate between villages: Minimum of 130,000 square feet, Maximum of 200,000 square feet; Expand the two major seasons: strengthen winter and grow and extend summer; Increase vitality/activity: o High occupancy turnover beds ("real hotels"), o Conference-friendly (single or double occupancy) high occupancy turnover beds, Places for public interaction, Conference/performing arts center, On-site or in-town employee housing; Minimize construction impacts on commercial uses by phasing future development. Appendix—Chapter 5: Community Services, Facilities and Amenities Existing Conditions and Guiding Principles To respond to the public desires for a vital, social and healthy community, the Town should develop a detailed plan for amenities. To provide appropriate amenities the plan should identify and prioritize desired amenities such as an: Ice skating rink, Multi-purpose performing arts center, Sports playing fields , Additional trails, Playground for children (pirate ship, climbing wall), Zip lines, Indoor play area, Dog park, and Public spaces. To be fiscally responsible for the provision of amenities, the plan should be referred to in the Town's Capital Improvement Plan and other budgeting programs and also reviewed during land use and development review for opportunities with new development. The community values athletics and sports. Two other inclusions in the plan are a strategy for the expansion of events and an approach to community health needs. A strategy for the expansion of events allows for an active and vital social environment for all age groups. The strategy should include public and private funding of events. Such activities or amenities could include: Ice sculptures, Environmental hikes, Sound and light shows, Sustainability education, Concerts, Mountain events, Competitions (bike race: I'Alp d'Huez), and A variety of restaurants and bars. An approach to address community health and medical needs of a full community demographic spectrum should list the essential services, i.e. pharmacy, medical, dental offices. After essential services are identified, Staff should ensure zoning allows the group services in one location (new Center, Offices at Snowmass). Existing Facilities Snowmass Water & Sanitation District The Snowmass Water and Sanitation District is a special district and was formed in June 1966. The District's 1966 Service Plan targeted a build-out population of 29,000 people. The district has acquired water rights to meet the average-year and dry-year estimated peak water demands for that population. This equates to a capacity of 6,200 Equivalent Residential Unit (EQR's). Currently, the facility is meeting 4,700 EQR's. The District has 5.2 mg(16 acre-feet) of water storage. For Snowmass Village, water is a limited resource and an element that should be watched while the community grows. It is identified as limiting factor for the Town's carrying capacity. There is some stress in winter when there's a larger local population and also in later summer when outdoor use increases. The issues for the District are raw water supply and storage capacity. Current storage capacity is 36% below the amount needed to serve demand anticipated for Base Village development. At the time of this report, the District was attempting to securing additional storage to accommodate existing and future growth at the Zeigler Reservoir. The water district has received preliminary approval to move forward to secure this water storage area. This additional storage site would allow additional flexibility for future development and expansion of existing uses including community amenities and employee housing. If the location is not approved, the Town will need to increase its efforts to work with the District to meet its needs. With this comes an opportunity for the Town and District to develop a common correlation between water use and land use so that water needs can be measured and tracked as future development occurs. The District's water treatment plant capacity and potable water storage were established by analyzing peak demand for water, fire flows and emergency storage during a major system failure. The water treatment plant can treat 4.7 million gallons per day (mgd) and has an ultimate design capacity of 5.1 mgd. At capacity, the District could treat a flow of 6.5 cubic feet per second. The District operates a sanitary sewage plant that performs primary, secondary and advanced treatment at a capacity 3.2 cubic feet per second. Sewer capacity appears to be adequate to accommodate growth. Snowmass-Wildcat Fire Protection District The Snowmass-Wildcat Fire Protection District was organized in 1971 as an all volunteer department. Since that time, population demands have increased the need for prompt reliable emergency services that has gradually transformed the Snowmass-Wildcat Fire Protection District into a professional agency with 16 full-time employees and 11 resident firefighter EMTs. The Snowmass-Wildcat Fire Protection District utilizes 9 fire suppression units and 3 "advanced life support" ambulances that serve the community's citizens, tourists and day skier population. The Snowmass-Wildcat Fire Protection District encompasses 21 square miles which includes the Town of Snowmass Village, Snowmass Creek drainage and Wildcat Rauch areas. Emergency services mutual aid is offered with cooperation by the Aspen, Basalt and Carbondale Fire Departments. Other Districts Snowmass Village is also a part of the Aspen Public School District RE-1, the Roaring Fork School District RE-1, the Aspen Valley Hospital District, the Colorado River Conservation District, and Colorado Mountain College. Telecommunication and Transmission Devices Snowmass Village embraces technology and should continue to in order to proceed as a world class resort. The Town should evaluate cell phone and other technology needs such as wifi within the community— especially the Town Core. As technology advances, there will be greater demand for locating new telecommunication reception devices. These devices must be carefully sited to mitigate visual impacts and impacts to environmentally sensitive areas. Little Red Schoolhouse. The Little Red Schoolhouse is one of the Town's few historic structures. Built over a century ago, the schoolhouse is owned by the Town and leased to a day care center for local residents. Projections for Roaring Fork Valley indicate a 30 to 80 percent growth in childcare demand over the next 20 years. With these projections, childcare capacity will be exceeded between 2007 and 2012. The Little Red Schoolhouse is at capacity with 10 children in early childhood facility and 22 children in preschool facility. Tree House Adventure Center. The Tree House Adventure Center, a new, state-of-the-art 25,000-square-foot kids ski facility is located in the Base Village. The Treehouse stands as the first of its kind in the snow sports industry, and will contain: family-friendly climbing gym, teen activities, kids' retail and a host of themed rooms for ages eight weeks and older. The Aspen School District does not currently have a school or other facilities in Snowmass Village. The current capacity of the district schools includes 25 students at the High School, 140 students in middle school, and 40 students in the elementary schools. The capacity limits are set by policy and not necessarily capacity of facilities or ability to expand. An additional Capacity of 300 Students could be gained by limiting downvalley enrollment. Snowmass Village Recreation Center & Gym The 9,000 square foot Snowmass Recreation Center was opened in 2007. State-of-the-art amenities include Matrix cardio equipment, a weight room, four outdoor pools with water features for kids and an adult hot tub. Town Hall Facilities A new Town Hall was opened to the public in 2008. The facility holds the majority of Town including Town Manager/Administration, Police, Finance, Building and Planning and Marketing, Special Events and Group Sales. The facility also houses the town council chambers and community meeting rooms. A branch of the Pitkin County Library has been opened in the facility. The Housing Office is located in Mountain View employee housing complex, Public Works has a facility on the just east of Town off of Owl Creek Road and the administrative offices of the Transportation Facilities are located in the Snowmass Mall. The Bus Barn and Shuttle Drivers' Lounge are condominiums in the Mall that are Town- owned. Snowmass Village Conference Center In 1984-85, the Town of Snowmass Village financed the construction of a conference center adjacent to the Snowmass Village Mall. The Town of Snowmass Village manages the 30,000 square foot conference center nut leases the space. The Conference Center hosts a wide variety of conferences and specializes in seminars for medical professionals. See Chapter 3 for more information). The Conference Center is viewed as an important facility to the community. There is some threat to the continuance of the facility as it is today. In addition, the need for more large meeting rooms and an expanded facility has been expressed. Snowmass Chapel & Community Center In 1987, the Snowmass Chapel and Community Center (SCCC) was constructed to provide counseling services and wedding, worship and memorial services to residents and guests. Protestant and non-denominational services are held throughout the year, with weekly Catholic mass in the winter months. The SCCC offers 20,000 square feet of chapel and community space. Synopsis of Public Input A sense of community is highly valued in Snowmass Village. Participants expressed a desire for liveliness and energy. Snowmass Village was envisioned as a place where residents, guests and employees could work, retreat and exist; a healthy place with diversity of age. Services, facilities, and amenities build the framework for a healthy, energetic community. Participants supported local-oriented services such as medical and dental offices and more gathering places where our residents can encounter the same people consistently and serendipitously. The expansion of cultural offerings was also strongly expressed. Vitality and age diversity can be created by meeting other goals of this plan. One prime method is allowing the workforce to live in the community. This brings a broader, younger group into the village to support retail and restaurants year-round. Below are community values and key issues conveyed during the public process for this update: Vitality: Lively place to live, work, retreat and exist, Promote health, In town/on site employee housing, Gathering places (errands, events, recreation) provided with development or by the Town, Create a"Snowmass fun" identity. Culture: Multi-purpose facility (for movies, concerts, conferences, theater, other cultural events), Increased cultural opportunities—music, arts, film, Increased and expanded educational opportunities, Establish Snowmass Village as the "Arts Education Center of the Valley." Age: More age diversity of full-time residents, 5 star nursing home, Age-targeted events, Work center, Telecommuting program / outreach to companies. Recreation, Amenities: Adequate facilities for aging community members, Greater diversity of recreation and sporting activities, Expanded athletic events, Necessary amenities for all ages to utilize, More than just `resort-based' facilities but also community-based facilities. Government: Political will/leadership, Fair, balanced local government, Balance of resort and community. Cohesiveness: Small population, Safe, Social involvement/know.neighbor, Family friendly, Community events. Snowmass Villape Partnerships Aspen Skiing Company The obligations of the Aspen Skiing Company, and the Snowmass Land Company - the major property owner and developer in the Town - are contained in various land use approval ordinances and agreements. Under the land use approvals for Two Creeks and the Pines subdivisions, the Land Company is obligated to build specific trails and roads, to pay specified development mitigation fees, to mitigate wildlife impacts and to provide a specific numbers of affordable housing units within the Town. Under the land approval for the ski area expansion, the Aspen Skiing Company must pay mitigation fees to the Town to compensate for transportation and other impacts on the Town. Roaring Fork Transportation Authority The Town cooperates with the Roaring Fork Transportation Authority to provide transit services and is a member of the RFTA board. The Aspen Skiing Company contracts with RFTA to provide base-to-base skier transportation services. Second Homeowners Advisory Board Second Homeowners Advisory Board was created to communicate various Town projects and information to other second homeowners. Snowmass Village Resort Association Prior to the Town's incorporation, Snowmass Village Resort Association was the resort's first governing body. The SVRA provided basic services to the Mall area. They also managed the town's recreation assets as well as marketed the resort. When the Town incorporated, SVRA was relieved from services such as garbage collecting and snowplowing. More recently, the Town's Marketing / Special Events / Group Sales Department has taken over many of the resort marketing / public relations roles and the marketing and managing of the Snowmass Conference Center. Marketing and Lodge Taxes are the association's funding sources. Appendix— Chapter 6, Environmental Resources Synopsis of Public Input Though the topic was not a prominent one during the public process for the 2008 update of this plan, a healthy natural environment continues to be highly valued by the community. Public input received on the topic of environmental resources addressed the following areas: Preservation of open space, Maintaining view corridors, Retaining the scenic beauty, Promoting respect of our mountain environment, and Protecting water quality, air quality and wildlife. Existing Environmental Conditions 1. Elevation Elevation affects vegetation, temperature, precipitation, oxygen and air pollution. The Town boundary encompasses a topographic span reaching from the lower end of Wildcat Ranch, at approximately 7,300 feet, up to 12,600 feet at the summit of the Snowmass Ski Area. Brush Creek Road, at its intersection with State Highway 82, is at an elevation of 7,500 feet. Elevation rises steadily as Brush Creek Road approaches and enters the Town limits at 7,900 feet. A majority of the Town's residential neighborhoods, as well as its commercial core lie between 7,800 and 9,100 feet. 2. Slope Slope steepness is one determinant of the development suitability of land. Consideration should be given to physical hazards, the potential for successful revegetation, and the difficulty in repairing soil disturbances. Steep slopes are vulnerable to erosion and soil slippage. The Snowmass Village Municipal Code prohibits construction on natural slopes greater than 30%, unless approved by a supermajority vote of the Town Council, and subject to specific findings, exceptions and/or circumstantial criteria. Approximately 7700 acres, or 44%, of town land has a slope of 30% or greater. Mapping of slope is broken into five categories: 0%— 3%, 3% - 8%, 8%-15%, 15% - 30%, and 30% or greater and can be found at the end of this chapter. 3. Aspect Slope aspect is how a site is oriented to the sun, which influences soil and air moisture and temperature. The majority of Snowmass Village has a cooler slope aspect, a situation which is typical of ski areas. Slopes south of Brush Creek Road and much of Wildcat Ranch have a northern aspect with denser vegetation, longer snowpack, moist soils and increased wildfire hazards. Slopes north of Brush Creek Road have a primarily southern aspect with few trees, drier conditions and higher erosion potential. 4. Geology/Soils Most of Snowmass Village's soils have high shrink-swell potential, low strength and slow permeability. A large portion of the surface geology is Mancos shale, which can present challenges to development. On specific sites, soil type should be analyzed for engineering qualities and limitations for construction, ability to support plant growth, stability on slopes, erosion potential and drainage characteristics. 5. Vegetation Snowmass Village's diverse physical conditions create a complex distribution of plant communities. Vegetation distribution is influenced by elevation, solar exposure, slope aspect, soil characteristics, geology, moisture, and wind. Due to their respective aspects, north-facing slopes have abundant streams and lush meadows while south-facing slopes are semi-arid. Changes in the landscape's plant species are most evidently tied to changes in elevation and according to slope aspect. Major plant communities appear as irregular bands, often with very narrow transition bands between them. The succession of plants, beginning with lichens and mosses in dry areas and water plants in the streams and ponds, has climaxed in the four major "Vegetation Life Zones" within Snowmass Village. Foothill Zone. The Foothill Zone extends from the edge of the Roaring Fork Valley to the Rodeo parking lot and the Snowmass Club golf course. This is primarily a shrub zone, with few trees except in riparian areas and in deep ravines with northern exposure. Sagebrush dominates but coexists with aspen trees, foxtail barley, slender wheatgrass, yarrow and vetch. Montane Zone. This zone covers most of the former ranch land that is now golf course and residential development. Mountain meadow and grassland communities are numerous in this zone. Douglas Fir is prevalent and turf-forming grasses such as red-top, timothy and native bluegrass cover moist meadows and 1 Geology and soils infonnation was obtained front the United States Geological Survey (USGS) and the Soil Survey of the Aspen-Gypsum Area. the wetter and cooler areas. Along water courses, distinct riparian forest and shrub communities occur which include: narrow leaf cottonwoods, mountain alder, river birches, Colorado blue spruce, aspen trees and several species of willow. Subalpine Zone. This region begins at 8,000 feet on north-facing slopes and is covered by dense forests of Engelmann Spruce and Subalpine Fir, with equally dense intrusions of aspen groves or an occasional lodge pole pine stand. In the winter, these dense forests protect snowfall from melting so snow often remains on the ground until early July. Moisture-loving plants such as Fairy Slippers, Woodnymphs, and Dotted Saxifrage thrive in this woodland. Alpine Zone or Tundra. Above timberline is the alpine zone. Like the Arctic Tundra, it is a treeless region of grassland and rock fields. Snow melts sooner in this zone than the Subalpine Zone due to the lack of trees to shade the ground and the fact that winds keep the snow layer thin. A short growing season exists but allows for alpine flowers. In 2005, the Town of Snowmass Village adopted the Pitkin County weed control program that attempts to strategically remove noxious weeds from Pitkin County. The program includes a plan and community outreach objectives to address noxious weeds from spreading in Snowmass Village. 6. Hydrology Brush Creek is Snowmass Village's main watercourse and flows through Town from the Divide into the Roaring Fork River. Brush Creek's two major tributaries, the West and East Forks, flow from the Snowmass Ski Area along Fanny Hill in the west and below the Two Creeks lift in the east. Brush Creek Road parallels the creek. Historically, the creek and the road have vied for territory. As a result, the creek has suffered in the areas of bank erosion and degradation of stream biology. Cumulative impacts resulting from a variety of development practices have impaired the stream channel's ability to function naturally. The degradation of Brush Creek not only affects Snowmass Village but also impacts the downstream water quality of the Roaring Fork River. The Town has identified stream sections of Brush Creek that are candidates for restoration. Since the early 1990's, four reaches of Brush Creek (Woodbridge, May Fly, Snowmass Chapel and Base Village) have been restored. The majority of the projects were financed by the Town with the exception of the Base Village reach which was restored as a condition of development approval. There is an existing town fund for stream restoration but no regular budget line. There are no standard design specifications for restoration because each reach has different fluvial characteristics requiring a design specific to the reach. The Roaring Fork Conservancy, a non-profit watershed conservation organization, monitors the health of regional water ways. The Conservancy placed Brush Creek on its impacted list in its 2006 Water Quality Report due to consistently high pH and phosphorous levels and continued development along the drainage way. A targeted study was initiated in 2006 to set baseline conditions for the creek, determine the levels and duration of pollutants, and to determine appropriate management of open space parcels with regard to the riparian habitat. Most parameters in the study reflected normal and relatively healthy conditions though continued concern of high pH levels and impacts due to development continue. The Conservancy plans to continue monitoring of the Creek in the future. Future recommendations may include the need for a minimum in-stream flow to be established to ensure continued health. Water quantity is also important to measure. In recent years, heavy snow pack has eased the drought in the region and will likely begin refilling depleted reservoirs in the Colorado River Basin. However, severe or extreme drought conditions still exist and climate change or continued years with low precipitation removes the amount of water available to us and left in stream. 7. Snowmass Water and Sanitation District The Snowmass Water and Sanitation District is a special district created under the provisions of the Special District Act, 32-1-101 C.R.S. The District was formed in 1966 to provide potable water and sanitary sewer service for the Snowmass Village area. The District operation consists of water and sewer systems. i. Water System. The water system consists of a raw water intake system, a Water Treatment Plant to treat raw water and make it potable, a system of pressure zones, water tanks and water pipelines to deliver potable water to its customers. The Water Treatment Plant has a treatment capacity of 5.1 million gallons per day of potable water. The Water Treatment Plant utilizes mechanical filtration and ultra violet treatment to process raw water and produce potable water. Raw water is diverted from one of the three District sources of supply, Brush Creek, East Snowmass Creek and Snowmass Creek, or from storage at the Ziegler Reservoir and conveyed by pipeline to the Water Treatment Plant. Potable water storage tanks totaling in aggregate of approximately 6.2 million gallons are located in various District pressure zones to allow the District to manage water distribution during peak demand periods or during exigent circumstances. ii. Waste Water System. The waste water system consists of collection sewer mains and lift stations and a Waste Water Treatment Plant. The Waste Water Treatment Plant has a treatment capacity of 3.2 million gallons per day of influent. The Waste Water Treatment Plant is a mirror image 1.6 million gallon bifurcated system allowing the District to utilize the minimum capacity for its primary and tertiary treatment. After completion of the treatment process, treated effluent is discharged into Brush Creek. Sludge waste from the treatment operations is taken to the Pitkin County landfill to aid in the composting project or to the District's sludge disposal site in Woody Creek. The District recently conducted a review of its water rights inventory and its ability to serve future development and service requirements generally in the Snowmass Village area. As discussed more fully in Chapter 6, the District currently is serving a demand of approximately 4900 equivalent residential units (EQR). On the basis of the planning the District determined that a reasonable estimate of its ability to reliably serve potable water is 6200 EQR. The District determined that treatment capacity of the Waste Water Treatment Plant is adequate and can treat the anticipated associated influent from 6200 EQR potable water usage. The District is pursuing upgrades and capital replacement to its system and is replacing older water and sewer pipelines with pipelines made of modern materials. The District anticipates that it will require approximately$4,000,000.00 per year to conduct the upgrade and capital replacement program. The District is also seeking approval to expand Ziegler Reservoir to a total storage capacity of 225 acre feet with an estimated project budget of$10,000,000.00." 8. Wildlife Comprehensive Plan wildlife maps show the habitat of elk, mule deer, raptors, big horn sheep and ptarmigan. These mapped species were selected from a broad range of mammals and birds because they have a high level of public interest or are an indicator species"z for the Burnt Mountain region. While the black bear attracts a high level of public interest, it was not mapped because its range covers the entire Town. The wildlife maps were created using the Colorado Division of Wildlife CDOW) data. The United States Forest Service (USFS) has compiled a list of Management Indicator Species (MIS) for the Burnt Mountain area. These species are also of high public interest or are indicator species. Additionally, the White River National Forest has also drafted a list of sensitive species that are likely to occur in forested and non- forested communities in the area. The CDOW and USFS species lists should be kept on file in the Planning Department and reviewed when making planning decisions to ensure that impacts to indicator species or local sensitive species are identified. Development can then incorporate appropriate mitigation and ecologically sound design that protects the wildlife in Snowmass Village. a.Environmentally Sensitive Wildlife Areas Elk Habitat Areas. Regulations to protect certain elk habitats are included in the Town Municipal Code. Town policy prohibits development in the elk calving, severe winter range and migration corridors mapped by the CDOW, unless certain conditions are met. The elk that use habitats in or adjacent to Snowmass Village are part of the Maroon Bells-Snowmass Wilderness (MB-SW) elk herd. This herd has 2 Indicator Species are species whose habitat also meets the needs of an array of other species. approximately 350 elk. The MB-SW elk herd combines with other herds in the winter, forming a group of about 700 elk that use the surrounding winter range. The 1994 Snowmass Ski Area Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) indicates that half of the elk habitat has been rendered unsuitable due to nearby development on both private and national forest land. Since 1966, calving habitat has been reduced by 54% and the migration corridor for the MB-SW herd has been reduced by 90%. Because of habitat loss, protecting the remaining habitat should be a high priority if the herd is to remain viable. Elk Habitats vital for protection include: i. Calving Habitat. The aspen groves in the Owl Creek drainage east of Burnt Mountain. This includes areas such as Kelley Park, Mandalay Ranch and the USFS area prescribed as the future "413" in the White River National Forest Plan. ii. Migration Corridors. The route between summer and winter range, including the three crossings on Brush Creek Road near the Droste and Seven Star properties and the crossings along Owl Creek Road. iii. Winter Range. Overall winter range extends north of Owl Creek Road, west of Highway 82, east of Wildcat Reservoir and Snowmass Creek Road, and south of Snowmass. During winters with deep snows, winter range availability is the most crucial factor in the survival of the herd. Severe winter range habitat in the Snowmass Village area is located on the south or west facing oakbrush or sage-covered hills of the Seven Star, Droste and Wildcat Ranch properties. b. Areas of Ecological Significance. In addition to the elk habitat areas, there are three areas of ecological significance with elements that can support wildlife on a continuous basis and have a high biodiversity value: i. Upper Eastern Section of the Snowmass Ski Area near Elk Camp. ii. Sam's Knob west to East Snowmass Creek and to the top of the Big Burn. These areas contain mixed conifer-aspen habitat which are used throughout the year by deer, elk, bighorn sheep, neotropical birds, raptors, carnivores, small and medium-sized herbivores and ptarmigan. Land use decisions concerning the portions of the Snowmass Ski Area located within the Town's boundaries should insure preservation of the richness of this wildlife mix. iii. Habitat between Spring Creek and Owl Creek. This is a core area of species diversity due to the type of vegetation, abundant water and remoteness. It is of particular importance to elk and deer in the spring for calving/fawning and nursing. c. Dedicated Open Space and Other Areas of Wildlife Importance The Town owns the first two of the three open space parcels listed below, which have high value for wildlife. Any development of public facilities and/or recreational uses should promote wildlife stewardship on these parcels. These areas include: i. Open Space above Horse Ranch Subdivision - These 650 acres of open space has high value for wintering deer and elk. It is closed to all activity from September 15 —June 20th. ii. East Highline (Hidden Valley) - This 200 acre parcel was deeded to the Town from the Snowmass Land Company for wildlife habitat preservation. It is located in the draw near the Town cemetery and was intended for elk spring fall migration and winter range. iii. Horse pastures between Brush Creek Road and Horse Ranch Drive - This area is an important deer and elk travel corridor between the dedicated open space parcels. Preserving this area also ensures an undeveloped link for big game moving between winter and summer ranges. d. Current Wildlife Management and Mitigation Plans The Town currently has a number of plans and documents to guide the management of wildlife, including: Creenway Master Plan, (2000). Two Creeks and the Pines Wildlife Enhancement and Management Plan 1994). Snowmass Ski Area Wildlife Enhancement and Management Plan (1994). Snowmass Ski Area 1994 FEIS Mitigation and Monitoring Plan. Snowmass Wildlife Committee Report (1991). Pitkin County Wildlife Taskforce and Report (1989). These reports should be updated as necessary, formally adopted, and referred to during development review. 9. Open Space The community views open space as an important resource, and recognizes that it provides several benefits. Preserving open space allows for protection of sensitive habitat, creates open areas in the built landscape, and promotes a rural character. Open space also provides a mental and spiritual benefit. The Town has an open space program and owns several parcels that are restricted to use as public open space. To better manage this resource, the community needs to understand why the land is to be kept open and what the best use is for the properties. We can start by inventorying our properties to identify the legal parameters that are keeping the areas open (i.e. deed restriction, public ownership, development requirement). Knowing the ownership and potential for our open spaces will let us know where future acquisitions should occur as opportunities arise, or needs are identified. Effort should be given to analyze management techniques and methods of acquisition. 10. Environmental Sensitivity Environmental Sensitivity Map. The Environmental Sensitivity Map indicates all land that is markedly sensitive to environmental impacts from development. The Environmental Sensitivity Map indicates natural thresholds for the carrying capacity of the Town. The highest values have been placed on the protection of wildlife, stream corridors, steep slopes, open space and scenic views. Sensitivity is determined by the resource's historical ability to recover from development impacts and remain sustainable. Some environmental resources do not change significantly over time,while other resources are dynamic and may need periodic impact assessment, evaluation and monitoring. These areas have physical and ecological features whose preservation is essential to the Town's ability to maintain a high quality environment. The map covers the entire Town limits,as well as the designated Influence Areas. Physically sensitive features include: 1. Slopes in excess of 30%. These steep slopes are often highly visible and development of them could have a major visual, safety and financial impact. 2. Brush Creek. Brush Creek is important both for its scenic value and for its ecological value as a wildlife, wetlands and riparian area. 3. Critical Wildlife Habitat. Critical habitat areas for indicator species can be both ecologically and visually sensitive areas. The Environmental Sensitivity Map designates sensitive areas for preservation, conservation, open space, or low-density residential. All proposed development and redevelopment will be evaluated against this map. Proposed development which appears to penetrate any part of designated sensitive lands will require a site-specific review prior to approval, regardless of the location. Appendix - Chapter 7, Built Environment Introduction to the Plannine Area The Regional Context The Town of Snowmass Village lies within Pitkin County, Colorado approximately 200 miles west of Denver. It is accessed via State Highway 82, which runs south from Glenwood Springs, through the Roaring Fork Valley, intersecting with the primary entry to Town, Brush Creek Road. When entering Snowmass Village through either the rural Lower Brush Creek or Owl Creek Valleys, one is greeted by a panoramic view of the valley, Mount Daly, Burnt Mountain and Baldy Mountain. The Town of Snowmass Village, Pitkin County, and the White River National Forest own over 49 percent of the public land in the Town's influence area. The Planning Area Per Colorado State Statutes, the completion of a Comprehensive Plan is the Planning Commission's primary responsibility. Knowing that municipalities grow and the actions of adjacent governments may impact the operations of another government, Colorado law (CRS 31- 12-105) enables municipalities to plan for expansion in the 3-mile area surrounding the city limits. The planning area for the Comprehensive Plan contains several political and topographic boundaries and encompasses approximately 23,000 acres. It is divided into four primary areas. These areas include: 1. The current Town boundaries 1. The Lower Brush Creek Valley Influence Area 2. The Owl Creek Valley Influence Area 3. The Divide Influence Area Within the Town planning area there are seven special study Comprehensively Planned Areas or CPAs: 1. Faraway Ranch South CPA 2. Faraway Ranch North CPA 3. Faraway Ranch North CPA (including the Snowmass Center) 4. West Village-Mixed Use CPA 5. Base Village 6. Rodeo Grounds/Entryway 7. Multi-family Residential CPA The History of the Planning and Development of Snowmass Village A. Historical Perspective The Town of Snowmass Village's current planning policies and regulations were formed in the 1980's and have continued to evolve over the last two decades. Since 1955, Snowmass Village's zoning build-out has ranged from 4,350 to 20,000 dwelling units as planning policies evolved. The build-out varies from 8,145 units in Janss Plan (1964) and then reduced to the number used for current Multi-family and Single-family build-out including Base Village. Homesteads By 1890, ranchers and homesteaders had settled the land that is now Snowmass Village but it was mainly Aspen's ski resort success in the 1940's and 1950's that led people beyond the boundaries of Aspen and to the ranch lands of the Brush Creek Valley. In 1955, Pitkin County began planning for the Brush Creek Valley area and zoned the Snowmass Village area agriculture, forestry and residential and established a minimum lot size of two acres. Snowmass-at-Aspen In 1958, the Hoaglund Ranch was purchased by the Janss Colorado Corporation. Janss continued to make land purchases and prepared a development plan for the area in 1964. The natural assets of"Snowmass-at-Aspen" would be developed into a profitable year-round resort, linked to the Aspen areas lodging and amenities but including its own unique ski-in/ski-out residential opportunity. The Janss Plan integrated 8,145 dwelling units into several small, alpine pedestrian villages on the slopes of Burnt and Baldy Mountains. Building materials would come from the natural wood and stone available in the immediate area. Internal circulation would rely on pedestrian trails and an effective, accessible transit system. Less intensive residential use and recreational open space separated the planned villages. The Aspen Skiing Company would construct and operate the ski trails and lifts. The Janss Corporation would develop the residential, commercial and other recreational facilities. The formation of the Snowmass-at-Aspen ski area attracted growth and investors to the area. The first lifts began operating up Fanny Hill and Sam's Knob on December 16, 1967. The Aspen Area General Plan, prepared and adopted by the Pitkin County Commissioners in 1966, included many of the same concepts in the Janss Plan. Snowmass-at-Aspen and Aspen were identified as areas for intense residential density preserving other areas for agriculture and other rural uses. County Influence: the Snowmass General Submission of 1976 As Snowmass Village evolved, Pitkin County became concerned about the consequences of existing development proposals and zoning on the future density of the area. The Pitkin County Commissioners favored a less intense buildout, preserving open space and buffers around population centers. The Snowmass Corporation, now the major landholder, favored higher density pockets throughout the area. The Pitkin County Planning and Zoning Commission advised the Snowmass Corporation to consider the Janss Plan concept of clustering development in West Village, East Village and Sinclair Mesa/Meadow Ranch areas. West and East Village would be oriented toward visitors and Sinclair/Meadow Ranch toward permanent residents. The Snowmass General Submission of 1976 was then produced. The Town of Snowmass Village (TOSV) In 1977, Snowmass-at-Aspen officially incorporated as a Home Rule Town under Colorado law and became the Town of Snowmass Village. A citizen committee including representatives of the Aspen Skiing Company, the Snowmass Corporation, the Benedict Land and Cattle Company and the new Snowmass Village Planning and Zoning Commission prepared the Town of Snowmass Village Master Plan, which was adopted in 1980. The plan was a policy framework guiding growth to make a "harmonious, well integrated, environmentally sound and fiscally- balanced development" and envisioning Snowmass Village as both a world-class ski resort and a vibrant year-round community. The Master Plan addressed land use, transportation, employee housing and community facilities and adopted the same densities designated in the Snowmass Corporation's General Development Plan. West and East Villages remained as primary Town activity areas with 2,700 new residential units and commercial development. Those parcels not selected for development would be dedicated to the Town for open space or conservation. B. TOSV Comprehensive Plan Updates 1983 The Town's Master Plan was revised in 1983 and emphasized the development process, rather than a pre-determined Master Plan, to define the future of the Town. 1987 In 1987, a new land use plan was adopted. This plan included a very specific list of uses and re- established underlying zoning regulations. A maximum number of units were allocated to specific parcels that had no prior development approvals. A maximum number of dwelling units were set and certain amounts of commercial development were allocated to specific locations. Forty acres were designated for public purposes and new policies were adopted to improve the Town's ability to regulate development. The guidelines remain the basis by which development is evaluated today. 1998 In the 1998 update of the Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan, the number of dwelling units envisioned for the area continued to be the established 2,700 slated in 1980. Major focus areas of this plan were transportation and developing a consensus on the vision for the community. The community involvement in the preparation of the 1998 was impressive thus community ownership of the document was achievable. 2008 The latest revision to this plan is the 2008 Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan. A combination of events including a decreased desire to travel and downswings in the economy as a result of 9/11, early in the decade led to development approvals for Base Village that some considered contrary to the Comprehensive Plan vision. In 2004 the community, through a referendum, upheld the approval of a Planned Unit Development for Base Village. Ordinance No.'s 21 and 23, Series of 2004, adopted on October 20, 2004, approved the Base Village and Fanny Hill Cabins PUD's involving 620 condominium units. Upon full buildout (expected in 2011), the approved Base Village will become the core destination: a tourist-oriented mixed-use village node in the heart of Snowmass. Full buildout of the project is scheduled to include, over the course of five phases: 68,000 square feet of retail and restaurants including 5 restaurants specific tenant and floor space A 26,000 square feet child care facility A conference center Various public amenities 620 luxury units including a 236-unit condominium hotel Because the 1998 Plan was 10 years old and there was some question on what the vision of Snowmass Village ought to be, an update to the Comprehensive Plan was commissioned. Large segments of the community still supported the vision, goals and policies of the 1998 Plan and community ownership of the document still existed, the update was to be a targeted effort. The intention of the 2008 targeted update was to: Refine and provide definition to the Town's vision, Determine the Town's carrying capacity, Complete the West Village and transit plaza plan as part of a comp plan update, Provide clear guidelines for new development, and Provide an engaging and focused community process. Other Community Plans Many other plans have contributed significantly to the development patterns established during the past couple decades. Community Planning Process - In 1989, community members met in small committees to discuss transportation, employee housing, land use, open space and the environment. The Town has implemented most of the recommendations. A Road, A Creek, and A Community in Maturation" (the BTA Plan) developed in 1993 articulated "three basic and underlying values: stewardship of the environment, public support for a resort and hospitality-based economy, and a public expression of their pioneering spirit." Recommendations for Parking, Transit and Traffic in Snowmass Village, Colorado: Final Report Prepared by the Transportation Committee" This planning effort laid the foundation for the 1993 Transportation Plan. A coordinated transportation and parking plan for the entire Town including regional connections was recommended. The Transportation Committee analyzed parking and traffic conditions, and current and proposed Town buildout scenarios. The significant finding was that if skiers continued to drive in their private vehicles to the slopes, traffic and congestion would ultimately jeopardize the quality of life in Snowmass Village. This plan was the first to acknowledge community preference for rural character roads and recommended improved turning movements as opposed to road widening. Snowmass Village Community Partners Planning Process - Private and public sector members developed a Comprehensive Community Plan addressing a physical improvement plan, a review of the Town's economy and government, and a financial analysis of future funding options. Community Design Concept Plan - The Snowmass Village Community Partners Plan formed the "Community Design Committee" to evaluate input from citizens and from a variety of sources, to develop a "vision" for the future. The committee developed a very detailed recommendation for design and improvements throughout the community. Mall Transit & Parking Plaza — In 1998, the Mall was the hub of the tourist commercial in Town and provided a gateway to the ski lifts. The Mall Transit & Parking Plaza was a design plan that envisioned a smooth transit system that focused on pedestrian activities, ensured adequate parking and incorporated alternative forms of transit such as people movers and the more traditional bus system. Brush Creek Corridor Transportation Study — The Town initiated this study in 2000 in order to better understand the interface between transit service to Snowmass Village and a regional transportation plan conducted in the Roaring Fork Valley which located a mass transit station at the intersection of Brush Creek Road and Highway 82. The carrying capacity of the road was evaluated and alternative transit option analyzed. Snowmass Strategic Plan— This plan was developed in 2008 by the Marketing, Special Events & Group Sales Board with the assistance of a consultant team. It provides extensive data analysis and recommends a number of broad strategies and policy directions for the mountain resort within Snowmass Village. Key elements of this plan have been incorporated into the 2008 Comprehensive Plan update. Sustainable Market and Retail Study — A market analysis was competed in conjunction with both the 2008 Strategic Plan and the 2008 Comprehensive Plan update. Accomplishments and Challenges Since the 1998 Comprehensive Plan, the Town of Snowmass Village has made much progress and enacted several of that Plan's recommendations including: The development of a Recreation Center and Town Hall facility Increased transit opportunities Expanded events and activities, especially in the summer months Restoration of several reaches of Brush Creek At the same time, Snowmass Village continues to face a number of challenges: 1.) Snowmass Village is approaching buildout; there are few areas left to develop: A major expansion is underway at the Base Village. It promises to significantly increase the commercial and residential offerings of Snowmass Village. And yet, not being completed, the full impact of the development has not been experienced. A number of the observations and conclusions of the Comprehensive Plan are based on projected impacts of this project. Snowmass Mountain is managed by the Aspen Skiing Company. The mountain continues to provide the majority of Aspen Ski Company's intermediate skiing terrain. The mountain is authorized to accommodate over a million visitors per year. However, many of the Snowmass skiers do not patronize local businesses as they pass through the Village to return to Aspen or other destinations. The resulting potential sales capture is relatively low. Snowmass Village is relatively remote compared to many other Colorado mountain resorts, especially during the winter months due to the associated weather. Most visitors come via air—through the airports at Aspen or Eagle, or through DIA in Denver (a 3 %x hour drive). This makes the resort vulnerable to disruptions in air service and increased air fare. Down valley communities provide housing for our workers, goods, services and even clients to the businesses in the Village. On the other hand, they also provide employment opportunities that compete with Snowmass Village businesses. This is compounded by growth in the energy industry in nearby counties. The cost, and lack, of affordable work force housing in Snowmass makes it increasing difficult for local businesses to compete for workers—at all income ranges. Other competing resorts continue to upgrade and expand their offerings. On one hand this may be perceived to put the older establishments such as the West Village at a disadvantage. On the other hand, it is very possible that there is still a market within the skiing public for the lower scale, laid back development that the West Village still offers. The community continues to deal with the need to balance the aspects of resort and community, transportation and housing, and creating a `sense of place.' The strengthening and completion of a vital and vibrant Town Core is still an issue for the community. 2.) The Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan is intended to guide us in addressing these issues as we plan and develop our community for the future. The objectives of the 2008 Comprehensive Plan Update include the need to: Acknowledge the changing economic and social conditions within the valley, Integrate community expectations regarding government's role in land use and transportation issues, Mitigate the impacts of expanded commercial areas on our existing retailers, For the remaining areas subject to development, find an appropriate balance between the impact of growth and quality of life and community character; protect the integrity and character of the community while accommodating some level of growth, Establish land use guidelines to address the remaining undeveloped areas of Snowmass Village and define the community's expectations for development and redevelopment of the Town, Retain a cohesive Town Core with a `sense of place' in Snowmass Village with seamless connections between commercial nodes, Identify community thresholds, and expectations, for new development and redevelopment, Maintain acceptable levels of service on our main roads and the intersections, Determine the appropriate relationship of the Mall and Base Village transit centers, Understand the impacts of and mitigate the loss of quality short-term rental units in the Village, and Address employee issues, including the provision of affordable housing alternatives, which meet the needs, and preferences of the community. Synopsis of Public Input The subject of the built environment was one of the most emphasized topics during the Plan update. The community expressed various views on how much growth is acceptable in the community and how much is too much. Some participants were amenable to some levels of growth ranging from developments much more massive than seen today to 10% of what is seen today; others were against any additional. development. There was some level of comfort in maintaining the existing build-out guidelines in the 1998 Comprehensive Plan as an indicator of what should be `just enough'. The unknown impact of the completed Base Village was a major concern. Although the impacts of Base Village were reviewed during the public hearing process for the development review, many community members felt that an acceptable level of future development could not be established until the impacts of the completed Base Village could be assessed. General comments on the built environment, by topic, include: Bulk and mass Slightly larger(10%) than now-Use existing build-out chart, Compactness of town (limit sprawl, footprint), Scenery not obstructed by big buildings, Public gathering areas with sun, Interconnected resort commercial nodes and community commercial node— pedestrian and multi-modal, Irregular heights and facades, Character(small, urban, narrow meandering street) Village "feel', Aesthetic and functional mountain architecture, Quiet in residential areas, vibrancy in the core areas, Preserve neighborhoods, Sense of arrival at the entrance of Town (rodeo/parking/recreation/transportation) and at each resort commercial node(Base Village and existing mall), Sustainability: Become a leader in sustainability, Green, sustainability, self sufficiency, energy& environment, Off the electric grid, Operations Separate pedestrian and delivery services, and Reduce bus—pedestrian conflicts. Background 1.Existing Land Use: The Planning Area includes approximately 23,000 acres, including 16,000 acres within current Town boundaries and the remainder within the three-mile boundary that are under Pitkin County jurisdiction, but over which the Town of Snowmass Village may exert an influence. 2. Existing Zoning Snowmass Village never applied traditional (Euclidean) zoning to the Town Core. General land use concepts were dictated by the initial development plan. The Town has, instead, placed broader, more general land use categories on the land and allowed the development review process as a Planned Unit Development to determine the specific land use classification and density. Four Pitkin County zone districts are applied within the Influence Areas. 3. Existing Ownership The Town, Pitkin County and the White River National Forest own and manage most of the public land within Snowmass Village and its influence areas. Approximately 6,660 acres of the National Forest account for nearly 40% of the land within the Town. Land Use Categories Land Use classifications differ from Zoning Classifications in several aspects: Land Use (Comprehensive Plan) Zoning(Zoning map) Does not convey vested fights Conveys vested fights Does not necessarily apply to a Usually applies to a whole whole property (e.g. may indicated property different uses due to topography, flood plains, etc.) More than one Zone may be Generally, only a single zone is consistent with the Land Use applied to a property. designation (e.g. the density range could be met by two or three residential zones.) A broad range of balanced land uses can provide community and resort opportunities that honor the community's vision, goals and principles. Land Use Classifications from the previous Comprehensive Plan are continued. They include: Estate Residential. Very low-density residential development. Estate Residential lots are 100 or more acres per dwelling unit or an average of 100 or more acres per lot within a development. Estate residential development should be restricted to relatively small development envelopes in order to preserve large tracts of open space and sensitive lands. Single-Family Residential. Single dwelling units (one per building) used exclusively by one family and their guests. The single-family residential classification ranges from low density 10-99 acres/lot) to high density (less than 1 acre/lot). Single-family homes can range in size from 1,500 to 8,500 square feet and include free-market and price-restricted homes. Multi-Family Residential: Multi-family buildings contain two or more dwelling units and may share vertical and/or horizontal party walls. Each dwelling unit is designed for and used exclusively by one family and their guests. The multi-family housing classification includes both free-market and price-restricted duplexes, townhouses, apartments and condominium dwelling units. Fractional ownership units are included in the multi-family residential category; however, hotels or lodges are not included. Multi-family ranges from low density— less than ten units per acre, to high density— 50 plus units per acre. Multi-family residential can accommodate long and short-term visitors, and part and full-time residents. Lodge/Hotel. A building or a portion of a building containing rooms, areas or separate spaces intended for temporary occupancy by guests typically by the day or week. Each lodge or hotel unit must contain sanitation facilities but no kitchen. Lock-off rooms, which contain sanitation facilities but no kitchen, are included as hotel rooms in this classification. Services, 1 Right to develop in compliance with all conditions specified in the Zone designated for a given property. The Planned Development zone allows some flexibility, but also requires legislative approval. which are accessory to lodging or tourist uses are allowed. Lodges may provide employee units on premises. Mixed-Use: A mix of residential, retail, restaurant, office, public, cultural and recreational uses serving residents and visitors. Live/ work units are appropriate in this land use district. A diverse mix of uses is recommended in this area and is intended to create vibrancy and vitality. Commercial: Commercial uses oriented to both community residents and visitors. This classification includes retail and restaurant uses. Office: Office uses oriented to serve the resort and the community. This use is intended to house necessary services and administrative uses as well as to encourage the location of small businesses which will create jobs for local residents. Public: Public, private non-profit, communication and technology uses: as an example, the Snowmass Chapel and Community Center, the Snowmass-Wildcat Firehouse, Snowmass Water and Sanitation District facilities, Anderson Ranch Arts Center and some Municipal facilities. Open Space/Conservation: Includes both public and private lands held for passive recreation, conservation and preservation purposes. Recreation: Public and private lands used for active and high-use recreation. Examples include Town owned parks, the Snowmass Ski Area and the golf course. Recreational support structures are allowed in this classification. Future land usage within the planning area is summarized in the tables below: Table 7.5 Snowmass Village Future Land Use SNOWMASS VI LAG'E Land se G*lassifcation Number ofAcres °o of Total Acres Estate Residential 6,278.4 37.1% Single Family Residential 932.5 5.5% Multi-Family Residential 225.4 1.3% Lodging 4.9 0.0% Mixed Use 91.4 0.5% Commercial 5.7 0.0% Public 161.1 1.0% Open Space/Conservation 1,691.8 10.0% Recreation 7,369.4 43.5% Other* 161.3 1.0% SNOWMASS VILLAGE Land Use Classification Number of Acres % of Total Acres TOTAL 16,921.9 100.0% Source: Snowmass Village Planning Department Table 7.6 Influence Area, Future Land Use LOWER BRUSH CREEK VALLEY Land Use Classification Number of Acres of Total Acres Estate Residential 599.6 28.7% Single Family Residential 945.6 45.2% Multi-Family Residential 0 0% Lodging 0 0% Mixed Use 0 0% Commercial 0 0% Public 0 0% Open Space/Conservation 491.3 23.5% Recreation 0 0% Other* 53.6 2.6% TOTAL 2,090.1 100.0% JOWL CREEK VALLEY Land Use Classification Number of Acres of Total Acres Estate Residential 230.9 5.5% Single Family Residential 2,229.1 56.4% Multi-Family Residential 0 0% Lodging 0 0% Mixed Use 0 0% Commercial 0 0% Public 0 0% Open Space/ Conservation 363.5 9.2% Recreation 1,104.0 27.9% Other* 40.2 1.0% TOTAL 3,967.2 100.0% DIVIDE Land Use Classification Number of Acres of Total Acres Estate Residential 734.1 100.0% Single Family Residential 0 0% Multi-Family Residential 0 0% Lodging 0 0% Mixed Use 0 0% Commercial 0 0% Public 0 0% Open Space/Conservation 0 0% Recreation 0 0% Other* 0 0% TOTAL 734.1 100.0% OTHER represents road, road right-of-way areas and similar areas that do not have a designated land use. Source: Snowmass Village Planning Department The Future Land Use Map planning area boundaries encompass 16,921.9 acres (5% more acreage than the actual Town acreage), and includes parts of the Divide and Lower Brush Creek Valley Influence Areas. The existing Snowmass Ski Area is classified as Recreation and no other development is shown within its boundaries. The community has placed a high priority on maintaining the integrity and vitality of the ski area. The preservation of the ski area for skiing is of primary importance to the future success of the resort and the community. The Future Land Use Plan directly correlates existing land use and future land use patterns on a parcel-by-parcel basis. Development is discouraged in areas with sensitive environmental features depicted on the Environmental Sensitivity Map (Chapter Six). Limited development is recommended on steep slopes, visually significant areas, important wildlife migration routes and habitat and sensitive riparian areas. Specific development standards should be developed to address the following issues. Buildout Projections Residential growth projections used typical density and occupancy for land use designations. Population figures were derived by multiplying the number of residential dwelling units by average permanent and peak occupancies adjusted by unit type. Table 7.7 Projection Assumptions Unit T e and °o Permanent Permanent Occu anc Peak OO ccupancy Single Family(26.3%) 2.5 people/unit 4.5 people/unit Multi Family(13%) 2.5 people/unit 3.5 people/unit Lodge/Hotel (0%) 0.0 people/unit 1.9 people/unit Employee (100%) 2.5 people/unit 2.7 people/unit Source: Snowmass Village Planning Department Land use and density were assigned within the planning area to determine the necessary community infrastructure and amenity requirements. This scenario represents maximum potential buildout and is not to be construed as permitted for development. Actual density and land use will be determined through the development review process that insures that the policies of the plan are met. Future densities and land uses must complement Snowmass Village's vision for land use, infrastructure, environmental conservation, transportation and other key components. If the maximum potential build-out were permitted, residential dwelling units will increase by 19.6% over existing and approved units. Permanent population could increase 33.2% and peak population could increase 20.0%. [Verify] Table 7.8 Snowmass Village Buildout Chart ]Provided by Planning Department] E.H. stands for Employee Housing Unit Source: TOSV Planning Department, RRC Associates 2008 Housing Study Table 7.9 Permanent and Peak Population Projections ]Update per state Demographer] Year PernaneRIME har clogn ak o chan e 1980 984 5,904 1987 1,360 38.0 8,160 38.2 1990 1,449 6.5 8,694 6.5 1995 1,588 9.6 9,528 9.6 1998 1,875 18.1 11,072 15.6 1998 2,081 11.0 12,115 9.4 2000 2,142 2.9 12,332 1.8 2005 2,302 7.5 12,885 4.5 2010 2,458 6.8 13,432 4.2 2015 2,615 6.4 13,981 4.1 2020 2,771 6.0 14,528 3.9 Existing"based on residential units built as of Existing" based on residential units built in addition to proposed units approved as of Source: Snowmass Village Planning Department The effect of increased growth in the Town and on the Snowmass Ski Area is a major concern. As an internal measure of the land use plan, the ski area "Skiers-At-One-Time" SAOT) vs. ski area acreage was determined. Land use classifications are not a substitute for zoning, but serve as the guide for new land use and development regulations for the Town. By identifying desired land use patterns, defining urban boundaries, reviewing existing regulations, and preparing regulations and incentives, it will be possible to achieve the future land use vision for Snowmass Village. Appendix —Chapter 8, Transportation Synopsis of Public Input Participants in the Comprehensive Plan Update conveyed a desire to maintain low congestion on the town roadways. An equally important issue was the ease of access around town, especially concerning parking for locals. To accomplish this, participants supported a significant increase in use of transit and decrease in car use. Interest lay in improving transit valley-wide. Increased pedestrian access was also highly supported. Desire existed for seamless pedestrian linkages among the three commercial nodes and accessibility across the spectrum for an aging community. Alternative fuel options for public transportation relate the issue of transportation to the environmental resource goals of the plan. Existine Conditions and Guidine Principles I. Arrival Most winter guests (85 percent) get to Snowmass/Aspen primarily by air, and 57 percent of summer guests as well. They arrive at either: Aspen/ Pitkin County Airport and take a short drive or shuttle to Snowmass Village, Eagle County Airport and drive an hour and a half to Snowmass Village, Grand Junction and drive two and a half hours to Snowmass Village, or They land at Denver International Airport (DIA) and drive 3 %: hours. Some day visitors, and most non-resident workers, come to Snowmass Village from down valley locations ranging from nearby Basalt/Carbondale to as far away as Silt, Rifle, Hotchkiss, and Delta. Regardless of the origin, guests and workers must travel on Highway 82 to reach one of two roads into Snowmass Village. Highway 82 already exceeds roadway capacity at peak periods. Figure 8.1 Guest Arrivals:From left to right:A)Now do people get to Snownas's/Aspen;81 Purpose of All Trips,and Q Origin of All Trips tt.4 Ooo- CaIA 1% SNM.auiq St4.wnm]Vi11RJc 16% Slwpq.,rnnuq 0% 13% Y1e Wak AyaNRIWn County a% r1Y Gb S, Pupal 6% all% Ge tO% oanw Mam•IoM aspari NtPOIt 35% 0.County MW Rsrxtron Basal 11%15% Sotucc.Condon.Scott."Aspen's Main Comm Vows Bear Service."Tk Agpen Tim es13W.2007. Figure 8,2 Tmffic Volumes:Peak Season Average(upper)and on the/0 busiest Days(lower)—compared to Level Of Service C OMw1yCdlwdM1CM" use em fea, a 11)1 2 l 4 E E 7 0 Y 10 n 12 0 M 18 MD w. auwyoe ev,damled am usc eo Y" 2. Roadway System The Town of Snowmass Village is primarily accessed via Brush Creek Road; a long two lane rural cul-de-sac that extends from Highway 82 to the West Village. Owl Creek Road serves as an alternative arterial access. It is a two-lane paved road that intersects both Highline and Brush Creek Roads and connects to Highway 82 south of the airport closer to Aspen than Brush Creek Road). A series of cul-de-sacs serving residential neighborhoods intersect with Brush Creek Road. Traffic volumes are greatest in the winter with pronounced inbound and outbound peaks. In the summer, the afternoon peak hour traffic volume is 40% lower. Winter conditions were used for this analysis because they reflect both the highest daily peak and peak hour conditions. Under current conditions, using the "busiest 10 days" criteria, Brush Creek Road, in the vicinity of the Snowmass Center, approaches LOS C. The maximum one way peak hour directional volume by level of service' is presented in the following table. LOS C is the existing standard, for significant sections of Brush Creek Road as well as key intersections, but may not necessarily be a sustainable one. Table 8.1 LOS Standards-Average of 10 Peak(Busiest)Days-One-way Peak Hour L OS A B=C U E F Brush Creek Road 500 700 925 1,175 1,400 >1,400 Owl Creek Road and Highline Road 350 500 650 800 950 950 The analysis of traffic at buildout indicated that traffic'will significantly increase along Brush Creek Road. This increase is primarily due to new commercial, retail and mixed use development associated with the Base Village (under construction at the time of this Comp Plan update), as well as redevelopment of the West Village and Snowmass Center. Table 8.2 Intersection Level of Service Standards L OS N[Uela7inTSe'c'on'dS A 5.0 B 5-15 C 15-25 D 25-40 E 40-60 F 60 The peak hour one-way threshold is arrived at by multiplying maximum volume capacity by the ratio of facility and volume to capacity,which takes into account density, speed and delay. The proposed peak hour directional level of analysis is based on the maximum single direction lane capacity defined by the Highway Capacity Manual, and adjusted to reflect grade and resident/visitor mix within the Town of Snowmass Village. While future development will increase traffic on Brush Creek Road in peak season, in non-peak periods there is an opportunity to"smooth" out traffic flow through a diversified land use mix to"spread out' traffic throughout the day and evening when additional roadway capacity is available rather than concentrating most traffic in peak periods. Thus, in any project assessment it may be important to take into account both"10 busiest days"and Peak Season averages. The"10 busiest days' was established as the threshold to preserve a high quality of life for the general population of the village. The Peak season averages are based on the traffic volumes at: Christmas, New Years, Presidents weekend, and all of March. Analysis of key intersections for conformance with LOS standards shall continue to be required of future land use proposals. The precise amount of the buildout traffic increase depends on the actual effectiveness of potential trip reduction strategies (e.g. as proposed in the Traffic Impact Assessment for the Base Village submission. Figure 8.3 shows projections of both Peak Season Average and "10 Busiest Days'with, and without trip reduction assumptions. As shown, the resulting level of service could range from "D"to"E". With capacity constraints on Brush Creek Road (physical capacity and desire to stay as close as possible to LOS "C"), future traffic flow management should focus on minimizing automobile traffic increases, particularly single-occupant vehicles. To do this will require a shift to greater use of transit and pedestrian alternatives, as well as a comprehensive assessment of parking/transit/pedestrian land use relationships in any future development or redevelopment. Figure 9.3 Brush Creek Road Levels of Service Comparison:Peak Season Average vs. 10 Busiest Days for Existing compared to Existing Plus approved Traffic Generation Land Uses Brush Creek Road Peak Hour/Peak Day F 1400 1000 E 1100 10 D 915 900 C 700 600 B 600 4W A 200 9 Euslinq Etist.N iouci W/o Imp rsd NaEX w/MP t1on wJO Imp retluctim Peak Season Average 10 Busiest Days Average Y The Town of Snowmass Village's transportation demand management program is effective and should be further developed and strengthened. Examples of transportation demand management strategies include: Flexible work schedules to allow employees to commute in the off-peak hours, Flexible skiing options to spread day skier trips to the off-peak traffic hours, Employee transportation allowances that Figure 8.4 RFTA Ridership 1996—2006(top)and Shurde Passengers encourages carpooling 2006-2007(bottom) Source:ham://www.colomdoski.com and transit use, Preferential carpool and Aspen•Snene,..Total RFTA RWwshlpIM.2006 Zip Car parking spaces, 3SA000 and MM 000SubsidizedRFTApasses3b0. 39AO" for employees, visitors, and residents. X900 9 900 ,091 199e 1999 10r AM 30M 3000 3001 39a 300. Yee. Transit BEST COPY tip ts.r lr..a•>msaar The Roan Existing Transit Ridership(RFT RFTA) servi 6 Aspt Rifle nsit Ridership Village Shuttle Routes oom The VILLA(E ROUTE, u servt VIL OE ROUTE 3 w Fee . . . W wr1 !X NTRT ROME buse LOTROV 4 VIL GE ROUTE 5 5 Dial dmuGE RO.rtE6 VILLAGEROUTE7 0 , RFTA N MELTON RANCH MORSE RAHOH ROUTE 9 1 9.657 r '} Exte LW RFTA-TOSV ROUTE L a1r+'R`16 G mC1L d O RFTA-TOSV Shuttle Bus Stops r 1.wE" Average Monthly RWttSlup r g Curr r0.E¢+11U1Ao2 \ Ow,i'»firo- s 13t:C@ n e0. r•3 shou N The La 7.507 fi they o TOSVMai item: utilli Transit Sw9 on econ z By r- N trigger significant cost and service implications for both the Shuttle and RFTA. In addition to requiring a larger overall transit fleet, it will require agreement between the Town and RFTA as to allocation of routes, consideration of the type of vehicles that will best serve guest expectations, and substantially increased facilities for maintenance and storage of vehicles. Most day visitors will continue to enter Snowmass Village via Brush Creek Road, park at the Rodeo Grounds and transfer to Village shuttles. The major day skier parking area and transit center will be at the Town Park. With increased use of Owl Creek Road for commuting to and from Aspen, Two Creeks will be more important for parking day skiers. Transit is a primary transportation choice within Snowmass Village. Regional transit service is provided by RFTA, local service by the Town of Snowmass Village. Private transit is available from several providers. Improved transit centers and nodes will increase the effectiveness and attractiveness of transit by capturing more day- skiers, visitors and employees. Major RFTA and Snowmass Village transit centers include a redeveloped center at the Mall; and a new facility integrated into Base Village. Buses will typically end inbound trips and begin their outbound trips from the Mall. Access to the Mall will remain inbound via Brush Creek Road and outbound via Carriage Way. Base Village transit center has been designed as an integral element of the new Base Village development. The Base Village transit center has limited ability to queue passengers separately for uphill and downhill trips, sufficient bus bays to accommodate RFTA, Snowmass Village and private transit providers. Limited number of pedestrian trails and thoroughfares provide convenient links to surrounding properties and activities. The transit stop at the Snowmass Center should be significantly improved by locating new stops at the west end of Snowmass Center. It is important to separate the transit station and travel route from private vehicle. An excessive amount of headway time is lost in the Snowmass Center to traffic congestion. Transit center improvements at the Mall, Base Village, Snowmass Center and Town Park should include comfortable access, egress and queuing, heated passenger waiting areas, information booths/kiosks, restrooms and adequate space for future transit services. RFTA and Snowmass Village services have identified these needs: Bus bay requirements are preliminary and do not include staging for vehicles in peak periods. Need for a specific number of bus bays will be refined as precise regional and local transit service is defined for each location. Table 8.3 Bus Bay Requirements by Transit Center TIS , RFTA Requirement Requirement Location Funetion s s Other Needs Mall TOSV 8-10 bus bays 5-6 bus bays 5 cabs, limos, DAR* RFTA Transit 4-6 private shuttles & 1 Service Area charter bus Base TOSV 4-6 bus bays 3-4 bus bays 4 cabs, limos, DAR Village RFTA Transit 4 private shuttles & 1 Service Area charter bus Snowmas TOSV shuttle 4-6 bus bays - 2 cabs, limos, DAR s Center stop 2 private shuttles Town TOSV shuttle 3-6 bus bays Brush Creek No service Park pick-up & Road stops drop-off area Two TOSV 2-4 bus bays 1-2 bus bays 2 cabs, limos, DAR Creeks RFTA shuttle 2 private shuttles pick-up & drop-off area DAR: Dial-a-Ride Beyond the year 2025, it will not be possible to build enough roads, or develop enough housing to meet demand. As future traffic increases to where LOS "D" is reached, further mass transit improvements will be needed, and the role of transit must be expanded. Snowmass Village will need to be flexible and take advantage of future transit technology opportunities. Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) improvements are being proposed for the Highway 82 corridor between Glenwood Springs and Aspen. Ideally, connecting service will be provided to Snowmass Village. It is recommended that the Village identify and acquire a right-of-way corridor/easement for accommodating future technologies between Highway 82 and the Town Core. More immediate transit improvements to consider include the use of larger 45 passenger buses from Highway 82 into Snowmass Village. Improvements to the Intercept lot at Highway 82 and increased service to the lot will make it an attractive park and ride for day skiers and employees. Parking Today the Town of Snowmass Village and the Aspen Skiing Company (ASC) jointly manage the use of public-access parking spaces. Vehicles using public-access parking must obtain a parking permit. At the Snowmass Center there are privately-owned public parking spaces that are not managed by either Snowmass Village or ASC. There are also 400 spaces at Brush Creek Road and Highway 82 (the Intercept Lot) that are owned by the Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT) and managed by the Elected Officials Transportation Committee(EOTC). There are a total of 2,165 public-access parking spaces in Snowmass Village. The Town limits the use of public access spaces to 2,250 - The Numbered Lots are located adjacent to the West Village area. Parking in the Numbered Lots that is not used by the residents and guest of the West Village properties is used for resident-public access to the commercial retail and ski area. The Base Village development is also creating 375 spaces (not including residential) of structured parking to be used by village-residents, commercial patrons and day skiers. Under a Shared Use parking management plan, 200 day skier parking spaces are provided for in the parking structure. The Two Creeks lot is located at the base of the Two Creeks ski area portal and historically has been a paid parking lot. The Town Park is at the entrance to the Village on Brush Creek Road. Parking to date has been free at Town Park, and free shuttle transportation is provided to the Town Core. There are roughly 700 spaces at the Town Park and Two Creeks Lots. These two lots intercept vehicles traveling to Base Village and the West Village which reduces congestion in the Town. Employees of ASC have been relocated to parking in the Black Saddle Golf Course parking lot, although some provision for ASC employees (150 total) to park in the Number Lots has been provided to date. The parking capacity map illustrates that Town Park and Two Creeks Lots are at or exceed capacity during the ten busiest days. To successfully park more vehicles remotely,the size of these lots would need to be increased. T h Figure 8.6 e Existing Public Parking Ar Location p Existing Public Parking:2007108 Ski Season r C Pndngl.al ab himF ewune Town ol5nowmess'JAeOe FMem..m.+vmp. I j PwW aaaL' U m m E aaW 1 u E msnFF. C o ro» www U .ay...F» m4'.YF bYUOaPaYei I awa•.ar.e O m o.raaec m q p r c f C', NJ w;F- c f3 Topl PUbik PavkiinspacesavallaEleIn .,ppjap•°F TownloFlne ]OOTIOaa•M Y••» ski season is 2,165 °"v°a'•AO°1a°"» plus another 004 a1 me qm•J•vnn InlercaplLO1 hensive Plan parking cap of 2,250 parking spaces is being reached at times during peak season, and the rate at which this occurs for the day skier parking has become more frequent. The parking cap will be reached upon completion of the Base Village parking structure in 2010. New development is still required to provide new on-site parking. Conversely, providing additional parking conflicts with the objective of reducing vehicular traffic through town. There is an opportunity now to shift the focus from parking "supply" to parking "demand." The demand for parking is affected by many factors, such as the convenience of the pedestrian environment, availability of transit, convenience of travel from remote parking, and transportation demand management (TDM). Strengthening Snowmass Village's fee-in-lieu program could provide funding to meet the parking demand while meeting its other objectives. Figure 8.7 Parking Occupancy vs. Capacity Per Lot By Average Season(left)and by 10 Busiest Days(right) 1100 460 - —- 000 W N6 x0 B00 x0 M M_ el 1W 3110 50 0 0 voe.o el.n s.ea. •...a..e. w.,vuy. e...vwy. a.r.ark e.`r ._. .. .o cry Inme..am P.M Ltl oRmvlry ltpl o Remtininp CapxR A or IF P 81nq Ltl w.er Occ a Number of Employee Housing 469 Table 8.4 Multi-Family Residences/Lodge/Hotel 1.241 Private Parking Above Woodbridge Pedestrian Bridge Commercial/Office 327 Source:Snorrmass Village Transportation and Planning J Total 2.037 Departments Day Skier Location fraviie Spam Parking Town Core' 1.200 200 Two Creeks 400 400 Rodeo Lot 650 650 Total 2,250 1,250 Figure 8.8 Parking Space Distribution ht'Location Figure 8.9 Purpose of Trip:A11 Lots Business101her Sightseeing OWceW La 15% 1% 0% shoppng10inmg Work v'M 22% Wort V Mrge 40A RMe III^. ASC 61e.eerynce Fwky 1% 6%T.o Geeks 15% Sese veege DN La 1% ReCn miw erc4 sewer n% CJAh *6% Service and Delivery The ability of commercial delivery vehicles to move about and load and unload items is not meeting the needs of users. Adequate delivery facilities have not been developed, especially in the Mall / West Village area. Mall transit and parking redevelopment plans should accompany improvements to commercial delivery functions. Commercial delivery functions should be comprehensively analyzed, including a complete assessment of delivery functions on Daly and Elbert Lane. Base Village and other areas of new development should effectively accommodate and integrate necessary commercial delivery. Pedestrian Linkaaes Pedestrian linkages between housing, destination / activity areas, parking lots and transit stops are essential to convenient movement and effective transportation systems. In Snowmass Village, existing pedestrian links serve mostly recreational uses and link them to residential, lodge and parking areas. Some non-recreational links connect other areas but are incomplete. Where there are no sidewalks or paths, pedestrians are forced to walk on narrow roadway shoulders. The linkages between employee housing, Snowmass Center and the Mall are particularly inadequate. The significant distances and large grade changes in the Town Core make pedestrian trips difficult and increase vehicle trips. Improved pedestrian connections that include designated crosswalk between the Mall, the new Base Village and Snowmass Center may reduce automobile trips. Enforcement of the right-of-way of the pedestrian in a crosswalk to give them priority should be studied. The success of the transportation plan will rely in part on the pedestrian linkages between housing, activity centers, transit stations and stops. The Mall, Base Village and Snowmass Center are key locations to link; however, there are extensive grades to overcome. Improved pedestrian connections may include sidewalks, bridges and people movers. The Town Core area should be intensively developed as a pedestrian district. In addition, both Daly and Elbert Lanes should be modified to improve pedestrian circulation and limit automobile use. Appendix— Chapter 9, Employee Housing Existing Conditions and Guiding Principles Types of Employee Housing(see footnotel) a. Long-Term Rentals Long term rentals meet the needs of people of all ages and household types. It requires more square footage, personal storage space, parking and neighborhood green space than single-season housing. Public transportation is important, though not as critical as for single-season housing. The Town currently manages approximately 247 long-term rental units. b. Deed-Restricted Sales Units Deed- restricted sales units serve employees with a long-term commitment to the community and should not be mixed in the same building with rental employee housing. They are ultimately governed by individual homeowners associations and supported by Town authority and resources to enforce housing requirements. Square footage, storage, parking and green space needs are equal to or greater than those of long-term rentals. The Town currently manages approximately 127 deed-restricted sale units. c. Employee-Occupied Free-Market Housing There are approximately 150 free-market, dedicated but legally unrestricted employee dwelling units in the Town today. These units include employer-provided housing in multi-family and lodge dwelling units. Additionally, there are approximately 50 accessory and caretaker units in single-family homes. In addition, an estimated 210 free- market single-family homes and condominiums house many management workers and business owners, or are shared rentals by Village employees. Free-market units contribute to employee-housing needs although the Town may lose this unregulated employee housing stock as properties are re-sold. d. Single-Family Housing There are currently 774 free-market single-family units and 35 employee-restricted single-family units, for a total 809 units. Another 29 employee units have been approved at Rodeo Ranch but are unbuilt. Existing employee units are located at the Crossings at Horse Ranch subdivision and range in size from 1950 to 2400 square feet. There are 202 approved free-market single-family home sites that remain undeveloped. Approximately 112 free-market SFR units remain undeveloped. e. Duplexes Snowmass Village has one duplex subdivision located in Ridge Run I, containing 15 duplex lots (30 units), all free-market units. f. Multi-Family Housing 1 Source: 1998 TOSV Comprehensive Plan and Working Draft: Key Housing Measures, 4/13/08. Snowmass Village has 2,903 multi-family units, of which 483 units are hotel rooms, 1,811 are free-market units and 610 are restricted or dedicated employee units. Permanent residents occupy 13 percent of the free-market multi-family units. Multi- family employee units range from studios to three bedrooms. The majority of the multi-family employee housing is located in the Upper Village. g. Other Current and Future Providers Other providers of employee housing include: Pitkin County(30 deed-restricted owner units at Fairway 3), Aspen Ski Company(68 units at Club Commons), the Fire House, Anderson Ranch and the Water& Sanitation District (a total of 35 units; includes a small number of other scattered units). Approved-but-unbuilt employee units include: 29 single-family and 45 multi-family(including 26 at the new Base Village). h. Single Season Housing(The Town,does not currently provide any single-season housing) This housing option is generally more attractive to younger, single people who are new to the area. Conventional apartment-type housing(studios, one-bedrooms and shared two- bedrooms) is more desirable than dormitory style housing. Provisions must be made for resident vehicles and some personal storage. Accessibility to public transportation is a crucial to this type of housing. Current Housing Needs (see footnote 2) Based on the 2008 Snowmass Village employee housing survey, of the 1,780 in commuters during the peak winter season, approximately 33 percent are renters who would prefer to live closer to work. Assuming 2 workers per household, this yields a demand for approximately 294 units, of which all would need to be subsidized. This demand includes both year-round and seasonal housing(estimated at 50 percent each). Additionally, approximately 50 employee housing units would be needed to accommodate unmet housing demand associated with unfilled jobs in Snowmass Village. In addition, based on development that has been approved but not yet built, there is a potential demand for approximately 106 more units (excluding employees required to be housed by Base Village developers). In the longer term, there is a potential need for approximately 274 more units to make up for the potential loss of unrestricted employee housing units, and the conversion of employee-occupied free-market units to second homes or retiree housing. Allowing employees to retire and continue to live in restricted units reduces the existing housing supply by an additional 36 units. Over the long-term, in the categories described above, there is a potential need for approximately 580 units, of which at least 50 percent could be attributed to year- round employees. 2 Source: Snowmass Housing Overview, 5/19/08 Town Council Meeting, RRC Associates. Free-Market& Housing Costs (sec footnote 3) In 2007, the median sales price of a single-family home in Snowmass Village was 3.96 million ($950,000 for multi-family housing). In Carbondale, the median single-family home price was $589,784 ($375,950 for multi-family housing), and 229,650 in Parachute($189,800 for multi-family housing). In 2007, the average wage per job in Snowmass Village was $23,000, in Carbondale it was $35,000, Parachute it was $47,000. The Snowmass Village average wage that would support purchasing a free-market home is approximately $65,000. Even assuming a substantial increase in wages, it is evident that most permanent residents in the Roaring Fork Valley cannot afford to purchase free-market units in Snowmass Village. These figures make clear why Snowmass Village workers are commuting from further and further away. Although a significant number of residential units have been constructed in Snowmass and the Roaring Fork Valley in the past few years, most of those units are priced for upper-income buyers. Reasonably priced housing in Snowmass Village and within the Roaring Fork Valley for low and middle-income households is extremely difficult to find. From 2005 to 2007 less than 1 percent of the inventory on the market was affordable to an average Snowmass wage earner. Although Aspen, Pitkin County and Snowmass Village have made a significant effort to provide affordable housing, there is still a significant unmet demand. Existing Development Mitigation Requirements Snowmass Village requires employee-housing mitigation from new development with a winter housing impact. Requirements are based on job generation rates for different land uses. A formula determines how much restricted housing square footage will mitigate the development's impact. Snowmass Village can determine that a cash-in- lieu fee equal to the cost of providing restricted employee housing is more appropriate. As a result of significant employee housing contributions, the Snowmass Land Company currently has approximately 150,000 square feet of housing mitigation credit that can be applied to future development. Synopsis of Public Input In general, the most prevalent public comments focused around the following objectives: Attain to house 45% to 65% of Snowmass workers in town, Include housing for all economic levels of workers (not just the lowest income levels), Provide housing for year-round employees, Keep accurate data about the status of employee housing in Snowmass Village, and Keep an accurate assessment of the housing need in Snowmass Village. 3 Sources: Notes RE: Comprehensive Plan Update/Snowmass Village, czbllc, 1/31/2008; Land Title Aspen; Garfield County Assessor's Office. While discussing community issues with stakeholder groups, the lack of affordable housing for current and potential employees was repeated multiple times as a limitation to providing adequate services. These positions include services provided by firefighters, emergency medical technicians, police officers, day care providers, town staff, snow plow drivers, and town administrators. MEMORANDUM TO: Snowmass Village Town Council FROM: Jason Haber, Economic Resource Director DATE: April 6, 2009 SUBJECT: 2009 CONSTRUCTION UPDATE I. PURPOSE AND ACTIONS REQUESTED OF COUNCIL A. Receive Construction Update, including: 1. 2009 Construction Summary & Right of Way Impacts (attached) il. DISCUSION ITEMS 1. General Construction Issues 2. 2009 Right of Way Impacts 111. NEXT STEPS Staff will continue to provide a Construction Update at each Council Meeting. 2009 CONSTRUCTION SUMMARY RIGHT OF WAY IMPACTS A. GENERAL 1. Tim Holliday (TOSV Building Inspector) will serve as the Town's primary contact for issues related to Construction Management. Tim's cell phone number is (970) 618-3118. 2. 2009 Construction Communications will be handled primarily through the TOSV website www.tosv.com), E-blasts, and a new text messaging service. Community members wishing to receive construction-oriented text messages can sign up for this service at www.pitkinalert.org. 3. Due to the limited amount of construction activity (and ROW impacts) anticipated for the 2009 construction season, Construction Coordination Meetings will be held on an as-needed basis. However, Construction Updates will continue to be provided at each Council meeting. 4. Traffic Control will be provided on a project-specific basis. Wildcat Construction Services will be handling these services for all Related WestPac projects. The Water & Sanitation District and TOSV have not indicated which traffic control contractor(s) they will be using. 5. Contractors have been reminded of the importance of providing clear communication to the Town, so as to minimize unanticipated impacts and surprises to the community. 6. Contractors have also been reminded of the importance of maintaining the cleanliness of Town roadways. Tracking pads and tire washing stations will be established at construction site access points, and Related WestPac will be operating their street sweeper on a regular basis. B. RODEO PLACE HOMES Phase I construction is wrapping up. Landscaping to be complete by end of May. No ROW impacts. If Phase II work is approved by Council, deliveries of modular homes would begin this summer. Would require limited traffic control at Brush Creek/Highline Rd. Roundabout and staging on a portion of Stallion Circle. C. BASE VILLAGE Wood Road - Parking Garage Entrance This garage entrance will be closed during the Spring, Summer, and Fall Seasons in order to accommodate removal of the protective entry canopy and completion of the access roadway tie-in (80' snowmelted concrete). At some time, an alternating one-lane closure may be required to facilitate the roadway tie-in to Wood Rd. Building 8— Little Nell Normal construction activity and deliveries will continue throughout 2009. No significant ROW impacts are anticipated. Building 13A/B — Viceroy Construction fencing will be extended out onto Assay Hill to accommodate final sitework and landscaping to occur during Spring and Summer 2009. Construction trailers will be removed from area above 13B in late April. Deliveries of pre-cast concrete will continue through May/June 2009. The project may be requesting approvals to receive after-hours deliveries. An access driveway will be constructed and tied into Wood Rd. during the Fall Shoulder Season. Brief periodic traffic control will be necessary to facilitate site access from Wood Rd. Wood Road from Upper Side of Drive-Over Bridge to Below Enclave Entrance During the Fall Shoulder Season (beginning after Labor Day for this project only) a one-lane closure will be in place to allow asphalt paving, utility coordination, stormwater inlets, and sidewalk construction in a 300' section of roadway. Tie-in of Viceroy driveway will be completed during this time as well. Lower Carriage Way Lower Carriage Way will receive a crack-sealing treatment, requiring alternating one-lane closures for up to one week during the Spring Shoulder Season. D. SINCLAIR MEADOWS 24 modular buildings will be delivered between April 14 and mid-May. Related Westpac will be pursuing a Town permit to allow staging of modular deliveries for 5-10 days in the rodeo contestant parking area. The project may also be submitting requests for extended work hours. Scheduling has not been finalized for the following items: 1. Owl Creek Rd. Bus Shelters construction; 2. Final asphalt lift and tie- in to Owl Creek Rd. on the Sinclair Meadows main access road. During the delivery period, limited traffic control will be required at the Brush Creek/Highline Rd. Roundabout and to facilitate site access on Owl Creek Rd. A 100' section of the Meadow Ranch / Fox Run Trail will be closed for re-paving during the Spring Shoulder Season. E. WATER& SANITATION DISTRICT PROJECTS Alternating one-lane closures will likely be required to accommodate water line installations at the following locations and times: 1. Wood Rd. between Upper and Lower Edgewood - Spring Shoulder Season. 2. Faraway Rd. above View Ridge - Fall Shoulder Season. 3. Divide Rd. at entrance to Divide Subdivision - Scheduling Unknown. F. TOSV ROAD FUND PROJECTS Specific paving and overlay projects have not been identified at this time, but will require traffic control and lane closures to accommodate road paving and overlays. To be completed during the Spring Shoulder Season. G. MISCELLANEOUS PROJECTS Wood Rd. Pumphouse Driveway—An alternating one-lane closure will be in place for approximately one week during the Spring Shoulder Season to accommodate a driveway tie-in in the vicinity of the tennis courts on upper Wood Rd. Wood Rd. /Thornton Rd. Curb stop—An alternating one-lane closure will be in place for less than one week during the Spring Shoulder Season to accommodate re-construction of a curb stop at the Thornton Rd. intersection. On-Mountain Water Tank— Equipment mobilization and demobilization will be required via Thornton Rd. to complete final site grading and revegetation during the Spring Shoulder Season. Wood Rd. Landscaping— Periodic alternating one-lane closures may be necessary on Wood Rd. across from parking garage entrance) to stage a crane for landscaping installations to occur during the Spring Shoulder Season. Wood Rd. at Funnel Bridge—A brief alternating one-lane closure may be required to accommodate repairs to a water valve in this area during the Spring Shoulder Season. Junk Restaurant— Installation of 20-30 trees will complete landscaping in this area. No ROW impacts. Elk Camp Gondola—Approximately 5,000 cy of fill material will be placed in the void between the gondola station and parking garage. No ROW impacts. Sewer Service Line Repairs — Buildings 2C and 3ABC require sewer service line repairs that will not affect public ROW's, but will require a disturbance of the Base Village Plaza area during the Spring Shoulder Season. H. UPCOMING SPECIAL EVENTS& HOLIDAYS April 12 - Snowmass Mountain Closing Day May 25 — Memorial Day June 5 & 6, 2009 — Chili Pepper and Brew Fast TO: SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL FROM: RUSS FORREST, TOWN MANAGER SUBJECT: MANAGER'S REPORT DATE: April 6, 2009 The following is a summary of the goals and specific actions the Town Council wanted to achieve from the retreat in December of 2008. Staff has provided an update on the progress to date on each goal and specific action identified by the Council. This is provided for the Council's information. Also if Council would want to modify any of the strategic goals or actions staff is happy to do so. Strategic Direction for the Snowmass Village Town Council December 2008 1. Definition of Success and Goals Success for Town Council is achieved by attaining the following goals: 2. High Level Goal Areas of Council Provide the leadership to define and implement the community's vision. Ensure that the Town's plans for future development reflect the values and needs of the community while maintaining the quality of life the community expects during and after construction. Status: By completing the Comprehensive Plan and implementing the land use policy, the Council is realizing the Community's vision for the future. Provide the leadership that facilitates clear, open, honest, and full communication among Council members, staff and the community. Status: This might be a category that the Council evaluates. 3. Specific Goals of Council Complete the Comprehensive Plan, which includes defining the community's vision and values, determining carrying capacity, updating land use policy and developing a long-term housing and environmental strategy. Status: Planning Commission has completed its review of the Comprehensive Plan and Council is now working through the document. Increase economic sustainability by strengthening the winter season and broadening the summer season while increasing the total capture rate. This would be achieved while living within the carrying capacity of the community. Status: We can measure this goal by analyzing the sales tax over the course of a year. Jason Haber is putting together a metric from the data collected in the Comprehensive Plan on carrying capacity. Maintaining sustainability in this economic environment is challenging and is being addressed through the Town's financial contingency planning. We may want to make this goal more specific and reflective of the economic environment we are working in. Staff will be reviewing our economic sustainability in the month of May. Complete a housing action plan and implement a new policy to address the following: 1. New development mitigation for housing Status: All background work has been completed. Council asked that the Comprehensive Plan be reviewed first before completing this review. 2. Review and revise housing policy for the lottery process and new deed restrictions for housing projects. Status: This review has begun with Town Council. 3. Other housing polices identified in the Comprehensive Plan. Status: Council has begun its review of the Comprehensive Plan. Complete and adopt an Environmental Sustainability Plan that will move the Town towards achieving a goal of renewable energy generation that offsets non-renewable energy use. Status: The sustainability plan has been completed. We are now beginning implementation to achieve this goal. Actively improve and enhance the Town's outreach and communication with the public. Status: 1. The Town has significantly upgraded its website to improve outreach and communication — included in the technology upgrades are a Town Manager's Blog, streaming video, improvements to the Contact Us" feature, an "Announcements" section and ease of use when signing up for E-newsletters. 2. The Town has stepped up proactive communication with the local paper and the two Aspen dailies; the relationship with all papers remains healthy. The Snowmass Sun now runs a regular Town Manager's guest column on topics ranging from public safety issues to the current financial situation. 3. The Town continues to send out quarterly E-newsletters to the public and the list has grown to more than 1,400 individuals. 4. Lastly, the Town has partnered with Pitkin County in its text messaging system — an initiative aimed at informing citizens of everything from emergencies, to construction updates to special events. 4. Other Specific Actions Discussed Insert the next agenda in Council packets Status: Complete and ongoing. Move the council delivery time of the packet back to allow more time for Council to review agenda items. Status: This has been completed Begin doing quarterly "informal' council meetings, potentially for lunch, to discuss goals, performance and to continue to enhance staff/Council relationships Status: Need to schedule an informal meeting. Regularly and proactively communicate information on Town projects. Status: The Town has proactively communicated information on budgetary issues, new policy (CO monitors), and actions. Summary of Ongoing and Pending Strategic Actions Last Updated — March 27, 2009 Staff Action Status Date to follow-up w/ Contact Council Land Use Comp. Plan Comprehensive The Planning Commission met on February Will be scheduled Team Plan Update 18'" 2009 and unanimously voted via a with Council until resolution to recommend approval of the draft approved. Ongoing comprehensive plan to the Town Council. The Town Council now needs to determine how they would like to move forward with a review. Staff would like to make an initial presentation to summarize the formatting changes staff made with the Planning Commission and highlight the substantive changes made to the policies in the document. Chris Conrad Local Retail Tool The Council on March 2, 2009 requested that April 20, 2009 Box & Demolition staff prepare a "cool off' period ordinance to require allow a period of time for the Town to review a demolition permit request. In addition Council agreed that staff should develop language for future PUDs to identify critical integral components of a PUD that must continue to exist over time. In addition, John Wilkinson requested that staff bring back a land mark ordinance for discussion in the future Russ Tree Ordinance Frame goals and provide alternative May 18, 2009 approaches to tree protection. Staff has several ordinance examples available for Council. Trees on single-family lots are protected through the Snowmass HOA, which does regulate tree removal. Most PUDs in Snowmass have Landscape Plans that provide some level of protection from tree removal. Other Land Use Other Land Use Code Improvements should Code Issues also be considered with the completion of the Comprehensive Plan. Staff would recommend having a work session with Council to review potential code changes. Housing Housing Draw Site/Land As directed, the Housing Director retained May 2009 Department Inventory Design Workshop to complete a site analysis of the Draw Site for a housing project. Design Workshop has developed several alternative scenarios. Staff would be happy to review these site designs with Council. In addition, staff would recommend that a land inventory be completed (this is recommended in the draft Comprehensive Plan) to determine other potential housing project sites. On February 17`h the Town Council asked that the Land Inventory be completed after the Town completes is May Budget review. Housing Housing Policy The consultant has completed a rational After review of Department nexus study and can begin to work with the Housing Policy in Town on a new housing policy. The Planning Comp Plan Commission is also reviewing housing goals as part of the Comp. Plan review. Staff will Council has asked schedule two agenda items based on the input that this occur after from Council on October 6 (these could be on the PC completes the same dates) which would be 1) policy review of Comp. Plan discussion to modify the current land use code or at least the related to affordable housing; and 2) a review housing chapter. of deed restriction policy. Joe C Natural Disasters On 11/3 Council asked that staff further June 1, 2009 Terri and Cost evaluate criteria for allowing some costs from Everest) Recovery in Deed property damage incurred by natural disasters Restricted For in deed-restricted homes to be recovered Sale Housing upon the resale of the home. Examples of criteria discussed included: cap on recovery based on a % (percent) value of the home and requirements for comprehensive insurance. Bud et/Finance Finance Monitoring Staff is carefully monitoring revenue and May 16, 2009 Department Revenue projected revenue by: Reviewing projected occupancy and Staff is also yield in the next 4 months in scheduling a meeting Snowmass Village with FAB Monitoring sales and lodging tax Monitoring parking and transit usage Regular communication with ski company, lodges, retail businesses on business activity Marianne Discussion of Council requested a direct discussion with April 20, 2009 hours with stakeholder (Aspen Skiing Co, West Pac stakeholders on Related, Staff, merchants) on hours of skittles lift summer operation for the Skittles. operation Environment/Sustainability Jason Haber Review of REOP On October 20, 2008, Council passed a October 2009 fee schedule motion directing staff to schedule this review for March 2, 2009. On March 2, Council asked that the fees and language for PUDs be reviewed prior to November 2009. Other Projects Art Smythe Incident Invite Ellen to do a 1 hour overview of ICS for April 20, 2009 Command Council System P:\MANAGER.XSC\Managers Report 09\04-06-09final.doc 7th DRAFT SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL REGULAR MEETING AGENDA APRIL 20, 2009 PLEASE NOTE THAT ALL TIMES ARE APPROXIMATE — ITEMS COULD START EARLIER OR LATER THAN THEIR STATED TIME CALL TO ORDER AT 4:00 P.M. Item No. 1: ROLL CALL Item No. 2: PUBLIC NON-AGENDA ITEMS 5-minute time limit) Item No. 3: COUNCIL UPDATES Item No. 4 UPDATE ON SUMMER EVENTS AND PROPOSED NAME OF MARKETING, SPECIAL EVENTS AND GROUP SALES DEPARTMENT Time 30 minutes) ACTION REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: Receive update on summer programs and proposed name change. Susan Hamley.................................................Page (TAB--) Item No. 5: GID FUNDING OF THE SKITTLES LIFT Time: 60 minutes) ACTION REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: Marianne Rakowski and Susan Hamley.................Page (TAB--) Item No. 6: REQUEST FOR FUNDING FOR SUMMER RODEO Time: 30 minutes) ACTION REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: Authorize $35,000 to complete the physical improvements to host the Rodeo in the coming summer season. Tom Yocum......................................................Page (TAB--) Item No. 7: PUBLIC HEARING AND SECOND READING OF ORDINANCE NO. 5, SERIES OF 2009 - CONCERNING A MINOR PUD AMENDMENT FOR BASE VILLAGE INTERIM BUILDING 7 Time: 60 minutes) ACTION REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: Approve, modify, or deny second reading of the ordinance Jim Wahlstrom...................................................Page (TAB--) Item No. 8: PUBLIC HEARING AND SECOND READING OF ORDINANCE NO. 04, SERIES OF 2009 - CONCERNING A MINOR PUD AMENDMENT AND OFFICIAL ZONE DISTRICT MAP AMENDMENT REGARDING COUNTRY CLUB TOWNHOMES Time: 60 minutes) 04-20-09 TC Page 2 of 2 ACTION REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: Open Public Hearing to approve, modify or deny the Second reading of the ordinance. Bob Nevins.....................................................Page (TAB--) Item No. 9: ORDINANCE. NO . 3. SERIES OF 2009 Requirement for prior demolition Time: 30 minutes) ACTION REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: Adopt Ordinance No. , Series of 2009 John Dresser.....................................................Page (TAB--) Item No. 10: MANAGER'S REPORT Time: 10 minutes) Russell Forrest ...................................................Page (TAB--) Item No. 11: AGENDA FOR NEXT TOWN COUNCIL MEETING Page (TAB--) Item No. 12: APPROVAL OF MEETING MINUTES FOR: March 16. 2009 Page (TAB--) Item No. 13: COUNCIL COMMENTS/COMMITTEE REPORTS/CALENDARS Page (TAB--) Item No. 14: ADJOURNMENT NOTE: Total time estimated for meeting: Approx 4 hours and 40 minutes excluding items 1-3 and 11-14) ALL ITEMS AND TIMES ARE TENTATIVE AND SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT FURTHER NOTICE. PLEASE CALL THE OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK AT 923-3777 ON THE DAY OF THE MEETING FOR ANY AGENDA CHANGES. SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL REGULAR MEETING MINUTES NOVEMBER 17, 2008 CALL TO ORDER AT 4:00 P.M. OLD BUSINESS Mayor Mercatoris called to order the Regular Meeting of the Snowmass Village Town Council on Monday November 17, 2008 at 4:01 p.m. Item No. 1 ROLL CALL COUNCIL MEMBERS PRESENT: Mayor Douglas Mercatoris, Sally Sparhawk, John Wilkinson, Reed Lewis, and Arnold Mordkin. COUNCIL MEMBERS ABSENT: All council members were present. Russ Forrest, Town Manager, Hunt Walker, Public Works Director, Rhonda B. Coxon, Town Clerk, STAFF PRESENT:John Dresser, Town Attorney, Jason Haber, Economic Resource Director, Joe Coffey, Housing Manager, Marianne Rakowski, Finance Director Joan Bemis, John Bemis, Steve Alldredge, Deidre Boineau, Cathy Lenyo, Mark Berg, Jeremy Assalone Lisa Wilkinson, John Schultz, Ian Long Dwayne PUBLIC PRESENT: Romero, Scott Stenman, Bob Purvis, Robin Smith, Rex Smith, Pat Smith, Don Schuster, Mark Fuller, Mak Keeling and other Members of the Public interested in today's Agenda items. Item No. 14 APPROVAL OF MEETING MINUTES FOR JUNE 4, 2007 John Wilkinson made the motion to approve the Minutes for June 4, 2007. Reed Lewis seconded the motion. The motion was approved by a vote of 5 in favor to 0 opposed. Voting Aye: Arnold Mordkin, John Wilkinson, Reed Lewis, Sally Sparhawk and Mayor Douglas Mercatoris Voting Naye: None. 11-17-08tc Page 2 of 11 Item No. 3 COUNCIL UPDATES Council Member Sparhawk reminded the public that there are rebates through Holy Cross and C.O.R.E for new appliances in your home. She encouraged people to use the website and obtain information on additional rebates. Item No. 2 PUBLIC NON-AGENDA ITEMS Council Member Sparhawk presented her Town Hall key to Markey Butler and Mayor Mercatoris presented his Town Hall key to Bill Boineau. NEW BUSINESS At this time Town Clerk Rhonda Coxon presented the "Certificate of Election" to Bill Boineau, Markey Butler and John Wilkinson and then administered their oaths for Mayor and Town Council Members. Item No. 1 ROLL CALL Mayor Boineau called to order the Regular Meeting of the Snowmass Village Town Council on Monday November 17, 2008 at 4:15 p.m. COUNCIL MEMBERS PRESENT: Mayor Bill Boirieau, Markey Butler, John Wilkinson, Reed Lewis, and Arnold Mordkin. COUNCIL MEMBERS ABSENT: All council members were present. Russ Forrest, Town Manager, Hunt Walker, Public Works Director, Rhonda B. Coxon, Town Clerk, STAFF PRESENT:John Dresser, Town Attorney, Jason Haber, Economic Resource Director, Joe Coffey, Housing Manager, Marianne Rakowski, Finance Director Joan Bemis, John Bemis, Steve Alldredge, Deidre Boineau, Cathy Lenyo, Mark Berg, Jeremy Assalone Lisa Wilkinson, John Schultz, Ian Long Dwayne PUBLIC PRESENT: Romero, Scott Stenman, Bob Purvis, Robin Smith, Rex Smith, Pat Smith, Don Schuster, Mark Fuller, Mak Keeling and other Members of the Public interested in today's Agenda items. 11-17-08tc Page 3 of 11 Item No. 3 TOWN COUNCIL APPRECIATIONS Mayor Boineau read a Resolution of Appreciation for Douglas "Merc" Mercatoris. Mayor Bill Boineau made the motion to approve Resolution No. 32, Series of 2008. Arnold Mordkin seconded the motion. The motion was approved by a vote of 5 in favor to 0 opposed. Voting Aye: Mayor Bill Boineau, John Wilkinson, Reed Lewis, Arnold Mordkin, and Markey Butler. Voting Naye: None. Sally Sparhawk presented Douglas Mercatoris with a gift of appreciation and Town Manager Russ Forrest presented the Mayor with a gift: his gavel mounted. Mayor Boineau read a Resolution of Appreciation for Sally Sparhawk. Mayor Bill Boineau made the motion to approve Resolution No. 33, Series of 2008. Arnold Mordkin seconded the motion. The motion was approved by a vote of 5 in favor to 0 opposed. Voting Aye: Mayor Bill Boineau, John Wilkinson, Reed Lewis, Arnold Mordkin, and Markey Butler. Voting Naye: None. Item No. 2 PUBLIC NON-AGENDA ITEMS Jermey Assalone, a Snowmass Village lottery winner of the Rodeo Place housing, would like to discuss his dissatisfaction with the redistribution of the homes not taken by the original lottery winners and for people who were runner ups. He feels they should be given first right of refusal. He feels the people waiting for their homes to be built should have been moved up to the open homes instead of watching people move in that were not original lottery winners. Town Attorney John Dresser and Town Manager Russ Forrest stated there have been several discussions with the Rodeo Place lottery winners, and the rules and regulations that were in place at the time of the lottery are still valid today, one of which is not to allow "switching" of units. Council Member Butler asked if there has ever been a delay in any other housing project. Town Manager Russ Forrest responded that lessons have been learned and if given the choice, things would have been done differently. The lottery would have not taken place so early in the process. It is critical to maintain the clear concise rules. 11-17-08tc Page 4 of 11 Council Member Wilkinson directed staff to take a look at the Housing Guidelines and put a discussion item on the December 1 st meeting agenda. This was consensus of the entire Council. Council Member Mordkin agreed that the Town must follow the current rules from the beginning of the process through the end. Item No. 4 APPOINTMENT OF MAYOR PRO TEM Mayor Boineau made a nomination for John Wilkinson to be the Mayor Pro Tem during his term, and Council Member Lewis nominated Arnie Mordkin for Mayor Pro Tem. At this time the Town Council voted and the Mayor Pro Tem is Council Member Wilkinson. Item No. 5 COUNCIL UPDATES Council Member Butler invited members of the public to attend the Community Thanksgiving Dinner at the Silvertree Hotel at 6:00 p.m. She acknowledged the hard work of John Bemis for putting this event together. She also mentioned the Loving Tree celebration at the Silvertree Hotel on December 9th, 2008. Item No. 6 DISCUSSION ON BUS ROUTE 8 Transportation Manager Dave Peckler spoke to Route 8 (Melton Ranch, Recreation Center and Horse Ranch). He feels something needs to change this winter season to keep this route functional. He stated there are items in the proposed 2009 budget that relate to his proposal. Council's direction concerning the route will determine which impacts they would prefer. Route 8 can no longer function in the 30 minute headway as it has in the past. The biggest impact to the route has been the increase in demand to run through Melton Ranch going downhill. He stated there is not enough time to make the run if the driver consistently goes through Melton downhill. Based on the ridership analysis, the recommendation is to discontinue service on Route 8 from the Crossings to Stirrup Circle. The homeowners that would be affected by this cut have worked with staff on some suggested solutions. Peckler stated that staff is proposing to provide Demand-Responsive service to Stirrup Circle during the Route 8 service hours that are outside of Dial-a-Ride service; Village Shuttle Demand-Responsive service from 7:05 a.m. - 8:05 a.m. and Dial-a- Ride High Mountain Taxi) from 8:10 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. and Village Shuttle Demand- Responsive service from 9:05 p.m. to end of service. Arnold Mordkin made the motion to have on call at Colt Circle in Horse Ranch and report back in 60 days. Markey Butler seconded the motion. The motion was approved by a vote of 5 in favor to 0 opposed. Voting Aye: Arnold Mordkin, John Wilkinson, Reed Lewis, Markey Butler, and Mayor Bill Boineau. 11-17-08tc Page 5 of 11 Voting Naye: None. Council Member Wilkinson disclosed he lives on the Route 8 bus route and he objects to the curtailing of that service not because he lives on the route but because it is one of the few bus routes that services a residential area. Council Member Mordkin feels that the service through Melton Ranch should be curtailed to only one or two stops on that route not each house. Ian Long a Snowmass Village resident asked that we think about a one way route. John Schultz, a Snowmass Village resident, stated the problems with Route 8 seem to be created by the Melton Ranch homeowners and the Horse Ranch residents are being forced to make an unbalanced sacrifice. Whether it be true or perceived the Horse Ranch residents do not consider the Dial-A-Ride service a workable alternative for various reasons. He stated that Mr. Long and Mr. Purvis met with David Peckler and he feels the solutions offered today will not meet the needs of the Horse Ranch Homeowners. Council Member Mordkin made a motion to provide on demand service to one stop in Horse Ranch at Colt Circle during the season and strongly urge the transportation department to provide this service by adjusting pick ups in Melton Ranch and the Sinclair areas. He would like the transportation director to report back in 60 days for review. Recognizing this could be up to a $12,000 budget impact. Arnold Mordkin made the motion to approve. Markey Butler seconded the motion. The motion was approved by a vote of 5 in favor to 0 opposed. Voting Aye: Mayor Bill Boineau, John Wilkinson, Reed Lewis, Arnold Mordkin, and Markey Butler. Voting Naye: None. Council Member Wilkinson asked that we consider looking into another bus for this route due to the addition ridership with the Rodeo Place Homes. Town Council took a 10 minute break at this time. Item No. 7 ASPEN SKIING COMPANY - FALL UPDATE Mike Kaplan, Steve Sewell and Dave Perry from the Aspen Skiing Company presented a PowerPoint presentation for this fall update. Steve Sewell Mountain Manager reported 20 inches on top of the mountain and 8 inches midway. To open next week we could use another 12 inches of natural snow 11-17-08tc Page 6 of 11 and midway down man made snow. Scheduled to open: the Village Express, the Big Burn and the Gondola. Sewell discussed parking and transportation, reduction of price at Two Creeks should help pull some people out of the Rodeo Lot. Increased free skier shuttles into RFTA's normal schedule which is every 15 minutes from Aspen. The Treehouse will be managed by the skier services to help move traffic through this area. He stated that Base Village may alleviate a mass exodus at 3:30. He went on to discuss the summer on mountain projects, Sam's Knob restaurant is completed and will open December 15th, 2008. Next project was replacement of the Shear Bliss lift, which was a very large project. This lift will open on December 14, 2008. He stated that this lift will change how Snowmass skis, and it will be big improvement. Lastly was the improvements on Rayburn's Pond. This on mountain storage will supplement the water from Snowmass Creek for snowmaking. The last project he mentioned was the opening of Sneaky's Tavern in Base Village. David Perry, Sr. Vice President of Marketing and Sales, spoke to booking pace and gave a look ahead at the economy. He stated consumer confidence is down and unemployment is up. But people will still come here for a vacation but not spend as freely as in the past. There are 14% more air seats coming into Aspen and the prices are coming down due to fuel costs going down. The snow last winter reminds people of how wonderful this sport is. He noted that snow does trump the economy. Perry showed a competitive report including other ski resorts which showed Aspen and Snowmass doing better than other resorts. Mayor Boineau and Council Member Mordkin commented we need to maintain our standards of high quality guest service. Dave Bellack, Attorney for the Aspen Skiing Company, spoke to the four Mountain interconnect and stated that the Ski Company is not steering this project but it is strictly lead by Toni Kromberg. Perry spoke to a luggage shipping program called Aspen Snowmass Luggage Express which can be booked through Stay Aspen Snowmass. There is also the United door to door program with Federal Express, and the third option to alleviate baggage charges is to rent equipment when they arrive. Town Council took a 10 minute break at this time. Item No. 8 DISCUSSION BASE VILLAGE INTERIM PARKING PLAN 08-09 Dwayne Romero from Related WestPac spoke to the last six weeks and the economy has dictated a loss of 25% of the team. He spoke to the communication and dedication and ensures this is the first step in an effort to continue future success. Scott Stenman, from Related WestPac, presented the Interim Parking Plan for Base 11-17-08tc Page 7 of 11 Village, which included the scaffold bridge, temporary way finding signs, interim arrival center in Boardroom of 2B and temporary arrival center in 2C. Planning Director Chris Conrad stated the original application submitted for October 27 involved use of one of the boardrooms in Building 2A as an arrival center with vehicles accessing the center by utilizing the Children's Ski School driveway in front of Buildings 1 and 2A. Following a Town staff Technical Review Committee meeting on November 5, the Applicant was informed that the proposal, as submitted, would be denied by the Planning Director and alternatives were recommended. He referred to the comments made by John Mele with Snowmass Wildcat/Fire Protection District. He also stated that the applicant amended the request and now proposes that the arrival center will only be located in the Children's Ski School area until a temporary arrival center is constructed in Building 2C on both the Village Level and P1 Level. Check-in and arrival traffic would then avoid the Children's Ski School area and utilize the parking structure to access the newly proposed arrival center below Building 2C. He stated they are hoping to transition from Building 2A to 2C prior to Christmas. It was noted that the Town staff, Fire Department and Related WestPac worked on this interim parking plan and feel this plan will work for this winter season. Council Member Lewis and Wilkinson stated concern with the temporary capacity and would like to know the date when there is no longer a temporary solution needed. They also noted that Building 7 will be discussed in the future as this is a necessity for the community. Planning Director Chris Conrad recapped and stated that he would prepare a record of decision containing the issues discussed today. Item No. 9 ADMINISTRATIVE REVIEW OF BUILDING 8, BASE VILLAGE Planning Director Chris Conrad noted the purpose of this discussion is solely to advise the Town Council that Building 8, Base Village PUD, has been removed from the Sketch Plan application, and that he is preparing to issue an Administrative Modification Record of Decision concerning certain minor modifications being proposed, and that a Minor PUD amendment application has been submitted that will start review by the Planning Commission in the near future. A draft of the record of decision has been included in today's packet. He also stated that Building 8 had been part of the Sketch Plan application submitted earlier this year. That application proposed connecting Building 5 with Building 8 with the intent that both buildings would operate as a branded Little Nell Hotel. Due to the current financial market, that has been placed on hold and the Applicant has submitted a Minor PUD Amendment application for certain 11-17-08tc Page 8 of 11 modifications to Building 8 not involving Building 5. The elements comprising the Minor PUD Amendments have been generally described within the Administrative Modification application notebook for Town Council reference. Mayor Boineau noted his concerns with the delay of Building 7. We realize this Building is not a money maker but the community is depending on this Building being finished. There was Town Council consensus that Building 7 is very important to the Town Council and the community. Item No. 10 RUEDI WATER & POWER AUTHORITY FUNDING REQUEST Mark Fuller from Ruedi Water and Power stated that he admits he missed the Grant Cycle and thought he would use this avenue to request $2,500 from the Town of Snowmass Village for the Watershed Plan Phase II. Fuller provided an Executive Summary of the Water Shed project. Town Council consensus was to deny the funding request and have Mr. Fuller come back before Town Council in May. Item No. 11 GRASSROOTS TV - FUNDING REQUEST Town Manager Russ Forrest stated that Grassroots TV is requesting an additional 11,734 which would be a total contribution this year of$35,734. Brad Manosevitz and John Masters from Grassroots TV stated that this request for additional funding is for CGTV Channel 11 not Grassroots TV Channel 12. Manosevitz stated that funding needs are not being met by the three entities using the service. The entities are Pitkin County, City of Aspen and Town of Snowmass Village. He stated that instead of shutting down Channel 11 for lack of funds, resources have been coming from Channel 12. This funding request will close the gap in the shortfall. Council Member Mordkin asked what the usage per jurisdiction is, and why do all three entities pay the same amount. Masters explained these are fixed costs of running the station. The Town Council consensus was to deny the additional funding request and to come back before Town Council in May. Item No. 12 FIRST READING - ORDINANCE NO. 16, SERIES OF 2008 Reed Lewis made the motion to approve first reading of Ordinance No. 16, Series of 2008 extending the Temporary Moratorium on new land use applications. Arnold Mordkin seconded the motion. The motion was approved by a vote of 5 in favor to 0 opposed. Voting Aye: Arnold Mordkin, John Wilkinson, Reed Lewis, Markey Butler, and Mayor Bill Boineau. 11-17-08tc Page 9 of 11 Voting Naye: None. Item No. 13 MANAGER'S REPORT Council Planning Session (Retreat) Town Manager Russ Forrest would like Town Council to think about a date for a retreat with the department heads. Council Member Lewis does not feel that a moderator is needed or is it a responsible use of Town money. Town Council directed staff to schedule something in an afternoon with a date sometime in December. Town Council will check their schedules and tentatively hold December 8th at 4:00 p.m. Budget Contingency Planning/Citizens Grant Review Board Town Manager Russ Forrest noted that Town Staff is preparing three contingency plans to include a reduction in expenditures to balance a budget with a 10%, 15%, 20% reduction in revenues over the flat sales tax budget revenues approved in the 2009 budget. The Town Council also asked that staff should focus on improving efficiency and cutting programs/projects before impacting the employees of the organization. This will be challenging given the Town is a service organization and most of our costs are in our people. Given that direction, all programs and projects need to be considered in this planning. The Town has historically budgeted $33,000 to be distributed for the Arts Organizations and $87,000 for the Charitable and Service Organization. Typically the Board met in the November/December time frame to award the next years grants. Grant recommendations by the Board are reviewed and approved by'the Town Council. Staff would recommend that the annual grant approval process be deferred until after the holidays. This will give staff the opportunity to review the economic performance of the Christmas holiday and review occupancy projections for the rest of the season with the Town Council. Staff also anticipates giving a budget update on December 151h to the Council. Staff consulted with representatives of the Board and the input we received was that if the budget was to be modified, the Board would like to wait until they know exactly what dollar amount they have to work with. If Council does not want staff to consider the grants program in our contingency planning, then this process can move forward at this time. Town Council agreed with the Town Manager's suggestion. Item No.15 COUNCIL COMMENTS/COMMITTEE REPORTS/CALENDARS Sales Tax Council Member Lewis stated our sales tax will be going up to 10.4% which he feels is not appropriate or responsible and he would like to have an item on a future agenda to discuss reducing sales tax back to 9.9%. 11-17-08tc Page 10 of 11 Wood Road Council Member Lewis also asked about reconfiguring the traffic down hill taking a left at Wood Road. He would like someone to look at this scenario. RFTA Board Council Member Mordkin advised he will no longer be able to be the representative for the RFTA Board. The alternate should attend each meeting. Council Member Wilkinson will continue as the representative for this Board and Mayor Boineau will be the alternate. SVRA Board Liaison Council Member Mordkin and Mayor Boineau will represent the Town in the continued discussion regarding Snowmass Village Resort Association. Related WestPac Council Member Mordkin noted that Related WestPac is willing to put the large binders of information on a CD for Town Council versus the very large and heavy notebooks. Council Committee Council Member Mordkin would like to hold some type of a committee meeting or work session to continue discussions with the applicant on the "big picture" of the Base Village concept. He does not feel this is a staff level discussion. Council Member Butler is asking what is the outcome we are looking for? Katie Redding from the Aspen Daily News asked that the Town Council do as much business in the public meetings as possible. FAB Responsibilities Council Member Mordkin would like to have an item on the second meeting in December to discuss amending the Municipal Code to expand the responsibilities of the FAB. At 9:12 p.m. Town Attorney John Dresser stated at this time he would like a motion and a vote of two thirds of the Town Council to enter into an Executive Session per C.R.S. Section 24-6-402 Subsection 4 Section B and E, and the Town of Snowmass Village Municipal Code Chapter 2 Section 45 subpar c Sections 2 and 5. Arnold Mordkin made the motion to enter closed session Reed Lewis seconded the motion. The motion was approved by a vote of 5 in favor to 0 opposed. Voting Aye: Mayor Bill Boineau, John Wilkinson, Reed Lewis, Arnold Mordkin, and Markey Butler. 11-17-08tc Page 11 of 11 Voting Naye: None. At 9:29 p.m. John Wilkinson made the motion to approve reconvening to the Regular Meeting of November 17, 2008. Reed Lewis seconded the motion. The motion was approved by a vote of 5 in favor to 0 opposed. Voting Aye: Mayor Bill Boineau, John Wilkinson, Reed Lewis, Arnold Mordkin, and Markey Butler. Voting Naye: None. Item No. 16 ADJOURNMENT At 9:30 p.m. Reed Lewis made the motion to adjourn the Regular Meeting of the Snowmass Village Town Council on November 17, 2008. Arnold Mordkin seconded the motion. The motion was approved by a vote of 5 in favor to 0 opposed. Voting Aye: Mayor Bill Boineau, John Wilkinson, Reed Lewis, Arnold Mordkin, and Markey Butler. Voting Naye: None. Submitted By, Rhonda B. Coxon, Town Clerk SNOWMASS VILLAGE REGULAR MEETING MINUTES MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2009 Mayor Boineau called to order the Regular Meeting of the Snowmass Village Town Council at 4:04 PM. on Tuesday, March 02, 2009. Item No. 1: ROLL CALL COUNCIL MEMBERS PRESENT: Mayor Bill Boineau, John Wilkinson and Reed Lewis Markey Butler arrived at 4:15 P.M. Arnold Mordkin arrived at 6:15 P.M. STAFF PRESENT: Russ Forrest, Town Manager; Hunt Walker, Public Works Director; Chris Conrad, Planning Director; Jason Haber, Economic Resource Director; Lesley Compagnone, Public Relations; John Dresser, Town Attorney; Mark Kittle, Chief Building Official; and Donna J. Garcia-Spaulding, Deputy Town Clerk PUBLIC PRESENT: Dan Alpert, George Newman, Jim D'Agostino, Steve Alldredge, Brad Manosevitz, Hal Mallory, Scott Stenman, Jeff Tippett, Austin Weiss, Mark Fuller, Sharon Clark, Mel Blumenthal, David Mallory, Bill Fabrochini, Ashlee Fairey, and other members of the public interested in today's Agenda items. Item No. 2: PUBLIC NON-AGENDA ITEMS Krabloonik Bill Fabrochini commented on the PUD Agreement he and others have been trying to get enforced with regard to the Krabloonik Restaurant dog sled program regarding standards of care. Fabrochini reported that this formal agreement addresses how many dogs are allowed on the premises, which limits out at 250 animals. He reported that he has been trying to get a letter out to Dan MacEachen, owner of the Krabloonik for the past six weeks unsuccessfully. He has spoken to the local animal shelter and learned that they are willing to take the extra dogs above the 250 limit. Lastly, Fabrochini requested a placeholder on the Aril 6th Town Council meeting Agenda for the purpose of presenting a draft ordinance specifying details obtained through an advisory committee who has been working closey with MacEachen, where to go from here and to bring Town Council up to date on 03-02-09tc Page 2 of 15 findings, which include the five-foot chains the dogs spend approximately eight months out of the year on. The Town Manager Russ Forrest informed Council that the Town Attorney is working on a letter to MacEachen and stated that it would be appropriate based upon previous discussions, to hear from Fabrochini regarding with regard to the ordinance language and legislation findings. The Mayor, Billy Boineau clarified that the April 6t' Agenda is already very heavily scheduled and that Council needs to have a discussion with Town staff prior to committing to scheduling this on a Town Council Agenda and that staff would update Fabrochini concerning the Agenda thereafter. Open House with C-G TV-12 & GrassRoots TV Station Manager Brad Manosevitz of the C Government TV station and Field Production Representative for GrassRoots formally invited the Town of Snowmass Village elected official and Town staff to an Open House of fun and discovery at the GrassRoos TV-12, Red Brick Center for the Arts, 110 E. Hallam, St., Ste. 132 in Aspen. This event is scheduled for Thursday, March 5t" from 5:00 p.m. until 8:00• p.m. and will address recent advancements of GrassRoots including GrassRoots Video Now, GrassRoots TV LIVE and their improved studio technology. Item No. 3: COUNCIL UPDATES Apres Ski - Ordinance Council Member Butler inquired of the Town Manager if the Town has an ordinance in place that would address an issue of concern that happened recently at the apre ski loction, where scantily-clad women were observed dancing on tables and inappropriate conduct with families passing by. The Town Manager Russ Forrest reported that he requested that the Police Department investigate the occurance and they concluded that no Town ordinance had been broken, no law was violated and from a public relations standpoint that the situation was moved in doors. Wind Power Generation Council Member Wilkinson reported that a wind power generation test is currently being conducted on top of the berm and stated that this was highlighted in the Skier Magazine this weekend. Wilkinson reported that he has a copy of the data compile from the Forest Services indicating that the testing is looking good so he remains hopeful in participating with Aspen Skiing Company (ASC) as the Town moves 03-02-09tc Page 3 of 15 forward with the feasibility of having a wind power generation as an alternative resource for this community. Rodeo Duplex Mayor Boineau reported that he received an e-mail from a citizen who is concerned with a move in date to the rodeo duplexes. Boineau explained that the Town has been working on providing documentation and a few other necessary things are in place so that we can assist this person however the Housing Manager Joe Coffey has been on medical leave, so things have been moving along slowly. He explained that it is difficult to give anyone a date certain and requested that the community be patient. The Town Manager Russ Forrest reported that the schedule for construction is going well and explained that a number of homeowners have commented that the loan process is taking longer for them to go through the loan process. Forrest stated that the Town Attorney and himself have been looking into the Party Wall Agreement between the two duplexes, which can lead to significant conflicts. Council consensus requested that staff make the Party Wall Agreement more detailed in language; make it available so that when the Phase II units come online they can join the association; make is an association and word smith the definitions. Item No. 4: RESOLUTION NO. 5, SERIES OF 2009 —EXPRESSING APPRECIATION TO DAN ALPERT FOR HIS SERVICE ON THE CITIZEN GRANT REVIEW BOARD Mayor Boineau read Resolution No. 5, Series of 2009 expressing appreciation to Dan Alpert for his service on the Citizen's Grant Review Board and handed him a plaquerd and a Linda Roberts poster. There being no further business, Mayor Bill Boineau made a motion to approve Resolution No. 5, Series of 2009, seconded by John Wilkinson. The motion was approved by 4 in favor and 0 opposed. Council Member Mordkin was absent. Voting Aye: Mayor Bill Boineau, John Wilkinson, Reed Lewis, and Markey Butler. Voting Naye: None. CONSENT AGENDA ITEM NO. 5 Item No. 5: RESOLUTION NO. 06, SERIES OF 2009- SPECIFYING PERIODS DURING WHICH CONSTRUCTION ACTIVITY WILL BE 03-02-09tc Page 4 of 15 . LIMITED OR PROHIBITED The Economic Resources Director Jason Haber stated that the purpose of today's discussions is to establish the days and hours of construction activity within the Town and to make sure that this activity is being conducted pursuant to SVMC Section 18-3 (a), which stated that no noise producing construction or excessive vehicle activity shall be permitted during the hours on Sunday or legal holidays. In addition, SVMC Section 18-10.2(d)2 stated that the Town Council may choose to further prohibit or otherwise limit excessive noise-producing construction and vehicle activity, including road and lane closures, or other construction-related activities from occurring during Peak Seasons (winter and summer), major special events and other holidays throughout the year. Council shall determine specific dates defining these periods and days on which such activities are prohibited or limited. In order to provide adequate notice and clear expectations to contractors and developers, such Resolution should be adopted prior to March 1 st of each year. However, Council shall retain the right to alter or amend such Resolution at any time, as deemed necessary by the council. Haber further cited SVMC Section 18- 10.2(z), which established seasonal restrictions (i.e., Peak vs. Shoulder Seasons) related to Traffic Control throughout Town (i.e., lane closures, traffic delays, etc.). This section is available upon request from the Town Clerk's Department. Haber outlined what adoption of this resolution would accomplish including the following: 1. Defines "legal holidays" for the remainder of 2009 2. Established dates defining the 2009 Peak and Shoulder seasons 3. Establishes several construction prohibitions/limitations concerning 2009 special events. Council Member Butler requested that the Balloon Festival special event be added to line 107 of Resolution No. 6, Series of 2009 scheduled for the second Saturday as well as the Wine and Food Festival that same Saturday afternoon, which historically has 900 attendees; she emphasized that there not be construction on that Saturday. Council and staff continued to define the resolution line-by-line and made further amendments consistent with the resolution citations mentioned by Haber earlier. Staff concluded that there are a limited amount of construction activity projects on the schedule, including water line extensions on Wood road, Faraway and the Divide. There is some Right-of-Way work in connection with the Viceroy project that is scheduled for the fall off seasons. Council consensus agreed that the Town no longer put construction projects on hold and that activity be considered on a case by case basis. 03-02-09tc Page 5 of 15 After further discussion, Council continued Resolution No. 6, Series of 2009 to the March 16, 2009 Town Council meeting, in an effort to have the Marketing Special Events & Groups Sales Department staff input included. Item No. 6: NORDIC TRAILS PLAN The Public Works Director Hunt Walker provided Council with background information and stated that the Nordic Trails Plan was presented to Council on May 5, 2008 with a recommendation from the Trails Committee to adopt the Nordic Trails Plan with changes regarding the grooming of existing and new multi-use trails. Walker further stated that the Trails Committee requested the Nordic Trals Plan include language acknowledging that regulations for the use of trails on the Snowmass Club Golf Course are established by the Town subject to the Recreation Use Agreements between the Snowmass Club and the Town of Snowmass Village. Walker stated that the Nordic Council was wiling to accommodate the changes regarding the grooming of the multi-use trails, they were also willing in the next amendment to acknowledge the Town's authority to set regulations for the use of the trails on the Snowmass Club Golf Course (please refer to Ben Dodge's letter included in today's packet of information). Walker commented regarding enforcement that the Town's Police Department agrees that the Nordic Council/Pitkin County Open space Rangers be permitted to patrol the Nordic Trails within the Town of Snowmass Village for the purpose of educating the public. However, if an enforcement issue occurs where someone needs to rec eive a ticket or a summons to Court the Snowmass Police Department should be called to perform this duty. In conclusion, Walker reported that the Town of Snowmass Village Planning Department agrees to refer land use applications, which could potentially affect Nordic Trails to the Nordic Council for their review and input. He stated that staff recommends that Council adopt the Nordic Trails Plan. Representative of the City of Aspen Nordic Council Austin Weiss was present to answer questions that Town Council might have of him. Weiss reported that they have established a new multi-use trail on the golf course that allows for both walkers and dogs. In response to an inquiry of Council Member Butler, Weiss stated that as a result of being a 501 C the Nordic Council is raises funds in the ballpark of approximately 10,000 per year that are put towards individual projects and their operating and capital funding come from Pitkin County at this time. 03-02-09tc Page 6 of 15 Butler referred Weiss to packet page 19 and inquired of what the definition of Existing Partner Groups is. In response, Weiss stated that this refers to those organization that they work with throughout the year, such as Aspen Skiing Company. The Existing Partner Groups do not donate to their organization however, the Nordic Council does coordinate very closely with them. Weiss further explained that the "Lit Trail'is a trail that is actually lit by means of solar-powered garden type lamps that allow one to see where to venture ahead of oneself. In response to an inquiry by Butler, Weiss explained the technology behind the under and over road crossings they have set up and stated that the under and over is done by means of an underpass and bridge. He stated that a company out of Australia has built a devise that is called a Nordic Slider that functions as a French drain that is built into the road design with rubberized rollers to allow one to get into the road groove and double pole their way across the road without gravel spilling into the drain. Wilkinson clarified that installation of this type of drain is part of the agreement the Town has with the Snowmass Golf Course operator, who would be responsible for building the Nordic slider across from Club House Drive, which is scheduled for installation this summer. There being no further discussion, John Wilkinson made the motion to approve Pitkin County Nordic Trails Plan, Markey Butler seconded the motion. The motion was approved by a vote of 4 in favor to 0 opposed. Council Member Mordkin was absent. Voting Aye: John Wilkinson, Reed Lewis, Markey Butler, and Mayor Bill Boineau. Voting Naye: None. Chairman of the Trails Committee Jeff Tippet reported that it was a very good winter for pedestrians and pedestrians with dogs. He stated that the additional trail that was granted has made a lot of folks extremely happy. Also, the town was kind enough to grant additional funds for Public Works staff to come up with a machine that allowed packing of trails that historically were plowed. NOTE: Town Council took a 5-minute break at this time and reconvened at 4:45 p.m. Item No. 7: STATE OF THE WATERSHED REPORT PHASE 1 - FINDINGS Representatives of the Ruedi Water and Power Authority Mark Fuller and Sharon Clark were present to answer question that Town Council might have of them, provided Council a PowerPoint presentation and a verbal summary briefing on Phase I of the Watershed Plan - State of the Watershed Report and apprised Council of plans for Phase 11 of the Plan. 03-02-09tc Page 7 of 15 Council Member Wilkinson stated that in his view the plan contradicts the global direction we are going in. Fuller stated that he would be delighted to sit down with the Town Planners as part of the reviewing document process. After further discussion, Council requested that Fuller meet with the people who are working on the Comprehensive Plan and discuss what would be appropriate direction to take. Item No. 8: PUBLIC HEARING - FIRST READING OF CARBON MONOXIDE DETECTOR - ORDINANCE NO. 1. SERIES OF 2009 The Town Chief Building Official Mark Kittle provided Council with background information relating to the Carbon Monoxide Detector ordinance. Kittle stated that the Building Department has submitted a draft of the ordinance and is reviewing it for approval of a draft of House Bill 1091, Carbon Monoxide Alarms to be installed in residential properties. He explained that this act shall be known and may be cited as the "Lofgren Family Carbon Monoxide Safety Act" and that staff believes that the ordinance is an enhancement for public safety compared to the House bill, since the his draft ordinance requires CO monitors to be installed within six months of its passage, which is April 1 st . Kittle further explained that the State of Colorado is trying to implement a requirement that a building be retrofitted upon sale of a unit or upon change in tenant. He reported that Aspen/Pitkin County's ordinance went into affect today. In response to an inquiry by Butler, Kittle stated that the implementation will be similar to smoke detectors in that upon building inspections he will be checking for compliance. The Building Department will be conducting random checks and he is not going to require a permit be obtained for this and is asking that the owners call Building Department if it is an owner installed or battery type detector due to lack of staff man power to go out and physically knock on doors. In response to an inquiry by Butler, Kittle stated that he will investigate whether there is a way that the Building Department and the Snowmass Fire Department can partner on this effort to offer a discount program and report back to Council during a meeting in the near future. The Town Manager Russ Forrest reported that the Town's Public Information Officer is working on joint Aspen/Snowmass/Pitkin County effort. Kittle reported that there is a volunteer screening effort taking place through the Fire Department now for people who can not afford to run out and buy detectors. JOHN AT 01:20:45 The Town Attorney John Dresser stated his concerns including 03-02-09tc Page 8.of 15 NOTE: Mayor Boineau opened the Public Hearing at 5:25 P.M. There being no public comment the Mayor closed the Public Hearing at 5:25.15 P.M. After further discussion, John Wilkinson made the motion to approve First Reading of Ordinance No. 1, Series of 2009 as amended, Markey Butler seconded the motion. The motion was approved by a vote of 4 in favor to 0 opposed. Council Member Mordkin was absent. Voting Aye: John Wilkinson, Reed Lewis, Markey Butler, and Mayor Bill Boineau. Voting Naye: None. NOTE: Town Council took a 10-minutes break at 6:00 P.M. and recovened at 6:10 P.M. Item No. 9: DEED RESTRICTION POLICY ON FOR SALE UNITS The Town Manager Russ Forrest stated that-the purpose of today's discussion is in response to Town Council direction, that staff at the February 16, 2009 meeting to evaluate whether to reduce the one-year minimum employment time guideline. In addition, staff would like to clarify how values are calculated if there is a decline in the Consumer Price Index (CPI). Forrest clarified that.both issues can be acted upon via a motion to amend the attached housing regulations. Forrest provided Council with background information and stated that today's packet Attachment A consists of the current regulations for deed restricted affordable housing within Snowmass Village, which were last modified in January of 2002 after the Town convened a Housing Advisory Committee to review and recommend modifications to the Town's deed restrictions. Forrest reported that the Town has recently seen a decline in demand for certain types of deed restricted housing with the down-turn in the economy. The Tow currently gives preference in a lottery process for total years of employment in Snowmass village and people working less that one year in Snowmass are not eligible to participate in a fore-sale housing lottery. If there is not a qualified Snowmass employee for a lottery, then the lottery is opened up to employees working in Pitkin County (Pitkin employees must work for more than one year in the County to be eligible). He sated that council expressed the desire to lower the time threshold for working in Snowmass Village so that all Snowmass employees with one day or more of employment could participate in a lottery before offering units to Pitkin County employees. 03-02-09tc Page.9 of 15 Forrest clarified that how the value of units are calculated upon resale. The intent of the Town's Housing Policy has been to control appreciation of value to help ensure long-term affordability. This policy has been to limit appreciation to 3% per year or CPI whichever is lower. He referred Council to the proposal on packet page 55, a table depicting the amount of years a Snowmass Village employee is employed paralleled with the Lottery Chances. Town Council and staff began discussion of the body of policies and the integrity of the policy to determine whether this is something that needs to be put into effect now. After further discussion, Council majority determined that a six-month threshold would be appropriate keeping the system we have today but if nobody qualified then opening it up to a second round for Snowmass business employees to be eligible, with a qualifier to include individuals working in the Aspen School District, Aspen Valley Hospital and special priorities for Fire and Police department employees. Council Member Lewis requested that the towns of Marble and New Castle be included. After further discussion, Council directed staff to provide them with a couple of examples if people were still allowed to get 3% CPI to continue for two or three years, figure out the breakpoint over two years, and whether the Town would reduce that maximum supply and bring back findings to Council during a meeting in the near future. Local resident Sally Sparhawk commented in agreement of keeping the 3% and above years and clarified that people don't always get the 3%, as they get the CPI up to 3%. She commented in favor of keeping it as it is but say if the CPI goes in a negative you stay static. Council consensus agreed with Sparhawk's recommended option. NOTE: Council took a 10-minute break to allow GrassRoots Television time to change their disc. Item No. 10: ENVIRONMENTAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE DISCUSSION The Economic Resource Director Jaso Haber outlined the purpose and action requested of Town Council and stated that on February 2, 2009 th eCouncil accepted the Snowmass Village Environmental Sustainability Plan and directed staff to develop a Council agenda item to consider the formation of an environmental advisory body. Staff is requesting clarification as to whether Council desires to create a formal Town Board/Commission, or a less formal ad-hoc committee or task 03-02-09tc Page 10 of 15 force. Council consensus requested an ad-hoc committee because this type of committee invites more participation. Haber reported that several interested individuals from the community have expressed interesting serving on this committee including Anita Manchester, Wendy Harris, Chris Jacobson, and Sally Sparhawk to mention a few. The Town Manager reported that the Finance Director has found, through a franchise agreement with Holy Cross, that the Town has actually been receiving funds from Holy Cross for specific purposes that adds up to half-a-million dollars. He reported that one category for the funds is energy conservation, efficiency, community technological advancements for schools, water conservation etc. . . Haber added that the funds would be extremely appropriate for implementing items specified within the Sustainability Plan. He further explained the process for implementation and stated that the adopting ordinance that created this fund was the Holy Cross Enhancement Fund, which stipulates that the Town Council has to approve the spending of funds by means of a resolution and prior to making any expenditure decisions Holy Cross representatives must approve the way such funds will be spent. Item No. 11: REVIEW AND DISCUSSION OF RENEWABLE ENERGY OFFSET PROGRAM FEES AND APPLICABILITY PROVISIONS The Economic Resource Director Jason Haber explained the purpose of today's discussions are to review the Renewable Energy Offset Program (REOP) fees pursuant to the provisions of Section 18-224.7.b of Ordinance No. 11, Series of 2008; discuss the applicability provisions of Section 18-224.7 of the same ordinance; and to provide direction to staff concerning proposed amendments to the same ordinance. NOTE: Council Member Mordkin arrived at 6:15 P.M. Haber stated that staff recommends that Council direct staff to schedule a Council agenda item to review the REOP fees at an appropriate time prior to November 1, 2009 and Council direct staff to prepare an agenda item to consider adoption of an ordinance amending Sec. 18-224.7 to include amended language presented on packet page 70 of today's information. Council Member Wilkinson stated that he is not interested in changing any of the fees. Council and staff began the process of a detailed discussion of the REOP fees and applicability provisions. 03-02-09tc Page 11 of 15 The Mayor requested that staff conduct examples of real-to-life scenarios and and calculate what the fee and value is and to discuss all the particulars at once during the October town Council meeting. Local resident Sally Sparhawk emphasized that we need a program to incentivize people to do the right thing and not pay the fee. She stated that most of the homes that would be built on existing lots are worth a $1.5Million and the homes that are going on those lots are consuming a lot of energy so in one way we don't want to burden one with something that is unreasonable and on the other hand it is not fair for someone to do something that hurts the environmental lot and not take responsibility for the damagae. Item No. 12: DISCUSSION REGARDING LOCAL RETAIL AND DEMOLITION: A PLANNER'S TOOLBOX TO ADDRESS RETAIL MIX, DEMOLITION AND TREE PROTECTION The Planning director Chris Conrad provided Council with background information and stated that prior to the development of Base Village Snowmass has supported two commercial/retail centers known as West Village aka: Snowmass mall•and serves the needs of skiers and overnight guests; as well as the Snowmass Center that provides basic locally serving businesses for residents and guests with the grocery store, post office and drug/liquor store. He stated that with the addition of Base Village as a third commercial/retail node at the base of the ski area that is more "resort retail" oriented serving visitors and locals alike, the potential change in character, scale and retail/commercial mix has generated concerns within the community. While it was generally understood at the last meeting that regulating to achieve a preference for "locally owned" businesses would be very problematic, there were planning tools available that can ensure that locally-serving businesses and essential services will be maintained and/or even enhanced in the future. Town Council and staff began discussions re-crafting language relating to packet page 78 regarding the zone districts; permitted uses; commercial village scale; Comprehensive Plan; community purpose; development of community benefits agreement; and demolition and tree protection including the next steps involved. After much discussion, Council consensus requested that there be a cooling-off period and that it be placed on the Town Manager's staff matrix, further discussion regarding the historical land mark preservation and further discussion is necessary before moving forward with policies implementation. Item No. 13: MANAGER'S REPORT 03-02-09tc Page 12 of 15 Comprehensive Plan Update Forrest reported that the Planning Commission met on February 18, 2009 and unanimously voted via a resolution and unanimously recommended approval of the draft Comp. Plan. The Town Council now needs to determine how they would like to move forward with its review and staff would like to make an initial presentation to summarize the formatting changes made with the Planning commission and highlight the substantive changes made to the policies within the document. After further discussion, Council majority requested that staff begin with an introduction presentation of the plan during the next regularly scheduled Council meeting. Food Expenses - Requested by Local Newspaper Forrest reported that the local newspaper has requested that staff provide them with a summary of food expenses. Lockers Forrest referred to a recent e-mail correspondence that he sent the Town Council and explained that the Town has a bunch of lockers downstairs in the Police Department garage, that are taking up space. He reminded Council that the Town originally purchased then for$250.00 and Related WestPac would now like to purchase them for 100.00. Forrest reported that staff did an online investigation of what used lockers go for and determined that used lockers sell between $60 - $80 delivered and requested that Council respond to his e-mail if they haven't already done so. Council agreed to sell the lockers. Country Club Townhomes Forrest reported that the Town has purchased 25 Country Club Townhomes and proposed that the Town rent them and offer this option to a Town employee and then proceed with the normal Housing Department process. Council agreed with this recommendation. Board of County Commissioners (BOCC) Joint Meeting The Town Manager Russ Forrest reported that the BOCC will meet with the Snowmass Village Town Council on April 6, 2009 in Snowmass Village scheduled to start at 3:00 P.M. Elected Officials Transportation Committee (EOTC) Forrest reported that the next EOTC meeting is on April 16, 2009 at 4:00 P.M. at the City of Aspen in the Council meeting room. Item No. 14: AGENDA FOR NEXT TOWN COUNCIL MEETING 03-02-09tc Page 13 of 15 . Council and staff discussed the March 16th Agenda and determined that with regard to Item No. 8, the Housing Mitigation discussion, that it would be appropriate for Council to hear the Comp. Plan presentation first and bump Item No. 8. Council agreed with the Manager's recommendation. Bring Your Own Liquor (BYOL) - Thursday Night Concert Series Forrest stated that he received a letter from the Town's Insurance carrier and he would e-mail the Council that information. Council Member Wilkinson stated that he is not in favor of ignoring the enforcement of the Town's liquor law for the Thursday Night Concert Series because of the individual litigation liability. Forrest reported that he spoke with the Botanical Gardens in Denver and they expressed that they had to be established for three years prior to hosting that event or even being eligible for that opportunity. After further discussion, Council majority directed staff to not pursue this issue further. Item No. 15: APPROVAL OF MEETING MINUTES FOR: NOVEMBER 3, 2008 AND FEBRUARY 2. 2009 Reed Lewis made a motion to approve the meeting minutes of November 3, 2008, seconded by Arnold Mordkin. Council Member Wilkinson requested a correction to packet page 89, Item No. 4 Krabloonik Update, middle paragraph, the word "is" changed to "it." Wilkinson requested a correction to packet page 91, Item No. 9, that the December 31, 2008 date be changed to April 30, 2009. Lastly, Wilkinson requested a correction to Item No. 7, Charlie Podalak be corrected to stated as follows: "Council member Wilkinson stated that flood insurance would have covered it and it is not nearly the costs of$5,000.00, rather that costs are around $500 - 4600 at the most. There being no further amendments, Reed Lewis made a motion to approve the meeting minutes of November 3, 2008 as amended, seconded by Arnold Mordkin. the vote was approved by 5 in favor and 0 opposed. AYE NAY START AT 03:31 :27 03-02-09tc Page 14 of 15 Determining positions relative to matters that may be subject to negotiations, developing strategy for negotiations, instructing negotiators pursuant to C.R.S. 24-6- 402(4)(e) and Snowmass Village Municipal Code Section 2-45(c)(5); and Conferences with an attorney for the purposes of receiving legal advice on specific legal questions pursuant to C.R.S. 24-6-402(4)(c) and Snowmass Village Municipal Code Section 2-45(c)(2); markey=10 chapters russ=4 most chg. wilkinson=sp. mtg. specifically for that Mayor=yes arnie=concerned abt. sp. mtgs. Comp. Plan is most important thg. this counl is going to do. we need most participation from the Public. Not going to-v the pressure in terms of Land use devel. that's goig to free some time to go over during Reg. Mtgs. markey=do it in the afternoon arnie=not during the day russ=respect that couple of windows suggest begin at next mtg. intro of Plan russ=we're going to keep in WORD doc. P.C. has same thg. get to you torm! give resentation of highpoints structure high poits of policy we will not be able to give redlied of old version give younew version of new work. policies are ost imortant. dresser=moritorim is up Aril 15th???? russ=item at next mtg. russ=informational requeest summary of food expenses e-mail = lockers down stairs in the Police Dept. baught at $250 someone wants to buy them purchased 2250 townhomes proiose that we rent it and offer to own employee thru normal process. mayor--agree to sell thel ockers?? dresser- history Item No. 16: COUNCIL COMMENTS/COMMITTEE REPORTS/CALENDARS BOCC mtg. = start 1 Dreseer-chg. PN to 3p.m. on the 16th 03-02-09tc Page 15 of 15 mayor—agenda for next T.C. Mtg. russ=Item No. 8 may bump russ=the Ii. Thurs. night concert series skussion e-mailed to counl not on 3/16 Agenda wilkinson=letter frm. Marianne no way put self at risk if we know the law we are at risk of litigation. no way he cn serve o this body russ=called the botanical gardens chalj w/tha they had tob established for 3 yrs. to hv. that tunity. mayor=nt pursue DIRECTION COUNL CONSENSUSH Minute count comments REED=thr. is th marketing so events dealine mar. 15th application by received and post marked ar moved wilkinson 2nd reed 5/0 Item No. 17: ADJOURNMENT Respectfully Submitted By: Donna J. Garcia-Spaulding, CIVIC Deputy Town Clerk Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 PALM TOWN PASSOVER GOOD SUNDAY COUNCIL FRIDAY MEETING r 4:00 P.M. 7RT S 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 EASTER SUNDAY s t EQStE 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 TOWN EARTH DAY COUNCIL MEETING 14:00 P.M. 1 t 26 27 28 29 30 1 1 Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Town Council Meeting 4:00 p.m. 0 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 Town Council Meeting 4:00 p.m. 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 Memorial Day P°W'MI 31 d RiRNAL. ATTACHMENT FOR ITEM NO . 9 ON THE APRIL 6 , 2009 TOWN COUNCIL MEETING AGENDA MEMORANDUM RELATED WESTPAC To: Snowmass Village Town Council From: Scott Stenman Date: March 25, 2009 Commu"' ua,;,opment RE: Response to Staff and Planning Commission Comments Please accept the enclosed supplemental information in response to the comments received from the Town's Transportation Department, Snowmass Wildcat Fire Department and the Planning Commission's review of the application. The enclosed plans reflect the modifications described below and replace page 24 and 25 of the 11x17 booklet. 1. Heaters. The Development Agreement specified that the radiant heating system for passengers waiting areas will be provided in accordance with the currently approved design. The number of radiant heats for the passenger waiting areas within the Transit Center is consistent with the number of heaters approved in the original plans for the garage. Two of the seven locations do not provide the clearance needed for the heaters. The heaters in these two locations will be modified to meet the design specifications while maintaining the intent of the design. Related WestPac will work cooperatively with the Town to provide a solution to the heaters in these area. 2. Conduit Locations. The conduit locations are approximant and may be revised in response to coordination efforts with the Transportation Department. 3. Transit Office. The total area of the transit office is 116 square feet. The usable area of the transit office has been increased to 98 square feet. The transit office, parking management office and break room are set back from the bus bays by approximately 15 feet allowing ample circulation for the bus bay in front of these offices. The three access doors into these spaces currently exist. 4. Transit Center Light Sources. In accordance with the Town of Snowmass Village Lighting Code, pedestrians and cars do not see the direct source of light from outside the Transit Center. The current light level helps illuminate the entrance into the garage for passing vehicles. Due to the restrictive height limitations of the garage entrances, a valance for additional screening is not feasible in this location. 5. Vehicular Access. The Town has complete control over the vehicular access within the Transit Center. Unless approved by the Town, vehicular access within the Transit Center is restricted to Town Village Shuttles and RFTA buses. Non-Town Village Shuttles and non-RFTA vehicles do not currently use the Transit Center and will therefore continue to operate as they have in the past. A public loading/unloading area is located on Level P1 with direct access to the Village Level. In accordance with the Development Agreement, the Metro District will enter into a Joint Operating Intergovernmental Agreement with the Town "to provide for priority use by the Town of the Town Transit Facilities and may allow, subject to such terms and conditions as the Town may determine, for additional use of the Town Transit Facility for private valet, shuttle, limousine, charter bus, or other transportation services. " 6. Fencing. A split rail fence is proposed to separate the sidewalk along the road from the landscaped area in front of Interim Building 7. A split rail fence will not obstruct the view of the landscaping or the lower portion of the temporary facade. The proposed split rail fence is less obtrusive than most other types of fencing. 7. Architectural Character. A conceptual sample of the translucent plastic panels proposed on the Village Level will be brought to the April 6, 2009 public hearing to further clarify the design concept. Below is an image using the proposed translucent plastic panels; this was taken at the Willow's in Snowmass. 8. Snowmass Wildcat Fire Department (SWFD). Interim Building 7 will meet all SWFD requirements. All non-conditioned spaces within the building will have a dry-pipe system as well as a fully addressable alarm system which will be fully tested prior to occupancy. Conditioned spaces will have a wet-pipe system. When the final building is constructed or if any occupancy changes the sprinkler system in the non-conditioned spaces will be changed to a wet system as required by SWFD. The building will likely remain classified as a Type IV, Heavy Timber construction. If heavy timber members are not used in the roof construction the building will meet Type 2 Noncombustible. Type 2 Noncombustible exceeds the current approval in its fire resistance. The design will fully comply with IFC 1019.1, Enclosures Required, and IBC 2003 which includes 2 hour fire rated enclosures around the exist stairwells. March 25,2009 2 Base Village Minor PUD Amendment Interim Building 7 o Ili m O n o. o eeo LA 0 0 7 Provide two junction boxes, one 1" G' 0 power conduit for power, and one 1" communications conduit message sign. Interconnect power conduits as shown. Communications conduits r shall be homerun to control office. VO4 Provide two junction boxes, one 1" Y power conduit for power, and one 1" communications conduit CCTV P3 Gara a Plan J1 camera. Interconnect power 1 conduits. Communication conduits SCALE: 1" = 35- 0" shall be homerun to control office. Locations are approximate and still need 35' 70 a to be finalized with RFTA and TOSV Radiant HeatersSROWMASS BASEVILLAdE 24 BUILDING 7 OVERALL TRANSIT CENTER PLAN r 13 L S o 4A] czy t a 19 - 4„ 8,_ 0„ 10,_ 4„ R y` nrrrurrrrunnrrruu r ururururnurrunr rruurrnrurrgrrurrub 37'- 9" o Net usable area of the transit office is 98 square feet. P3 Breakroom SCALE: 1/ 8" = 1'- 0" 8' 16' SNOWMi4SS- 13ASE VILLAGE 25 BUILDING 7 TRANSIT OFFICE, BREAK ROOM, PARKING OFFICE Gll&JhL ATTACHMENT FOR ITEM NO . 10 ON THE APRIL 6 , 2009 TOWN COUNCIL MEETING AGENDA RELATED WESTPAC 2009 BASE VILLAGE CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT PLAN Submitted March 3, 2009 RECEIVED PEAR 18 2009 snowmass Community Developm-nt March 1009 1009 Base Village Construction Management Plan 1 r0 RELATED WESTPAC 1 MEMORANDUM 1 To: Chris Conrad From: Mak Keeling Date: 3/03/09 RE: 2009 Base Village Construction Management Plan 1 Cc: 1 The purpose of this memo is to update the Base Village Construction Management Plan(CMP)as required in Ordinance 421 in the series of 2004. Ordinance 21, Section Three—Conditions,#14 Construction Management Plan states,"Due to the phasing and lengthy development construction period,certain refinements,modifications,or amendments to the Construction Management Plan may be required in the future by the Town to mitigate impacts which were not apparent at the time of adoption of this Ordinance. The Planning Director is authorized to require reasonable amendments to the plan as determined to be reasonable and necessary to mitigate an unforeseen impact. The Applicant will either amend their plan accordingly or request that the matter be reviewed by Town Council for 1 final determination. It is the desire of the Applicant to update the CMP due to the inherent changes associated with a lengthy construction 1 project as certain refinements&modifications have been made to the schedule and the narrative to reflect the latest town Ordinances(Ordinance 12 of 2007)and to reflect the Applicants latest thinking based on speed of construction weighed against community impact. 1 The plan is being amended and it is up to you on whether or not this goes to Town Council or if it can be amended administratively. If this does need to go to Town Council please tell us when so that we can prepare properly. 1 WLLC. d ger 1 1 RELATED i IWESTPAC i TABLE OF CONTENTS i SECTION 1 2009 Base Village Construction Management Plan SECTION 2 Red Line Construction Management Plan iSECTION 3 Construction Management Plan Exhibits 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 i 1 i 1 March 1009 1009 Base Village Construction Management Plan 1 CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT & PHASING PLAN SNOWMASS BASE VILLAGE & FANNY HILL CABINS October 12, 2004 (REV 2 Feb 2007) (REV 3 March 12, 2007): (REV 4 March 10, 2008) (REV 5 March 3, 2009) I. GENERAL PROJECT CONSTRUCTION: 1) Construction Hours A. Standard Hours for exterior activities a. Monday through Saturday(Unless under special request and approval by the Town Manager or designee). b. 7:00am to 6:00pm or as otherwise approved or requested by the Chief Building Official of the Town of Snowmass Village. c. With prior Town Manager authorization,the applicant may extend working hours for work in the Right of Way for emergency situations as necessary to complete work. B. Activities occurring inside buildings that are not disruptive to the general public a. 7 days a week b. Unlimited hours C. To achieve the proposed schedule in this plan and in order to facilitate the execution of certain portions of the construction,variations from the standard hours of operation need to be considered.A minimum 7 day prior notification to the Town Manager,or approved designee, will be required for any construction activities beyond the Standard Hours of construction. The following construction methods and materials will require variation of construction hours to achieve an acceptable level of quality and efficiency. a. Cast in place concrete construction. b. Exterior work that does not violate the Town noise ordinances. c. Steel erection and delivery d. Roadway grading and asphalt work e. Other work in the Right of Way D. Prior to commencement of construction,the owner shall designate responsible parties to provide direct communication with the appropriate TOSV Personnel (TOSV Construction Coordinator)and provide responses to complaints. E. The contractor shall be responsible for providing information of general construction activities and schedules. Public Meetings will be held to inform the public on construction issues and information sources. An Email and Facsimile construction notice list will be developed and regularly scheduled construction updates will be distributed by the appropriate TOSV personnel - TOSV CC. F. The TOSV Police Department will be notified of major material deliveries and concrete pours. Regularly scheduled construction updates will be distributed to the Police Department. G. If construction of the project is interrupted, Applicant will work with the Planning Department to establish interim landscaping plans for the affected areas. H. Extended Hours for emergency situations—In the event of an emergency situation the Town 1 Manager, Chief Building Official,or their designee may approve work to occur outside of permitted work hours at their discretion. Related WestPac,LLC. Snowmass Bate Village 1 CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT& PHASING PLAN 2) Construction Traffic Management on Town Roads A. Brush Creek Road a. Traffic flow to be reduced by shuttling employees to the construction site from 1 external parking areas. The primary parking area will be the Intercept lot at Brush Creek Road and SH 82. b. In addition to Brush Creek Passing Lane, existing pullouts are to be used along Brush I Creek road by trucks that are not able to maintain reasonable speed up the road. This will allow for vehicles backing up behind the trucks to pass at these locations. Specifically designated non bus stop areas may also be used for temporary truck stacking during large material deliveries at times when limited staging on site is available. c. Peak traffic times of 7 AM to 9 AM (10 AM during ski season)and 3:00 PM to 5:00 PM are to be reasonably avoided,whenever possible for major material deliveries during the ski season and summer season. d. Lighted roadway information signs will be maintained at key entrances to the village. These signs will alert motorist of detours and construction activities that could affect travel. e. A Traffic Control Coordinator will be designated for the project. The Traffic Control Coordinator will develop a written delivery plan, manage all deliveries to the site, 1 develop and enforce a policy that all deliveries must be coordinated through the Traffic Control Coordinator, limit deliveries during peak skier traffic times,conduct a traffic control meeting at the end of each shift identifying deliveries and traffic control issues for the next day,personally dispatch all delivery vehicles to the site from the designated staging area, be in continuous radio contact with the site, and continuous radio contact with the site concrete superintendent who will be in direct telephone contact with the batch plant. The Traffic Control Coordinator will ensure identified and established guidelines are complied with and consistent throughout all projects. B. Wood Road and Lower Carriage Way a. No staging of trucks or other construction vehicles is allowed along these roadways. Accommodations will be made within staging areas for vehicles except for work required within the Right of Way. b. If parking is not available in the staging areas for construction vehicles, they will be directed to other off site vehicle parking areas provided by the Contractor. 3. Public Access Closure Notification A. Public Trails a. Public notice shall be provided a minimum of I week in advance of all public trail closures. Signs shall be placed for trail closures, including alternative route signage, in advance of the closed sections so alternate routes can be used, Prior to trail closure, Contractor must gain approval of a way finding plan to reroute the closed trail from the Public Works Director or his designee,who may refer the matter to the Town Council. b. A functional,well-defined ski back trail through or around the Base Village shall be preserved and operational during the ski season. Alternate routing of affected trails Related WestPac,I.I.C. Snowmass Base Village 2 1 CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT& PHASING PLAN during non-ski season timeframes will be provided and coordinated with the Public Works Director or his designee. B. Public Roads a. Contractor shall coordinate all road closures with the TOSV Construction Coordinator. b.b. Public notice will be required a minimum of 1 week prior to all roadway closures. c. Single lane closures will be used as much as possible instead of closing entire road sections. d. All closures shall follow Manual of Uniform Traffic Control Devices. e. Full closure of Brush Creek Road(between Upper Kearns Road and Brush Creek Lane)will be required during the installation of improvements necessary to construct the roundabout. 4. Construction Fencing A. Site fencing a. Site fencing shall be 8' and can either be chain link with screened mesh or wood. The type of fence used shall be determined at the discretion of the applicant. b. 20' planting buffer along roads when practical and where space allows. The applicant shall submit a construction landscape plan for these areas to be approved by TOSV I staff. c. Permanently installed on posts, except some areas that require movable fencing for construction activities. d. Maintained by the contractor to remain in tact and neat to outside appearance. e. The fence line depicted on the Construction Management Plan drawings(CM-1 through CM-14)represents the outermost extent of where the construction fence can be located. The developer may move the construction fence inside of the extents shown on the CM drawings without issuing an Administrative Modification, provided that all areas outside of construction fencing shall be safe to the general public. E All graphics desired by the applicant are subject to the approval of the Planning Director prior to installation. I5. Construction Waste Management A. Reduction and reuse of waste material on the site through a specific site waste management and separation program. B. Recycling of all applicable products. C. All food waste must be disposed in specified receptacles to prevent access by bears and other wildlife. The construction site will be maintained and kept clean of trash and debris by the contractor. 6. Minimization of Construction Impacts on Wetlands A. Specific measures shall be employed during site construction in and around wetlands and the Brush Creek Riparian zone. These measures are intended to provide additional protective measures beyond a standard Erosion and Sediment Control plan to the natural resources Related WestPac,LLC. Snowmass Base Village 3 CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT& PHASING PLAN onsite and of Brush Creek. The Brush Creek Enhancement Plan(BCEP)shall be used for further detail on this issue. B. All construction shall comply with the Army Corps of Engineers 404 permits for the project area. C. All wetlands and existing sensitive riparian zones that are to be preserved shall be clearly identified and approved by the environmental consultant prior to the initiation of any site disturbance activities. 1 D. All wetland areas to be preserved shall be protected with 2 lines of silt fencing as described in the BCEP, and shall be maintained by the Contractor throughout the construction period. E. No machinery,equipment or other construction materials shall be allowed within the delineated wetland areas designated to be preserved. F. Wetland areas to be preserved shall be inspected on a weekly basis,or after significant storm events to insure that all protection devices are operational. Any devices that are deficient shall be replaced or repaired. 1 G. No cleaning of equipment,tolls, machinery, concrete trucks,vehicles, etc shall be conducted where runoff may enter erosion control measures or protected wetland areas. H. All protection devices shall remain in place until all adjacent uphill areas of the construction site have been revegetated or completed. Revegetation is considered re-established once 70% of overall ground coverage is achieved. These devices shall not be removed until approved by the environmental consultant. I. In the event of an accidental placement of fill material within the wetland areas,the Contractor shall immediately cease operations in or adjacent to the affected wetland area and notify the wetland consultant. 7. Limits of Disturbance A. All trees and other native areas to be protected shall be delineated with fencing to prevent damage B. Tree preservation areas and the surrounding tree crown line area must be left intact. C. All tree and native vegetation areas to be preserved shall be fenced off and approved by the landscape architect prior to the commencement of any site disturbance. D. The contractor will repair all disturbed areas. S. Storm Water Management and Erosion Control A. The Contractor shall follow the Storm water Management Plan and Erosion Control plans for control of water quality and erosion from the site disturbance during the construction period. B. A Storm water discharge permit is required by the State of Colorado and is required prior to the start of any construction. C. Detailed engineering plans for Final Erosion Control Plan and Storm water Management Plan shall be submitted for and approved by the Town Engineer prior to Building Permit approval. D. All silt fence, erosion control structures and water quality devices shall be installed and approved by the engineer prior to any site disturbance. The Contractor throughout the duration of the project shall maintain all of these devices implemented. E. All erosion control and water quality structures shall be inspected on a weekly basis, or after significant storm events to insure that all protection devices are operational. Any devices that are deficient shall be replaced or repaired by the Contractor. Related WestPac,LLC. Snowmass Base Village 4 CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT& PHASING PLAN F. An environmental consultant will review the site for hazardous materials at the beginning of the project construction. G. The offsite diversion drainage piping shall be constructed at the beginning of the construction phasing in order to intercept offsite runoff at upstream of the construction area in order to reduce contamination of this water from construction activities. H. Temporary settling ponds will be constructed with each phase of construction for control of water quality. Locations and design shall be detailed in final grading, drainage and erosion control plan. I. All hazardous and toxic materials must be disposed and/or treated as per the manufacturer's recommendations. J. All concrete trucks and concrete pumps are prohibited from disposing any excess concrete material or washout at the construction site unless a plan for such disposal is submitted to and approved by the Town via a formal Administrative Modification. The contractor is responsible for the proper disposal of any excess concrete material. K. All fueling of vehicles and machinery must be conducted in a designated area to prevent accidental leakage or spills.The fueling area shall be designed to contain spills and a typical plan shall be submitted for approval through the TOSV Construction Coordinator,&the town's Environmental Consultant, if deemed necessary. The excavation contractor shall meet with the Public Works Department staff and Planning Department representative on site prior to commencement of construction of any of the buildings to: a. Clearly describe the spill containment plan for the construction sites and/or staging areas and resolve any concerns with respect thereto to the reasonable satisfaction of the Planning Director; and b. Identify specific ways the contractors)will be responsive to street sweeping and erosion control to the reasonable satisfaction of the Planning Director. 9. Dewatering 1 A. Details of dewatering pond locations and designs will be completed with final grading, drainage and erosion control plans. The Contractor shall implement all measures in accordance of these plans. B. Dewatering ponds as per Corps of Engineers standards C. Dewatering treated discharge as per Corps of Engineers standards 10. Fugitive Dust Control and Air Quality A. Run out areas from excavation sites will be made as long as possible and recycled asphalt will be rolled and oiled to create a tire"spin-off area". B. Tire Anti-Tracking Devices(ATDs)will be used at all construction exits. In some cases, these may be comprised of a gravel or cobbled roadbase. In areas of heavy excavation greater than 30,000 cubic yards), and for any multi-year construction project,heavy steel plates with large steel angles welded to the plate will be required to create tire mud knockoff areas. These ATDs will be cleaned regularly during the day. C. In cases of heavy excavations and/or multi-year construction schedules,or at the discretion of the Town's Construction Coordinator,a tire wash may be required and the trench must be cleaned regularly during times that tires must be washed. D. Runoff shall be collected and treated in accordance with the Storrs Water Management Plan before being discharged from the site. 1 Related WestPac,LLC. Snowmass Base Village 5 CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT& PHASING PLAN E. A street sweeper with an internal vacuum and wash pot will be required to clean all project- adjacent roadways and intersections and to prevent airborne dust from being created by sweeping operations. F. Truck speed limits will be monitored and kept to a level that does not create excessive dust during dry periods. G. A water truck will be used during dry periods to wash down streets, control on-site dust,and minimize airborne dust on haul roads. H. Chemical stabilization (magnesium chloride)may be used on haul roads to mitigate dust during dry periods. I. Tracking of soil onto Town streets will be minimized by on-site mitigation measures. When tracking of soil occurs onto Town streets the Contractor shall effectively high pressure wash, flush and clean the roadways with a street cleaner. J. A real time air monitoring station shall be installed near the construction site in order to monitor air quality throughout the construction period.A baseline analysis will be conducted prior to major construction and the data shall be used to provide immediate response if air quality standards are exceeded. K. All exposed soil areas where grading operations are continuing shall be watered as required to reduce fugitive dust. Disturbed soil areas shall be revegetated as soon as possible after grading operations are complete. L. Vehicle engine pre-heaters will be used to reduce warm up times of vehicles on site for the purpose of minimizing vehicle idling time. M. All vehicles and machinery must be in good working order and comply with all necessary environmental legislation. N. A primary water truck shall be designated on site for the purpose of dust control. Remainder of Page Intentionally Blank-] 1 Related WestPac,LLC. Snowmass Base Village 6 CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT£ PHASING PLAN H.PROJECT PHASING: This schedule represents the most likely schedule of development for the Base Village and Fanny Hill Cabins projects. It is directly dependent on timely approvals and permits. Related WestPac reserves the right to modify this schedule at any time. The dates used on all drawings (CM-9 through CM-12)are meant to represent the start/end of ski season and Thanksgiving. 1 On the drawings and in the following narrative"completing construction' is intended to mean that the building, landscaping,hardscaping, lighting, signage, etc. shall potentially be under construction until the final date in the date range. 9.9. April 13,2009 through November 26,2009—Refer to map CM-9 A. Infrastructure a. Upper Wood Road between Wood Road Bridge(drive over/ski under)and the Building 13ab driveway. b. Snowmelted entrance to garage from Wood Road. B. Buildings Phase Starting Construction a. Interim Building 7 C. Buildings Phase Continuing Construction a. Bldg 8 b. Bldg 13ab D. Buildings Phase Completing Construction a. Interim Building 7 E. Construction Staging and Hording a. Residential and commercial are on-line and operating. b. Construction fencing line to allow for: i. Operation of residential ii. Operation of commercial iii. Fire access as per local fire authority requirements F. Construction Fencing Line to Enclose: a. Areas as delineated on the plan b. Temporary fire access will need to be kept clear for fire access to all buildings under construction. c. All construction staging(construction materials, storage, construction staging, site offices, necessary construction vehicles,construction apparatus,etc.)occurs within construction fencing. G. Parldng a. Construction Parking i. Limited areas within staging limits for some trades, inspectors and visitors ii. Worker parking at off-site lots and shuttled in to site for work day Related WestPac,LLC. Snowmass Base Village 7 1 CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT& PHASING PLAN b. Guest Parking i. Guest Parking(residential and commercial)in the Village Parking Structure will be opened to meet space requirements described in the PUD. ii. Guest Parking(residential and commercial) in the Viceroy Parking Structure will be under construction to meet the future space requirements for 13a described in the PUD. 1 t 1 Related WestPac,LLC. Snowmass Base Village 8 i CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT& PHASING PLAN 10. November 26,2009 through April 12,2010—Refer to map CM-10 A. Infrastructure a. None at this time B. Buildings Phase Starting Construction a. None at this time C. Buildings Phase Continuing Construction a. Bldg 8 b. Bldg 13b D. Buildings Phase Completing Construction a. Bldg 13a 154 Units Total 154 Residential Units E. Construction Staging and Hording a. Residential and commercial are on-line and operating. b. Construction fencing line to allow for: i. Operation of residential ii. Operation of commercial iii. Operation of Ski Operations iv. Fire access as per local fire authority requirements F. Construction Fencing Line to Enclose. a. Areas as delineated on the plan b. All construction staging(construction materials, storage, construction staging, site t offices, necessary construction vehicles,construction apparatus,etc.)occurs within construction fencing. G. Parldng a. Construction Parking i. Limited areas within staging limits for some trades, inspectors and visitors ii. Worker parking at off-site lots and shuttled in to site for work day b. Guest Parking i. Guest Parking(residential and commercial)in the Village Parking Structure will be opened to meet space requirements described in the PUD. The 150 spaces required for Day Skier parking will be located in Lot C. ii. Guest Parking(residential and commercial) in the Viceroy Parking Structure will be opened to meet the space requirements for 13a described in the PUD. Related WestPac,LLC. Snowmass Base Village 9 CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT& PHASING PLAN t11. April 12,2010 through November 25,2010—Refer to map CM-11 A. Infrastructure a. Snowmelted entrance to garage from Wood Road will be necessary if construction activities are not completed between 4/13/2009 & 11/26/09. B. Buildings Phase Starting Construction None at this time C. Buildings Phase Continuing Construction a. Bldg 13b. D. Buildings Phase Completing Construction a. Bldg 8 29 Units Total 29 Residential Units E. Construction Staging and Hording a. Residential and commercial are on-line and operating. b. Construction fencing line to allow for: i. Operation of residential ii. Operation of commercial iii. Fire access as per local fire authority requirements F. Construction Fencing Line to Enclose: a. Areas as delineated on the plan b. All construction staging(construction materials, storage, construction staging, site offices, necessary construction vehicles,construction apparatus, etc.)occurs within construction fencing. G. Parldng a. Construction Parking i. Limited areas within staging limits for some trades, inspectors and visitors ii. Worker parking at off--site lots and shuttled in to site for work day b. Guest Parking i. Guest Parking(residential and commercial) in the Village Parking Structure will be opened to meet space requirements described in the PUD. 1. The Residences at Little Nell will be opening and guest parking(club, valet,commercial and residential)on P1,P2 and P3 will be opened to meet space requirements described in the PUD. ii. Guest Parking(residential and commercial) in the Viceroy Parking Structure will be opened to meet the space requirements for 13a described in the PUD. 1 Related WestPae,LLC. Snowmass Base Village 10 CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT& PHASING PLAN 12. November 25,2010 through April 11,2011 —Refer to map CM-12 A. Infrastructure a. None at this time B. Buildings Phase Starting Construction a. None at this time C. Buildings Phase Continuing Construction a. None at this time D. Buildings Phase Completing Construction a. Bldg 13b 80 Residential Units Total 80 Residential Units E. Construction Staging and Hording a. Construction fencing line to allow for: i. Operation of residential ii. Operation of commercial iii. Fire access as per local fire authority requirements iv. Fencing to enclose areas delineated on plans F. Construction Fencing Line to Enclose: a. Areas as delineated on the plan b. All construction staging(construction materials, storage, construction staging, site offices,necessary construction vehicles,construction apparatus, etc.)occurs within construction fencing. G. Parking a. Construction Parking i. Limited areas within staging limits for some trades, inspectors and visitors ii. Worker parking at off-site lots and shuttled in to site for work day b. Guest Parking i. Guest Parking(residential and commercial)in the Village Parking Structure will be opened to meet space requirements described in the PUD. The 150 spaces required for Day Skier parking will be located in Lot C ii. Guest Parking(residential and commercial)in the Viceroy Parking Structure will be opened to meet the space requirements for 13a and 13b described in the PUD. Related WestPae,LLC. Snmvmass Base Village 11 CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT& PHASING PLAN April 11, 2011 to the end of the project: The exact start date of improvements from April 11, 2011 to the end of the project is currently unknown. When construction does start up on future improvements it will follow the last approved Phasing sequence as described in Ordinance No. 3, Series of 2007. In addition to this ordinance (per the development agreement approved by Town Council on February 17'h, 2009) Building 7 will be the next building to achieve final certificate of occupancy. Phase Lots Buildings Phase 1B 3 Final Building 7 13 surface parking spaces on Lot 3 Phase 1 B 3 6 Phase 2B 2 &4 4AB, 5, 9AB, 9C With underground parking in main parking Structure, and The Aqua Center Phase 3 5 & 8 11 With underground parkin Phase 4 6 10AB with underground parking Phase 5 7 12 with underground parking The exact wording of the Phasing paragraph from Ordinance No. 3, Series of 2007 is as follows: 6. Phasing. The project will be developed in accordance with the Phasing Plan with no building permits being issued for a subsequent phase until building permits have been issued for each building in the previous phase and substantial construction has been begun on each such building in the previous phase, except that(a) building permits may be issued and construction may begin on Phase 2A prior to the issuance of building permits for any of the buildings in Phase 1B and (b) Building 13B, on Lot 8, may be construction as part of Phase 2A." In addition to this table of Buildings there are two remaining public improvements that need to be completed, the roundabout and the completion of the Upper Wood Road improvement The upper Wood Road improvements will be phased with the openings of the Buildings along Wood Road (Buildings 10, 11, 12 &the Fanny Hill Town Homes) and the roundabout will be completed (pursuant to item 2.1.e of the Funding Agreement dated November 4th, 2004) prior to the issuance of a certificate of occupancy for Building 6, 9AB & 9C. No permit for Fanny Hill Townhomes will be issued until Phase 2B is completed. Related WestPac,LLC. Sn"mass Base Village 12 CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT& PHASING PLAN SNOWMASS BASE VILLAGE & FANNY HILL CABINS October 12, 2004 (REV 2 Feb 2007) (REV 3 March 12, 2007) (REV 4 March 10, 2008) (REV 5 March 3, 2009) Redlined Version 1. GENERAL PROJECT CONSTRUCTION: 1) Construction Hours A. Standard Hours for exterior activities a. Monday through Saturday(Unless under special request and approval by the Town Manager or designee). b. 7:00am to 6:00pm or as otherwise approved or requested by the Chief Building Official of the Town of Snowmass Village. c. With prior Town Manager authorization,the applicant may extend working hours for work in the Right of Way for emergency situations as necessary to complete work. B. Activities occurring inside buildings that are not disruptive to the general public a. 7 days a week b. Unlimited hours C. To achieve the proposed schedule in this plan and in order to facilitate the execution of certain portions of the construction,variations from the standard hours of operation need to be considered.A minimum 7 day prior notification to the Town Manager,or approved designee,will be required for any construction activities beyond the Standard Hours of construction.The following construction methods and materials will require variation of construction hours to achieve an acceptable level of quality and efficiency. a. Cast in place concrete construction. b. Exterior work that does not violate the Town noise ordinances. c. Steel erection and delivery d. Roadway grading and asphalt work e. Other work in the Right of Way D. Prior to commencement of construction,the owner shall designate responsible parties to provide direct communication with the appropriate TOSV Personnel(TOSV Construction Coordinator)and provide responses to complaints. E. The contractor shall be responsible for providing information of general construction activities and schedules.Public Meetings will be held to inform the public on construction issues and information sources.An Email and Facsimile construction notice list will be developed and regularly scheduled construction updates will be distributed by the appropriate TOSV personnel-TOSV CC. F. The TOSV Police Department will be notified of major material deliveries and concrete pours.Regularly scheduled construction updates will be distributed to the Police Department. G. If construction of the project is interrupted,Applicant will work with the Planning Department to establish interim landscaping plans for the affected areas. H. Extended Hours for emergency situations—In the event of an emergency situation the Town Manager,Chief Building Official,or their designee may approve work to occur outside of permitted work hours at their discretion. Related WestPac,L.L.C. Snowmms Base Village 1 1 1 CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT d PHASING PLAN 2) Construction Traffic Management on Town Roads A. Brush Creek Road a. Traffic flow to be reduced by shuttling employees to the construction site from external parking areas.The primary parking area will be the Intercept lot at Brush Creek Road and SH 82. b. In addition to Brush Creek Passing Lane,existing pullouts are to be used along Brush Creek road by trucks that are not able to maintain reasonable speed up the road. This will allow for vehicles backing up behind the trucks to pass at these locations. Specifically designated non bus stop areas may also be used for temporary truck stacking during large material deliveries at times when limited staging on site is available. c. Peak traffic times of 7 AM to 9 AM(10 AM during ski season)and 3:00 PM to 5:00 PM are to be reasonably avoided,whenever possible for major material deliveries during the ski season and summer season. d. Lighted roadway information signs will be maintained at key entrances to the village. These signs will alert motorist of detours and construction activities that could affect travel. e. A Traffic Control Coordinator will be designated for the project. The Traffic Control Coordinator will develop a written delivery plan,manage all deliveries to the site, develop and enforce a policy that all deliveries must be coordinated through the Traffic Control Coordinator,limit deliveries during peak skier traffic times,conduct a traffic control meeting at the end of each shift identifying deliveries and traffic control issues for the next day,personally dispatch all delivery vehicles to the site from the designated staging area,be in continuous radio contact with the site,and continuous radio contact with the site concrete superintendent who will be in direct telephone contact with the batch plant. The Traffic Control Coordinator will ensure identified and established guidelines are complied with and consistent throughout all projects. B. Wood Road and Lower Carriage Way a. No staging of trucks or other construction vehicles is allowed along these roadways. Accommodations will be made within staging areas for vehicles except for work required within the Right of Way. b. If parking is not available in the staging areas for construction vehicles,they will be directed to other off site vehicle parking areas provided by the Contractor. 3. Public Access Closure Notification A. Public Trails a. Public notice shall be provided a minimum of 1 week in advance of all public trail closures.Signs shall be placed for trail closures,including alternative route signage, in advance of the closed sections so alternate routes can be used. Prior to trail closure,Contractor must gain approval of a way finding plan to reroute the closed trail from the Public Works Director or his designee,who may refer the matter to the Town Council. b. A functional,well-defined ski back trail through or around the Base Village shall be preserved and operational during the ski season. Alternate routing of affected trails Related WestPac,L.I.C. Snowm s Base Village 1 1 1 1 1 CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT&PHASING PLAN during non-ski season timeframes will be provided and coordinated with the Public Works Director or his designee. B. Public Roads a. Contractor shall coordinate all road closures with the TOSV Construction Coordinator. b. Public notice will be required a minimum of I week prior to all roadway closures. c. Single lane closures will be used as much as possible instead of closing entire road sections. d. All closures shall follow Manual of Uniform Traffic Control Devices. e. Full closure of Brush Creek Road(between Upper Kearns Road and Brush Creek Lane)will be required during the installation of improvements necessary to construct the roundabout. 4. Construction Fencing A. Site fencing I a. Site fencing shall be 8'and can either be chain link-with screened mesh or wood-------- Deleted:rmcina The type of fence used shall be determined at the discretion hionofeapplicant _-- - Deleted:. b. 20'planting buffer along roads when practical and where space allows.The applicant shall submit a construction landscape plan for these areas to be approved by TOSV staff. c. Permanently installed on posts,except some areas that require movable fencing for construction activities. d. Maintained by the contractor to remain in tact and neat to outside appearance. e. The fence line depicted on the Construction Management Plan drawings(CM-1 through CM-14)represents the outermost extent of where the construction fence can be located. The developer may move the construction fence inside of the extents shown on the CM drawings without issuing an Administrative Modification, provided that all areas outside of construction fencing shall be safe to the general public. f. All emohics desired by the applicant are subject to the approval of the Planning • --' Formatted:gullets and Numbering Director prior to installation. i5. Construction Waste Management A. Reduction and reuse of waste material on the site through a specific site waste management and separation program. B. Recycling of all applicable products. C. All food waste must be disposed in specified receptacles to prevent access by bears and other wildlife.The construction site will be maintained and kept clean of trash and debris by the contractor. 6. Minimization of Construction Impacts on Wetlands A. Specific measures shall be employed during site construction in and around wetlands and the Brush Creek Riparian zone. These measures are intended to provide additional protective measures beyond a standard Erosion and Sediment Control plan to the natural resources Related WewPac,LLC. Snowmass Base Village 3 1 CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT&PHASING PLAN onsite and of Brush Creek. The Brush Creek Enhancement Plan(BCEP)shall be used for further detail on this issue. B. All construction shall comply with the Army Corps of Engineers 404 permits for the project area C. All wetlands and existing sensitive riparian zones that are to be preserved shall be clearly identified and approved by the environmental consultant prior to the initiation of any site disturbance activities. D. All wetland areas to be preserved shall be protected with 2 lines of silt fencing as described in the BCEP,and shall be maintained by the Contractor throughout the construction period. E. No machinery,equipment or other construction materials shall be allowed within the delineated wetland areas designated to be preserved. F. Wetland areas to be preserved shall be inspected on a weekly basis,or after significant storm events to insure that all protection devices are operational. Any devices that are deficient tshallbereplacedorrepaired. G. No cleaning of equipment,tolls,machinery,concrete trucks,vehicles,etc shall be conducted where runoff may enter erosion control measures or protected wetland areas. H. All protection devices shall remain in place until all adjacent uphill areas of the construction site have been revegetated or completed. Revegetation is considered re-established once 70% of overall ground coverage is achieved. These devices shall not be removed until approved by the environmental consultant. I. In the event of an accidental placement of fill material within the wetland areas,the Contractor shall immediately cease operations in or adjacent to the affected wetland area and notify the wetland consultant. 7. Limits of Disturbance A. All trees and other native areas to be protected shall be delineated with fencing to prevent damage B. Tree preservation areas and the surrounding tree crown tine area must be left intact. C. All tree and native vegetation areas to be preserved shall be fenced off and approved by the landscape architect prior to the commencement of any site disturbance. D. The contractor will repair all disturbed areas. 8. Storm Water Management and Erosion Control A. The Contractor shall follow the Storm water Management Plan and Erosion Control plans for control of water quality and erosion from the site disturbance during the construction period. B. A Storm water discharge permit is required by the State of Colorado and is required prior to the start of any construction. C. Detailed engineering plans for Final Erosion Control Plan and Storm water Management Plan shall be submitted for and approved by the Town Engineer prior to Building Permit approval. D. All silt fence,erosion control structures and water quality devices shall be installed and approved by the engineer prior to any site disturbance. The Contractor throughout the duration of the project shall maintain all of these devices implemented. E. All erosion control and water quality structures shall be inspected on a weekly basis,or after significant storm events to insure that all protection devices are operational. Any devices that are deficient shall be replaced or repaired by the Contractor. Related WestPac,L.I.C. snowmass Base Village 4 1 CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT&PHASING PLAN F. An environmental consultant will review the site for hazardous materials at the beginning of the project construction. G. The offsite diversion drainage piping shall be constructed at the beginning of the construction phasing in order to intercept offsite runoff at upstream of the construction area in order to reduce contamination of this water from construction activities. H. Temporary settling ponds will be constructed with each phase of construction for control of water quality. Locations and design shall be detailed in final grading,drainage and erosion control plan. I. All hazardous and toxic materials must be disposed and/or treated as per the manufacturer's recommendations. J. All concrete trucks and concrete pumps are prohibited from disposing any excess concrete material or washout at the construction site unless a plan for such disposal is submitted to and approved by the Town via a formal Administrative Modification. The contractor is responsible for the proper disposal of any excess concrete material. K. All fueling of vehicles and machinery must be conducted in a designated area to prevent accidental leakage or spills.The fueling area shall be designed to contain spills and a typical plan shall be submitted for approval through the TOSV Construction Coordinator,&the town's Environmental Consultant,if deemed necessary.The excavation contractor shall meet with the Public Works Department staff and Planning Department representative on site prior to commencement of construction of any of the buildings to: a. Clearly describe the spill containment plan for the construction sites and/or staging areas and resolve any concerns with respect thereto to the reasonable satisfaction of the Planning Director,and b. Identify specific ways the contractor(s)will be responsive to street sweeping and erosion control to the reasonable satisfaction of the Planning Director. 9. Dewatering A. Details of dewatering pond locations and designs will be completed with final grading, drainage and erosion control plans. The Contractor shall implement all measures in accordance of these plans. B. Dewatering ponds as per Corps of Engineers standards C. Dewatering treated discharge as per Corps of Engineers standards 10. Fugitive Dust Control and Air Quality A. Run out areas from excavation sites will be made as long as possible and recycled asphalt will be rolled and oiled to create a tire"spin-off area". B. Tire Anti-Tracking Devices(ATDs)will be used at all construction exits.In some cases, these may be comprised of a gravel or cobbled roadbase. In areas of heavy excavation greater than 30,000 cubic yards),and for any multi-year construction project,heavy steel plates with large steel angles welded to the plate will be required to create tire mud knockoff areas.These ATDS will be cleaned regularly during the day. C. In cases of heavy excavations and/or multi-year construction schedules,or at the discretion of the Town's Construction Coordinator,a tire wash may be required and the trench must be cleaned regularly during times that tires must be washed. D. Runoff shall be collected and treated in accordance with the Storm Water Management Plan before being discharged from the site. Related WastPae,L.L.C. Snowiness Base Village S 1 1 CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT&PHASING PLAN E. A street sweeper with an internal vacuum and wash pot will be required to clean all project— adjacent roadways and intersections and to prevent airborne dust from being created by sweeping operations. F. Truck speed limits will be monitored and kept to a level that does not create excessive dust during dry periods. G. A water truck will be used during dry periods to wash down streets,control on-site dust,and minimize airborne dust on haul roads. H. Chemical stabilization(magnesium chloride)may be used on haul roads to mitigate dust during dry periods. I. Tracking of soil onto Town streets will be minimized by on-site mitigation measures. When tracking of soil occurs onto Town streets the Contractor shall effectively high pressure wash, flush and clean the roadways with a street cleaner. J. A real time air monitoring station shall be installed near the construction site in order to monitor air quality throughout the construction period.A baseline analysis will be conducted prior to major construction and the data shall be used to provide immediate response if air quality standards are exceeded. K. All exposed soil areas where grading operations are continuing shall be watered as required to reduce fugitive dust Disturbed soil areas shall be revegetated as soon as possible after grading operations are complete. L. Vehicle engine pre-heaters will be used to reduce warm up times of vehicles on site for the purpose of minimizing vehicle idling time. M. All vehicles and machinery must be in good working order and comply with all necessary environmental legislation. N. A primary water truck shall be designated on site for the purpose of dust control. Remainder ofPage Intentionally Blank) t Related WestPac,I.L.C. Snowmass Base Village 6 CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT&PHASING PLAN t II.PROJECT PHASING: This schedule represents the most likely schedule of development for the Base Village and Fanny Hill Cabins projects. It is directly dependent on timely approvals and permits. Related WestPac reserves the right to modify this schedule at any time. The dates used on all drawings are meant to represent the start/end of ski season- _ - Deleted:T and Thanksgiving. Deleted:4 On the drawings and in the following narrative"completing construction"is intended to mean that the building landscaoinghardscaoing lighting signage etc shall potentially be under construction until the final date in the date range. 9. April 13,2009 through November 26,2009-Refer to mapCMQ----------------- Deleted:to Formatted:Bullets and Numbering A. Infrastructure I a. Upper Wood Road between Wood Road Bridge(drive over/ski under)and the Building 13ab driveway. b. Snowmelted entrance to garage,from Wood Road. Formatted:Bullets and Numberng Deleted:Wall/Utility Work in Brush B. Buildings Phase Starting Construction Creek Rona a. InterimBuildine7_ Deleted:Bldg loab.90Uniaq C. Buildings Phase Continuing Construction Bldg 12. .al Unlaq Centela. Bldg8 Toud. UIR esi drndd Uvisq b. 13Idg13ab----------------------------------------Formatted;Indent:First line: 0" D. Buildings Phase Completing Construction Deleted:<#>Bldg sq a. Interim Building 7_ e>Bldg 71 O Bldg 71`Bldg 9sbq E. Construction Staging and Hording N;B,ag9" a. Residential and commercial are on-line and operating. b. Construction fencing line to allow for: t`1 Formatted:Bullets and Numbering i. Operation of residential J Formatted:Bullets and numbering ii. Operation of commercial Deleted:Bldg 6. .9 Unimi iii. Fire access as per local fire authority requirements p>Bldg 7. .8 . Uniaq 4>Bid8 dab.d.Umtsq Bldg 9ab.0.Unimq F. Construction Fencing Line to Enclose: Bldg go. .o.Uniaq a. Areas as delineated on the plan Toml . .21 Residrn6a1 U ift b. Temporary fire access will need to be kept clear for fire access to all buildings under construction. c. All construction staging(construction materials,storage,construction staging,site offices,necessary construction vehicles,construction apparatus,etc.)occurs within construction fencing. G. Parking IL Construction Parking i. Limited areas within staging limits for some trades,inspectors and visitors ii. Worker parking at off-site lots and shuttled into site for workday Related WestPac,I.I.C. Snowmass Base Village 7 t CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT&PHASING PLAN b. Guest Parking i__Guest Parking(residential and commercial)in the Village Parking Structure will be --- Formatted:Bullets and Numbering opened to meet space requirements described in the PUD--------------------- Deleted:9 ii. Guest Parking(residential and commercial)in the Viceroy Parking Structure will be under construction to meet the future space requirements for 13a described in the PUD. Deleted:(RematnderofPaga c___________________________________________________________________+ lntentiawlty Blank)1 Formatted:Bullets antl Numbering ' t 1 Related WestPac,I.I.C. Snowmass Base Village 8 1 CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT&PHASING PLAN 110. November 26,2009 through April 12,2010—Refer to map CM-JO----------------------- Deleted:II A. Infrastructure a. None at this time B. Buildings Phase Starting Construction a. None at this time C. Buildings Phase Continuing Construction a 11108-8-____ _ Deleted:<p>Bmg 51 b. Bldg 13 --------------------------------------------------- __ Deleted:Bldg 10AI Bldg uy D. Buildings Phase Completing Construction k>Bldg 121 Ague cenar a. Bldgl3q--154 ----- ------------------------------- -- Total X54 Residential Units Formatted:Bullets and Numbering Deleted:b E. Construction Staging and Hording Deleted:232 a. Residential and commercial are on-line and operating. Deleted:232 b. Construction fencing line to allow for: i. Operation of residential ii. Operation of commercial iii. Operation of Ski Operations iv. Fire access as per local fire authority requirements t F. Construction Fencing Line to Enclose: a. Areas as delineated on the plan b. All construction staging(construction materials,storage,construction staging,site offices,necessary construction vehicles,construction apparatus,etc.)occurs within construction fencing. G. Parking a Construction Parking L Limited areas within staging limits for some trades,inspectors and visitors ii. Worker parking at off-site lots and shuttled in to site for work day b, Guest Parking......................................Deleted:<s>, u=st Pertingq I. Guest Parking(residential and commercial)in the Village Parking Structure will be Formatted:Bullets and numbering opened to meet space requirements described in the PUD The 150 spaces required for Formatted:Font:Italic Skier puking,will be located in Lot C ii. Guest Parking(residential and commercial)in the Viceroy Parking Structure will Formatted:Font: to pc Italic be opened to meet the space requirements for 13a described in the PUD. c----------------------------------°_r; Deleted:<01.nowwmpleted Village vrkivg nmel 9 Formatted:centered Related WBa111eC,L.L.C. Snowman Base Village 9 t CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT 8.PHASING PLAN 11. April 12,2010 through November 25,2010_Refer to map CM-Zt ...................___ Deleted:-------Page Break------- ' Deleted:12 A. Infrastructure a. Snowmelted entrance to Parage from Wood Road will be necessary if construction activities are not completed between 4/13/2009& 11/26/09- -------------------- oeleted:Rowd,notul Cample6oa of Upper Woad aced B. Buildings Phase Starting Construction None at this time-------------------------------------------------- Deleted:F . .tmb ITom) . .0 HTH o uResidrnddUdb C. Buildings Phase Continuing Construction a. Bldg13b Deleted:Bldg[q Bldg 121 q>Bldg 1061 D. Buildings Phase Completing Construction Agee center a .BIdg8....2% Units---------------Deleted:unBldgs. .57 Unia9 Total 9 Residential Units Deleted:32 E. Construction Staging and Hording Deleted:a a Residential and commercial are on-line and operating. b. Construction fencing line to allow for: L Operation of residential ii. Operation of commercial iii. Fire access as per local fire authority requirements F. Construction Fencing Line to Enclose: a. Areas as delineated on the plan b. All construction staging(construction materials,storage,construction staging,site offices,necessary construction vehicles,construction apparatus,etc.)occurs within construction fencing. G. Parking a. Construction Parking i. Limited areas within staging limits for some trades,inspectors and visitors ii. Worker parking at off-site lots and shuttled in to site for work day b. Guest Parking i. Guest Parking(residential and commercial)in the Village Parking Structure will be opened to meet space requirements described in the PULL Deleted:In now completed Village ' 1. The Residences at Little Nell will be opening and guest parking(club. Perking Saucnae aad amociated project valet,commercial and residential)on PI.P2 and P3 will be opened to Perking anumurea meet space requirements described in the PUD. Formatted:Bullets and Numbering ii. Guest Parking(residential and commercial)in the Viceroy Parking Structure will be opened to meet the space requirements for 13a described in the PUD. Related WestPac,I.I.C. Snawmass Base Village 10 CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT&PHASING PLAN 12.November-25,2010 through April 11,2011—Refer to map CM Z_________ Deleted:u A. Infrastructure a, None at this time B. Buildings Phase Starting Construction a. None at this time I C. Buildings Phase Continuing Construction a. None at this time._ Deleted:Bldg 11 Deleted:0>Bldg 121 D. Buildings Phase Completing Construction O>Bldg 10ab1 a. J3Idg 136 80 Residential Units a>FnTBI Total 80 Residential Units Deleted:Aqua centu E. Construction Staging and Hording t a. Construction fencing line to allow for: i. Operation of residential ii. Operation of commercial iii. Fire access as per local fire authority requirements iv. Fencing to enclose areas delineated on plans F. Construction Fencing Line to Enclose: a. Areas as delineated on the plan b. All construction staging(construction materials,storage,construction staging,site offices,necessary construction vehicles,construction apparatus,etc.)occurs within construction fencing. C. Parking a. Construction Parking L Limited areas within staging limits for some trades,inspectors and visitors ii. Worker parking at off-site lots and shuttled in to site for work day b. Guest Parking i. C4ueest Parking(residential1 and commercial)i the Village Parking Structure will be _ _ Deleted:In now completed village opened to meet space requirements described in the PUD The 150 spaces PaAing auncunn and associated pml«t required for Day Skier parking will be located in Lot C parking structures. ii. Guest Parking(residential and commercial)in the Viceroy Parking Structure Formatted:Indent:Left: 1.5", Numbered+Level:1+Numberingwillbeopenedtomeetthespacerequirementsfor13aand136describedinStyle:I,Ii,iii,...+Start at 1+ the PUD. Alignment:Right+Aligned at: 1.63" Tab after: 1.88"+Indent at: 1.88",Tabs:Not at 1.98" Related WestPac,I.I.C. Snowmms Base Village 11 1 1 CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT&PHASING PLAN April 11, 2011 to the end of the Droiect. Formatted:superscript The exact start date of improvements from April 11.2011 to the end of the prolect is Formatted:Centered currently unknown. When construction does start up on future improvements it will Formatted Table follow the last approved Phasing sequence as described in Ordinance No.3.Series of Formatted:centered 2007. In addition to this ordinance(per the development agreement approved by Town a; Formatted:Normal,centered, Council on February 17. . 2009)Building 7 will be the next building to achieve final Tabs:Not at -2.06" certificate of occupancy. Formatted:Font Future Md BT,11 rr' ; pt Bold r Formatted:Font:Futura Md BT,11 Phase Lots Buildings Bold Phase 1B 3 Final Building 7 i Formatted:Normal,Centered, Tabs:Not at -2.06"13 surface parking spaces on Lot 3-------- r' Formatted:Heading 3,Left,Tabs: Phase 1B 3 6 2.06',Left Phase 2B 2&44 4A8.5,9AB,9C i Formatted:Font:Fu ure Md BT,11 With underground parking in main parking FormamaStructure.and I Tabs:N etl:Normal,centered,Tabs:Not at -2.06" The Aqua Center---------- ---- , , Phase 3 5&8 11 1',, Formatted:supersgipt With under round varking Deleted:through November 24, Phase 4 6 10AB with underground parking 2011-Refer to map CM-14 9 Phase 5 ........ 7 ---- ----------12+withundergroundparldng---------- 1, mfrastructure9 y None at this time.9 The exact wording of the Phasing paragraph from Ordinance No. 3.Series of 2007 is as y Buildings Phase Starting Construction9follows: None at this Ume9 6. Phasing. The Droiect will be developed in accordance with the Phasing Plan with Buildings Phase Continuing no building permits being issued for a subsequent phase until building permits have conswcuon9 ii FHTH9 been issued for each building in the previous phase and substantial construction has 9 been begun on each such building in the previous phase,except that(a)building permits Buildings Phase Completing Construction¶ may be issued and construction may begin on Phase 2A prior to the issuance of building 11 Bldg 11. . .so unib9 Permits for any of the buildings in Phase 1 B and (b) Building 13131, on Lot 8,may be Bldg 12. . .41 units9 construction as Dart of Phase 2A." Bldg t0ab. .90 Units9 1, Total. . .181 Residential Units9 In addition to this table of Buildings there are two remaining public improvements that Construction Staging and Hording9 ' need to be completed,the roundabout and the completion of the Upper Wood Road Residential and commercial are on- line and operating.9 improvement. The upper Wood Road improvements will be phased with the openings of 11 Construction fencing line to allow the Buildings along Wood Road(Buildings 10,11, 12&the Fanny Hill Town Homes)and for.¶ the roundabout will be completed(pursuant to item 2.1.e of the Funding Agreement Operation of commerclally dated November 47.20041 prior to the issuance of a certificate of occupancy for Building Fire access as per local gre 5.9AB&9C. authority requlrementsy 9 Construction Fencing Line to No permit for Fanny Hill Townhomes will be issued until Phase 2B is completed.. e:9 AreasAreas as delineated on the plan9 All construction staging construction materials,storage, construction staging,site Related WeslPec,LLC. Snowmass Base Village 12 1 1 iPage 12:[3]Deleted User 2/26/2009 9:36:00 AM 1 Page 12:[2]Deleted User 2/17/2009 2:32:00 PM 1 1 i 1 i 1 1 i 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 through November 24, 2011 — Refer to map CM-14 Infrastructure None at this time. Buildings Phase Starting Construction None at this time Buildings Phase Continuing Construction FHTH Buildings Phase Completing Construction Bldg 11 50 Units Bldg 12 41 Units Bldg 10ab 90 Units Total 181 Residential Units Construction Staging and Hording Residential and commercial are on-line and operating. Construction fencing line to allow for: Operation of residential Operation of commercial Fire access as per local fire authority requirements Construction Fencing Line to Enclose: Areas as delineated on the plan All construction staging (construction materials, storage, construction staging, site offices, necessary construction vehicles, construction apparatus, etc.) occurs within construction fencing. Parking Construction Parking Limited areas within staging limits for some trades, inspectors and visitors Worker parking at off-site lots and shuttled in to site for work day Guest Parking In now completed Village parking structure and associated project parking structures. Page Break-------------------------------------------------° November 24, 2011 through April 16, 2012— Refer to map CM-15 Infrastructure None at this time. Buildings Phase Starting Construction None at this time t Buildings Phase Continuing Construction None at this time 1 1 Buildings Phase Completing Construction FHTH 10 Units Total 10 Residential Units 1 Construction Staging and Hording Residential and commercial are on-line and operating. Construction fencing line to allow for: 1 Operation of residential Operation of commercial Fire access as per local fire authority requirements 1 Construction Fencing Line to Enclose: Areas as delineated on the plan 1 All construction staging (construction materials, storage, construction staging, site offices, necessary construction vehicles, construction apparatus, etc.) occurs within construction fencing. 1 Parking Construction Parking Limited areas within staging limits for some trades, inspectors and visitors 1 Worker parking at off-site lots and shuttled in to site for work day Guest Parking In now completed Village parking structure and associated project parking structures. All Work Completed 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 onstruction Start Date TBD AIEXIIEXIXXE Bldg 4ab Bldg 5 Bldg 6 Bldg 7 ( final building) Bldg 9ab c •. Bldg 10a Bldg 10b Fanny Hill Town Homes I 7 I X W 0 THE ENCLAVE JJ O r 4' t, is jJ ' • n J ] ' Jw. ; Sil' f'.i i0 n Cli Ilk OU) 9b Z t FrR ELA TEPUbIIC Entrance E5TPAC j J L R I{ Xterl I to the Garage Le X' 114 4/ 13/ 09 - 11/ 26/ 09 Building Under Construction Building Finishing Construction Construction Staging Area Construction Fence Road Construction 9/ 8/ 09 - 10/ 15/ 09 Road Construction 5/ 11/ 09 - 11/ 25/ 09 The fence In front of Interim Building 7, adjacent to Wood Road Construction Road & Emergency Access and tower Carriage Way will be a mesh construction fence until not for public) Interim Building 7is complete. Once Interim Building 7Is complete a4' tall split rail fence will separate this area from the road. Landscaping inside the fence will be in accordance with the Interim Buildin g7 interim landscape Ian. onnr CM 9 BCA E: 1wW- O• t]O O Ofl I 1 1 Y' I I , onstruction Start Date TBD ISBJ W, oly Save J: — Stiu 13U Bldg 4ab Bldg 5 Bldg 6 Bldg 7 ( final building) E'• u Bldg 9ab Bldg 10a Bldg 10b Bldg 11 Bldg 12 l j•/ / Fanny Hill Town Homes y Ot dD COQ THE ENCLAVE Q EYOU Lot C ( 150 spaces) Q CO 1 J n: cess to plaza from y [ r. ResAT rT. ED J' terim BlI n w. the Transit Center Legend 11 26 09 - 4 12 10 r" ri' pthru Interim Bldg 7 Building Under Construction Building Finishing Construction ce. a w.. Public Entrance ' Construction Staging Area i co Garage Construction Fence Construction Road & Emergency Access The fence in front of Interim Building 7, not for public) adjacent to Wood Road and Lower Carriage Lot C Day Skier Parking Way will be a4' tall split rail fence. landscaping Inside the fence will be in accordance with the Interim Building 7 interim landscape plan. etw e:,-. svo CM 10 IY] IxWn bv: onstruction Start Date TBD Bldg 4ab Bldg 5 Bldg 6 Bldg 7 ( final building) Bldg 9ab Bldg l0a Bldg 10b u ork° Bldg 11 Bldg 12 I i Fanny Hill Town Homes THEENC VE D J i ors? Fk i t. J 1 ov C) t Jam; t n J l l : j6 •!! ,: fu' _ a CQCO l 4` ' 1 4 ( Y• - u Veaa1LW 38 / R" tl ORELATED Public Entrance w Es TP/, c ilitenm Bid r+ _ _ to the Garage Legend 4/ 12/ 10 - 11/ 25/ 10 4 •' Access to placa from the Transit Center thru > Building Under Construction Interim Bldg 7 ck Building Finishing Construction Construction Staging Area 7 Construction Fence The fence in front of Interim Building7, Emergency Access COnStfConstruction Road 8t adjacent to Wood Road and Lower Carriage Way will be a4' tall split rail fence. not for public) Landscaping Inside the fence will be in Construction Road 4/ 12/ 10 - 11/ 25/ 10 accordance with the Interim Building 7 interim landscape plan. 7LI I u CM 11 scw e.a•.° va• T Sz a — F AGENDA ITEM SUMMARY WORK SESSION DATE April 6, 2009 AGENDA ITEM TITLE: Annual Meeting with the Snowmass Village Town Council DESCRIPTION OF ISSUE: Topics for discussion at today's meeting include: 1. Economic Conditions 2. Free Winter RFTA Svc. Between Snowmass Village &Aspen (TOSV request) 3. Brush Creek Trail Update (TOSV request) 4. Update on Public Health Act Activities 5. Workforce Housing 6. Pitkin County Strategic Plan/Urban Growth Boundaries LINK TO STRATEGIC PLAN: Regionalism - Pitkin County will work with citizens and groups and other jurisdictions in order to identify a shared vision for the region and to promote collaboration ATTACHMENTS: Memos on: Brush Creek Trail Update on Public Health Act Activities Urban Growth Boundary Agreement Discussion AGENDA ITEM SUMMARY WORK SESSION DATE: April 6, 2009 AGENDA ITEM TITLE: Brush Creek Trail Update STAFF RESPONSIBLE: Gary Tennenbaum, Pitkin County Open Space and Trails Land Steward ISSUE STATEMENT: The Brush Creek Trail seasonal closure will be lifted April 1St and Open Space and Trails (OST) maintenance crews will begin sweeping the trail when the Seasonal Crew starts on April 13i°. BACKGROUND: This is the first year with the new seasonal closure dates of December 1- March 31. The old dates were October 15-May 15 and OST worked with the Colorado Division of Wildlife and the Snowmass Trails Committee to change the dates to allow safe bicycle and pedestrian passage along the Brush Creek corridor during the.snow free months while protecting wildlife during the critical winter months. Also in the Brush Creek Valley, OST has also worked with neighboring land owners that have water rights that originate on Seven Star Open Space to install a Beaver Deceiver to allow the beaver dams to remain in the channel while all water rights are protected. In 2008 the Beaver Deceiver system worked well with little maintenance necessary to keep water in the ditch.The beavers at Seven Star have been able to return after many years of being removed before OST purchased the second piece of Seven Star Open Space in 2005 and have started to restore wetlands that historically occurred on Seven Star Open Space. KEY DISCUSSION ITEMS: A reminder to everyone that there is a gap in the equestrian connection from Cozy Point to Snowmass Village at the Droste property. The 1999 trail easement that'the Town of Snowmass Village and Pitkin County acquired does not allow equestrian traffic, and to date,the landowner has been unwilling to add this. BUDGETARY IMPACT: None RECOMMENDED BOCC ACTION: NA ATTACHMENTS: None 1 AGENDA ITEM SUMMARY WORK SESSION DATE: Monday,April 6th,2009-(Joint Work Session with Snowmass Village Town Council) AGENDA ITEM TITLE: Update on Public Health Act Activities INITIATOR OF ISSUE: Nan Sundeen,Director Health and Human Services BACKGROUND: The Public Health Act(also known as SB 08-194)has set forth a series of expectations and timelines for local county commissioners.The first obligation requires the establishment by resolution of each county public health agency by July 1, 2009. After that a Board of Health must be appointed in each county or district within 90 days.Then, early in 2010, counties will be required to submit"public health improvement plans" after the submission of the statewide public health improvement plan. County Commissioners will be required to determine the services to carry out the public health laws and rules of the state Board of Health and Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment according to the specific needs and resources available within the community as set out in the state and local plans. Ultimately,County Commissioners will be required to ensure the provision of money necessary (over estimated revenues from surpluses,grants and donations)to cover the total cost of maintaining the public health agency for the ensuing year by an appropriation from the county general fund. DESCRIPTION OF THE ISSUE Pitkin County is utilizing the obligations outlined in SB 08-194 to thoroughly review our unique structure for public health and to seek opportunities for efficiencies and clarification of roles and responsibilities. While we are fortunate to enjoy high quality public health and environmental health resources within Pitkin County, it is a challenge that our services are somewhat decentralized and fragmented. Since the early 1970's we have contracted public health services to a non-profit entity called Community Health Services(only three counties in the state contract these services to non-profit entities). Both Pitkin County and the City of Aspen have Environmental Health staff and separate Boards of Health. Water, air and environmental quality issues are dealt with in different ways. The Town of Snowmass Village addresses some of their public health obligations by contracting through an Intergovemmental Agreement(executed in 2003)with Pitkin County for provision of consumer protection program services($8,300).The IGA has a re-opener"clause in the event that either party identifies a change in the Scope of Work 10%).Town of Snowmass Village also contributed($15,000) in 2009 to Community Health Services for public health services. SB-194 allows municipal corporations to maintain their own public health agency. It is assumed, unless we hear differently from TOSV,that they do not intend to identify their own public health agency and are satisfied with continuing to work within the structure created by Pitkin County to address county-wide public health needs. I The Town of Basalt has an informal agreement with Pitkin County Environmental Health paying$5,000 toward the Consumer Protection Program to address a number of restaurants, schools,and child care facilities within Pitkin County in the Town of Basalt. Through the work of broad coalition of county stakeholders, Pitkin County will meet the July 1,2009 deadline to submit the name of Pitkin County's Public Health Agency and then identify the Board of Health. By December 31",2009, we expect to receive the statewide public health improvement plan and then we will be required to create a local improvement plan and move toward serving the public health needs of our citizens. KEY ITEMS FOR DISCUSSION I. Attached is a draft SWOT analysis(Strengths, Weaknesses,Opportunities and Threats) completed by the stakeholder work group analyzing Pitkin County's public health system. Snowmass Village Town Council members are invited to add their input to the list. 2. Identification of concerns, comments,questions about the establishment of the Pitkin County Board of Health membership? 3. Is there any feedback Snowmass Village Town Council members have regarding their contract with Pitkin County Environmental Health&Natural Resources for Consumer Protection (restaurant inspections and other consumer protection program services)? ACTION REQUIRED: No action required, informational only. 2 DRAFT STRENGTHS/WEAKNESSES/OPPORTUNITIES AND THREATS ANALYSES March 18,2009 What are the stren s of our Public Health System in Pitkin County? Meets the goal of the Aspen Area Community Plan: has messy vitality. In spite of its complexity, it has worked. Dedicated staff makes it work—dedicated to the mission. Nice blend of private and public entities. Overlap and collaboration is strength. of services being provided. Physical location of AVH, HHS,EH,CHS is a benefit. Non-profit partnerships. Crossjurisdictional interactions: Municipalities and counties. Limited turf issues. Separate City/County EH departments allows for pursuit of more./diverse goals. Diversified funding and reasonably sized funding. Political leadership allows dedicated funding through tax supports and programmatic supports. Not a lot of state or federal involvement/interference. Lot of expertise/historical knowledge. Lot of public awareness of agencies. What are the weaknesses of our Public Health system in Pitkin County? No organizational consolidation within these functions—seems disorganized. Turf issues Services have been dropped in the past due to funding shortages. The focus of the analysis is on 25 yr old service description(1984 services)and not representative of current needs. Relationship with CHS Board of Directors and Pitkin County BOCC/Board of Health: CHS not sufficiently represented for decisions. One entity does not have control over priorities-how do you prioritize community needs when so spread out. Different political entities have different priorities;assessment of priorities is not done in organized way. Environmental Health split into city and county. The sheer number of entities is a challenge. Expertise can be challenge: sometimes small entities may not know what they really need. Without a large department looking at big picture,small programs could get cut e.g. consumer protection. One entity does not have a lot of control over political community input. How to assess the wide array of providers and their overlap? Will Boards surrender their autonomy? No formal joint Community Needs Assessment between PH/EH. Access to medical/dental for participants in PH and private medical care. Lack of certain programs:EH-no pool program,no hotel inspections. Basalt: Emergency Health services are lacking—must travel to either Aspen or 3 Glenwood Springs. What external opportunities exist for this system? Regionalization: example=West Central Collaboration Partnership: 5 yr grant from Colorado Trust allowed 6 counties(Hinsdale,Montrose, Delta, Oumy,Gunnison, San Miguel)to work on regionalization. Have already been working for 2.5 yrs. Resolution states they will remain separate at this time but continue their assessment/planning towards regionalization.Good model to investigate. Could add programs. Community Needs Assessment could analyze the system. Political will exists between PH and EH to examine current structure—it's a good time to do this. If PH/EH was together, would you have more strength? Opportunity exists to show need collectively for increase funding on per capita basis. Opportunity to be recognized as resort-based economy and have a different funding. formula. Look at releasing strict fee structure/limits in EH for septic systems,(private sector work). Maximize amount of services while still preserving authority of individual jurisdictions. Process creates opportunity to increase efficiency and effectiveness for clients. Description of BOH structure: Convenes as BOH for PH and EH. What external threats exist for the system? Current economy. State funding inadequate and uncoordinated. State CDPHE systems unorganized. Lack of centralized control may make the state dictate services. Need entity to do analysis of health status indicators. Who is doing core services based on population needs? Need data to make case for our services. Pitkin County is big outlier in funding allocations. CHS (non-profit) receives all public health dollars directly.City EH receives theirs directly from State also. Need to have County Attorney review bill ASAP—60%of county resolutions state wide are complete. Who and how is the money controlled?Each jurisdiction or central authority with the County? PH director is not a County employee—what if BOCC has different priorities than CHS BOD? Lines of authority are in question. Combination of PH and EH would not be good? BOCC might oppose broadening membership to create new Board of Health. CHS has contract with the county but does not have a dispute process. Threat exists for continued support of Health Community Fund. CHS as a nursing service(Part 6) is repealed on July 1,2009. All but one other county in the state has EH/PH together for Master Contract/Task Orders with the state. Deadline of April 15's to submit name changes, signature authority, change in scope of work,date of scheduled hearing with BOCC concerning passage of resolution. 4 MEMORANDUM TO: Pitkin County Board of County Commissioners Snowmass Town Council FROM:Cindy Houben, Pitkin County Community Development Director RE: Pitkin County Strategic Plan/Urban Growth Boundaries DATE: April 6, 2009 Joint BOCC and Town Of Snowmass Village Council meeting The Pitkin County Board of County Commissioners (BOCC) has adopted a Strategic Plan that is comprised of 9 topic areas including Growth. The BOCC identified a strategic action item that directs the county to investigate the possibility of creating an Urban Growth Boundary (UGB) with the other jurisdictions within Pitkin County. Currently the BOCC and Pitkin County Planning and Zoning commission work with the City of Aspen on a joint plan (the Aspen Area Community Plan) for the areas within the Aspen UGB. While Basalt and Carbondale have UGB's, the County does not have a joint planning effort with those jurisdictions. An IGA was established to work jointly with the Town of Basalt on land use issues within the Basalt UGB and the surrounding area. In the past, the concept of an IGA with the TOSV was discussed but never implemented. Today the BOCC would like to explore whether the TOSV has an interest in pursuing the concept of a UGB. Our understanding is that the TOSV has identified an "Area of Influence" which covers properties outside of the Town limits, however, a formal UGB has not been discussed.