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06-29-09 Town Council PacketAV SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL SPECIAL MEETING AGENDA JUNE 29, 2009 PLEASE NOTE THAT ALL TIMES ARE APPROXIMATE — ITEMS COULD START EARLIER OR LATER THAN THE STATED TIME CALL TO ORDER AT 4:00 P.M. Item No. 1: ROLL CALL Item No. 2: PUBLIC NON-AGENDA ITEMS 5-minute time limit) Item No. 3: COUNCIL UPDATES Item No. 4: DISCUSSION ON HOUSING GUIDELINES Time: 30 minutes) ACTION REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: Receive potential changes for housing guidelines and provide direction on prioritizing tasks. Joe Coffey............................. Page 1 Item No. 5: COMPREHENSIVE PLAN —CHAPTER 7 BUILT ENVIRONMENT, CHAPTER 4 REGIONAL AND COMMUNITY ECONOMICS AND CHAPTER 5 COMMUNITY SERVICES, FACILITIES AND AMENITIES Time: 150 minutes) ACTION REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: Review Chapters 7, 4 and 5 and provide direction, and all the edited Chapters to date. Comp Plan Team (Russ Forrest, Chris Conrad, Lesley Compagnone, Jason Haber, David Peckler) Page 6 Item No. 6: EXECUTIVE SESSION Town Council will now meet in Executive Session pursuant to C.R.S. 24-6-402(4) and Snowmass Village Municipal Code Section 2-45(c), to specifically discuss two items: a) Determining positions relative to matters that may be subject to negotiations, developing strategy for negotiations, instructing negotiators pursuant to C.R.S. 24- 6-402(4)(e) and Snowmass Village Municipal Code Section 2-45(c)(5); and 06-29-09tc Page 2 of 2 b) Conferences with an attorney for the purposes of receiving legal advice on specific legal questions pursuant to C.R.S. 24-6-402(4)(c) and Snowmass Village Municipal Code Section 2-45(c)(2); Provided, there is an affirmative vote of two-thirds of the quorum present at this meeting to hold an Executive Session and for the sole purpose of considering items (a) and (b) above. Provided further, that no adoption of any proposed policy, position, resolution, regulation, or formal action shall occur at this Executive Session. Item No.7: ADJOURNMENT NOTE: Total time estimated for meeting: Approximately 3 hours excluding items 1-3 and 6 —7) ALL ITEMS AND TIMES ARE TENTATIVE AND SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT FURTHER NOTICE. PLEASE CALL THE OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK AT 923-3777 ON THE DAY OF THE MEETING FOR ANY AGENDA CHANGES. MEMO To: Town Council From: Russ Forrest, David Peckler, Susan Hamley, Lesley Compagnone, Jason Haber, Chris Conrad Date: June 29, 2009 Re: Review Chapter Updates to the Comprehensive Plan Chapter 7 -- Built Environment, Chapter 4 -- Regional and Community Economics and Chapter 5 -- Community Services, Facilities and Amenities 1.PURPOSE Council will review Chapter 7—Built Environment and Chapter 4—Regional and Community Economics. Time permitting, staff may present Chapter 5 -- Services, Facilities and Amenities. The chapters were drafted by the Planning Commission to be concise and consistent with the format of the updated Comprehensive Plan. Council's review of the key elements of the chapter, Strategic Objectives, Background and Policies, is requested to complete the editing of the chapters. 2.TODAY'S REVIEW 1. Chapter 7-- Built Environment: Focus on: Influence Areas —There are three influence areas adjacent to the Town: Lower Brush Creek Valley, Owl Creek Valley and Divide. Please consider whether additional goals or objectives should be added for these areas. The "Influence Areas" map will be amended to incorporate the annexed Cougar Canyon/Cozy Point Ridge property within the Town boundary. Comprehensively Planned Areas ("CPA") --There are seven CPA's identified in the Comprehensive Plan. Maps delineating their boundaries have been placed in your council boxes and copies are available for public viewing at the planning department. Each CPA contains "key objectives" that should be accomplished within that CPA's boundary. The Land Use Code then classifies each objective identified within the Comprehensive Plans as to whether it "shall be accommodated" or merely an objective that could be considered" in the development of the CPA area. It is essential that the objectives clearly articulate the community vision for the desired outcome of future development within the particular CPA. It should be noted that the Planning Commission did not focus upon the Snowmass Center CPA as there was a pending Preliminary PUD land use application and amendments to the CPA would not apply to that proposal. That application has been withdrawn and the CPA could be considered at this time. Future Land Use Map —The Future Land Use Plan will be amended to reflect past use changes that have occurred as approved by development proposals. A copy of the map was included with those place in the council boxes. Guidelines for Preserving West Village's Character & Sense of Place—This is a new section being added that was developed by Winston & Associates. Graphics will be inserted within the final document to illustrate the concepts discussed. Policies—Attachment 1 has been enclosed to provide a comparative analysis of the current vs. proposed policies. Underlined text represents current policy language retained in proposed chapter. Note that three current policies have not been carried forward in the draft chapter. 2. Chapter 4 -- Regional and Community Economics: Focus on: Existing Conditions and Guiding Principles—The Planning Commission intended to consolidate relevant past studies and identify the current conditions and principles being applied to the economic structure of the community. Policies—The policies outline a strategic strategy for future decision making. 3. Chapter 5 -- Services, Facilities and Amenities: Focus on: Policies. 3.PROPOSED REVIEW SCHEDULE April 201"—Chapter 9: Housing (60 minutes) April 271"—Chapter 8: Transportation (60 minutes) May 4'h— Chapter 1: Comprehensive Planning Process and Chapter 2: Community Values and Vision (45 minutes) May 18th—Chapter 8: Transportation (60 minutes) Junelst—Chapter 6: Environmental Resources June 291" - Chapter 7: Built Environment (45 minutes) and Chapter 4: Regional and Community Economics (45 minutes) with Chapter 5: Community Services, Facilities and Amenities (30 minutes) time permitting. July 6`"— Chapter 3: Community Arts (30 minutes) and Chapter 10: Actions and Implementation (60 minutes) 4. PREVIOUSLY REVIEWED CHAPTERS Red-lined versions of the following chapters are attached: Chapter 1 Introduction: The Comprehensive Planning Process Chapter 2 Community Character and Vision Chapter 6 Environmental Resources Chapter 8 Transportation Chapter 9 Workforce Housing These chapters include comments received during prior Council review, and are presented for verification as to whether staff has accurately captured your recommended edits. Attachment 1: Built Environment Policies Comparison: Adopted vs. Proposed Handouts: Current Comprehensive Plan Maps (for reference): Existing Land Use (smaller scale) Map Future Land Use Map Future Land Use (smaller scale) Map Influence Areas Map Town Core Map Base Village Comprehensively Planned Area Map Faraway South Comprehensively Planned Area Map Faraway North Comprehensively Planned Area Map Rodeo Entry Comprehensively Planned Area Map ATTACHMENT 1 Chapter 7 Built Environment Policies Comparison: Adopted vs. Proposed Underlined Text Represents Current Policy Language Retained in Proposed Chapter. Policies The Town of Snowmass Village shall: Maintain the Town of Snowmass Village's distinct community identity by preserving existing open space areas between the Town and other communities. Maintain the open character of the lower Brush Creek Valley as the entryway to Snowmass Village. Focus development away from this critically important visual and natural resource corridor. Note: "open character of the" was added. Minimize the negative environmental and visual impacts of development and preserve open space for scenic, recreational and wildlife uses. Annexation should be limited to areas where a public benefit can be shown. Consideration of any potential annexation should be limited to the west by the ridgeline into the Snowmass Creek drainage, and otherwise by designated influence Areas. Comprehensively address cumulative impacts and community objectives when making specific land use decisions. For example, to increase the capture of pass through guests, and yet make sure that new development doesn't diminish traffic levels-of- service, if a project results in increased development it may need to incorporate on-site local workforce housing, provide remote parking, and/or contribute to the transit system on both a local and regional basis. Make decisions that best serve the resort and the community over the long-term. During development or land use review, fully understand the limitations to growth for our community (our carrying capacity) and how the proposal impacts these limitations, as well as analyze the essential elements for maintaining the proportional balance between and understanding the limits of residential and commercial development. Complement and integrate new development into the existing character of Snowmass Village, reflecting a compact, pedestrian/village-scale environment based on a high- quality alpine resort experience. Note: "compact, pedestrian/village-scale environment" replaced "minimally built environment". Create a compact, clearly defined and well-connected Town Core with services and housing in proximity to each other. Density and growth should be concentrated in the Town Core area and land uses should support a place where visitors and locals can interact. Preserve the community character of Snowmass Village through intelligent land use: sensitive design; compatible mass, scale and density; and full evaluation and mitigation of impacts caused by new development. Encourage new development and/or redevelopment that serve visitor's recreation, dining, shopping, apres-ski and basic service needs in the Town Core. Note: Replaced Encourage new land uses which serve visitor's recreation, dining, shopping, apres-ski and basic service needs in Snowmass Village (even though Aspen remains a major attraction to the Snowmass Village visitor)." Ensure that new development has available employee housing on-site or in locations that minimize the need for single occupancy vehicles and that are or can be adequately supported by mass transportation. Encourage more amenities that enhance business, minimize vehicle trips out-of-town and generate local sales tax revenues to be located in the Town Core. Note: Replaced More amenities should be located in Town that enhance business, minimize vehicle trips out-of-town and generate local sales tax revenues." Encourage transit oriented development (TOD) ideas within Snowmass Town Core, and regionally, to provide housing in close proximity to service jobs. Discourage commercial development in areas outside of the Town Core, unless it can be demonstrated that such development is consistent with overall Town goals and there is a significant public benefit. Current Policies Not Within Proposed Chapter Consider long-range goals and community needs as a whole when making specific land use decisions. Make decisions that best serve the resort and the community over the long-term. Require that development projects within the Comprehensively Planned Areas be designed consistently with the preferred character in the plan. Encourage clustered development within established, built-up areas and discourage development in other areas. MEMORANDUM TO: Snowmass Village Town Council FROM: Housing Department DATE: June 29, 2009 SUBJECT: Housing Advisory Committee update and Discussion of Council's Housing Topics for the Committee I.PURPOSE AND ACTIONS REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: At the June 15, 2009 Council meeting the Council requested the new Housing Advisory Committee to prepare a list of Housing Guideline topics that need to be discussed before the upcoming housing lotteries. Council then said they would also have a list of topics for the Committee to discuss. Listed below are the Housing Topics the Committee plans to discuss right away. Lottery Procedures Discussion of Priorities for special district employees Discussion of number of people required per bedroom. Other Housing Topics the Committee plans to discuss are listed below. Downsizing within the current deed restricted sales units Income & asset guidelines Capital improvements Recovery of Interior capital improvement expenses Should the Town of Snowmass Village purchase units? Retirement/ possible incentives to sell units II. BACKGROUND The newly appointed Housing Advisory Committee has had two meetings to date. Our first meeting was mostly informational and many different housing topics were briefly discussed. The second meeting focused on the lottery procedures, priorities for special district employees and number of people required per bedroom to purchase units. The Housing Committee has decided to meet weekly on Tuesdays at 4:00 pm at the Housing Office. III. STAFF RECOMMENDATIONS Today Council is requested to provide the Housing Manager with other Housing Guideline topics they would like for the Housing Advisory Committee to discuss. TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN x T\, Uv l Base Village Comprehensively Soo 1000 rot Hrluru Planned Area SCALE: V= 500' 1:6,000 Legend: Land Uses h nnpr.a me dW fa uea pn inx Gxnprderun<19mranly Fv nmrN:rR' aRicwl Zrxn:huinzr nup US)Open Space PUB)Public ER) Estate/Residential MF)Multi-Family RFC) Recreation SF)Single Family TMIY sf ex®OS Vlao¢« MU) Mixed Use CO)Cmmnercial ce `"' Ch\ m VPy.n nleb tir Comprehenrww+opw+aurmsxrwncr+si,:n(wnlr.11m.uirv, uwnxwutip/ sively Planned Area r.r.mWr.a..xwMW4 w„nm..p..ry r,..rn wix,o..;wev TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN r 0 i r Faraway North Comprehensively ° 5, 1DWFm 11 SCALE: 1"=500' N01 Planned Area 1:6,000 Legend: Land Uses T M,WWnde„ w„„nor N.O ddr/IM Wy.F+r.m.-e OS)Open Space edlrW u..Ouen mr PUB)Public ER)EstaterResidential MF)Multi-Family REC)Recreation SF)Single Family LO)Lodging CO)Commercial r.v maeu MU)Mixed Use Comprehensively Planned Area nrer.r •awe.. ..ro..ra,,.err...arl'+4e.arwyv nr s.wP+Rww..UwrYrr.1 LL.ra., TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN Y r a J 0 1 a Faraway South W low Fxl Comprehensively Planned Area SCALE: V=500' 1:6,000 Legend: Land Uses rlkao vp ae 6iciUnl Rir ue r pm M a GMT hedw Wnoniy.Porm®g reeRkiYzandm OS)Open Sparc N (PUB)Public ER)FataodResidential W Multi-Family REQ Recreation SF)Single Family sw ef Vllyp Mil)Mixed Use CO)Commercial n rte+ r.-. 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MIY.ulerle.rapp nynlhMC xiennmll.aplinini+^^^I tlW:nl..mnnn.•Nr ILnx^t IwiM1n ml1 a ml u.kL M mvini eXm i a TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN 1W Legend: Land Uses 1.6,000 OS)Open Space Public CO)( ER) Estate/Residential MF) Multi-Family REC) Recreation SF)Single Family LO) Lodging MU) Mixed Use Town Core ON1133W1IONf10o BOOZ ' 6ZaNnr SaNdti `L110mmiM31A321 2131ddHDNd'ld 3AISN3H321dW0O 5 ' ONW311 BOA1N3WHDHlld pr.lb,ao 1 Chapter 1 Introduction: The Comprehensive Planning Process 2 3 4 December, 2008) 5 6 The Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan articulates a common vision for the 7 future of the Town. The Plan balances community values and vision with policies for 8 land use, economics, environment, housing, transportation and the arts. Both short-tern 9 and long-term actions are required to implement the Plan. The residents of, and visitors 10 to, the Town of Snowmass Village are integral to the -tanning of the future of the---- Deleted:N 11 community. Our collective and individual responsibility is to work together to identify 12 common issues and needs and to pool resources in order to improve the community. 13 14 The Process 15 Just as with past planning documents, the ideas,concepts and input gained from planning 16 experts, technical professionals, the general public and others, contributed to this update 17 of the Comprehensive Plan. Public officials and citizens were interviewed and a series of 18 public meetings were held to gather the best information and most current ideas about the 19 Town's present condition and future opportunities. 20 21 The process began with stakeholder interviews with the following groups: 22 TOSV Planning Commission 23 Citizens for Snowmass Village&Citizens for Responsible Growth 24 community focus groups 25 Related Westpac and Chaffin Light 26 lodges and merchants 27 marketing/sales 28 The Aspen Skiing Company 29 Infrastructure and utility providers 30 Part-Time Residents Advisory Board 31 32 Topics discussed included: 33 Housing 34 Employment 35 Transportation 36 Services and infrastructure 37 Carrying capacity 38 Economics 39 Vitality 40 Community,character and culture 41 Growth and development 42 The Base Village, West Village and Village Center nodes 43 The environment 44 Process 45 Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 1:Process December,2008 Page 1 1 Town staff initiated the process with a presentation of the State of the Comprehensive 2 Plan to the Planning Commission. The report identified specific areas of concern to 3 address in the update. 4 5 Public meetings then followed: 6 Public Meeting#1 —Vision 7 Public Meeting#2—Values 8 Public Meeting#3—Validate Vision and Values 9 Workshops—Specific to the redevelopment of the West Village 10 11 Common categories formed after these public meetings,they were assigned a chapter: 12 The Built Environment 13 The Natural Environment 14 Regional and Community Economics 15 Transportation 16 Housing 17 Arts and Culture 18 Facilities and Amenities 19 20 Policies 21 The Town of Snowmass Village shall: 22 23 Use the Comprehensive Plan as a regulatory document to guide Town elected 24 and appointed officials, staff, businesses, developers, property owners, and 25 other entities in implementing our goals and objectives. 26 27 Ensure that the Comprehensive Plan remains current and reflective of our 28 community values. 29 30 Ensure that implementation and updating of the Plan continues to be a 31 community-wide effort. 32 33 Provide opportunities for continued citizen involvement in implementation 34 decisions and in the land use planning process. The Plan will continue to 35 designate appropriate future land uses, activities and services, the protection 36 of the environment and the enhancement of the economy based on the 37 community's preferences. 38 39 Communicate and work with counties and municipalities in the region to 40 implement shared.regional goals. 41 42 Authority 43 All municipal governments in the State of Colorado derive authority to enact land use 44 control measures from the general municipal authority granted in the Colorado 45 Constitution and by State Legislation. The specific authority for a statutory municipality Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 1: Process December, 2008 Page 2 1 to plan and zone is contained in Title 31, Article 23, Colorado Revised Statutes (C.R.S.). 2 These statutes clearly specify the provisions pertaining to planning and zoning activities . 3 for municipal governments and also extend to home rule municipalities. In addition, the 4 jurisdiction of the Comprehensive Plan, pursuant to §31-23-212, C.R.S., includes land 5 within three miles of the boundaries of the Town located in unincorporated areas of 6 Pitkin County. 7 8 As a Home Rule Municipality, the Town may enact legislation that conflicts with state 9 legislation provided that the Town's legislation is of a purely local concern. The- 10 authority of the Snowmass Village Town Council to adopt a Master Plan arises 11 specifically from Section 1.7 of the Town of Snowmass Village Municipal Charter,which 12 states,"The council shall adopt and maintain a comprehensive master plan of the Town." 13 In addition, the Planning Commission is charged with conducting a review of the Plan 14 according to Code. Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 1:Process December,2008 Page 3 1 Chapter 2 Community Character and Vision 2 3 December, 2008) 4 5 6 Introduction 7 Tucked high in the Brush Creek Valley, Snowmass Village is an extraordinary place to 8 live, work and visit. While creating this resort, the founders of the Town Snowmass 9 Village also created a strong community. The community's Comprehensive Plan, and the 10 land use code adopted to implement that plan, helps define parameters for decision 11 making and articulates a future vision. The characteristics described below are essential 12 to create and maintain the character of the community and provide for the quality of life 13 enjoyed by residents and guests alike. The principles embodied in these characteristics 14 were derived from direct public input, and are the foundation of this Comprehensive 15 Plan. 16 17 Aspiration Statement 18 "We aspire to be the leading multi-season, family-oriented inclusive mountain resort 19 community. We will do this by creating, marketing, and delivering distinctive choices for 20 fun, excitement, challenge, learning, and togetherness. All this is done amidst our 21 unique, natural splendor...as part of a memorable Aspen/Snowmass experience. 22 Further, we wish to be seen by others as welcoming, dynamic, convenient, and 23 successful. We will always be responsible stewards of our environment, economy, and 24 society. When successful, Snowmass Village will have achieved the quality of life and 25 economic vitality that will assure our future as a sustainable resort community." 26 27 Vision: Snowmass Village in 2025 28 If we are successful in reaching our Aspiration, in the year 2025 the Town of Snowmass 29 Village will be characterized as follows: 30 31 The Town of Snowmass Village possesses a high quality of life with an intimate village 32 atmosphere. The Snowmass V page resort community is one of the premier, multi- 33 seasonal family- oriented resorts in the world. First class programs and public facilities 34 have been developed to broaden the seasons, provide a high level of customer service, 35 strengthen all business activity (especially locally-owned) provide community and visitor 36 amenities, and increase and diversify employment opportunities. It has done this while 37 maintaining a full-time residential community without exceeding its carrying capacity. 38 39 The completion of Base Village has successfully linked activity areas with pedestrian 40 trails and transit, and enhanced pedestrian connections to the Mall and the Snowmass 41 Center. The Center has expanded its role in meeting the convenience needs of the 42 community and guests. Development over the past 20 years has complemented and 43 even improved the resort and community, helped existing business, provided beneficial 44 recreational and cultural facilities, and added needed infrastructure. With the addition of 45 new, diverse commercial uses, more of the residential and visitor retail sales have been 46 captured in Snowmass Village. 47 48 Improved transit services and parking facilities has reduced dependence on ides ------ Deleted: the car 49 maintained adequate Levels of Service (LOS)on our roads. Our road system is safe and 50 efficient while remaining mostly rural in character. On entering and leaving Snowmass 51 Village, the understated, open feeling of the Brush Creek Valley continues to be Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 2: Community, Character and Vision December,2008 Page 1 1 preserved and enhanced. At the entrance to Snowmass Village, parking facilities, new 2 housing, the recreation center and the rodeo grounds have been sensitively integrated 3 into the natural environment. 4 5 The Town aspires to provide housing to all full-time and seasonal employeesand-------- Formatted:Indent.Left: o",First 6 employees that service the Town of Snowmass Village, to the extent possible — as line: o" 7 defined in the Land Use and Development Code (LUDC)—who desire to live,here with_-------- Deleted: in 8 requirements that can be reasonably met. The proximity of housing to jobs allows 9 employees to conveniently walk or use transit to commute to work. By providing a pro- - Deleted:n 10 active hhousing--program,-there--is-adequate_ housing._t.supporls- a._high_leyel-of ,--..- Deleted:aggressive 11 customer service throughout the community, thereby reducing the burden on the Town Deleted:o 12 and area's transportation systems. 13 n_ Deleted: without exceeding the 14 Snowmass Village embraces sports and athletics which provide substance for the soul Deleted:Town and region's 15 of a community. Snowmass Village offers multiple sporting activities for all ages and trensportaeonczayng wpaciry.¶ 16 abilities and takes pride in its array of offerings. The Village provides facilities that 17 encourage athletic programs of all types and consistently host several world class .----.- Deleted:s 18 athletic events on a yearlWbasis---------------------------------------- ---------------------------------------------- Deleted:M 19 20 Snowmass Village is attractive to those seeking to enhance the mind, body and spirit, a 21 concept the Town recognizes as vital to nurturing the entire person. Af special Deleted:it education. 22 significance to this concept is the Town's visual_an d_paggrTing-arts community and Deleted; 23 programs, which continue to draw guests from around the world. Our expanded year-DeIeLYao T 24 round development of arts programs promotes cultural consciousness, stimulates 25 economic viability, and fosters a sense of community pride. Easy access to a diversity of Deleted:he v 26 cultural offerings and institutions exemplify our arts programming. Our public art 27 program is an ongoing mean sfor expression of the Village's character. Deleted:vehicle 28 29 30 Challenges 31 The community is approaching buildout. This places a high priority on ensuring the 32 remaining development and redevelopment complement the existing conditions to 33 solidify the Town's sustainability and competitiveness far into the future. Carrying 34 capacity is limited by the transportation infrastructure which is also approaching 35 capacity. This challenge is magnified by the fact that a significant portion of our 36 workforce commutes from down valley. With increasing costs of commuting and 37 competition from down valley employers, we must provide workforce housing in, or 38 closer to, Town. Another challenge is the fact that the Town captures only 38 percent 39 (RRC Associates, 2008) of potential expenditures of guests, many of whom stay in 40 Aspen or down valley at night. Maximizing the Town's economic capture rate (making 41 the economic engine more efficient) will help the community financially thrive within its 42 carrying capacity for growth. 43 44 45 Character and Goals 46 In response to these challenges,our key goals are to: 47 48 Live within the constraints of natural and man-made systems.Delelsd: (eminenment and traffic) 49 Maintain or create a multi-faceted workforce that is essential to sustain the resort 50 and community economy 51 Capture a greater share of guest and resident's expenditures, Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 2: Community,Character and Vision December,2008 Page I Attract more guests/visitors, especially by broadening summer and strengthening 2 winter seasons 3 4 If we are successful in reaching our Aspiration and goals, by the year 2025 the Town 5 of Snowmass Village will be characterized as follows: 6 7 A premier winter sports mountain with a wide variety of terrain that attracts all 8 levels of sports enthusiasts 9 A resort that benefits from its proximity to Aspen, but.has its own individual 10 identity 11 A strong connection to the natural environment 12 Stimulating atmosphere-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- --- Deleted:Clean air,clear skies and a 13 Significant opportunities for a variety of recreational and cultural activities heanhy, 14 A clustered, low density development pattern that allows for the physical and Deleted:invigorating 15 visual openness and connection to the mountains to dominate valley views 16 A town core that has an intimate,village feel 17 A traffic system that allows convenient circulation and mobility 18 Physical separation from other communities that allows Snowmass Villa a to be 19 isolated in a dramatic valley setting 20 Friendly interactions with fellow community members and guests 21 The presence of a vital, permanent community of residents that take an active 22 role in, not only governance, but value a participation in "community life" as a 23 whole. 24 A casual lifestyle 25 Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 2:Community, Character and Vision December,2008 Page 3 Appendix—Chapter 6, Environmental Resources Synopsis of Public Input Though the topic was not a prominent one during the public process for the 2008 update of this plan, a healthy natural environment continues to be highly valued by the community. Public input received on the topic of environmental resources addressed the following areas: Preservation of open space, Maintaining view corridors, Retaining the scenic beauty, Promoting respect of our mountain environment,and Protecting water quality,air quality and wildlife. Existine Environmental Conditions 1. Elevation Elevation affects vegetation, temperature, precipitation, oxygen and air pollution. The Town boundary encompasses a topographic span reaching from the lower end of Wildcat Ranch, at approximately 7,300 feet, up to 12,600 feet at the summit of the Snowmass Ski Area. Brush Creek Road,at its intersection with State Highway 82, is at an elevation of 7,500 feet. Elevation rises steadily as Brush Creek Road approaches and enters the Town limits at 7,900 feet. A majority of the Town's residential neighborhoods, as well as its commercial core lie between 7,800 and 9,100 feet. 2. Slope Slope steepness is one determinant of the development suitability of land. Consideration should be given to physical hazards, the potential for successful revegetation, and the difficulty in repairing soil disturbances. Steep slopes are vulnerable to erosion and soil slippage. The Snowmass Village Municipal Code prohibits construction on natural slopes greater than 30%, unless approved by a supermajority vote of the Town Council, and subject to specific findings, exceptions and/or circumstantial criteria. Approximately 7700 acres, or 44%, of town land has a slope of 30% or greater. Mapping of slope is broken into five categories: 0%—3%, 3% - 8%, 8%-15%, 15% - 30%,and 30%or greater and can be found at the end of this chapter. 3. Aspect Slope aspect is how a site is oriented to the sun, which influences soil and air moisture and temperature. The majority of Snowmass Village has a cooler slope aspect, a situation which is typical of ski areas. Slopes south of Brush Creek Road and much of Wildcat Ranch have a northern aspect with denser vegetation, longer snowpack, moist soils and increased wildfire hazards. Slopes north of Brush Creek Road have a primarily southern aspect with few trees, drier conditions and higher erosion potential. 4. Geology/Soilsi Most of Snowmass Village's soils have high shrink-swell potential, low strength and slow permeability. A large portion of the surface geology is Mancos shale, which can present challenges to development. On specific sites, soil type should be analyzed for engineering qualities and limitations for construction, ability to support plant growth, stability on slopes, erosion potential and drainage characteristics. 5. Vegetation Snowmass Village's diverse physical conditions create a complex distribution of plant communities. Vegetation distribution is influenced by elevation, solar exposure, slope aspect, soil characteristics, geology, moisture, and wind. Due to their respective aspects, north-facing slopes have abundant streams and lush meadows while south-facing slopes arc semi-arid. Changes in the landscape's plant species are most evidently tied to changes in elevation and according to slope aspect. Major plant communities appear as irregular bands, often with very narrow transition bands between them. The succession of plants,beginning with lichens and mosses in dry areas and water plants in the streams and ponds,has climaxed in the four major"Vegetation Life Zones" within Snowmass Village. Foothill Zone. The Foothill Zone extends from the edge of the Roaring Fork Valley to the Rodeo parking lot and the Snowmass Club golf course. This is primarily a shrub zone, with few trees except in riparian areas and in deep ravines with northern exposure. Sagebrush dominates but coexists with aspen trees, foxtail barley,slender wheatgrass,yarrow and vetch. Montane Zone. This zone covers most of the former ranch land that is now golf course and residential development. Mountain meadow and grassland communities are numerous in this zone. Douglas Fir is prevalent and turf-forming grasses such as red-top, timothy and native bluegrass cover moist meadows and 1 Geology and soils infonrmtion was obtained frmn the United States Geological Survey(USGS)and the Soil Survey of tire Aspen-Gypsum Area. the wetter and cooler areas.Along water courses, distinct riparian forest and shrub communities occur which include: narrow leaf cottonwoods, mountain alder,river birches,Colorado blue spruce, aspen trees and several species of willow. Subalpine Zone. This region begins at 8,000 feet on north-facing slopes and is covered by dense forests of Engelmann Spruce and Subalpine Fir, with equally dense intrusions of aspen groves or an occasional lodge pole pine stand. In the winter, these dense forests protect snowfall from melting so snow often remains on the ground until early July. Moisture-loving plants such as Fairy Slippers, Woodnymphs, and Dotted Saxifrage thrive in this woodland. Alpine Zone or Tundra. Above timberline is the alpine zone. Like the Arctic Tundra, it is a treeless region of grassland and rock fields. Snow melts sooner in this zone than the Subalpine Zone due to the lack of trees to shade the ground and the fact that winds keep the snow layer thin. A short growing season exists but allows for alpine flowers. In 2005, the Town of Snowmass Village adopted the Pitkin County weed control program that attempts to strategically remove noxious weeds from Pitkin County. The program includes a plan and community outreach objectives to address noxious weeds from spreading in Snowmass Village. 6. Hydrology Brush Creek is Snowmass Village's main watercourse and flows through Town from the Divide into the Roaring Fork River. Brush Creek's two major tributaries, the West and East Forks, flow from the Snowmass Ski Area along Fanny Hill in the west and below the Two Creeks lift in the east. Brush Creek Road parallels the creek. Historically, the creek and the road have vied for territory. As a result, the creek has suffered in the areas of bank erosion and degradation of stream biology. Cumulative impacts resulting from a variety of development practices have impaired the stream channel's ability to function naturally. The degradation of Brush Creek not only affects Snowmass Village but also impacts the downstream water quality of the Roaring Fork River. The Town has identified stream sections of Brush Creek that are candidates for restoration. Since the early 1990's, four reaches of Brush Creek (Woodbridge, May Fly, Snowmass Chapel and Base Village) have been restored. The majority of the projects were financed by the Town with the exception of the Base Village reach which was restored as a condition of development approval. There is an existing town fund for stream restoration but no regular budget line. There are no standard design specifications for restoration because each reach has different fluvial characteristics requiring a design specific to the reach. The Roaring Fork Conservancy, a non-profit watershed conservation organization, monitors the health of regional water ways. The Conservancy placed Brush Creek on its impacted list in its 2006 Water Quality Report due to consistently high PH and phosphorous levels and continued development along the drainage way. A targeted study was initiated in 2006 to set baseline conditions for the creek, determine the levels and duration of pollutants, and to determine appropriate management of open space parcels with regard to the riparian habitat. Most parameters in the study reflected normal and relatively healthy conditions though continued concern of high PH levels and impacts due to development continue. The Conservancy plans to continue monitoring of the Creek in the future. Future recommendations may include the need for a minimum in-stream flow to be established to ensure continued health. Water quantity is also important to measure. In recent years, heavy snow pack has eased the drought in the region and will likely begin refilling depleted reservoirs in the Colorado River Basin. However, severe or extreme drought conditions still exist and climate change or continued years with low precipitation removes the amount of water available to us and left in stream. 7. Snowmass Water and Sanitation District The Snowmass Water and Sanitation District is a special district created under the provisions of the Special District Act,32-1-101 C.R.S. The District was formed in 1966 to provide potable water and sanitary sewer service for the Snowmass Village area. The District operation consists of water and sewer systems. i. Water System. The water system consists of a raw water intake system, a Water Treatment Plant to treat raw water and make it potable,a system of pressure zones, water tanks and water pipelines to deliver potable water to its customers.The Water Treatment Plant has a treatment capacity of 5.1 million gallons per day of potable water. The Water Treatment Plant utilizes mechanical filtration and ultra violet treatment to process raw water and produce potable water. Raw water is diverted from one of the three District sources of supply, Brush Creek, East Snowmass Creek and Snowmass Creek,or from storage at the Ziegler Reservoir and conveyed by pipeline to the Water Treatment Plant. Potable water storage tanks totaling in aggregate of approximately 6.2 million gallons are located in various District pressure zones to allow the District to manage water distribution during peak demand periods or during exigent circumstances. ii. Waste Water System. The wastewater system consists of collection sewer mains and lift stations and a Waste Water Treatment Plant. The Waste Water Treatment Plant has a treatment capacity of 3.2 million gallons per day of influent. The Waste Water Treatment Plant is a mirror image 1.6 million gallon bifurcated system allowing the District to utilize the minimum capacity for its primary and tertiary treatment. After completion of the treatment process,treated effluent is discharged into Brush Creek. Sludge waste from the treatment operations is taken to the Pitkin County landfill to aid in the composting project or to the District's sludge disposal site in Woody Creek. The District recently conducted a review of its water rights inventory and its ability to serve future development and service requirements generally in the Snowmass Village area. As discussed more fully in Chapter 6,the District currently is serving a demand of approximately 4900 equivalent residential units(EQR). On the basis of the planning the District determined that a reasonable estimate of its ability to reliably serve potable water is 6200 EQR. The District determined that treatment capacity of the Waste Water Treatment Plant is adequate and can treat the anticipated associated influent from 6200 EQR potable water usage. The District is pursuing upgrades and capital replacement to its system and is replacing older water and sewer pipelines with pipelines made of modern materials. The District anticipates that it will require approximately$4,000,000.00 per year to conduct the upgrade and capital replacement program. The District is also seeking approval to expand Ziegler Reservoir to a total storage capacity of 225 acre feet with an estimated project budget of$10,000,000.00." 8. Wildlife Comprehensive Plan wildlife maps show the habitat of elk, mule deer, raptors, big hom sheep and ptarmigan. These mapped species were selected from a broad range of mammals and birds because they have a high level of public interest or are an indicator species"2 for the Burnt Mountain region. While the black bear attracts a high level of public interest, it was not mapped because its range covers the entire Town. The wildlife maps were created using the Colorado Division of Wildlife CDOW)data. The United States Forest Service (USFS) has compiled a list of Management Indicator Species (MIS) for the Burnt Mountain area. These species are also of high public interest or are indicator species. Additionally,the White River National Forest has also drafted a list of sensitive species that are likely to occur in forested and non- forested communities in the area. The CDOW and USFS species lists should be kept on file in the Planning Department and reviewed when making planning decisions to ensure that impacts to indicator species or local sensitive species are identified. Development can then incorporate appropriate mitigation and ecologically sound design that protects the wildlife in Snowmass Village. a. Environmentally Sensitive Wildlife Areas Elk Habitat Areas. Regulations to protect certain elk habitats are included in the Town Municipal Code. Town policy prohibits development in the elk calving, severe winter range and migration corridors mapped by the CDOW,unless certain conditions are met. The elk that use habitats in or adjacent to Snowmass Village are part of the Maroon Bells-Snowmass Wilderness (MB-SW) elk herd. This herd has 2 Indicator Species are species whose habitat also meets the needs of an array of other species. approximately 350 elk. The MB-SW elk herd combines with other herds in the winter, forming a group of about 700 elk that use the surrounding winter range. The 1994 Snowmass Ski Area Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) indicates that half of the elk habitat has been rendered unsuitable due to nearby development on both private and national forest land. Since 1966,calving habitat has been reduced by 54% and the migration corridor for the MB-SW herd has been reduced by 90%. Because of habitat loss,protecting the remaining habitat should be a high priority if the herd is to remain viable. Elk Habitats vital for protection include: i. Calving Habitat. The aspen groves in the Owl Creek drainage east of Burnt Mountain. This includes areas such as Kelley Park, Mandalay Ranch and the USFS area prescribed as the future "413" in the White River National Forest Plan. ii. Migration Corridors. The route between summer and winter range, including the three crossings on Brush Creek Road near the Droste and Seven Star properties and the crossings along Owl Creek Road. iii. Winter Range. Overall winter range extends north of Owl Creek Road, west of Highway 82, east of Wildcat Reservoir and Snowmass Creek Road, and south of Snowmass. During winters with deep snows, winter range availability is the most crucial factor in the survival of the herd. Severe winter range habitat in the Snowmass Village area is located on the south or west facing oakbrush or sage-covered hills of the Seven Star, Droste and Wildcat Ranch properties. Consider which category the inclair Divide to Horse Ranch corridor fallc _ Fonnattetl:nigmignt under, b. Areas of Ecological Significance. In addition to the elk habitat areas, there are three areas of ecological significance with elements that can support wildlife on a continuous basis and have a high biodiversity value: i. Upper Eastern Section of the Snowmass Ski Area near Elk Camp. ii. Sam's Knob west to East Snowmass Creek and to the top of the Big Bum. These areas contain mixed conifer-aspen habitat which are used throughout the year by deer, elk, bighorn sheep, neotropical birds, raptors, carnivores, small and medium-sized herbivores and ptarmigan. Land use decisions concerning the portions of the Snowmass Ski Area located within the Town's boundaries should insure preservation of the richness of this wildlife mix. iii. Habitat between Spring Creek and Owl Creek. This is a core area of species diversity due to the type of vegetation, abundant water and remoteness. It is of particular importance to elk and deer in the spring for calving/fawning and nursing. c. Dedicated Open Space and Other Areas of Wildlife Importance The Town owns the first two of the three open space parcels listed below, which have high value for wildlife. Any development of public facilities and/or recreational uses should promote wildlife stewardship on these parcels. These areas include: i. Open Space above Horse Ranch Subdivision - These 650 acres of open space has high value for wintering deer and elk. It is closed to all activity from September 15—June 20th.Check Dates-------------------------------------------------------- rormatmd:Highlight wmwteea:Highlight ii. East Highline (Hidden Valley) - This 200 acre parcel was deeded to the Town from the Snowmass Land Company for wildlife habitat preservation. It is located in the draw near the Town cemetery and was intended for elk spring fall migration and winter range. iii. Horse pastures between Brush Creek Road and Horse Ranch Drive - This area is an important deer and elk travel corridor between the dedicated open space parcels. Preserving this area also ensures an undeveloped link for big game moving between winter and summer ranges. d. Current Wildlife Management and Mitigation Plans The Town currently has a number of plans and documents to guide the management of wildlife,including: Greenway Master Plan, (1000). Two Creeks and the Pines Wildlife Enhancement and Management Plan 1994). Snowmass Ski Area Wildlife Enhancement and Management Plan(1994). Snowmass Ski Area 1994 FE/S Mitigation and Monitoring Plan. Snowmass Wildlife Committee Report(1991). Pitkin County Wildlife Taskforce and Report(1989). These reports should be updated as necessary, formally adopted, and referred to during development review. 9.Open Space The community views open space as an important resource, and recognizes that it provides several benefits. Preserving open space allows for protection of sensitive habitat, creates open areas in the built landscape, and promotes a rural character. Open space also provides a mental and spiritual benefit. The Town has an open space program and owns several parcels that are restricted to use as public open space. To better manage this resource, the community needs to understand why the land is to be kept open and what the best use is for the properties. We can start by inventorying our properties to identify the legal parameters that are keeping the areas open(i.e. deed restriction,public ownership, development requirement). Knowing the ownership and potential for our open spaces will let us know where future acquisitions should occur as opportunities arise, or needs are identified. Effort should be given to analyze management techniques and methods of acquisition. 10. Environmental Sensitivity Environmental Sensitivity Map.ditach Map. The Environmental Sensitivity Map . Formatbed:Highlight indicates all land that is markedly sensitive to environmental impacts from development. The Environmental Sensitivity Map indicates natural thresholds for the carrying capacity of the Town. The highest values have been placed on the protection of wildlife, stream corridors, steep slopes, open space and scenic views. Sensitivity is determined by the resource's historical ability to recover from development impacts and remain sustainable. Some environmental resources do not change significantly over time, while other resources are dynamic and may need periodic impact assessment, evaluation and monitoring. These areas have physical and ecological features whose preservation is essential to the Town's ability to maintain a high quality environment. The map covers the entire Town limits as well as the designated Influence Areas. Physically sensitive features include: 1. Slopes in excess of 30%. These steep slopes are often highly visible and development of them could have a major visual, safety and financial impact. 2. Brush Creek. Brush Creek is important both for its scenic value and for its ecological value as a wildlife, wetlands and riparian area. 3. Critical Wildlife Habitat. Critical habitat areas for indicator species can be both ecologically and visually sensitive areas. The Environmental Sensitivity Map designates sensitive areas for preservation, conservation, open space, or low-density residential. All proposed development and redevelopment will be evaluated against this map. Proposed development which appears to penetrate any part of designated sensitive lands will require a site-specific review prior to approval,regardless of the location. I Chapter 6 Environmental Resources 2 3 December,2008) 4 Strategic Objectives 5 The natural environment is a primary asset to the community and positively influences the 6 continued success of the resort. The environmental resources of the Town of Snowmass Village 7 have played a significant role in attracting people to the area, as well as in stimulating and 8 regulating the Town's growth and development. The community supports the conservation and 9 preservation of unique lands,wildlife habitat,stream corridors,sensitive hillsides,important view 10 corridors, and other significant natural features. The Town promotes long-term stewardship of 11 clean water and air, energy efficiency, and ongoing opportunities for residents and visitors to 12 explore,learn and enjoy the natural beauty of the area. 13 14 Background 15 Recognizing that the quality of our environmental resources are directly tied to the health of our 16 citizens, our resort competitiveness, and our economy, the community initiated a number of 17 efforts aimed at improving environmental sustainability during 2008. 18 19 The concept of environmental sustainability speaks to the preservation of an ecological system in 20 its naturally occurring state,that it may continue providing life-supporting resources such as food, 21 water and oxygen over a very long period of time. Ecological sustainability is integrally linked to 22 our resort economy by virtue of global warnting's predicted impact on winter recreational 23 activities, Preserving the quality of our natural environment and taking action to minimize local_.....-- Deleted: It has been predicted 24 contributions toward global climate change is expected to positively affect our resort that in the nest 25 years,winters will 25 competitiveness and long-term economic stability. become shorter and mere will be a 3 26 to 4 degree increase of average temperature,resulting in more min 27 Land development, and its associated energy consumption, can negatively impact the natural and less snow. (source:Aspen 28 environment by consuming resources faster than they are able to be regenerated. Consideration of Global Change Institute). 29 impacts to ecological sustainability can be applied to several aspects of development review. By 30 considering the characteristics of a site in its natural condition (soils, drainage ways, slope,solar 31 access,etc)and those of a proposed development's impacts to the surrounding environment(view 32 sheds,air quality, wildlife,etc)environmental quality can be preserved. 33 34 Protection of wildlife has long been a value in the Town of Snowmass Village. Development 35 should be located and designed}o encoura a he existence and diversity of species in our wildlife- Delatad: so as not 36 habitat. Wetland and riparian communities are especially significant in this regard because they Deleted: diminish wildlife 37 have the highest density and diversity of wildlife species. habitat or 38 39 Scenic views and air quality are also highly important. Air quality is an environmental resource 40 that has been periodically and narrowly measured (primarily during periods of heavy 41 development activity) through PM-10 monitoring, designed to measure particulate matter 42 important to public health and safety. Air Quality Monitoring Plans requiring the most 43 anpronriate and up-to-date technologies available at a given time, are required on a project-by- 44 project basis, in order to ensure that the quality of our air is protected. Quality public views 45 contribute greatly to the uniqueness and attractiveness of this valley, and significantly contribute 46 to the desirability of our resort, and the value of local real estate. While the quality of public 47 views has no direct impact on environmental carrying capacity, it is highly valued from a quality- 48 of-life perspective. Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 6: Environmental Resources December,2008 Page 1 I 2 The Snowmass Water and Sanitation District recently conducted a review of its water rights 3 inventory and its ability to serve future development and service requirements generally in the 4 I Snowmass Village area Site title and date here ; The review considered the treatment capacity of ---- Formatted: Highlight 5 the Water Treatment Plant, the priority and diversion availability of its water rights, raw water 6 and potable water storage capacities, peak demand requirements,projected growth and raw water 7 storage for system reliability. The limiting factor to the ability of the District to provide potable 8 water service was determined to be the legal and physical availability of raw water of satisfactory 9 quality for treatment at peak demand times. The District currently is serving a demand of 10 approximately 4,900 equivalent residential units (EQRs). The District's analysis estimates that 11 approximately 1,100 EQRs will be added upon completion of Base Village, Sinclair Meadows, 12 Entryway, Snowmass Center (assuming a project similar to the 3rd Amendment), and West 13 Village(assuming a 20 percent increase in EQRs, i.e. bedrooms&bathrooms). This falls within 14 the District's anticipated ability to reliably serve 6,200 EQRs. On the basis of the planning the 15 District determined that a reasonable estimate of its ability to reliably serve potable water is 6,200 16 EQR. The District determined that treatment capacity of the Waste Water Treatment Plant is 17 adequate and can treat the anticipated associated influent from 6200 EQR potable water usage. 18 19 Existing Environmental Conditions 20 Detailed descriptions and discussions on the following environmental resources are included in 21 the Chapter 6 Appendix: 22 23 Elevation 24 Slope 25 Aspect 26 Geology/Soils 27 Vegetation 28 Hydrology 29 Wildlife 30 Water 31 Open space 32 Environmental sensitivity 33 Add a section pertaining to impacts associated with Annual,Rain/Snowfall Totals Formatted: xighl fight 34 FOrmatted: Highlight 35 dd SWSD Ca aoit Stud ' Formatted: Highlight 36 37 Policies 38 The Town of Snowmass Village shall: 39 40 1. Promote renewable energy generation, conservation of natural resources, and energy 41 efficiency. 42 43 2. Employ smart growth strategies and land use policies that limit development to the 44 minimum amount deemed necessary for the community to achieve economic 45 sustainability. 46 47 3. Provide essential community-oriented goods, services and housing with an aim to 48 reducing the environmental impacts associated with our dependency on other 49 communities. Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 6:Environmental Resources December,2008 Page 2 1 2 4. Promote community stewardship for the Town's natural resources, and for those of the 3 Brush Creek and Owl Creek Valleys, by supporting land use policies and regulatory 4 processes that acknowledge an understanding of our environmental carrying capacity. 5 6 5. Ensure that development review processes include consideration of the community's 7 environmental values and an understanding of potential impacts to environmental 8 resources. 9 10 6. ,Protect significant public views and view corridors, an_d enhance the visual quality of ..... Formatted: Highlight 11 open space, national forest, wilderness and agricultural lands of the Town, Brush Creek, 12 and Owl Creek Valleys. 13 14 7. Protect riparian habitat and ensure that riparian vegetation and streambeds are maintained 15 in a naturally functioning state. 16 17 8. Qiscourage development in critical wildlife habitat areas, including but not limited to elk Dal.eted: Prohibit 18 calving, severe winter range and migration corridors mapped by the Colorado 19 Department of Wildlife (CDOW), in order to maintain ecosystem integrity, and preserve 20 the existence and diversity of species within the Town. 21 22 9. Require new development to incorporate appropriate mitigation measures and 23 ecologically sound design principles that protect wildlife and wildlife habitat in 24 Snowmass Village. 25 26 10. Update, adopt and reference the following reports , as such reports may be deemed 27 pertinent to the specific project under development review: 28 a. Greenwav Master Plan, (1000). 29 b. Two Creeks and the Pines Wildlife Enhancement and Management Plan(1994) 30 c. Snowmass Ski Area Wildlife Enhancement and Management Plan(1994) 31 d. Snowmass Ski Area 1994 FE1S Mitigation and Monitoring Plait 32 e. Snowmass Wildlife Committee Report(1991) 33 f Pitkin County Wildlife Taskforce and Report(1989) 34 35 11. Evaluate all proposed development and redevelopment against the Town of Snowmass 36 Village Environmental Sensitivity Map. 37 38 12. Require a site-specific review for any proposed development that appears to penetrate 39 any part of designated sensitive lands. 40 41 13.Piscourage construction on slopes greater than 30OZo Deleted: Prohibit 42 Deleted: ,unless approved by a 43 14. Encourage new development to restore degraded reaches of the Brush Creek Watershed supermajority vote of the Town 44 located within Town,and adjacent tq and/or within their projects, __ . Council,and subject to specific B P45findings,exceptions and/or 46 15. Encourage new development to help fund bridges and culverts necessary to preserve the circumstantial criteria 47 Town's waterways located adjacent to,and/or within their projects.Deleted: , 48 49 16. Prohibit any new development that is determined to cause an exceedence of the 50 Snowmass Water and Sanitation District's stated maximum treatment capacity(currently 51 defined as 6,200 EQR's). Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 6: Environmental Resources December,2008 Page 3 t 2 3 Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 6:Environmental Resources December,2008 Page 4 1 Chapter 8 Transportation 2 3 January,2009) 4 Strategic Objectives 5 The Town of Snowmass Village supports-continued improvements to an integrated 6 mobility system that minimizes vehicle traffic, increases pedestrian options and links 7 land use and urban form with sustainable transportation. The goal is a transportation 8 system that serves residents, guests, employees and visitors quickly and effectively with 9 minimum impacts on the quality of life. 10 11 The Town of Snowmass Village shall be served by convenient, effective and attractive 12 transit service between local commercial and residential nodes, and work with the 13 Roaring Fork Transportation Authority(RFTA)to improve transit services throughout the 14 greater Roaring Fork Valley. A major objective for the community will be to minimize 15 increases in single-occupant vehicle (SOV) use and to increase the use of transit, 16 pedestrian, and other non-SOV modes of travel in the town. Sustainable land use, 17 urban design and employee housing strategies that create vibrant, mixed-use nodes that 18 encourage walking and transit use are design elements for achieving these goals. 19 20 Background 21 Traffic is the significant carrying capacity limit to the town's growth and continued 22 success. Recognizing that approved development will push traffic up to, or beyond, 23 maximum desirable levels, future development must address traffic in their land use 24 decisions to not increase current levels. The transportation issues we face today and into 25 the near future include: 26 27 Local roadways will exceed previously established Levels of Service (LOS) 28 thresholds during peak periods while congestion exists on Highway 82 for even 29 longer periods, 30 The current local and regional transit systems are approaching peak period 31 capacity, 32 Remote parking lots are at or exceed capacity during peak days of peak season, 33 and 34 More designated pedestrian commuting means and walkways are needed-- --- pelewd; mmmong-oriented 35 topography & other constraints aside), and grade separated crossings when sidewalks 36 feasible- 37 38 Existing Conditions&Guiding Principles 39 (Note—An extensive 13-page document addresses these areas in greater depth, with 40 accompanying charts, graphs, statistics and research findings. It can be found in 41 Appendix #. The following is a synopsis of the Existing Conditions and Areas of 42 Significance information.) 43 44 1. Measurement of "Person Trips:" Create a useful tool to measure and 45 understand the ramifications of(re)development on the transportation system. It 46 is important to understand the future impacts of (re)development on all the 47 various modes of travel. Modeling of "person trips will not replace the LOS 48 measurements of traffic volume, but would incorporate LOS standards for the 49 other modes of transportation as well. We are approaching critical mass in the Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 8:Transportation January, 2009 Page 1 1 three current key transportation areas: parking, traffic and mass transit. It is 2 becoming difficult to make changes in one area without having a negative impact 3 on another. For example, it is possible to say that no employees of a 4 re)development will be parking in the Village. This would have a favorable 5 impact on traffic volume, but it could have a negative impact on parking in 6 another location and add to the demand for transit services. It 3 irnpor[ant_to.- ---- Deleted:will be 7 know that adequate capacity and funding exists to accommodate and support the 8 re)development, It is necessaryc to develop standards.and mitigation.,--- Deleted: This is a new concept for 9 measures that will be reasonable, consistent and applicable. measudng mobility needs. Deleted:Further study is needed 10 2. Traffic Volume: In the review of Base Village it was stated that the "Cumulative 11 total of future projected traffic, including the Base Village and other outparcel's 12 traffic projections at full build out indicate that one-way peak hour volumes along 13 Brush Creek Road are projected to exceed the Town's established limits." It was 14 projected that the cap of 925 one-way trips would be exceeded roughly 15-20 15 times, at approximately 1,145 one-way trips. This would be considered LOS D. 16 LOS D is described as being congested to the point of"approaching gridlock." It 17 is important to note that this is projected to occur on 15-20 times in the peak 18 season. The Transportation Plan recommends the community continue to apply 19 Transportation Demand Management (TDM) and alternatives to strive to 20 preserve the LOS C standard of 925 into the future. Alternatives that are realistic 21 and financially sustainable will need to be developed to achieve this goal. It is 22 recommended to continually monitor the traffic volume on Brush Creek and any 23 other locations deemed appropriate. 24 3. Parking Inventory and Distribution: The Base Village land use application and 25 Entryway projects have changed the parking inventory in the Village. 26 Development upon the base area lots A-C will result in a parking structure 27 containing public parking with the capacity in the AM peak hour for 200 day 28 skiers and 175 commercial parking spaces. Adding this to the 1,000 parking 29 spaces in the Numbered lots results in 1,375 public parking spaces above the 30 Wooden Skier Bridge. This is an increase of 175 parking spaces over the 1,200 31 spaces recommended in the original Comprehensive Plan. This increase in 32 parking would not have a significant impact on the LOS on Brush Creek Road. 33 The Entryway project is designed to have 325 surface parking spaces upon 34 completion,-The 1998, and in this updated Comprehensive Plar<recommendg,,..- Deleted: in the Entryway planning 35 650 parking spaces at the Entryway sltei f)ternatives to providing the 650 process it was contemplated that additional parking could be added by36parkingspacesormoreasmaybenecessaryinordertofulfillthedemand. This `., decking over of the surface parking to 37 will require further solutions that will require future study. will most likely push `, achieve some soo pa dng spaces 38 parking further from the community. This will have impacts on other jurisdictions Deleted: had 39 and the regional transit services. Deleted:ed 40 4. Transit Carrying Capacity: The existing regional and local transit services are Deleted:.The decking over of the 41 reaching heir carrying capacity in the AM and PM peak hours. The local service sudeoeparkirgmaynothea g fyi g p practical poGtiaueconomk alternative 42 Village Shuttle) is operating at 6,000-7,000 passengers a day during peak for the community. 43 periods. The regional services (RFTA) are at 2,500 - 3,000 for valley wide 44 services and 3,500 -4,000 for day skier services. The existing facilities for both 45 regional and local transit services are at their practical limits in the peak periods 46 for both bus bays and queuing space for passengers. To make significant 47 increases in the carrying capacity of transit services will require investments in 48 infrastructure, rolling stock and personnel. The original Comp Plan and the Base Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 8:Transportation January,2009 Page 2 I Village land use submission both contemplated a redeveloped Mall area with a 2 transit station. This was tied directly to the Bi-Nodal commercial goal stated in 3 both studies. If redevelopment of the West Village and the reconfiguration for the 4 existing transit facilities are put off significantly into the future, then interim 5 solutions may be necessary to continue quality transit services. 6 5. Alternative Technologies: Cable technologies, aerial guide ways and 7 pedestrian improvements have been incorporated into the Base Village 8 development plan to help mitigate traffic impacts. Evaluation studies are 9 launched to examine and monitor overall success of these alternative 10 technologies. Long range planning that preserves corridors for alternatives are 11 still recommended in the Transportation Plan. We should Preserve these 12 corridors and do this throughout the entire Village. 13 Policies 14 The Town Snowmass Village shall: 15 16 Measure transportation performance in the context of 'person trips," rather than 17 only in vehicle trips. It has become increasingly clear that using a roadway/car- 18 based LOS metric leads to roadway-based mitigation measures. Given current 19 realities, this creates a conflict with the community vision for a "rural' Brush 20 Creek Road. Shifting the metric to "person trips" allows a more complete context 21 of moving people through town, and expands the toolkit of strategies to use. This 22 approach allows for new development only by mitigating traffic through other 23 strategies;_such as, remoteCntercept--parking,.-parking hared_use-measures,- -. Deleted:: 24 transportation demand management strategies, mixed land uses, on-site Deleted: fee-;n-lieu/ 25 employee housing, attractive pedestrian environments, and other measures to 26 address trafftc.,This involves measuring the use(volume/ridership)of each travel Deleted:The amount of 27 mode, the capacity or availability of each mode, and the associated costs of develop ent,themrore,is restricted 28 expanding each mode. by the cost or the mitlga oe. 29 30 Require new development and redevelopment to project the number of "person 31 trips" generated by their application, and present alternatives that strive to 32 achieve a zero growth rate in traffic volume in the peak periods. The approach 33 must be realistic and not overtax any one of the components of the overall 34 transportation system. Developers are to demonstrate how alternative modes of 35 transportation will be encouraged through traffic mitigation such as: 36 37 o Design and configuration of the development or redevelopment 38 o Amenities 39 o Roadway design 40 o Parking(on site and I or off site) 41 o Transit 42 o Staggering employment and service shifts and find creative staffinm------ Fo matted:Bullets and Numbering 43 solutions 44 o Pedestrian corridors 45 o Alternative mobility deviges (Gondolas,independent two-way es-calators,-.--- Deleted:s 46 etc) 47 o Additional employee housing in town 48 o Funding or construction of intercept parking Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 8:Transportation January,2009 Page 3 I o Long-term commitment to a lodging community shuttle servic% that - Deleted: private 2 complements the public system Deleted: transit(shuttle)system 3 o Contribution to a mass transit system 4 o Find creative alternatives to transportation funding including, but not•------- Formatted:Bullets and Numtenng 5 limited to, transit mitigation impact fees that could be put into a trust 6 possibly utilizing the interest to subsidize operating and maintenance 7 costs. 8 9 10 Uphold the following performance standards as a base line for measuring the 11 impact of future development: 12 13 o Upper Brush Creek Road (above Woodbridge): no significant (equal 14 or greater than five percent of current PM peak hour, peak direction 15 phpd) roadway traffic) net increase in vehicle_trips_during_the PM peak_-...--- Deleted:vehicle 16 travel period(3:00 to 5:00 pm) 17 o Lower Brush Creek Road (below Woodbridge): maintain existing LOS 18 standard/threshold of 925 peak hour,peak direction(phpd)trips 19 o Owl Creek Road: maintain existing LOS standard/threshold of 650 peak 20 hour, peak direction(phpd); 21 o Intersections: maintain existing LOS C standard/threshold 22 o Non-auto travel modes(for example: walking, busses):1nonitor usage-------- Deleted: 23 and capacity to ensure that capacity is not to exceed more than the 10 24 busiest days of peak season 25 26 Comprehensively link land use/employee housing decisions with mobility options. 27 Increase the availability of affordable housing in the town core to reduce 28 workforce commuting along Brush Creek Road.- 29 30 Address future parking needs primarily through off-site parking and programs, ,- Deleted:fee-in-aeu 31 limiting the amount of new on-site parking provided in town. Require 32 development to provide adequate parking per the Land Use Code but at a Town 33 approved location that does not cause a net increase of vehicles on the critical 34 sections of Brush Creek Road during peak hours. Parking may be built off-site 35 with proven ability to move people from the parking lots to the town core and 36 base of the ski area. Additional parking may be allowed in Two Creeks Lot, the 37 Rodeo Lot or other town approved location if parking offsets traffic volume on 38 Brush Creek Road. 39 40 Maintain a maximum of 1,375 spaces for public parking in the town core(1,000 in 41 the Numbered Lots and 375 in Base Village). Make space at Two Creeks and 42 the Rodeo Lot available for day skier parking and limit 200 of the 1,375 spaces in 43 the Town Core to day skier parking. Continue to ensure that the objective of 44 achieving 85 percent utilization of day parking through pricing (Ordinance #9 45 series of 1994) remains in balance with this plan's goal to control traffic volumes 46 within the community. 47 48 For multi-family development,increase the use of mass transit in the_Brush-------- Deleted:existing 49 Creek corridor to reduce individual automobile use. The use of personal vehicles 50 may be lessened by providing effective transit, intercept parking, traffic demand Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 6:Transportation January, 2009 Page 4 1 management, courtesy van service, enhanced pedestrian/bicycle opportunities, 2 and improved amenities such as ski lockers near transit stations. 3 4 Develop a fully integrated commuter-oriented trail, bike and pedestrian system 5 for Year-rounduse that connects to regional trail systems and transit stops_ Deleted:summer and winter 6 7 Work with RFTA, Aspen Skiing Company and other transportation stakeholders 8 to provide an integrated premium mass transit system for the Roaring Fork 9 Valley. 10 11 Maintain the "village feel' and character of Brush Creek Road from Highway 82 12 to the town core, but plan for future premium transportation technologies in the 13 Brush Creek corridor. 14 15 Develop seamless transportation links between Base Village, Snowmass Center 16 and West Village so guests and workers will be able to travel back and forth 17 without cars. Ensure that the capacity and speed will meet expectations. 18 19 Reduce conflicts between pedestrians, buses and delivery services. Encourage 20 Jimited and operationally functional underground--parking_and/or underground-----.--- [Delleted: 21 service and delivery in the West Village. 22 23 Support and encourage the use of alternative fuels inAvehicles. Deleted: Town-owned Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 8:Transportation January,2009 Page 5 1 Chapter Workforce Housing 2 3 January, 2009) 4 5 Strategic Objectives 6 The Town of Snowmass Village, as a resort community, considers the provision of affordable 7 employee housing (workforce housing) to be a critical element of our success. We aspire to 8 provide such housing to all full-time employees - as defined in the Land Use and Development 9 Code (LUDC) — who desire to live in Town with requirements that can be reasonably met. 10 Achieving this objective will assure an adequate workforce, create a diverse, vibrant community 11 and lessen the environmental impacts. 12 13 Background 14 The Town of Snowmass Village has historically been a leader in providing workforce housing for 15 employees. However, the demand for affordable housing remains a pressing issue in 16 Snowmass Villaoe and the region. The median income of a three-person household in the Town 17 of Snowmass Village was $87,800. This income, based on a 2008 housing study from RRC 18 Associates, can afford a home valued at approximately$350,000. The median sales price of a 19 free market single-family home in Snowmass Village in 2007 was$3.96 million and$950,000 for 20 a multi-family unit(Coates, Reid,and Waldron, 2007): Resort communities including Snowmass 21 Village have increasingly found the issue of work force housing challenging considering the 22 income levels supported by the resort service industry and the escalating price of free market 23 housing. The Town of Snowmass Village and Aspen have historically depended on employees 24 finding affordable housing down valley(Basalt to Rifle). However, with the oil and gas industry 25 in the area growing at a rapid pace, employees are finding jobs closer to home. In addition, 26 home values from Rifle to Snowmass Village are now out of reach for many service employees. 27 Maintaining both a quality work force, and a strong community, has required an aggressive 28 housing policy and these needs have only grown with additional job opportunities up and down 29 the Roaring Fork Valley. 30 31 It should be recognized that there are cycles in the labor and housing market. The policies 32 reflected in this chapter reflect long-term observations and trends in the labor and housing 33 market in Snowmass Village. 34 35 Existing Conditions and Guiding Principles 36 The critical issues associated with workforce housing include: 37 38 Total Jobs: In 2007 and 2008, RRC Associates was hired to determine how many 39 jobs and employees exist in Snowmass Village and where they live. They were also 40 asked to evaluate how many jobs Snowmass businesses generated. RRC concluded 41 that in the winter(06/07)there were 3,914 peak winter jobs and 2,474 summer jobs. 42 Each employee, on average, works 1.35 jobs in the winter and 1.3 jobs in the 43 summer (See Table 1). Based on the number of jobs in the Town of Snowmass 44 Village, there are 2,900 employees in the winter and 1,903 employees in the 45 summer. Based on the information in Table 2 there appears to be 1,740 full time 46 year round employees working in the Town of Snowmass Village. 47 48 Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 9:Workforce Housing January,2009 Page 1 2 Table 1: Current makeup of lobsAvorkers Winter 2006107 Summer 2006 Year-round jobs 1,659 42.4% 1,659 67.0% Seasonal jobs 22,256 57.6%815 33.0% Total jobs 3,914 100.0% 2,4741 100.0% I Average lobslworker 1.35 12,_3 Employed persons 2,900 1,903 3 Source:Colorado Dept. of Labor and Employment QCEW employer address files;2008 4 TOSV Employee Housing survey by RRC Associates. Seasonal employees represent 5 40%of total employees. 6 7 Historical Policy: Over the history of Snowmass Village,housing goals and polices 8 have fluctuated. The 1998 Comprehensive Plan stated policy was to house 60 9 percent of Snowmass Village employees. In addition,the 1998 Plan included a 10 policy to"increase employee housing mitigation requirements for developers so that 11 they mitigate 100 percent of their housing impact."The Land Use Code in 2008 12 requires that developers provide housing for 45 percent of new employees generated 13 from a project. 14 Where Employees Live: Table 2 summarizes where Snowmass Village employees 15 live.Of note,49 percent or 852 people of Snowmass Village's full time(work summer 16 and winter)employees(1,740 people)live within Town. Of the roughly 2,900 17 persons employed in Snowmass Village in the winter,approximately 1,100(39 18 percent)are Snowmass Village residents,while approximately 1,800(61 percent) 19 commute from elsewhere.). This adds significantly to the daily traffic volume on 20 Brush Creek Road. It also should be noted that 23 percent of workers that live in 21 Snowmass Village in the winter out-commute to other communities such as Aspen. 22 If hypothetically, all these out-commuters worked in Snowmass Village,the Town 23 would house 50 percent of its total winter peak season workers. 24 Table 2:Summarizing Where Employees Currently Live 25 EMPLOYEES WORKING IN SV IN WINTER Work In SV In TOTAL work I BOTH winter Work In SV I SVlnwinte I summer winter ONLY Elive In TOSV 1,119 857 26 uveelwwhere 1,700 667 893 Total 2,900 11710 1,160 Live In TOSV 1 39% 19% 23% W live elsewhere 81% M 77% a total 100% 100%100% 26 Source: Colorado Dept. of Labor and Employment QCEW employer address files; 2008 27 TOSV Employee Housing Surveys by RRC Associates. Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 9:Workforce Housing January,2009 Paget 2 e Regional Housing: In the last 10 years, housing prices have risen sharply in down 3 valley communities. The average single-family home sales price has risen from just 4 above $200,000 to over$500,000 in both Glenwood Springs and Carbondale. Even 5 in traditionally affordable locations such a Rifle and New Castle home prices can be 6 out of reach for many employees. The average single-family homes sales price in 7 2007 was $301,739 and $372,000 respectively (Garfield County Assessors Office, 8 2007). 9 10 Housing Supply: Current housing supply is summarized in Table 3. Approximately 11 1,453 employees are housed in 563 restricted units (either by deed or zoning) and 12 360 non-restricted units (free market homes and dwelling units provided by 13 employers). It is difficult to determine how many units are occupied by seasonal 14 versus full time employees, and it should be noted that some households contain 15 both residents who work in Snowmass on a seasonal basis and residents who work 16 in Snowmass Village on a full-time year-round basis. However, it is estimated that 17 most of the Aspen Skiing Company units(68 units/154 employees), and some of the 18 dedicated units by lodging (150 units/179 employees) are utilized by seasonal 19 employees. This roughly equates to minimum of 23 percent of the total occupied 20 employee housing stock being occupied by primarily seasonal employees.The Town 21 has historically focused on providing housing to full time employees. 22 23 Table 3:Housing Supply- Employee Units in the Town of Snowmass Village 24 25 Percent of S maiden Total employees employee Housing units housed house EMPLOYEE HOUSING UNITS IN TOSV: TOSV Housing Ol units 374 558 38 County deed restricted(Fairway 3) 30 48 3 Other restricted(e.g.by zoning) 35 45 35 Accessory Employee Units 7 7 0 Accassory Caretaker Units 43 43 3 Shico restricted(Guo Commons) Go 154 11 Dedicated but not restricted mostly lodges) 150 179 12 Total affordable/employee units 713 1,034 71 FREE-MARKET UNITS IN TOSV: Free-market units occupied by employee s 210 419 29 TOTAL UNITS HOUSING EMPLOYEES IN TOSV 923 11453 100 HOUSING UNITS OUTSIDE OF TOSV 890 1,780 nla GRANDTOTAL 1,813 3,233 na 26 27 Source: Town of Snowmass Village housing records; Dec. 2007 State of Snowmass;SV 28 employee surveys; RRC 29 30 Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 9:Workforce Housing January,2009 Page 1 Housing Demand in 2008: Based on the 2008 Snowmass Village employee 2 housing survey conducted by RRC Associates, of the 887 full time year round 3 employees that commute to Snowmass Village, approximately 33 percent are renters 4 who would prefer to live closer to work. Assuming 2 workers per household, this 5 yields a demand for approximately 146 units, of which all would need to be 6 subsidized. The potential demand for the peak number of 1,780 commuters (887 7 year round +893 winter seasonal employees)using the same methodology would be 8 294 units. Additionally, approximately 50 employee-housing units would be needed 9 to accommodate unmet housing demand associated with unfilled jobs in the winter. 10 Demand from unfilled jobs may or may not to be added into our demand forecast, 11 since this may reflect typical unemployment in the Village. It is estimated that 164 12 full time year round employees would like to live in Snowmass Village. Another 13 indicator on current demand is that the Town of Snowmass Village Housing 14 Department in December of 2008 had the following wait list for deed restricted 15 housing: 80 people for studio unit; 86 people for a 1 Bedroom; 60 people for a 2 16 bedroom,and 3 people for a 3 bedroom. 17 18 Table 4:Housing Demand Person Total potions working In TOSV Persons worlds working in In both winter A In TOSV in winter TOSV In winte summa on DEMAND ASSOCIATED WITH IN-COMMUTERS: In< mmuters 1,780 887 893 of in=muters who rent A prefer to live closer to 3 33% 33% e of in muters who rent&prefer to lion darer 10 v 588 293 295 I A eraoa workersMH 2M. 20 20 Housing units demanded by Ir-eernmuter5 294 146 147 DEMAND ASSOCIATED WITH UNFlLLED JOBS: Unfilled jobs h TOSV 136 48 I Average jobs per worker 1.35 1.35 1.3 1 Average wakers per nousellold _ U Housing units required 0 fill unfilled Jobs 50 18 TOTAL HOUSING UNITS DEMANDED: 344 164 180 19 Source:2008 TO_ and,employee surveys;.RRC Associates ---------------------------- Deleted:sv 20 21 22 RRC Associates was asked to project future housing demand for both full time and 23 seasonal employees. It should be noted that this prediction may reflect a worst case 24 scenario based on market forces for future demand of housing and assumes the 25 town does not implement polices to prevent the erosion of housing. The following 26 predictions do not include new development at the Center or West Village. They 27 made the following predictions: 28 29 30 31 32 Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 9:Workforce Housing January,2009 Page 2 3 Table 5:Future Housing Demand Forecast 4 Units Assumption 164 Current unmet demand for housing in Snowmass Village of full time em to ees See Table 4 189 90% of free market units occupied by full time employees would be lost over time. 85 Dedicated unrestricted housing scattered through Snowmass Village if lost Assume 100%seasonal 36 Potential loss of 28%of owner occupied for-sale TOSV housing from retirement 474 Total demand for units assuming 2 employees per unit. 5. 6 Policies 7 The Town of Snowmass Village shall: 8 9 The Town of Snowmass Village shall, as its primary housing goal, provide housing for M........ Deleted:65 10 percent of the full-time year round employees (60 percent of total employees). Recent 11 studies of historical patterns(RRC 2008 and Pathways 2003)indicate that 50 percent of 12 our current full-time employees live in the Village and an additional 10 percent wish to do 13 so under reasonable requirements. This suggests a total apparent demand of 60 14 percent. Full time employees represent 60% of total employees. An additional —ig_ Deleted:5 15 percent is added to the mitigation ratio in response to forecasted changes in the future 16 environment. These changes foresee reduced affordability of"down valley" alternatives,Deleted,The Town of Snowmass 17 increased cost and inconvenience of commuting, retired employee residency and a ;' village shall 18 reduced contribution of Town free-market employee housing.Deleted:a 19 20 I establish as a seconds Deleted: LuDc ry..goal_.to..proyige-hous)ng_to_seasonal-employees._._This i 21 inventory could be allocated,on a priority basis, to small Town businesses(as defined in Formatted:not Highlight 22 the Land Use and Development Code), which a_re owned and operated by Snowmass,; Deleted:The To"of Snowmass Village shall 23 Village residents. However, it is recognized that such projects would be a lower priority 24 within the Town's housing program and addressed only after the primary goal has been Deleted;r 25 achieved. Deleted:65 26 Deleted:The mitigated housingf•:' 27 WORK ON STRUCTURE.$squire private developers to provide housing for 7( percent ^ ;' shouldround bepbyeesgenefelltitime28oftotalemployeesgeneratedbyadevelopment. Mitigation housinD should first be development and then 29 Provided to full time employees generated by a new development and then. at__the ,.-.-.Deleted:, 30 discretion of the Town, for seasonal employees.,--------------------_---------_-_---______ 3, Deletetl: employees generated by new development 32 The developer should provide the land for affordable housing and shall maximize (on '' Deleted: ant 32 33 sites deemed suitable by the Town) the location of affordable housing on the epresent40hoftotalempbyees- 34 development site. If physical constraints (in the Town's opinion) limit the location of addroretlet. 35 housing on the development site, affordable housing required by developers should be Fo matted:Not Highlight Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 9:Workforce Housing January,2009 Page 5 1 located either within walking distance of the development site or located to minimize the 2 use of commuting in personal vehicles. 3 4 gnsure "I hat employees are.housed_ in._close proximity to_ transportation...nodes_to .--. Deleted:The Tom shall 5 minimize vehicular traffic and the demand for parking for affordable housing projects. In it 6 addition,the Town shall explore design alternatives for auto-free employee housing. 7 8 gevelop-policies-and actions to maximize the long-term-efficiency of its.housing stock. -_.- shall 9 The Town of Snowmass Village shall implement actions to provide housing for retiring Deleted: homeowners in deed restricted housing to maximize the efficiency of larger deed 11 restricted homes. In addition,the Town shall develop programs to incentivize free market 12 employee occupied housing from being lost from the employee housing supply., 13 rage and 14 When appropriate, work regionally, in partnership.with other public and.private entities,facilitate the development of 15 to bring about a wide variety of affordable housing types, sizes and price ranges to serve workforce housing on Town-owned and other public lands where 16 the needs of all employees, including those that choose to live outside of town limits.appropriate within land use 17 Regional housing solutions should focus on sites that have close pedestrian access to considerations as necessary to close 18 mass transportation. Increasing density around transportation nodes transit oriented the gap if any between existing full p 9 y p 19 development) to maximize housing at transportation nodes regionally, should be time employee demand and current suppNll 20 encouraged and complement RFTA's Bus Rapid Transit program. Deleted;w 21 22 yiew and assess housing n---------------------------------------------------------ds for both full-time and seasonal mployees, every 3 to- --. Deleted:Eery 3 to 4 years the 23 4 years. to ensure housing supply is meeting demand for full time year round Town ofsnowmassvillageshall 24 employees.Deleted:r 25 26 Award higher priority in the tenure-based housing lottery process, and consider----- Formatted:Indent.Left: 0.25•, 27 increased housing mitigation requirements of developers, in order to accommodate Bulleted+Level: l+Aligned at: 28 housing needs of regional employees of districts and/or entities that provide services the 0.75•+Tab after: 1•+Indent at: 29 Snowmass Village community. 1",Tabs: 0.5",List ale+Not at r 30 Deleted!for critical Snowmass 31 Support energy efficient housing. vilUye and easentul regional.,;,a 32 providers JOHN LANGUAGE HERE for example:day rare.leachers. 33 Long-term affordability needs to be maintained on deed restricted units that are marital personnel,public servants, 34 integrated with free market units when considering a new condominium development.corn-.My B1V10°)' Award families prienry on future sales of adomable35Theeconomiceffectcreatedbypotentialassessments, both common and special,units of three bedrooms or more. The 36 should be considered, as they would affect the long-term affordability of the employee developer mitigation requirement may 37 Ur1115. need to be increased at the discmtian of the Town,to accommodate Formatted:Indent:Left: 0.25• Deleted:regional employees Nat service the Snowmass Village community.¶ Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 9:Workforce Housing January,2009 Page