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10-05-09 Town Council PacketSNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL REGULAR MEETING OCTOBER 5, 2009 PLEASE NOTE THAT ALL TIMES ARE APPROXIMATE — ITEMS COULD START EARLIER OR LATER THAN THE STATED TIME CALL TO ORDER AT 4:00 P.M. Item No. 1: ROLL CALL Item No. 2: PUBLIC NON-AGENDA ITEMS 5-minute time limit) Item No. 3: COUNCIL UPDATES Item No. 4: RESOLUTION NO. 14, SERIES OF 2009 — SNOWMASS CHAPEL Time: 5 minutes) SUBDIVISION EXEMPTIONS INVOLVING LAND EXCHANGES AND A LOT LINE ADJUSTMENT BETWEEN LOT 1 OF THE SNOWMASS INTERFAITH CHAPEL SUBDIVISION AND PARCEL 10 OF THE SNOWMASS CLUB PHASES I AND II REPLAT Jim Wahlstrom ......................Page 1 TAB A) Together with" Item No. 5: CONTINUATION OF PUBLIC HEARING AND RESOLUTION NO. 15, SERIES OF 2009 — SNOWMASS CHAPEL Time: 5 minutes) A FINAL RE-PLAT LOTS 1 ,AND 2 OF THE SNOWMAINTERFAITH CHAPEL SUBDIVISION, INCORPORATING THE ASSOCIATED SUBDIVISION EXEMPTIONS FOR LAND EXCHANGES AND A LOT LINE ADJUSTMENT BETWEEN LOT 1 AND PARCEL 10 OF THE SNOWMASS CLUB PHASES I AND II REPLAT TOGETHER WITH THE RE-PLAT OF LOT 2A OF THE SNOWMASS INTERFAITH CHAPEL SUBDIVISION RE-PLAT "A." ACTION REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: Approve, Modify or Deny together with Resolution No. 14, Series of 2009 and Resolution No. 15, Series of 2009 Jim Wahlstrom ......................Page 9 TAB B) Item No. 6: RESOLUTION NO. 24, SERIES OF 2009 —TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE ASPEN SCHOOL DISTRICT IGAI EMPLOYEE HOUSING PROJECT Time: 30 minutes) 10-05-09 TC Agenda Page 2 of 4 A RESOLUTION APPROVING THE ENTRANCE INTO AN INTERGOVERNMENTAL AGREEMENT WITH THE ASPEN RE-1 SCHOOL DISTRICT TO ESTABLISH A LAND USE REVIEW PROCESS REGARDING AN EMPLOYEE HOUSING PROJECT PROPOSED BY THE ASPEN RE-1 SCHOOL DISTRICT ACTION REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: Approve, Modify or Deny Resolution No. 24, Series of 2009 John Dresser/Russ Forrest .....Page 20 TAB C) Item No. 7: JOINT MEETING SNOWMASS VILLGE TOWN COUNCIL AND PLANNING COMMISSION TO REVIEW THE PROPOSED ASPEN SCHOOL DISTRICT HOUSING PROJECT Time: 60 minutes) ACTION REQESTED OF COUNCIL: Provide direction to the Planning Commission on areas of concern Chris Conrad .........................Page 35 TAB D ) Item No. 8: CONTINUATION OF PUBLIC HEARING — SNOWMASS CLUB EMPLOYEE HOUSING Time 45 minutes) Consideration of a Minor PUD Amendment concerning a proposed employee housing unit at the Snowmass Club. ACTION REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: Provide directives to staff in preparing an ordinance with findings and conditions for consideration at a subsequent meeting. (Continued from August 17, 2009 Meeting) Jim Wahlstrom .......................Page 39 TAB E ) Item No. 9: FIRST READING — ORDINANCE NO. 8, SERIES OF 2009 AMENDING CHAPTER 10 OF THE SNOWMASS VILLAGE MUNICIPLAN CODE PERTAINING TO GENERAL OFFENCES Time: 15 minutes) ACTION REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: Approve, Modify or Deny First reading of Ordinance No. 8 Series of 2009 Art Smythe ..............................Page 47 TAB F ) Item No. 10: RESOLUTION NO. 25, SERIES OF 2009 - SUBSTANCE ABUSE POLICY FOR EMPLOYEES Time: 10 minutes) ACTION REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: Approve, Modify or Deny Resolution No. 25, Series of 2009 David Peckler ........................Page 55 TAB G) Item No. 11: COMPREHENSIVE PLAN Time:45 minutes) 10-05-09 TC Agenda Page 3 of 4 ACTION REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: Review the final draft of the Comprehensive Plan. Comp Plan Team (Russ Forrest, Chris Conrad, Lesley Compagnone, Jason Haber, David Peckler) Page 82 TAB H) Item No. 12: ENVIRONMENTAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE BIANNUAL STATUS REPORT AND 2009 RENEWABLE ENERGY OFFSET PROGRAM FUNDING REQUEST Time: 30 minutes) ACTION REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: Receive a status report from the Environmental Advisory committee and approve the 2009 Renewable Energy Offset Program (REOP)funding request in an amount not to exceed $26,000. Jason Haber ..........................Page 188 TAB 1) Item No. 13: RESOLUTION NO. 26, SERIES OF 2009 — IN SUPPORT OF REFERENDUM 1A Time: 5 minutes) A RESOLUTION IN SUPPORT OF THE 2009 PITKIN COUNTY BALLOT ISSUE KNOWN AS "REFERENDUM IIX THAT CREATES THE ENERGY SMART LOAN PROGRAM ACTION REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: Approve, Modify or Deny Resolution No. 26, Series of 2009 Jason Haber ..........................Page 209 TAB J) Item No. 14: MANAGER'S REPORT Time: 10 minutes) Russell Forrest ..........................Page 212 (TAB K) Item No. 15: AGENDA FOR NEXT TOWN COUNCIL MEETING Page 218 (TAB L) Item No. 16: APPROVAL OF MEETING MINUTES FOR: JUNE 29. 2009 AND AUGUST 3. 2009 Page 221 TAB J) Item No. 17: COUNCIL COMMENTS/COMMITTEE REPORTS/CALENDARS Page 229 TAB K) Item No. 18: EXECUTIVE SESSION Town Council will now meet in Executive Session pursuant to C.R.S. 24-6-402(4) and Snowmass Village Municipal Code Section 2-45(c), to specifically discuss one item: 10-05-09 TC Agenda Page 4 of 4 a) Conferences with an attorney for the purposes of receiving legal advice on specific legal questions pursuant to C.R.S. 24-6- 402(4)(c) and Snowmass Village Municipal Code Section 2- 45(()(2); Provided, there is an affirmative vote of two-thirds of the quorum present at this meeting to hold an Executive Session and for the sole purpose of considering item (a) above. Provided further, that no adoption of any proposed policy, position, resolution, regulation, or formal action shall occur at this Executive Session. Item No. 19: ADJOURNMENT NOTE: Total time estimated for meeting: Approximately 4 hours and 30 minutes (excluding items 1-3 and 15 —19 ALL ITEMS AND TIMES ARE TENTATIVE AND SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT FURTHER NOTICE. PLEASE CALL THE OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK AT 923-3777 ON THE DAY OF THE MEETING FOR ANY AGENDA CHANGES. MEMORANDUM TO: Snowmass Village Town Council FROM: Planning Department DATE: October 5, 2009 SUBJECT: RESOLUTION NO. 14, SERIES OF 2009: SUBDIVISION EXEMPTIONS INVOLVING LAND EXCHANGES AND A LOT LINE ADJUSTMENT BETWEEN LOT 1 OF THE SNOWMASS INTERFAITH CHAPEL SUBDIVISION AND PARCEL 10 OF THE SNOWMASS CLUB PHASES I AND II REPLAT. The application is being processed pursuant to Section 16A-5-500, Exemptions authorized, of the Town of Snowmass Village Land Use and Development Code. The property on Lots 1 and 2A encompasses 3.99 acres, not including the impacted area onto Parcel 10 (golf course) of the Snowmass Club Phases I and II Replat. Applicant: Snowmass Chapel, Inc., formerly known as Snowmass Chapel and Community Center, Inc. Applicant representative: Doug Dotson Planner: Jim Wahlstrom I. PURPOSE AND ACTIONS REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: The purpose of the meeting would be to approve, modify or deny the attached subdivision exemptions' resolution for the proposed land exchanges and lot line adjustment. II. SUMMARY OF DESCRIPTION OF PROJECT. The Applicant proposes to exchange land with the owner of Parcel 10 of the Snowmass Club Phases I and II Replat, as illustrated in Exhibit "A" of attached Resolution No. 14. The purpose of the land exchanges is to accommodate and provide adequate land or space to develop the associated, proposed building addition and maintenance building in the Final PUD approved pursuant to Ordinance No. 9, Series of 2009, on September 14, 2009. The proposal would increase the size of Lot 1 for the existing Chapel facilities from 102,845 square feet or 2.36 acres to 105,048 square feet or 2.41 acres The subdivision exemption does not require a public hearing, but the related Resolution No. 15 for the re-subdivision plat requires a public hearing, which hearing was continued from the September 14, 2009 meeting when the accompanying rezoning and Final PUD ordinance was approved. III. BACKGROUND The Applicant formally submitted a subdivision exemption application in February 2009 concurrent with the Final PUD/re-zoning and re-subdivision plat for consolidated review. IV. APPLICABLE REGULATIONS Conveying title and adjusting a lot line are authorized via a subdivision exemption pursuant to Municipal Code Section 16A-5-500. Municipal Code review criteria, which regulate the review and approval of a Subdivision Exemption applications, are outlined in Section 16A-5-530, Review Standards, as follows: An application for a subdivision exemption shall comply with the following standards: 1) Exemption is necessary. The exemption shall be necessary for the preservation and enjoyment of substantial property rights of the applicant. 2) Consistent with subdivision. The exemption shall be consistent with the preservation of the goals, objectives and standards of the particular subdivision or land area involved. 3) No new lots created. Granting of the exemption shall not create any new lots in any single-family subdivision. 4) Comply with Development Code. The exemption shall comply with the standards of the zoning district in which the property is located and all other applicable standards of the Development Code. With respect to an application for a lot line adjustment, if any of the lots or structures thereon are nonconforming prior to the adjustment, then no adjustment shall be allowed that increases the nonconformity of the lot or structure. 5) No adverse impacts. Granting of the exemption shall not be detrimental to the public welfare and shall not affect in a substantially adverse manner the enjoyment of land abutting upon or within the area in which the subject property is situated. 6) Not increase total allowable floor area. Granting of the exemption shall not increase the total allowable floor area on a lot or lots affected by the proposed exemption beyond the total allowed without the exemption, and any change in allowable floor area permitted by the exemption within those totals shall be consistent with the surrounding area. 7) Special circumstances. In the instance where the Town Council is unable to find that an application is consistent with any of the above standards, the exemption may only be granted if the Town Council finds that there are special circumstances or conditions affecting the subject property such that the strict application of these standards would result in undue hardship and deprive the applicant of the reasonable use of the land. Pursuant to Code Section 16A-5-60 of the Municipal Code, the subdivision exemptions for the proposed land exchanges and a lot line adjustment do not require a public hearing. V. STAFF FINDINGS AND RECOMMENDATIONS The proposed subdivision exemption for the requested land exchanges and lot line adjustment by itself do not necessarily conflict with the review standards above. However, 2 per criterion #7 above, the exemption request would increase the size of Lot 1 and the resulting F.A.R., but the applicant was required to submit a variation with the accompanying Final PUD application for exceeding the buildout for this area that would be restricted to 29,700 square feet. The buildout variation granted in Ordinance No. 9, Series of 2009, is under the F.A.R. limit for the 'MU-1' zone district. See criterion #7 above for the exception language in the Code. VI. OTHER HEADINGS RELATED TO THE TOPICS Attachments: Town Council Resolution No. 14, Series of 2009, with exhibit Separate Handout: 11" x 1 T' subdivision exemption plat drawing. VII. NEXT STEPS None for Town Council. If approved, staff would process Resolution No. 14 and the accompanying exemption plat drawing for recording with the County prior to execution along with the recording of the associated re-subdivision plat via Resolution No. 15. 3 I TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE 2 TOWN COUNCIL 3 4 RESOLUTION NO. 14 5 SERIES 2009 6 7 A RESOLUTION APPROVING SUBDIVISION EXEMPTIONS INVOLVING LAND 8 EXCHANGES AND A LOT LINE ADJUSTMENT BETWEEN LOT 1 OF THE 9 SNOWMASS INTERFAITH CHAPEL SUBDIVISION AND PARCEL 10 OF THE in SNOWMASS CLUB PHASES I AND II REPLAT. II 12 WHEREAS, the Town Council approved on September 5, 2006 the Snowmass 13 Chapel modified Preliminary Plan application together with the preliminary concept of a 14 land exchange and lot line adjustment as accepted, subject to ratification, with 15 Resolution No. 9, Series of 2006 (Resolution 9); and 16 17 WHEREAS, the Snowmass Chapel, Inc., formerly known as Snowmass Chapel 18 and Community Center, Inc., ("Applicant') initially submitted on December 11, 2008 as 19 updated for completeness on January 26, 2009 and formally submitted on February 2, 20 2009, a completed Final PUD application that together includes a formal request to 21 rezone the property to "MU-1," and subdivision exemptions for a lot line adjustment and 22 planned land exchanges with an adjacent property owner that would increase the size of 23 Lot 1 from 102,845 square feet or 2.36 acres to 105,048 square feet or 2.41 acres, and 24 a final re-plat involving Lot 1 of the Snowmass Interfaith Chapel Subdivision and Lot 2A 25 of the Snowmass Interfaith Chapel Subdivision Re-plat "A" encompassing in existing 26 total 3.99 acres ("Application"), not including the impacted area onto Parcel 10 (golf 27 course) of the Snowmass Club Phases I and II Replat, together with associated draft 28 agreements; which subdivision exemptions, involving land exchanges of approximately 29 0.38 acres or 16,334 square feet, are described or illustrated in attached Exhibit "A" 30 incorporated herein; and 31 32 WHEREAS, the Aspen Skiing Company / Snowmass Club Associates, LLC 33 consented on January 14, 2009 to the applications, including the proposed subdivision 34 exemptions for the lot line adjustment and the land exchanges affecting Parcel 10 of the 35 Snowmass Club Phases I and II Replat; and 36 37 WHEREAS, the application was sent to affected Town Departments and referral 38 agencies for review and comment on February 18, 2009, and the Applicant submitted on 39 April 24, 2009 updated plat drawings of the subdivision exemptions, in response to Q Town staff and referral agency review comments dated March 20, 2009, that were re- 41 referred to affected agencies for re-review; and 42 43 WHEREAS, public hearings or continuances thereof, were scheduled before the 44 Town Council on May 4, 18, June 1, 15, July 6, 20, August 3, and September 14, 2009 45 to review the proposed Final PUD application together with the re-zoning, and the 46 associated subdivision exemptions and final re-plat, to consider the recommendations of 47 Town Staff and hear public comments; and, on October 5, 2009 to act upon this 48 resolution; and 49 TC Reso.09-14 Page 2 of 3 50 WHEREAS, the application for the subdivision exemptions were processed in 51 accordance with Section 16A-5-500-530, Division 5 — Subdivision Exemptions, of the 52 Municipal Code. 53 54 NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, by the Town Council of the Town of 55 Snowmass Village, as follows: 56 57 Section One: Findings. Based upon the information contained in the subdivision 58 exemptions' application, supplemental information submitted to Town Staff and 59 testimony in the record, the Town Council hereby finds that: 60 61 1) The applicant has submitted sufficient information pursuant to Section 16A-5-500 62 520 of the Municipal Code to permit the Town Staff and Town Council an 63 adequate review of the subdivision exemption application for the proposed land 64 exchanges and a lot line adjustment. 65 66 2) One of the review criterion states that the granting of the exemption shall not 67 increase the total allowable floor area on a lot or lots affected by the proposed 68 exemption beyond the total allowed without the exemption, and any change in 69 allowable floor area permitted by the exemption within those totals shall be 70 consistent with the surrounding area. However, the exemption request would 71 increase the size of Lot 1 and the resulting F.A.R., but the applicant is required to 72 submit a variation with the accompanying Final PUD application for exceeding the 73 buildout for this area that would restrict the total floor area to a maximum of 29,700 74 square feet, which is also under the F.A.R. limit if zoned to MU-1, as approved by 75 Town Council via Ordinance No. 9, Series of 2009 on September 14, 2009. 76 Therefore, pursuant to criterion #8 in the Municipal Code, Town Council finds that 77 there are special circumstances or conditions affecting the subject property such 78 that the strict application of these standards might result in undue hardship and 79 deprive the applicant of the reasonable use of the land to accommodate the 80 accompanying Final PUD proposal. 81 82 3) The application, subject to satisfying the conditions stated below, is consistent 83 with the applicable review standards specified within Section 16A-5-530 of the 84 Municipal Code. 85 86 Section Two: Action. The Town Council hereby approves the subdivision exemptions 87 for the land exchanges and the lot line adjustment involving Lot 1 of the Snowmass 88 Interfaith Chapel Subdivision and Parcel 10 of the Snowmass Club Phases I and II 89 Replat, as shown or illustrated in attached Exhibits "A," subject to the conditions in 90 Section Three below. 91 92 Section Three: Conditions. The approval granted herein is subject to the following 93 conditions: 94 95 1) The land exchanges and the lot line adjustment reflected in this Resolution shall 96 be incorporated into the associated re-subdivision plat involving the same 97 properties pursuant to Resolution No. 15, Series of 2009, if approved. TC Reso. 09-14 Page 3 of 3 98 99 2) The off-site easements between the applicant and adjacent private property 100 owners for utilities, construction, landscaping and pedestrian access shall be 101 executed and recorded in conjunction with the associated final re-plat that would 102 incorporate the subdivision exemption plat, or no later than prior to 103 commencement of construction. 104 105 3) The Applicants shall complete all other actions or matters which in the opinion of 106 the Planning Director and the Town Attorney are necessary to satisfy or 107 dispense with the completion, execution and/or recording of all documents 108 necessary to implement the conditions of this Resolution and the requirements of 109 the Municipal Code. Should disagreements arise regarding matters requiring 110 Planning Director approval or completion of the necessary documents that III cannot be resolved between Town Staff and the Applicants, the matter will be 112 referred to the Town Council for final direction and/or determination. 113 114 4) Following execution, this resolution and its exhibits shall be recorded, at the 115 Applicant's expense, with the Pitkin County Clerk and Recorder. 116 117 Section Four: Severability. If any provision of this Resolution or application hereof to IIS any person or circumstance is held invalid, the invalidity shall not affect any other 119 provision or application of this Resolution which can be given effect without the invalid 120 provision or application, and, to this end, the provisions of this Resolution are severable. 121 122 READ, APPROVED AND ADOPTED by the Town Council of the Town of 123 Snowmass Village on this 51" day of October 2009, upon a motion by Council Member 124 the second of Council Member and upon a vote of _ in favor 125 and _ opposed. 126 TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE 127 128 129 130 Bill Boineau, Mayor 131 ATTEST: 132 133 134 135 Rhonda B. Coxon, Town Clerk 136 137 APPROVED AS TO FORM: 138 139 140 141 John C. Dresser, Jr., Town Attorney 142 143 Attachments: 144 Exhibit "A" — Subdivision exemption plat drawing for the land exchanges and a lot line 145 adjustment SUBDIVISION IXE Off FOR A Wr I EA Sf1 : LOT 1, SNOWMASS INTERFAITH CHAPEL SUBDIVISION AND PARCEL 10 . THE SNOWMASS CLUB PHASE I AND II REPLAT A PARCEL OF LAND SITUATED IN SECTION 1 TOWNSHIP 10 SOUTH, RANGE 86 j`,.,., i• K,;, ..•:;.. ::, ayr a WEST OF THE 6th P.M. L'• , i • J, _,. l.S. .. COUNTY OF PITKIN, STATE OF COLORADO f/ ri !^• i!^? r Sf661' I OP 2 i' 1°.. F.. yi . r7 • 1'.< G yr— r• um n r. rr .. m D.,t\.. .', 1') ur w• r um r. nertli YlY MUP Is CT 37 rRALT 41 a- RECEIVED wpm—. TRACT s8 cnAPwc scAtt APR 24 2009 Sno unase vmage CannnRr DaiebpmeM a...... r.. w., r r TRACT ss SOPRIS ENGINEERING - LLC ctvD. roNSUCrAxrs 602 YACl 31RCEi,$ URg A.y w,.. Ti. — 2T'• rS3• tia 3 CA280NDlid. NLDFADO BIBZ1 r rrr Oie) J04- Nti Z JO 3 aged 60OZ 10 SaiJaS' tl ' ON uoilnlosoU 1! 3uno3 umol 1, V, l! q! 4x3 SUMMSION E% EYPTfON FOR A LOT LRIS ADlV31' LENT: LOT 1 , SNOWMASS INTERFAITH CHAPEL SUBDIVISION AND PARCEL 10, THE SNOWMASS CLUB PHASE I AND II REPLAT A PARCEL OF LAND SITUATED IN SECTION 1 TOWNSHIP 10 SOUTH, RANGE 86 WEST OF THE 6th P.M. COUNTY OF PITKIN, STATE OF COLORADO 01 bo C v N r. W F G a Qj Nlk SOPRIS ENGINEERING - LLC OML CONSRLA Q„ s 602 YAR1 StREtf. SUIi' R A9 cAReaxnAtc. mwRAno e1222 MEMORANDUM TO: Snowmass Village Town Council FROM: Planning Department DATE: October 5, 2009 SUBJECT: RESOLUTION NO. 15, SERIES OF 2009: A FINAL RE-PLAT OF LOTS 1 AND 2 OF THE SNOWMASS INTERFAITH CHAPEL SUBDIVISION, INCORPORATING THE ASSOCIATED SUBDIVISION EXEMPTIONS FOR LAND EXCHANGES AND A LOT LINE ADJUSTMENT BETWEEN LOT 1 AND PARCEL 10 OF THE SNOWMASS CLUB PHASES I AND II REPLAT, TOGETHER WITH THE RE-PLAT OF LOT 2A OF THE SNOWMASS INTERFAITH CHAPEL SUBDIVISION RE-PLAT "A." The application is being processed pursuant to Section 16A-5-450, Amendment of Final Plat of the Town of Snowmass Village Land Use and Development Code. The property on Lots 1 and 2A encompasses 3.99 acres, not including the impacted area onto Parcel 10 (golf course) of the Snowmass Club Phases I and II Replat. Applicant: Snowmass Chapel, Inc., formerly known as Snowmass Chapel and Community Center, Inc. Applicant representative: Doug Dotson Planner: Jim Wahlstrom I. PURPOSE AND ACTIONS REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: The purpose of the meeting would be to approve, modify or deny the attached re- subdivision plat resolution to create a modified lot and perimeter boundary arrangements for the existing and proposed development together with new and replacement easements. II. SUMMARY DESCRIPTION OF PROJECT. The Applicant proposes to re-subdivide the affected properties noted above to propose the creation of: A modified arrangement of Lot 1 that incorporates the land exchanges and lot line adjustment pursuant to associated Resolution No. 14, Series of 2009, for the purpose of constructing the proposed building addition and the maintenance building pursuant to Ordinance No. 9, Series of 2009, which was approved at the September 14, 2009 meeting. Such a proposal would increase the size of Lot 1 from 102,845 square feet or 2.36 acres to 105,048 square feet or 2.41 acres and grant related easements to serve the development. To re-plat Lot 2A for the existing parking lot and to re-establish the easements for access, utilities, drainage and trails along the existing alignments; and Maintaining the Lot 2 arrangement for the Yarrow Park area. The proposed lot and easement re-configurations are illustrated on Exhibit "A" of attached Resolution No. 15. 111. BACKGROUND The Applicant formally submitted the re-plat application concurrent with the Final PUD/re- zoning and subdivision exemption applications for consolidated review. IV. APPLICABLE REGULATIONS According to Municipal Code Section 16A-5-410, "no land shall be transferred, conveyed, sold or subdivided to create a new non-conforming use or to avoid, circumvent or subvert and provision of the affected Code Section, or the provisions of any Final PUD Plan." A subdivision plat approval is also required prior to issuance of a building permit for a proposed structure or other improvements on a proposed lot for development. The review criteria for a Re-plat per Section 16A-5-460, include the follow standards: The proposed subdivision plat shall comply with the following review standards: 1) Consistency with the original subdivision. The proposed amendment shall be consistent with or an enhancement of the original subdivision approval. 2) No substantially adverse impact. The proposed amendment shall not have a substantially adverse effect on the neighborhood surrounding the land where the amendment is proposed, or have a substantially adverse impact on the enjoyment of land abutting upon or across the street from the subject property. 3) Not change character. The proposed amendment shall not change the basic character of the subdivision or surrounding areas. 4) Comply with other applicable standards. The proposed amendment shall comply with the applicable standards for review of a subdivision application, as specified in Subsection (3), Review Standards. The re-plat requires a public hearing that was continued from the September 14, 2009 meeting. Pursuant to Section 16A-5-60, the Applicant submitted the signed affidavits for the mailing of the public hearing notices to owners within 300 feet of the impacted site areas together with the posting of the notices. The public hearing for the re-plat was published in the Snowmass Sun on April 1, 2009 concurrent with notice for the associated re-zoning and Final PUD. V. STAFF FINDINGS AND RECOMMENDATIONS Staff is continuing to work with the applicant to address technical aspects and review comments concerning the plat. Update title work may be needed to consummate the re- plat. In addition, the off-site easements for construction, landscaping, pedestrian access and utilities should be executed between the applicant and the affected property owners and/or districts and recorded or concurrently with the recordation of the re-plat or no later than commencement of construction. 2 VI. OTHER HEADINGS RELATED TO THE TOPICS Attachments: Town Council Resolution No. 15, Series of 2009, with exhibit Separate Handout: 11" x 17 re-subdivision plat. VII. NEXT STEPS None for Town Council. If approved, staff would process Resolution No. 15 and the accompanying re-plat for execution and recording with the County following or concurrent with execution and recording of the associated subdivision exemption plat drawings via Resolution No. 14. 3 I1 a '` I TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE 2 TOWN COUNCIL 3 4 RESOLUTION No. 15 5 SERIES OF 2009 6 7 A RESOLUTION APPROVING A FINAL RE-PLAT OF LOTS 1 AND 2 OF THE SNOWMASS 8 INTERFAITH CHAPEL SUBDIVISION, INCORPORATING THE ASSOCIATED 9 SUBDIVISION EXEMPTIONS FOR LAND EXCHANGES AND A LOT LINE ADJUSTMENT 10 BETWEEN LOT1 AND PARCEL 10 OF THE SNOWMASS CLUB PHASES I AND II 11 REPLAT,TOGETHER WITH THE RE-PLAT OF LOT 2A OF THE SNOWMASS INTERFAITH 12 CHAPEL SUBDIVISION RE-PLAT"A." 13 14 WHEREAS,the Town Council approved on September 5,2006 the Snowmass Chapel 15 modified Preliminary Plan application together with the preliminary concept of a land 16 exchange and lot line adjustment as accepted, subject to ratification, with Resolution No. 9, 17 Series of 2006 (Resolution 9); and 18 19 WHEREAS, the Snowmass Chapel, Inc., formerly known as Snowmass Chapel and 20 Community Center, Inc.,("Applicant')initially submitted on December 11,2008 as updated for 21 completeness on January 26,2009 and formally submitted on February 2,2009,a completed 22 Final PUD application that together includes a formal request to rezone the property to"MU- 23 1,"and subdivision exemptions for a lot line adjustment and planned land exchanges with an 24 adjacent property owner that would increase the size of Lot 1 from 102,845 square feet or 25 2.36 acres to 105,048 square feet or 2.41 acres, and a final re-plat involving Lot 1 of the 26 Snowmass Interfaith Chapel Subdivision and Lot 2A of the Snowmass Interfaith Chapel 27 Subdivision Re-plat "A" encompassing in total 4.04 acres ("Application"), including the 28 impacted area onto Parcel 10 (golf course) of the Snowmass Club Phases I and II Replat, 29 together with associated draft agreements; which final re-plat, involving a total of 30 approximately 4.99 acres including Lot 2 also known as Yarrow Park, is described or 31 illustrated in attached Exhibit "A" incorporated herein; and 32 33 WHEREAS,the Aspen Skiing Company/Snowmass Club Associates,LLC consented 34 on January 14, 2009 to the applications, including the proposed final re-plat affecting Parcel 35 10 of the Snowmass Club Phases I and II Replat via an accompanying subdivision 36 exemption; and 37 38 WHEREAS, the application was sent to affected Town Departments and referral 39 agencies for review and comment on February 18,2009, and the Applicant submitted on April 40 24, 2009 updated plat drawings of the final re-plat, in response to Town staff and referral 41 agency review comments dated March 20,2009,that was re-referred to affected agencies for 42 re-review; and 43 44 WHEREAS, public hearings or continuances thereof,were scheduled before the Town 45 Council on May 4, 18, June 1, 15, July 6, 20, August 3, and September 14 to review the 46 proposed Final PUD application together with the re-zoning, and the associated subdivision 47 exemptions and final re-plat,to consider the recommendations of Town Staff and hear public 48 comments; and, on October 5, 2009 to act upon this resolution; and 49 50 WHEREAS, the application for the final re-plat was processed in accordance with 51 Section 16A-5-450, Amendment of Final Plat, of the Municipal Code. 52 TC Reso. og-15 Page 2 of 3 53 54 NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, by the Town Council of the Town of 55 Snowmass Village, as follows: 56 57 Section One: Findings. Based upon the information contained in the subdivision re-plat 58 application along with the documentation and testimony in the record,the Town Council finds 59 that: 60 61 1) The Applicant submitted the application the re-plat in accordance with the provisions 62 of the Municipal Code. 63 64 2) The applications provided the Minimum Contents required and included written and 65 graphic materials in sufficient detail pursuant to Sections 16A-5-450(2)b for the 66 purpose of initial review. 67 68 3) Public notification requirements were met in accordance with the requirements of 69 Section 16A-5-60(b) of the Municipal Code. 70 71 4) The re-plat,as further described or illustrated in attached Exhibit'A,"is consistent with 72 Section 16A-5-450(1), Review standards, of the Municipal Code, because it: 73 74 a) is consistent with the original subdivision; 75 b) does not have a substantially adverse effect on the neighborhood surrounding the 76 land where the amendment is proposed, or have a substantially adverse impact on 77 the enjoyment of land abutting upon or across the street from the adjacent property; 78 c) would not change the basic character of the subdivision or surrounding areas; and 79 d) complies with other applicable provisions of the Municipal Code. 80 81 5) The subdivision exemptions involving the land exchanges and a lot line adjustment 82 reflected in the accompanying Resolution No. 14, Series of 2009, are satisfactorily 83 incorporated into the final re-plat involving the same properties. 84 85 Section Two: Action. Pursuant to the findings stated in Section One of this resolution, the 86 Town Council approves the final re-plat of Lots 1 and 2 of the Snowmass Interfaith Chapel 87 Subdivision, incorporating the associated subdivision exemptions for land exchanges and a lot 88 line adjustment between Lot 1 and Parcel 10 of the Snowmass Club Phases I and II Replat, 89 together with the re-plat of Lot 2A of the Snowmass Interfaith Chapel Subdivision Re-Plat"A," 90 subject to addressing the conditions in Section Three below. 91 92 Section Three: Conditions. As part of the action above, the following conditions shall be 93 complied with or implemented by the Applicant: 94 95 1) The off-site easements between the applicant and adjacent private property owners 96 for utilities, construction, landscaping and pedestrian access shall be executed and 97 recorded in conjunction with the re-plat, or no later than prior to commencement of 98 construction. 99 100 2) All prior plat notes, restrictions, easements and rights-of-way of record shall remain 101 and will be shown upon the final re-plat unless they are no longer applicable,or have TC Reso. 09-15 Page 3 of 3 102 been restated, relocated or relinquished by all parties having interest. 103 104 3) The Town of Snowmass Village shall not accept the obligation for financing, 105 construction or maintenance of improvements on land, streets or easements granted 106 to the public by the subdivision plat. 107 108 4) The Applicant shall complete all actions or matters, which in the opinion of the 109 Planning Director and the Town Attorney,are necessary to satisfy or dispense with the 110 completion, execution and/or recording of all documents, including affected 111 agreements including those in associated Ordinance No. 9, Series of 2009, that are 112 necessary to implement the conditions of this Resolution and the requirements of the 113 Municipal Code, before the subject plat is executed and placed of record, or in regard 114 to the deed restriction, prior to the issuance of a building permit or certificate of 115 occupancy as deemed applicable by the Town Attorney. Should disagreements arise 116 that cannot be resolved between Town Staff and the Applicant, the matter shall be 117 referred to the Town Council for direction or a final determination. 118 119 5) Following execution, this resolution and its exhibits shall be recorded, at the 120 Applicant's expense, with the Pitkin County Clerk and Recorder. 121 122 Section Four: Severability. If any provision of this Resolution or application hereof to any 123 person or circumstance is held invalid, the invalidity shall not affect any other provision or 124 application of this Resolution which can be given effect without the invalid provision or 125 application, and, to this end, the provisions of this Resolution are severable. 126 127 READ,APPROVED AND ADOPTED,by the Town Council of the Town of Snowmass 128 Village, Colorado on this 51" day of October 2009, upon a motion made by Council Member 129 and the second by Council Member upon a vote of_in favor and 130 against. 131 132 TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE 133 134 135 136 Bill Boineau, Mayor 137 ATTEST: 138 139 140 141 Rhonda B. Coxon, Town Clerk 142 143 APPROVED AS TO FORM: 144 145 146 147 John C. Dresser, Jr., Town Attorney 148 149 Attachments: 150 Exhibit "A"— Re-plat drawing SECOND AMENDED PLAT SNOWMASS IN' T' ERFAI' T' H CHAPEL SUBDIVISION A PARCEL OF LAND SITUATED IN THE NM, 01' SECTION I rcasv TOWNSHIP 10 SOUTH, RANGE 86 WEST OF THE 6th P. IL TOWN OF SN06' AIASS, COUNTY OF' PI'1' AIN. STATE OF COLORADO SHFR l or s e, rr. ro.. r a°° norms rear — ra 4• s« w. wr n rr. srar• s r °• i t f• 4~" t r...°., m .... ea. r, ar• wz A:- v. a. a« e _ or.. r•.. rn.. r« mr:' ,® r. n .. a,.a. r.. r.. r°« w °-® rr_ ar n.• e®. d__. RECEIVE ter-°= JUL 08 2009 e a... ar e ° r v. ww. a_ m® rarn. a.. e `--•^ y[ G sea Sffium sRDNR13s5 VwCy< Dev" m, v parr« rrr rr• rrw___ SOPRIS ENGINEERING - LLC A r.. r r°.,. . d:e^ e ®•'°="• ate OWL[ 0. 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NRf M CAR00a' UAIE, COW" M BIG'.' 1 SECOND AMENDED PLAT SNOWMASS INTERF' AIT' H . CHAPEL SUBDIVISIOJV A PARCEL OF LAND St MATEO IN TFfE NW OF SECTION I TOWNSHIP 10 SOUTH, RANGE 86 WEST' OF THE 6110 Y.V. TOWN OF SNOiVAIASS, Co"" y OF YITNIR. STATE 01' COLORADO RFE 3 FM1 MSTI\' C EA9E. 11E\ T YACATIOA' DETAIL AkD\ OTCJ r NnAa a I i/ j! Aaavmm 0 cur- 41 p wi Obo S p A vb.+ v% ' I_. j ovmxreucx wwrexxme. x O Z a r 111 F- W A NWx3lox RECE+ WEIID JUL 08 2009 fll 1 1 S xonATP a* lun IWMIM1d35 un,( rE tr l\ iI n¢ sumY CIRtl1UNIY DEVEbNt1E!" I ' cPAVxK scaE SOYRISOVIL Co M% 7C — 11C CIVIL COY3ULTMT FT.;• 3a(' L+`. w SS^ fi02 dW. Y STI( fiT. SUTf AS nP^' 9..+:__ n CARDOI: DALE. COLORADO AIE°_ J rr.' r ,. feral d- OSll SECOND AMENDED PLAT SNOWMASS INTERFAITH CHAPEL SUBDIVISION A PARCEL OF I. ANO SITUATED IN THE NEY, OF SECTION I TOWNSHIP 10 SOUTH, RANGE 86 REST OF THE 6th P.M. TOWN OF' SNORMASS, COUNTY OF PI' TKIN, STATE Of' COLORADO SIFT ! nr 3 SHEET is N6YAIY16C AND FRP StiB1ID' I:' 106 IIA56Yk' Nffi cn I I I 4+ U mw LLI r, w _ Ac,. u teaN L .._. j. T r Erma i' 45•• 4ssr. WUw[ 1, 0' s 6.w.1:r M:It Rg- RECEIVED i JUL 08 2009 CanmMiN Oeveloprtl2rn romvol eemRr I I rw n. nav 1 R•, y,. , a:,. SOPRIS ENGIi\ EERING — LLC CAL WSMVEANT IS MM. NR2 A0 ryr.. R u^ 1 Ora pPn CARMNMUI. COIORA00 01829 90i- 0311 . nR SECOND AMENDED PLAT IINTERFAITH CHAPEL SUBDIVISION A PARCH, OF LAND SITUATED fS THE', NER, OF SECTION I TOWNSHIP 10 SOUTH, RANGE 86 WEST OF THE 6th P. M. TOWN OF' SNOWMASS, MUM' OF PITKIN. . SLATE OF COLORADO 111LR 5O— 5 SHEM 5: NENAl9.\ G AND NF.1 SI; HHI11e10F EAILMFAl C J / N 4 ,// i E dltl; f-. ' w` e0a• i411 rtax Nv x 0 LLI O c 141 u 1 rW i ' omiypip i _: y+..•\ ". e"' L m1 annl. lii ave z°, mvluo. RECEIVEDJUL 08 2009 9[C AMII ELU 9 wnu m^ p,> o Community Devebomew I c99rxK acAU: I_ SOPRI EVIL M,% LTAN — LLC r GAIL INEE IN 1. m1 50.: YNN S M.. NRE M yry. ryg1 MONMI{ cow" O0 91, 1M s OM) 701- PJII TO: SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL FROM: RUSS FORREST, TOWN MANAGER SUBJECT: RESOLUTION NO. 24, SERIES OF 2009 : INTERGOVERNMENTAL AGREEMENT (IGA) WITH THE ASPEN REA SCHOOL DISTRICT AND THE TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE TO ESTABLISH A LAND USE REVIEW PROCESS REGARDING AN EMPLOYEE HOUSING PROJECT PROPOSED BY THE ASPEN REA SCHOOL DISTRICT DATE: October 5, 2009 1.PURPOSE The purpose of the proposed IGA is to define a process for reviewing and commenting on the proposed Aspen School District's affordable housing project on Owl Creek Road. The Town Council is requested to either approve or reject the proposed IGA. 2.BACKGROUD In November of 2008, the voters of Pitkin County approved a ballot initiative to fund affordable housing for Aspen School District employees. In the summer of 2009 the School District acquired a site adjacent to Anderson Ranch and Fairway III on Owl Creek Road for the purpose of building an affordable housing project for District employees. After reviewing the Town's development review process, the District indicated that they would not go through the Town's land use review process but would rather follow the process outlined in the Colorado State Statute C.R.S. § 22-32-110 and 124. Under this statute the School District has the authority to acquire land and construct necessary buildings and structures. After several discusions between the Town Council and the Aspen School District, the two parties agreed to the concept of developing an Intergovernmental Agreement (IGA)to allow the Town to review and comment on the proposed project. 3.SUMMARY OF ISSUES RELATED TO THE IGA At the September 14th Town Council meeting, representatives of the School District met with the Town Council to discuss a draft IGA. The primary topics of conversation at that meeting included a recital in the IGA stating: WHEREAS, the Town desires to ensure that the proposed housing for District employees be permanently restricted to remain affordable housing for District employees and not be converted to another form of ownership or use in the future. The District would not agree to the words "permanently restricted" in the recitals of the IGA. The statement in the current proposed IGA now states: WHEREAS, the Town desires to ensure that the proposed housing for District employees remain affordable housing for District employees and not be converted to another form of ownership or use in the future; and Staff has acknowledged to the District that whether the words "permanently restricted" are left in or out of the recitals it will be a primary topic of discussion in the review of the project. Staff believes that a permanent restriction on the site is critical in consideration of the unique and expedited process that is contemplated in the IGA. The only other significant issue discussed on September 14th was the District's reluctance to pay for any fees that the Town may incur in reviewing the project. After discussing the issue, the District indicated that they could consider paying for specific fees if they were capped. Staff maintained that the District should pay for out of pocket costs incurred by the Town. After discussing potential costs with the Town Engineer, staff believes that out of pocket (consultant) costs should not exceed $2,500. These fees would be associated with reviewing circulation and transportation issues. The District agreed to the following language (see bold text)which is acceptable to staff: 3.12 Utility Costs. The School District shall be responsible for payment of applicable utility fees and charges associated with the construction or expansion of new residential buildings. The School District shall not be required to pay, directly or indirectly, any of the other usual Town fees for plan processing, plan review, plat review, plat application, annexation application or processing, building permit, service expansion fees or any Town tax on building materials incorporated into construction projects, excepting the School District shall be responsible for fees charged by consultants not employed by the Town but rather engaged by the Town for this specific land use review process in an amount not to exceed $2,500. In summary, the IGA provides the opportunity for Snowmass Village to review and comment on the project. The IGA is an alternative to the process delineated in the State Statute outlined in C.R.S. § 22-32-110 and 124. In an effort to resolve any conflicts between the two parties, the IGA requires the Town Council and the School District Board to meet on November 2, 2009 as part of the regularly scheduled Town Council meeting to discuss any findings or recommendations contained in the resolution of the Town Council if the School District will not incorporate those recommendations into the project. The Aspen School District under the IGA will be the land use decision-making authority as proposed and the Town will provide comments and recommendations to the School District. However, it should also be noted that the Town does not waive any of its authority with the statement in section 3.10 of the agreement: 3.10 Supremacy. Neither the Town nor the School District concedes supervening authority of the other over any matter. The Town acknowledges the existence of C.R.S. § 22-32-110(1)(b) and 124 and that the proposed project will be located within the territorial limits of the School District. The School District acknowledges that the Town is a Colorado home rule municipality; the existence of the Snowmass Village Municipal Code and the proposed project will be located within the territorial limits of the Town. Both parties agree that by entering into this Agreement neither party has waived or released any rights. " 4. ACTION REQUESTED OF COUNCIL Council is requested to approve, deny or propose amendments to the proposed IGA. If amendments are proposed, the School District would also have to approve of those changes. That may prevent further discussion of the substantive issues related to the housing proposal on October 5th until both parties approve those amendments. Given the direction staff has received to date from the Town Council, staff would recommend approving the IGA and moving forward with a joint meeting of the Town Council and Planning Commission to review the project on October 5, 2009. 1 SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL 2 3 RESOLUTION NO. 24 4 SERIES OF 2009 5 6 A RESOLUTION APPROVING THE ENTRANCE INTO AN INTERGOVERNMENTAL 7 AGREEMENT WITH THE ASPEN RE-1 SCHOOL DISTRICT TO ESTABLISH A 8 LAND USE REVIEW PROCESS REGARDING AN EMPLOYEE HOUSING PROJECT 9 PROPOSED BY THE ASPEN RE-1 SCHOOL DISTRICT 10 I 1 WHEREAS, the Town of Snowmass Village (the "Town") and the Aspen RE-1 School 12 District (the "School District") are both political subdivisions of the State of Colorado; and 13 14 WHEREAS, pursuant to C.R.S. § 29-20-105, local governments are authorized and 15 encouraged to cooperate or contract with other units of government; and 16 17 WHEREAS, the people of the State of Colorado have authorized political.subdivisions to 18 cooperate with each other and contract in matters set out in this Agreement through the Colorado 19 Constitution, Article XIV, Section 18(2)(A), Article XX and Article XI, Section 7; and 20 21 WHEREAS, the Town wishes to ensure compliance insofar as feasible with the adopted 22 plan of the community as reflected in the Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan and the 23 Snowmass Village Municipal Code, specifically Section 16A-5-300(c), General Restrictions and 24 Section 16A-5-310, Review Standards; and 25 26 WHEREAS, the Town and School District desire to cooperate with respect to managing 27 the physical growth of the Town of Snowmass Village, identifying and mitigating impacts 28 caused by the project, and giving its elected officials and citizens the opportunity to read, review, 29 discuss, comment and understand the Project; and 30 31 WHEREAS, a majority of the electors in the Snowmass Village precincts voted to 32 approve additional School District indebtedness for the purpose of providing affordable housing 33 for District Employees in the School District's bond election in November 2008; and 34 35 WHEREAS, pursuant to C.R.S. § 22-32-110 and 124, the School District has the 36 authority to acquire land and construct necessary buildings and structures; and 37 38 WHEREAS, The Intergovernmental Agreement (the "IGA") is designed to provide the 39 framework for a coordinated and expedited land use review process specific to and limited to the 40 development of the Project, to ensure insofar as feasible that the plans and procedures 41 undertaken by the School District are supported by the Town Council, the neighbors and the 42 community, to protect the legal rights of the School District to develop property in an expedient 43 manner, to protect the legal rights of the Town to establish an efficient development review 44 process, provide for participation, protect the quality of life, provide for orderly development of 45 the Town, to implement the Comprehensive Plan insofar as feasible, and to promote the interest 46 of the Town in ensuring that the Project conforms to community development standards insofar 47 as feasible; and 48 49 WHEREAS, the Town Council desires to approve the entrance into the IGA. 50 51 NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED by the Town Council of the Town of 52 Snowmass Village, Colorado as follows: 53 54 1. Intergovernmental Agreement To Establish A Land Use Review Process Reeardine 55 An Employee Housing Project Proposed By The Aspen Re-1 School District. The 56 Intergovernmental Agreement with the Aspen RE-1 School District to establish a land use 57 review process regarding an employee housing project proposed by the aspen re-1 school district, 58 Exhibit 1 attached hereto is hereby approved and adopted by the Town. 59 60 2. Direction to Mayor. The Mayor is hereby authorized and directed to execute the 61 Intergovernmental Agreement approved by this Resolution on behalf of the Town. 62 63 3. Severability. If any provision of this Resolution or application hereof to any person or 64 circumstance is held invalid, the invalidity shall not affect any other provision or application of 65 this Resolution which can be given effect without the invalid provision or application, and, to 66 this end, the provisions of this Resolution are severable. 67 68 INTRODUCED, READ AND ADOPTED, on this 5th day of October, 2009 by the Town 69 Council of the Town of Snowmass Village, Colorado on a motion made by Council Member 70 seconded by Council Member 71 and by a vote of_in favor and opposed. 72 73 74 TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE 75 76 77 78 79 Bill Boineau, Mayor 80 81 ATTEST: 82 83 84 85 Rhonda B. Coxon,Town Clerk 86 87 APPROVED AS TO FORM: 88 89 90 91 John C. Dresser, Jr., Town Attorney INTERGOVERNMENTAL AGREEMENT BETWEEN THE TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE AND THE ASPEN RE-1 SCHOOL DISTRICT TO ESTABLISH A LAND USE REVIEW PROCESS REGARDING AN EMPLOYEE HOUSING PROJECT PROPOSED BY THE ASPEN RE-1 SCHOOL DISTRICT This INTERGOVERNMENTAL AGREEMENT ("IGA") is made and entered into this 5th day of October, 2009, (the "Effective Date") by and between the TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE (the "Town"), a Colorado home rule municipality , and the ASPEN RE-1 SCHOOL DISTRICT, (the "School District") (collectively, the"Parties"). The subject of this agreement is an employee housing development to be located on property owned by the School District on Owl Creek Road within the Town (the Project"). RECITALS WHEREAS, the Town and the School District are both political subdivisions of the State of Colorado; and WHEREAS, pursuant to C.R.S. § 29-20-105, local governments are authorized and encouraged to cooperate or contract with other units of government; and WHEREAS, the people of the State of Colorado have authorized political subdivisions to cooperate with each other and contract in matters set out in this Agreement through the Colorado Constitution, Article XIV, Section 18(2)(A), Article XX and Article XI, Section 7; and WHEREAS, the Town wishes to ensure compliance insofar as feasible with the adopted plan of the community as reflected in the Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan and the Snowmass Village Municipal Code, specifically Section 16A-5-300(c), General Restrictions and Section 16A-5-310, Review Standards; and WHEREAS, the Town and School District desire to cooperate with respect to managing the physical growth of the Town of Snowmass Village, identifying and mitigating impacts caused by the project, and giving its elected officials and citizens the opportunity to read, review, discuss, comment and understand the Project; and WHEREAS, a majority of the electors in the Snowmass Village precincts voted to approve additional School District indebtedness for the purpose of providing affordable housing for District Employees in the School District's bond election in November 2008; and 1 WHEREAS, the Town desires to ensure that the proposed housing for District employees remain affordable housing for District employees and not be converted to another form of ownership or use in the future; and WHEREAS, the School District desires to ensure that the proposed housing for District employees be retained in the School District's inventory as affordable, rental housing for the foreseeable future; and WHEREAS, pursuant to C.R.S. § 22-32-110 and 124, the School District has the authority to acquire land and construct necessary buildings and structures. AGREEMENT NOW, THEREFORE, in consideration of the mutual covenants, conditions, and agreements made by the parties as set forth herein, the parties agree and contract as follows: ARTICLE I PURPOSE, SCOPE AND TERM 1.1 Purpose. The purposes of this Agreement are: (1) to provide-the framework for a coordinated and expedited land use review process specific to and limited to the development of the Project; (2) to ensure insofar as feasible that the plans and procedures undertaken by the School District are supported by the Town Council, the neighbors and the community; (3) to protect the legal rights of the School District to develop property in an expedient manner; (4) to protect the legal rights of the Town to establish an efficient development review process, provide for participation, protect the quality of life, provide for orderly development of the Town, to implement the Comprehensive Plan insofar as feasible; and (5) to promote the interest of the Town in ensuring that the Project conforms to community development standards insofar as feasible. 1.2 Scope. The terms and provisions of this Agreement shall apply only to the Project. 1.3 Term. The term of this Agreement commences on the Effective Date and shall remain in effect through final completion of the Project, unless terminated by either party in accordance with Section 3.1 of this Agreement. ARTICLE II SUBMITTAL ELEMENTS AND REVIEW PROCESS 2.1 Site Plan and Review Elements: The School District shall submit to the Town and the Town shall review the site plan as currently provided in C.R.S. § 22-32- 2 124. Additionally, the Town and School District agree that the site plan and project submittal shall include the following elements: a) Name, address, telephone number and power of attorney. The applicant's name, address and telephone number. If the applicant is to be represented by an agent, a letter signed by the applicant granting power of attorney to the agent shall be submitted, authorizing the agent to represent the applicant and stating the representative's name, address and phone number. b) Legal description. The legal description and street address, if such exists, of the parcel on which development is proposed. c) Disclosure of ownership. A current certificate from a title insurance company or attorney licensed in the State which shall set forth the names of all owners of property included in the application and shall include a list of all mortgages,judgments, liens, contracts, easements or agreements of record that affect the property. At the Town's option, the holders or owners of such mortgages, judgments, liens, contracts, easements or agreements of record may be required to consent to the application before it is acted upon by the Town. d) Written description. A written description of the proposal and an explanation, in written, graphic or model form. e) Vicinity map. An eight and one-half inch by eleven inch 8%z"x I I") vicinity map locating the subject parcel within the Town. f) Development plan, which shall include the following: 1. General. The property boundaries of the site, title of the proposed development, date of preparation, bar-type or graphic scale, north arrow (designated as true north) and legal description of the property. 2. Proposed development. The plan shall show the proposed dimensions and locations of all buildings, public and private roadways, existing and proposed utility lines and fire hydrants, service areas, emergency vehicle access areas, parking facilities, pedestrian pathways, trails and use areas, common open areas, public open spaces, public transportation facilities, drainage facilities and detention areas, snow storagelremoval areas, trash storage areas and other information necessary to allow detailed review of the project design. Existing and proposed contours shall be shown at two-foot intervals, or less. 3. Topography/Height. The site plan showing both existing topography and proposed grading. Plan shall show both the horizontal and vertical location of driveways, parking areas, walkways, stairs, retaining walls and patios relative to Mean Sea 3 Level Elevation (MSLE). A roof plan showing ridge elevations shall be overlaid on the site plan. MSLE roof ridge heights shall be provided. 4. Surrounding structures. The plan shall depict structures and landmarks within three hundred (300) feet of the site, so as to show the relationship of the proposed development to its surroundings. 5. Chart. The preliminary plan shall contain a chart of proposed land uses by acreage, including the percentage of land coverage by each type of use, together with a detailed listing of the following development parameters: a) Dimensions. Proposed square footage and height of buildings. b) Dwelling units. Proposed number of bedrooms; square footage of dwelling units by type of unit; proposed number of dwelling units per acre. c) Floor area. Proposed maximum allowable floor area FAR). d) Parking. Proposed number of parking spaces. c) Open space. Proposed amount of open space. g) Architectural Elevations. Elevations at a vertical scale of not less than one-eighth inch equals one foot ('/8"= 1') or larger of all significant facades of the proposed buildings. Building elevations shall be of sufficient detail to indicate building openings, alternate materials proposed for the roof and exterior of the buildings, decks and other architectural features of the buildings, including chimneys and mechanical areas and features affecting the roof lines of all proposed buildings. h) Architectural Floor plans. Proposed floor plans drawn at a scale of one-eighth inch equals one foot (1/8" = 1') or larger of all floors of the proposed buildings showing all living, sleeping, cooking, bathroom, and storage areas. Typical floor plans with a floor layout plan may be substituted: i) Landscape plan. A general landscape plan, depicting the type, amount, size, species and location of all plant materials. The plan shall show the location of all existing trees with a trunk circumference of fourteen (14) inches or more measured four and one-half (4%i) feet above the ground and shall indicate which trees are proposed to be removed. Where large groves of trees are to remain undisturbed, single trees need not be located. 0) Solid waste disposal plan. A proposed solid waste disposal plan, including the anticipated volume (cubic yards) of solid waste that will be generated by the development, proposed trash container size and location of said facilities. 4 k) Water supply and sewage disposal. The applicant shall obtain from the Snowmass Water and Sanitation District a confirmation that, based upon the data submitted for this review, the District be able to provide service for the project as proposed. 1) Clearinmgrading and drainage plans. A report identifying plans for clearing, grading and drainage including: 1. Limits of clearing. The location and defined limits of all clearing and/or removal of vegetation cover. 2. Grading plan. Existing and proposed grades at a contour interval of two (2) feet or less, based on field survey controls, including location with proposed grades and elevations for all buildings, roads, walks, storm sewers and other drainage structures and devices, retaining walls and other landscape features. The plan shall provide designs for sediment control devices to be employed, including specifications of how graded areas will be stabilized and re-vegetated after construction is completed. m) Transportation impact analysis. (Not required with initial application but must be submitted to the Town by September 21, 2009) The TIA report will be based upon the "Snowmass Base Village and Outlying Parcels" Transportation Analysis and Parking Management Strategy report dated March 2004, a copy which was forwarded by the Town Engineer to the School District for use by reference. The applicant shall submit the following information in a manner that reasonably permits the Town to evaluate the impacts of the proposed development: 1. Daily traffic counts. All total daily traffic counts shall be actual machine counts and not based on factored peak hour sampling. All traffic counts will be based upon the "Snowmass Base Village and Outlying Parcels" Transportation Analysis and Parking Management Strategy report dated March 2004. 2. Trip generation rates. The applicant shall use a 5.0 vehicle tripsMwelling generation rate to calculate the development's impact on the Town road network. The Planning Director may, upon request by the applicant, accept different trip generation rates than that, considering whether any special transit features are planned for the development, or if there are unusual land use, occupancy or other features of the development. 3. Existing conditions. The report shall be based upon the Snowmass Base Village and Outlying Parcels" Transportation Analysis and Parking Management Strategy report dated March 2004. 4. Anticipated ridership. A determination of the anticipated public transportation ridership, using data supplied by the Town's Transportation Department for similar projects with the Town. 5 5. Trip generation and design hour volumes. A summary table shall be provided listing each type of land use, the number of units or the amount of nonresidential square footage involved, the average trip generation for each use (total daily traffic and a.m. and p.m. peaks) and the resultant total trips generated. 6. Trip distribution. The direction of approach for site-generated traffic shall be presented in the report. The technical analysis steps, basic methods and assumptions used shall be clearly stated. 7. Trip assignments. Internal trips shall not exceed ten percent 10%) without analytical support to demonstrate how the larger figures were determined. Non-generated passerby traffic reductions in generation volumes may be considered if applicable. 8. Existing and projected traffic volumes. The report shall include the following illustrations: a) Peak hour traffic. Illustrations of current a.m. and p.m. peak hour site traffic (in and out), including turning movements. b) Future peak hour traffic. Illustrations of future a.m. and p.m. peak hour site traffic (in and out), including turning movements for current conditions and future buildout of the project in comparison with the "Snowmass Base Village and Outlying Parcels" Transportation Analysis and Parking Management Strategy report dated March 2004., c) Not applicable 9. Capacity analysis. The report shall include a comparison of the site in order to identify the incremental impacts to all public street intersections impacted by the proposed development and for the private property identified in the "Snowmass Base Village and Outlying Parcels" Transportation Analysis and Parking Management Strategy report dated March 2004. 10. Conclusions. The report shall contain a clear and concise executive summary, describing the study's findings. If the analysis indicates unsatisfactory levels of service, a description of proposed improvements to remedy deficiencies shall be included in the executive summary. n) Geologic report. A report evaluating geologic and soils conditions, including: 1. Potential geologic hazards. A site specific analysis of the geologic characteristics on, or in the vicinity of, the site that could have a significant impact on the proposed development shall be conducted. It shall be prepared by a geologist or engineer who is qualified to map and evaluate geologic hazards and to assess their potential impacts on the development. It 6 shall discuss any recent activity associated with the geologic hazards and shall provide an expert opinion as to the degree of severity of the potential geologic hazards. It shall also include recommendations as to how the development will avoid or mitigate any dangers posed to life or property from these hazards. 2. Soils study. A study prepared by a qualified professional describing existing surface and sub-surface soil characteristics on the site, and evaluating the suitability of such soils for the planned construction. o) Construction management plan. (Not required with initial application but must be submitted to the Town by September 21, 2009) A detailed construction management plan describing development phasing, construction schedules and measures for mitigating impacts associated with all aspects of the project. 2.2 Public Notification. A notice and display ad will be published in the Snowmass Sun the cost of which will be shared equally by the Town and the School District, generally describing the development proposal and providing a meeting schedule. The notice and display ad will run in the editions published September 23 and 30 and October 7 and 14, 2009. 2.3 Joint Meeting. The Planning Commission and Town Council shall hold one (1)joint meeting to hear the initial presentation of the development proposal by the School District. The Town Council shall identify the specific components or core issues within the School District's submittal that the Planning Commission should focus upon during the course of its review. Provided the submittal requirements contained herein are timely satisfied, this meeting shall occur on October 5, 2009. 2.4 Planning Commission. Provided the submittal requirements contained herein are timely satisfied, on October 7, 2009, the Planning Commission will review the School District's submittal package, hear testimony and provide comments and direction to Town staff regarding their recommendations and concerns. The Town staff agrees to provide a written summary of the Planning Commission's comments or a copy of any Resolution adopted by the Planning Commission to the School District by October 9, 2009. 2.5 Planning Commission Report to Town Council. The Planning Commission will transmit a written summary of the Planning Commission's comments or a copy of any Resolution adopted by the Planning Commission to the Town Council for consideration by the Town Council during the October 19, 2009 Town Council meeting. The Town Council will then conduct a hearing to hear testimony and review the development submittal. A resolution may be adopted by the Town Council to adopt any findings and make recommendations. The Town Council may schedule a Town Council meeting on October 26, 2009 to further hear testimony, resolve any requests for additional information and adopt a resolution. Any duly adopted resolution of the Town 7 Council, regardless of the date adopted, will be provided to the School District no later than October 27, 2009. 2.6 Joint Meeting of the Town Council and the School District Board. The Town Council and the School District Board shall meet on November 2, 2009 as part of the regularly scheduled Town Council meeting to discuss any findings or recommendations contained in the resolution of the Town Council that the School District will not incorporate into the project in an effort to resolve such issues; provided, however, that such informal discussions shall not modify or extend the time periods or procedures established by C.R.S. 22-32-124. In the event all the comments and recommendations contained in the resolution of the Town Council will be incorporated into the Project, the School District shall give written notice advising the Town accordingly and the Joint Meeting shall be cancelled. ARTICLE III MISCELLANEOUS PROVISIONS 3.1 Termination. This Agreement may be terminated by either party for any material breach that has not been cured as provided herein. The party alleged to be in breach of the Agreement shall first be given a reasonable opportunity to cure the breach after receiving notice stating the substance of the breach from the other party. For purposes of this section, reasonable opportunity to cure shall mean cure within fifteen 15) days of the effective date of such notice. 3.2 Amendments. This Agreement may be amended only by mutual agreement of the parties and shall be evidenced by a written instrument authorized and executed with the same formality as accorded this Agreement. 3.3 Notices. Any notice required by this Agreement shall be in writing. If such notice is hand delivered or personally served, it shall be effective immediately upon such delivery or service. 3.4 Governing Law. This Agreement and the rights and obligations of the parties hereto shall be interpreted and construed in accordance with the laws of the State of Colorado. 3.5. Severability. If this Agreement, or any portion of it, is for any reason held invalid or unconstitutional by any court of competent jurisdiction, such portion shall be deemed a separate, distinct, and independent provision, and such holding shall not affect the validity of the remaining portions of the Agreement. 3.6 No Implied Representations. No representations, warranties, or certifications, express or implied, shall exist as between the parties, except as specifically stated in this Agreement 8 3.7 No Third Party Beneficiaries. None of the terms conditions, or covenants in this Agreement shall give or allow any claim, benefit, or right of action by any third person not a party hereto. Any person other than the Town or the School District. receiving services or benefits under this Agreement shall be only an incidental beneficiary. 3.8 Integrated Agreement and Amendments. This Agreement is an integration of the entire understanding of the parties with respect to the matters stated herein. 3.9 Approvals. Each party represents and warrants to the other that this Agreement has been duly approved in accordance with the law and the applicable procedures of each party, and that no further action is necessary to make this Agreement binding upon them. The persons whose signatures appear below are the duly authorized representatives of each party, empowered to bind their respective parties to the terms hereof. 3.10 Supremacy. Neither the Town nor the School District concedes supervening authority of the other over any matter. The Town acknowledges the existence of C.R.S. § 22-32-110(1)(b) and 124 and that the proposed project will be located within the territorial limits of the School District. The School District acknowledges that the Town is a Colorado home rule municipality, the existence of the Snowmass Village Municipal Code and the proposed project will be located within the territorial limits of the Town. Both parties agree that by entering into this Agreement neither party has waived or released any rights. 3.11 Time Limits. Except for provisions in Section 2.1 related to notice or otherwise required by statute, any failure of either party to give notice or take action within the time limits specified herein shall not affect that party's right to undertake whatever action it is otherwise authorized by law to take. 3.12 Utility Costs. The School District shall be responsible for payment of applicable utility fees and charges associated with the construction or expansion of new residential buildings. The School District shall not be required to pay, directly or indirectly, any of the other usual Town fees for plan processing, plan review, plat review, plat application, annexation application or processing, building permit, service expansion fees or any Town tax on building materials incorporated into construction projects, excepting the School District shall be responsible for fees charged by consultants not employed by the Town but rather engaged by the Town for this specific land use review process in an amount not to exceed $2,500.00. 3.13 Dispute Resolution. In the event any dispute arises between the parties concerning the interpretation, implementation or application of this Agreement that cannot be resolved between the School District's Land Use Planner and the Town's Director of Planning or designee, either party may then submit such dispute to the Superintendent of the School District and Town Manager. This dispute resolution 9 process shall not suspend or otherwise affect the other time lines in this Agreement or as provided by law nor be a condition precedent to either party timely exercising any rights. EFFECTIVE AS OF THE DAY AND YEAR FIRST WRITTEN ABOVE. ASPEN RE-I SCHOOL DISTRICT ASPEN, COLORADO By: President, Board of Education ATTEST: Secretary, Board of Education APPROVED AS TO FORM: Attorney for School District TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE, COLORADO By: Russell W. Forrest, Town Manager ATTEST: Rhonda B. Coxon, Town Clerk APPROVED AS TO FORM: John C. Dresser, Jr., Town Attorney 10 TO: SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL FROM: Chris Conrad, Planning Director SUBJECT: joint meeting to hear the initial presentation of the development proposal by the Aspen School District(`ASD"). The Town Council needs to identify the specific components or core issues within the ASD submittal that the Planning Commission should focus upon during the course of its review. SNOWMASS VILLGE TOWN COUNCIL AND PLANNING COMMISSION TO REVIEW THE PROPOSED ASPEN SCHOOL DISTRICT HOUSING PROJECT MTG. DATE: October 5, 2009 1. PURPOSE Provided the Intergovernmental Agreement has been accepted, the Planning Commission and Town Council shall now hold a joint meeting to hear the initial presentation of the development proposal by the Aspen School District ("ASD"). The Town Council needs to identify the specific components or core issues within the ASD submittal that the Planning Commission should focus upon during the course of its review. Further information/clarification regarding the application is needed to complete a staff report. Additional comments may be available to be provided at this joint meeting with a detailed staff report being completed and available for review by the Planning Commission on October 7. 2. PROJECT OVERVIEW Legal Description: Generally described as Lot 1, Parcel 6, Filing No. 1, The Snowmass Club Subdivision, excluding a 0.155 acre portion platted as part of Anderson Ranch. Site area: 0.87 acre or 37,932 SF. Dwellings: 15 employee housing units. Bedrooms: 25 Parking: 33 provided Density: 17.24 DU/acre proposed; However, it is unclear whether there is future buildout density proposed? (See 'TBD' area on basement level with 10' clearance and separate entries in Building B); Reference geotechnical report which states that there are 17 units in the project. Per existing PUD, the existing density is 2.3 DU/acre. Floor Area: Per application, heated and storage spaces totals 16,891 SF and unheated space totals 3,076 SF, Total Calculable Floor Area (per Municipal Code): Building A: 4,677 SF total calculable floor area including units, storage areas and the stairway on 1s'floor level; Exempt spaces are decks per 12% rule, mechanical rooms and stairs on upper levels. Building B: 6,889 SF total calculable floor area including units, storage areas and the stairway on 1 s'floor level, plus the 'TBD' area of 1,611 SF with separate entries and over 5'-6" clearance in the basement level; Exempt spaces are decks, mechanical rooms and stairs on upper levels. Building C: 5,955 SF total calculable floor area including units, storage areas and the stairway on 15'floor level; Exempt spaces are decks, mechanical rooms and stairs on upper levels, including crawl space on lower level if under 5'-6". Total: 17,521 SF (calculable floor area) FAR: 0.46:1 (per the calculable floor area); 0.39:1 per application; 0.75:1 if zoned MF Building Coverage: 8,712 SF or 0.2 acre per the existing PUD; Not accounted for in application Maximum Height: Maximum 32 feet per the existing PUD; Height variation not noted in application to exceed 32 feet; There would be a 38 feet maximum if property were zoned 'MF,' but it does not exist. Minimum Lot Area: Minimum of 30,500 SF required if zoned MF; The lot is 37,932 SF in size. 3. CONSISTENCY WITH CURRENT ZONING The current underlying zoning for the parcel is "PUD" Planned Unit Development PUD"). It is actually a portion of Parcel 14 according to the Snowmass Club PUD Land Use Plan Map. The zoning parameters established for that parcel include: Permitted Use: Cultural Facilities/Professional Offices Permitted Building Square Footage: 13,000 sq. ft. Maximum Building Height: 32 feet above natural grade Maximum Building Coverage: 0.20 Acres Residential is not a use permitted by the existing PUD standards. The project exceeds the 32 foot height limit specified in the Snowmass Club PUD for this parcel. 4. CONSISTENCY WITH MR MULTI-FAMILY ZONE DISTRICT AND LAND USE CODE The project is clearly not consistent with the underlying zoning. If the project is evaluated as if the underlying zoning was "MF" Multi-family: Parking Requirement: 1.5 spaces per bedroom (Restricted Units). Project has 25 bedrooms/providing 33 spaces (2 are ADA). The Land Use Code would require 37.5 spaces rounded up to 38 spaces. NOTE: 10-11 spaces partially extend into the Owl Creek Road right-of-way and none of the spaces are designated for the for the planned shuttle van/bus to be utilized by the ASO employees to commute to the various school district facilities. Minimum Lot Area Requirement: Minimum of 30,500 SF required if zoned MF. The lot is 37,932 SF in size and therefore would comply. Lot Size:0.87 Acre 37,897.2 S.F. Minimum Lot Area: 3,000 S.F. 1st Bedroom: 22,500 S.F. 10 Additional Bedrooms: 5,000 S.F. TOTAL Min. Lot Area Required: 30,500 S.F. Meets Minimum Lot Area Requirement Maximum Building Height: 38 feet (Could not confirm consistency with the information provided — Staff will coordinate with ASD and verify prior to meeting). 5. CONSISTENCY WITH COMPREHENSIVE PLAN Future Land Use Map: Commercial Build-out Chart: No Future Land Use, Future Units or Commercial Square Footage Specified (Residential or Commercial). 6. COMMENTS There is no entitlement to the 'MF' zone district standards although they are the zoning parameters most compatible with the ASD proposal. If this were a private development where rezoning the property would be required, it would be difficult to demonstrate a change in conditions or character for the neighborhood to warrant the height, mass, scale, density and FAR being proposed. Clearly, the proposal is not consistent with the Snowmass Club PUD and Comprehensive Plan. Therefore, it seems meaningless to compare the proposal against a certain zoning district standard unless that district is truly proposed. It would be more appropriate to review the proposed housing project on its own merits, if exempt from zoning and PUD regulations. Hopefully, the Town Council and ASD will be able to work together to resolve any issues that may be identified during the Planning Commission and Town Council review of the development proposal. Staff referral comments have been received and will be provided to the Planning Commission for their review on October 7. 7. ACTION REQUESTED OF COUNCIL The primary purpose of this joint meeting to hear the initial presentation of the development proposal by the Aspen School District ("ASD"). The Town Council needs to then identify the specific components or core issues within the ASD submittal that the Planning Commission should focus upon during the course of its review. MEMORANDUM TO: Snowmass Village Town Council FROM: Planning Department DATE: October 5, 2009 meeting SUBJECT: CONTINUATION OF PUBLIC HEARING: Snowmass Club Employee Housing Minor PUD Amendment The application is being processed pursuant to Municipal Code Section 16A-5-390, Amendment of Final PUD, proposing a seasonal housing unit on the second level of the existing Snowmass Club building located on Lot 1, Parcel 4 of the Snowmass Club PUD Subdivision. Applicant: Aspen Skiing Company, represented by: Mr. Don Schuster, Vice President of Real Estate Development; Dana Dalla Betta, Project Manager Planner: Jim Wahlstrom, Senior Planner I. PURPOSE AND ACTIONS REQUESTED. The purposes of the meeting are to: a. Review the applicant's replies and proposed options received September 15, 2009 concerning the ownership, operation and usage of housing credits in response to the Town Council concerns and comments expressed at the August 17, 2009 meeting; (Note: Staff believes that it could be interpreted that the supplemental information is an addendum, modification of request, and replies in response to the Town Council's previous issues and concerns more so than as an separate unrelated amendment solely submitted by the applicant's own volition, and therefore, a certain proposed option or amendment could be acknowledged or accepted by Council in a subsequent ordinance noting it was provided in response to Town Council comments and concerns); b. Re-open the hearing and consider comments from the public; and c. Consider the comments and recommendations of the Town staff. No action is required for this meeting other than to provide direction to staff in preparing findings and possible conditions for placement in a subsequent ordinance. II. SUMMARY DESCRIPTION OF PROJECT. A summary of the proposed changes in the Minor PUD Amendment application includes: Adding a 10-bedroom dormitory style, seasonal employee housing unit with common area on the second level exterior deck space all containing 2,872 square feet above the Club building's loading and service area, which is next to the tennis 1 structure. The applicant has now proposed options for the ownership and operation of the seasonal housing unit for Council's consideration. The applicant is seeking a modified mitigation credit of 2,373 square feet for the housing of 2,872 square feet minus the 499 square foot of employee housing required by the conversion of the second level storage space to office per the applicant's addendum received September 15, 2009. Expanding the dining/locker room facilities by 511 square feet for the existing employees. III. APPLICABLE REGULATIONS. Amendment to Final PUD. For the proposed changes to qualify as a 'Minor Amendment' pursuant to Code Section 16A-5-390(1)b, meaning a one-step review before the Planning Commission and the Town Council, the amendments must comply with the review standards outlined below per Section 16A-5-390(3): a. Consistent with original PUD. The proposed amendment shall be consistent with, or an enhancement of, the original PUD approval. b. No substantially adverse impact. The proposed amendment shall not have a substantially adverse effect on the neighborhood surrounding the land where the amendment is proposed, or have a substantially adverse impact on the enjoyment of land abutting upon or across the street from the subject property. c. Not change character. The proposed amendment shall not change the basic character of the PUD or surrounding areas. d. Comply with other applicable standards. The proposed amendment shall comply with the other applicable standards of this Division 3, Planned Unit Development, including but not limited to Section 16A-5-300(c), General Restrictions, and Section 16A-5-310, Review Standards. The Town Council should be satisfied that the above criteria have been met and state as findings in their ordinance. If such criteria cannot be met, such proposal should be considered a major amendment to the Final PUD triggering the need for Preliminary Plan and Final PUD reviews at minimum and additional application submission requirements. Final PUD Guide land uses and development parameters. As the proposed employee unit is located on Lot 1 of the Snowmass Club PUD Subdivision, which is currently zoned 'PUD,' the allowed land uses and development parameters include: Permitted uses: Athletic Club, Restaurant, Tennis Complex, Child Care Facility, Offices, Restricted Housing. Number of Units: 1 Unit Size: 1,691 square feet Athletic Club and Restaurant Parking: 56 Spaces 2 North Surface Parking: 40 Spaces According to the Schedule of Uses in the Land Use Code, 'Dormitory' style units are most typically an allowed usage, or by special review, in Mixed-Use PUD, a Mixed- Use, or Multi-Family zone districts. Methods for complying with employee housing requirements. Pursuant to Section 16A-4-420 of the Municipal Code, when development applications are proposed requiring employee housing mitigation, the restricted housing is typically provided during the preliminary review of the project, and based upon the information provided by the developer and Town staff, the Town Council shall determine: a. Whether the project is an appropriate project to be financed, constructed, owned and operated by the Town. b. Whether the project is an appropriate project to be financed, constructed, owned and operated by the developer. c. Any combination of the above that the Town Council determines to be in the best interest of the Town. The methods of provided housing per the Code include: a) developer buy-down, b) restricted sale, and c) other means as may be agreed upon by the Town Council at its sole discretion. IV. DISCUSION ITEMS: ALTERNATIVES AND IMPLICATIONS TOGETHER WITH SUMMARY OF FINDINGS AND RECOMMENDATIONS CORE ISSUES: At the August 17, 2009 to begin review of this application, staff understood that the following issues or concerns by the Town Council were in summary: 1. Proper granting of housing credits. There seemed to be questions raised for consideration as to whether it was appropriate to grant housing credits for a unit that would be primarily occupied the applicant's seasonal employees, whether the housing is planned in advance or proposed with a new development application. 2. Proper amount of credit for mitigation. Discussions seemed to occur contemplating if mitigation is granted in advance, perhaps it should initially be a partial mitigation credit only and/or maybe the applicant might consider or propose a first priority or first refusal scenario (e.g., on a few of the bedrooms) and open the remainder to other employees within the Town. 3. Appropriate housing restrictions. A questions was raised that if and when the proposed housing is actually used to fulfill future mitigation requirements, whether the applicant would be willing to subsequently remove the restriction for using the units by applicant's seasonal employees and open it up to other employees within the Town. 4. Suitable control of employee housing. Concerning the employee housing proposal overall, 100% employer controlled employee housing for mitigation purposes seemed to be the major concern of Town Council members, and that further justification from the applicant was needed. See the separate correspondence handout dated September 15, 2009. 3 5. Conversion of storage to office. There appeared to be consensus among the Town Council members not being keen on the conversion of storage space to office space, especially with no employee housing mitigation requirement. 6. Auto-free clause. There did not seem to be a significant issue about the proposed 'no parking or no vehicle' clause for the residents of the dormitory unit, except that perhaps one or two Council members thought it might not be practical. 7. Parking permits. Staff understood that the applicant agreed to 'no Town parking permits' for the residents of the dormitory unit. 8. Additional parking. There seemed to be consensus among the Town Council members that they agreed with the Planning Commission recommendation for five 5) additional parking spaces on the site pursuant to PC's finding that additional activity or guest visits might occur as a result of the employee housing. Staff comments/ recommendations: In reviewing the applicant's supplemental information dated September 15, 2009 (see separate handout), staff has the following observations, comments or recommendations for consideration by the Town Council, even though per Code Section 16A-4-420, the Town Council appears to have sole discretion in their deliberations with the applicant: 1. Option #1. Staff would not recommend that the Town not take on the title for the employee housing unit with 10 dormitory style bedrooms and common area, that would be managed and operated by the Town, as well as be encumbered financially by a lease agreement for such housing. The employee unit would also be located on private property, within a private building, and not accessed directly off a public way. Such an arrangement would appear to be too constraining for the Town to own, manage and operate within a private site and facility. 2. Option #2. The applicant has also proposed what seems to be a reasonable concept of a restrictive covenant for the restricted rates and usage or the unit and bedrooms under the ownership and management of the applicant following the Town's Restricted Housing Guidelines, following the 'Other Means' portion of Code Section 16A-4-420(2). Such section also refers to the possibility of discussing the granting of employee housing credits in exchange for developable land. The applicant also appears be willing to assign the employee housing credit, if granted, to the future proposed development of the Elk Camp Restaurant. Staff believes this option might be reasonable considering a similar operational approach was utilized for the Club Commons II employee housing project, although that project had both permanent and seasonal housing and was actually partial mitigation for a development elsewhere within the Town. 3. Option #3. Staff suggests that, as an option not currently proposed by the applicant, it could be a combination of the above noted options #1 and #2 or variations thereof. According to the proposed floor plans for the unit, there would be four pods of two to three bedroom each containing a shared bath. These pods would share a common kitchen, dining, laundry and living area. Under a restrictive covenant arrangement, a few of the pods could be utilized by the applicant and the others for usage by the Town to fill. Such arrangement, whether before or after the related off-site development is constructed, could be set up as either a phased interim operation or as a permanent operation; or, it could be set up as an interim 4 operation first then arranged differently for a permanent operation after the off-site development is completed. Depending on how arranged or operated in the interim or permanently, partial or full mitigation credit could also be phased in until the related off-site development is built, as seemed to be one of the thoughts expressed at the meeting on August 17th. Such scenarios of different operations now or in the future should be more fully described in a development agreement. VI. OTHER HEADINGS RELATED TO THE TOPICS Separate Handout: Applicant's replies and addendum received September 15, 2009 in response to Town Council concerns and comments at the August 17, 2009 meeting. VII. ,NEXT STEPS Continue the public hearing to the next meeting; and If desired, direct staff to prepare an ordinance for consideration at the next meeting. 5 RECEIVED ASPEf C"bSNOWMASS S 15 1gg9 Snowmassmass tillage sri+sknr:rcmarar`v Community Development On August 17`", 2009, Aspen Skiing Company(ASC),on behalf of Snowmass Club Associates, LLC(SCA) presented to the Town of Snowmass Village Town Council a request for a Minor PUD amendment of the Snowmass Club Phase 11 PUD. The application included a request to add approximately 2,800 SF of employee housing in a dorm configuration. The project was proposed to be mitigation housing for future development projects.The project received approval from the Planning Commission as of July 15, 2009. This approval is detailed in Planning Commission Resolution No. 12, Series of 2009. As noted, the project includes the addition of 2,800 SF of employee housing which would be managed as seasonal housing under ASC's Housing department. Per the current SMV Land Use code, such square footage will provide housing for 10 employees under the seasonal housing guidelines. The project will be built on top of an existing concrete deck and will not expand the footprint of the Snowmass Club. The applicant has proposed an auto-free housing environment to further minimize the built impacts of the project. While it is located on the Snowmass Club property, the housing would not be specifically reserved for those employees. Instead residents would be placed in this housing based on the appropriateness of the dorm style, auto-free living environment. Council in general responded favorably to the project which represents a creative approach to finding land for affordable housing. The housing, which as noted will not expand the footprint of the existing building, is in keeping with the Town's goal to encourage development and density "within established, built up areas." A key portion of this application is the request to provide mitigation credits which could be used by the applicant for future development. Councilman John Wilkinson expressed concern over this request stating that housing developed for the purpose of mitigation is not typically under the long term control of a developer. The other members of Council present subsequently agreed with this concern and noted that while the application has merits as an employee housing project, full mitigation credit could not be awarded unless the housing was for the benefit of the Town as a whole. In addition, staff and council expressed concern over the idea of providing such credits ahead of the development which they are mitigating. The award of mitigation credit is a key component to pursuing the approval of the application. As such, ASC reviewed the Land Use code as it relates to restricted housing along with several past precedents and approvals in order to formulate a response to Town Council. We would like to offer the following options to Council for their further consideration: Option ff1-Develop the project pursuant to the regulations detailed in Section 16A-4-420.2.a of the SMV land use code: In this scenario, ASC/SCA as the applicant would construct the housing as approved at our cost and upon completion, transfer the title of such housing to the Town of Snowmass Village per Section 16A-4-420.2a of the Land use code. The purchase price would be arrived at based on the bondable debt service which could be issued relative to the property's income. The Town would then maintain full rights to manage the housing units and place residents per the Town's housing guidelines. Further discussions would be necessary to determine the exact terms of leasing and management since the project is located within to the Snowmass Club property. The bondable value of the project is estimated at this time to be approximately$540,841. This value is arrived at using similar methodology described within the Timbers Club approval as noted in Town ordinance No. 16, Series of 2000 as well as Section 16A-4-420.2.a. The following calculations detail this value: Stabilized Year NOI:47,591 (based on current rents plus 10%per Ord. 16/2000) Debt Service Coverage Ratio: 1Jx Supportable Debt payment: $42,832 (per year) Interest Rate:5% Term: 20 years If the project is completed under this scenario, ASC would receive payment for the bondable amount, estimated at$540,841. In addition, full mitigation credit would be awarded for the 2,872 SF constructed less any mitigation associated with the proposed office space also included with the application. Such credit would be applied against a future development application subject to the regulations in place at the time of such future application. Option N2-Develop the project pursuant to the regulations detailed in Section 16A-4-420.2.c of the SMV Land use code: The Land Use Code provides two other methods beyond the developer buy-down option noted above (420.a)to provide mitigation housing. While the Land Use code notes a preference towards sections 420.a or 420.b (restricted sale) in the development of housing it also allows the option to negotiate with Council. Section 16A-4-420.2.c allows the discussion of'other means' which can include: 1. Restricted Rates and use-the developer builds, owns and manages restricted rental units in accordance with the current Town of Snowmass Village Restricted Housing Guidelines. When permitted by all applicable state and local laws, or when agreed to by the developer, the units shall be restricted at the same rental rates charged by the Town for similar size units with similar amenities, as determined by Town Council. Rental rates may be adjusted annually based on the inflation index used by the Town. 2. Land for Credits In keeping with Section 1 of this code provision the applicant proposes to build at their cost, retain ownership and management of the mitigation housing. The housing would be subject to a restrictive covenant similar to that which was approved for Club Commons II within Ordinance No. 1, Series of 2008. Similar to this agreement, the applicant would agree that the 'beneficiary of the restriction on use is the Town.' The applicant would request the following restrictions be placed on the 10 dormitory units: 1. Primary use rights shall be for Aspen Skiing Company employees who work in the Town of Snowmass Village or on Snowmass Mountain. 2. After all primary use rights have been accommodated the beds will become available to any Town employee on a seasonal basis pursuant to the Town Housing Office Policies and Procedures as may be in effect from time to time. 3. The housing as a whole would be restricted to employees within the Town of Snowmass Village and then if available, employees within Pitkin County. The approval to allow ASC to retain ownership of Club Commons 11 was part of a larger mitigation housing strategy applied to a portion of the Base Village project. Similar to this, the housing proposed in this application will likely be applied to a larger housing strategy for the redevelopment of Elk Camp Restaurant. As such, it would seem appropriate that this housing be treated in a similar manner. ASC, as applicant would find either option acceptable to move forward with. There are certain advantages to the Town should Council choose to move forward under Option 2. The Town has expressed concern in the past over the challenges posed in the management of seasonal housing. Allowing the applicant to retain management of the units while still working under the Town's housing guidelines would eliminate this concern. In addition, Option 2 eliminates the need for the Town to purchase and issue bonds on this project. Housing Credits-As noted,there has been concern raised over the validity of the request to provide mitigation credit ahead of the development which the housing is mitigating. ASC feels this should not be a concern as there is historical precedent of such prior approval. Ordinance 6, Series of 1994 specifically addresses this situation. Within this ordinance, the Snowmass Land Company(SLC) received full vesting rights for 142,019 SF of restricted housing which was already constructed (at Horse Ranch and Mountain View), This housing credit was to be used to "satisfy the employee housing requirements of future development." Per the agreement between TOSMV and SLC contained within Town Council Resolution No. 12, Series of 1994, such credits were vested in perpetuity to SLC and their successors. Based on this precedent, ASC requests similar vesting rights to those granted within Ordinance 6/1994. We have agreed to specifically tie such rights to a designated future development project as opposed to allowing them to be used against any future development. The minor PUD application also included a request to change the use of 672 square feet of existing space within the Snowmass Club from storage to office space. Staff recommended, and Council concurred the requested change of use must be mitigated for employee housing impacts. Based on the current Land Use Code, 672 SF of office use would generate a requirement for 499 SF of employee housing space. Staff has recommended this be deducted from the requested 2,872 SF mitigation credit resulting in 2,373 SF of mitigation housing credits remaining. The applicant is in agreement with Staff on this point and is willing to deduct the mitigation for the added office space despite the fact that such office space will be used for existing Snowmass Club employees. In summary, ASC believes that any addition of housing will help to relieve the general burden on existing housing stock within the Town. This project will provide 10 added beds to the seasonal housing stock at an affordable rate. As is common knowledge, providing such housing is a significant investment. As such, the award of mitigation credits is of utmost importance as part of this application. We look forward to discussing these options further to arrive at a mutually agreeable scenario which both meets the needs of future development while also working towards the Town's overall housing goals. MEMORANDUM TO: Snowmass Village Town Council FROM: Art Smythe, Police Department DATE: Oct. 5, 2009 SUBJECT: Ordinance No. 8, Series of 2009 amending Chapter 10 of the Snowmass Village Municipal Code regarding General Offenses and Chapter 7 of the Snowmass Village Municipal Code regarding Animal Regulations 1.PURPOSE AND ACTIONS REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: The Police Department is submitting these Municipal Code amendments and additions for first reading and review. II.BACKGROUND In conjunction a re-codification process being performed by the Town Clerk's Office, the Police Department recently conducted a review of the chapters in the Municipal Code that related to our area of operational responsibility. After completing this review, which included input from the officers, it was determined that some changes and additions to the chapters dealing with General Offenses and Animal Regulation would be appropriate and we are submitting these for review and approval. Adoption of this Ordinance will enhance the Code's compatibility with operational practices and allow for the local enforcement of certain offenses that are of local concern. Ill. APPLICABLE REGULATIONS Chapter 10 of the Snowmass Village Municipal Code, General Offenses and Chapter 7, of the Snowmass Village Municipal Code, Animal Regulations. IV. DISCUSSION ITEMS: SIGNIFICANT CHANGES AND IMPLICATIONS The changes and additions to the Municipal Code are as follows: 1. Sec. 10-30 Abandonment of Motor Vehicles Prohibited The abandonment of vehicles in our parking lots is a fairly common occurrence and the Municipal Code does not currently include a specific violation for this act. 2. Sec. 10-43 Assault Prohibited, Sec. 10-44 Trespass Prohibited, Sec. 10-45 Theft Prohibited and Sec. 10-46 Criminal Mischief Prohibited These are offenses that we encounter from time to time that are violations of State law, but are not Municipal violations. Adding these offenses to our Municipal Code will expand our enforcement options for minor violations of these types of crimes and allow us to deal with them on a local level. 3. Sec. 10-46 False Identification Prohibited We currently have an active education and enforcement program to discourage the selling of alcoholic beverages to underage individuals. However, we currently do not have an enforcement tool in the Municipal Code to deal with underage persons who present false identification for the purpose of making an illegal purchase. We are recommending the addition of this Section to address this problem and provide a deterrent. 4. Sec. 10-47 Urinating In Public Unfortunately, we occasionally encounter rather egregious examples of this behavior that requires our intervention. In some of these incidents we have utilized the Disorderly Conduct Section of the Municipal Code, but it would be more appropriate to have specific violation. 5. Article VII Sections 10-141, 10-142 and 10-143. Regulations Regarding Peddlers, Solicitors, Transient Merchants and the Posting of Handbills. This Article was apparently inadvertently left out of the Municipal Code during the last codification process. Complaints and reports of concern received by our Department would indicate that the community still does not support door to door commercial solicitation or the random posting of handbills. 6. Sec. 7-90 Vicious Animals In dealing with these types of incidents, the animal control officers have found that in some cases it may be preferable for the offending animal to remain in the controlled custody of its owner pending adjudication of the case. Changing the language in the current Code that states, "upon issuance of a summons and complaint to the owner of a vicious animal, the vicious animal shall be impounded" to" may be impounded" will allow for this type of arrangement. 7. Sec. 7-126 Dogs; exemption from license. We are recommending the addition of Subsection (b) in this Section so that the Code better reflects the regulatory practices currently in place regarding the Krabloonik operation. The operator is required to provide us with list of the dogs and their certificates of vaccination on an annual basis, but the individual dogs are not required to be licensed or wear a tag. V. STAFF RECOMMENDATIONS AND FINDINGS This Ordinance has been reviewed by the Town Attorney and staff recommends approval. 1 TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE 2 TOWN COUNCIL 3 4 ORDINANCE NO. 8 5 SERIES OF 2009 6 7 8 AN ORDINANCE AMENDING CHAPTER 10 OF THE SNOWMASS VILLAGE 9 MUNICIPAL CODE BY ADDING SECTIONS 10-30, 10-43, 10-44, 10-45, 10-46, 10-47, 10 10-141, 10-142 AND 10-143 TO CHAPTER 10 OF THE SNOWMASS VILLAGE 11 MUNICIPAL CODE ESTABLISHING ADDITIONAL GENERAL OFFENSES IN THE 12 TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE AND AMENDING SECTIONS 7-90 AND 126 OF 13 CHAPTER 7 OF THE SNOWMASS VILLAGE MUNICIPAL CODE REGARDING 14 ANIMAL REGULATIONS 15 16 WHEREAS, The Town of Snowmass Village has enacted regulations regarding general offenses 17 committed in the Town; and 18 19 WHEREAS, The Town of Snowmass Village Police Department has recommended to the Town 20 Council that additional general offenses be established; and 21 22 WHEREAS, The establishment of such offenses will allow the local enforcement of certain 23 offenses that are of local concern or are offenses and that are violations of the State of Colorado 24 but are not violations of the Municipal Code; and 25 26 WHEREAS, The Town Council finds the adoption of this Ordinance is necessary for the 27 immediate preservation of the public health, safety and welfare. 28 29 NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED, by the Town Council of the Town of Snowmass 30 Village, as follows: 31 32 33 1. That the Snowmass Village Municipal Code is hereby amended by adding the 34 following Section to Chapter 10 General Offenses, Article II Offenses Relating to 35 Streets and Public Places which Section shall read as follows: 36 37 Sec. 10-30 Abandonment of Motor Vehicles Prohibited 38 39 a) Any person who abandons any motor vehicle upon a street, roadway, right-of-way 40 or any other public property or on private property without the expressed consent 41 of the owner or person in lawful charge of such property commits the violation of 42 abandonment of a motor vehicle. 43 44 b) To abandon means to leave a thing with the intention not to retain possession of 45 or assert ownership over it. It is prima facie evidence of the necessary intent that: 1 46 1. The motor vehicle has been left for more than seven (7) days unattended and 47 unmoved; or 48 2. License plates or other identifying marks have been removed from the motor 49 vehicle; or 50 3. The motor vehicle has been damaged or is deteriorated so extensively that it 51 has value only for junk or salvage; or 52 4. The owner has been notified by the Police Department to remove the vehicle 53 and it has not been removed with three(3) days after notification. 54 55 56 2. That the Snowmass Village Municipal Code is hereby amended by adding the 57 following Sections to Chapter 10 General Offenses, Article III Offenses Against 58 Public Peace, Order and Safety, which Sections shall read as follows: 59 Sec. 10-43 Assault Prohibited 60 61 a) It shall be unlawful for any person to strike another person, commit assault upon 62 another person or injure another person. For purposes of this Section, assault shall be 63 defined as the knowing, willful or reckless use of force or violence upon another 64 person. 65 66 Sec. 10-44 Trespass Prohibited 67 a) It shall be unlawful for any person without legal privilege to enter on or remain on the 68 premises of another or refuse to remove himself or herself from the premises when 69 requested to do so by the owner or person having lawful control thereof. 70 See. 10-45 Theft Prohibited 71 a) It shall be unlawful for any person to commit a theft. A person commits theft when 72 he or she knowingly obtains or exercises control over a thing of value of another 73 without authorization or by threat or deception, and: 74 1. Intends to deprive the other person permanently of the use or benefit of the thing 75 of value; or 76 2. Knowingly uses, conceals or abandons the thing of value in such manner as to 77 deprive the other person permanently of its use or benefit; or 78 3. Uses conceals or abandons the thing of value intending that such use, 79 concealment or abandonment will deprive the other person permanently of its use 80 or benefit; or 81 4. Demands any consideration to which he or she is not legally entitled as a 82 condition of restoring the thing of value to the other person. 83 b) For purposes of this Section, the value of the thing involved shall be less than five 84 hundred dollars. 2 85 86 Sec.10-46 Criminal Mischief Prohibited 87 a) It shall be unlawful for any person to knowingly damage the real or personal property 88 of another person. 89 b) For purposes of the Section, the aggregate damage to the real or personal property 90 shall be less than one thousand dollars. 91 92 Sec.10-46 False Identification Prohibited 93 a) It shall be unlawful for any person to offer or use any document, card license, or any 94 evidence of identification of age of such person for the purpose of making sales or 95 purchases, cashing checks, gaining admission to any place, or for any other purpose 96 where such identification is false, fraudulent, incorrect, forged or altered, or 97 misrepresents such person or his age, or does not belong to such person. 98 b) It shall be unlawful for any person to provide any other person with any form of false 99 identification which is to be used to misrepresent age or for any other unlawful 100 purpose. 101 Sec. 10-47 Urinating In Public Prohibited 102 a) It shall be unlawful for any person to urinate in any public way or place that is open 103 to or used by the public except rest rooms or toilets which are provided for this 104 purpose. 105 106 3. That the Snowmass Village Municipal Code is hereby be amended by adding the 107 following Sections to Chapter 10 General Offenses, Article VIII Regulations 108 Regarding Peddlers, Solicitors, Transient Merchants and the Posting of Handbills, 109 which Sections shall read as follows: 110 Sec. 10-141 Peddlers and Solicitors Prohibited From Going On To Private 111 Residences; exemption. 112 a) It shall be unlawful for solicitors, peddlers, hawkers and transient merchants to go in 113 or upon private residences in the Town, not having been requested or invited to do 114 so by the owner or occupant of such private residences, for the purpose of soliciting 115 orders for the sale of goods, wares, services and merchandise, or for the purpose of 116 selling or disposing of the same. 3 117 b) This section shall not be applicable to persons representing local schools, charitable, 118 or civic enterprises. 119 Sec. 10-142 Selling In Public Parks, Parking Lots and Rights of Way Prohibited; 120 Exemption 121 a) It shall be unlawful for a person to occupy any public street, sidewalk, path, right of 122 way, park, or parking lot for the storage, display, or sale of goods, services, or 123 merchandise. 124 b) The provisions of this section shall not apply to any activity for which a Temporary 125 Use Permit, in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 16 of this Code, has been 126 issued. 127 Sec. 10-143 Distribution and Posting of Handbills Prohibited; Exemption 128 129 a) It shall be unlawful for any person to place or attach any handbill, sign, pamphlet, 130 advertisement, or similar item to or upon any private or public property, building, 131 structure, or vehicle without the expressed permission of the owner thereof. 132 133 b) The provisions of this section shall not prohibit the installation of bulletin boards 134 specifically designed for the placement of such notices upon private or public 135 property with the consent of the owner thereof. 136 137 4. That Sections 7-90 and 7-126, Chapter 7 Health, Sanitation and Animals, Article V 138 Animals of the Snowmass Village Municipal Code are hereby amended to read as 139 follows: 140 Sec. 7-90. Vicious animals. Vicious animals are prohibited. 141 Upon issuance of a summons and complaint to the owner of a vicious animal, the 142 vicious animal may be impounded as a public nuisance or the owner shall be 143 ordered to confine the animal in a manner that protects public safety pending 144 final disposition of the charge. Upon conviction of the owner, and the exhaustion 145 of any right the owner has to appeal, the court may order that the owner's vicious 146 animal be destroyed by lethal injection administered by a licensed veterinarian. 147 148 149 Sec. 7-126. Dogs; exemptions from license. 150 151 a) Dog licenses shall not be required if the owner resides less than fifteen (15) 152 consecutive days in the Town and does not own real property in the Town, 153 provided that a valid certificate of vaccination properly issued by the 154 authorities in the regular place of residence of the owner, and a valid proof of 155 licensing, exist for the dog. 156 4 157 b) An owner of a dog breeding operation licensed by the State of Colorado, shall 158 not be required to obtain a dog license for each dog owned provided that a 159 certification of vaccination for all of the dogs that are six (6) months of age 160 and older is submitted to the Animal Control Department on an annual basis. 161 162 163 5. If any provision of this Ordinance or application hereof to any person or circumstance 164 is held invalid, the invalidity shall not affect any other provision or application of this 165 Ordinance which can be given effect without the invalid provision or application, and, 166 to this end, the provisions of this Ordinance are severable. 167 168 READ, APPROVED AND ADOPTED by the Town Council of the Town of Snowmass 169 Village on First Reading on October 5, 2009 upon a motion by Council Member 170 _ the second of Council Member and 171 upon a vote of_in favor and_ opposed. 172 READ, APPROVED AND ADOPTED by the Town Council of the Town of Snowmass 173 Village on Second Reading on October 19, 2009 upon a motion by Council Member 174 the second of Council Member and upon a vote of in favor and _ 175 opposed. 176 177 TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE 178 179 180 Bill Boineau, Mayor 181 ATTEST: 182 183 184 Rhonda B. Coxon, Town Clerk 185 APPROVED AS TO FORM: 186 187 188 John C. Dresser, Jr., Town Attorney 5 MEMORANDUM TO: Snowmass Village Town Council FROM: David Peckler Transportation Director DATE: October 5, 2009 SUBJECT: Resolution #25, Series of 2009 — Approval of Updated Substance Abuse Policy I.PURPOSE AND ACTIONS REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: Formal adoption of a substance abuse policy by the governing board is a requirement to receive Federal Transit Administration (FTA)funds. The Town's current substance abuse policy needs to be amended to include updates to the testing guidelines. Given that the Town has applied for and received FTA funding, our policy with the amendments needs to be approved by Town Council. II.BACKGROUND The policy has been reviewed by a consultant for the Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT) to help ensure that the policy will be in compliance with current standards required by the FTA. The policy applies to specific employees performing safety sensitive" functions relative to transit operations. There are only a small differences between the Town's current policy and amended policy, mostly covering the use of certified collection sites, laboratories, medical/professional personnel, and the protocol for tests conducted under certain circumstances (e.g. Return to Duty and Follow-Up). III. APPLICABLE REGULATIONS Amending current Substance Abuse Policy approved by Resolution #8, Series of 2005. IV. DISCUSION ITEMS/ NEXT STEPS NA A. ACTION REQUESTED OF COUNCIL Staff recommends that Council approve the amendments to the policy. 1 2 SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL 3 4 RESOLUTION NO. 25 5 SERIES OF 2009 6 7 A RESOLUTION OF THE TOWN COUNCIL OF THE TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE, 8 COLORADO, ADOPT A SUBSTANCE ABUSE POLICY FOR EMPLOYEES SUBJECT TO 9 DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING STANDARDS UNDER FEDERAL TRANSIT 10 ADMINISTRATION'S REGULATIONS AND IN COMPLIANCE WITH "THE DRUG FREE 11 WORKPLACE ACT OF 1988" LOCATED IN 20 CFR PART 29, 40 and 655. 12 13 WHEREAS, the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) requires all fund recipients to 14 implement a substance abuse policy that addresses drug and alcohol testing in accordance with 15 FTA regulations; and 16 17 WHEREAS, the FTA regulations require that a fund recipient's local governing board 18 adopt the recipient's Substance Abuse Policy; and, 19 20 WHEREAS, the Town Council desires to adopt the amended Substance Abuse Policy set 21 foith in the attached and incorporated Exhibit A; 22 23 NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED by the Town Council of the Town of Snowmass 24 Village, Colorado, 25 26 The Town of Snowmass Village Council hereby approves and adopts the substance 27 abuse policy as set forth in the attached and incorporated Exhibit A. 28 29 READ, APPROVED AND ADOPTED by the Town Council of the Town of 30 Snowmass Village on the 51" day of October 2009 upon a motion made by Council Member 31 _ the second of Council Member and upon a vote of_in favor and _ 32 opposed. 33 34 35 TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE 36 37 38 39 Bill Boineau, Mayor 40 41 42 43 ATTEST: 44 45 46 47 _ 48 Rhonda Coxon, Town Clerk 49 Town of Snowmms VlnaBe Substance Abuse Policy POLICY The Town of Snowmass Village ("Town") is dedicated to providing safe, dependable and economical transportation services to our transit system passengers. The Town's employees are our most valuable resource; and it is our goal to provide a safe, satisfying working environment, which promotes personal opportunities for growth. In meeting this goal it is our policy to: (1) assure that employees are not impaired in their ability to perform assigned duties in a safe, productive and healthy manner; (2) create a workplace environment free from the adverse effects of drug abuse and alcohol misuse; (3) prohibit the unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensing, possession, or use of controlled substances; and (4) encourage employees to seek professional assistance any time personal problems, including alcohol or drug dependency, adversely affect their ability to perform their assigned duties. The Town's Substance Abuse Policy has been in place since January 1, 1995. In light of the numerous updates to the Federal standards, the new policy is approved and adopted by Snowmass Village's Town Council on October 5, 2009 and became effective October 5, 2009. A copy of the signed adoption by the Town Council is attached to this policy. Anytime this policy is amended or updated due to changes in Federal regulations in the future, the policy will contain the date, proof of adoption of the amended policy by the Town Manager and the date the amended policy, or portion thereof, became effective. PURPOSE The purpose of this policy is to assure worker fitness for duty and to protect our employees, passengers, and the public from the risks posed by the misuse of alcohol and use of prohibited drugs. This policy is also intended to comply with all applicable Federal regulations governing workplace anti-drug and alcohol programs in the transit industry. The U.S. Department of Transportation, Office of Drug and Alcohol Policy Compliance (ODAPC) has published 49 CFR Part 40, enacted December 19, 2000, and fully implemented August 1, 2001, and revised June 25, 2008; 73 FR 70283, November 20, 2008; 74 FR 37949, July 30, 2009, effect August 31, 2009 that mandates urine drug testing and breath alcohol testing for safety-sensitive positions and prohibits performance of safety-sensitive functions when there is a positive test result and sets standards for the collection and testing of urine and alcohol breath specimens. The Federal Transit Administration (FTA) of the U.S. Department of Transportation has published 49CFR Part 655, as amended, which mandates urine drug testing and breath alcohol testing for safety-sensitive positions with the Transit Authority and prohibit performance of safety-sensitive functions when there is a positive test result. All provisions set forth in bold face print are included consistent with requirements specifically set forth in 49 CFR Part 655,or Part 40,as amended. Provisions set forth in the Drug-Free Workplace Act(49 CFR Part 29)are delineated in italics. All other provisions are set forth under the authority of the transit system. Page 1 of 20 In addition, the Federal government published 49 CFR Part 29, The Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988." This policy incorporates those requirements for safety-sensitive employees and others when so noted. . This policy will be kept current with the latest federal regulations and approved by the Town Council as and when revised. APPLICABILITY This policy applies to all transit system employees; paid part-time employees; contract employees and contractors when performing any transit-related safety- sensitive duties or when they are on transit property. This policy applies to off-site lunch periods or breaks when an employee is scheduled to return to work. Adherence to this policy is a condition of employment. Visitors, vendors, and contract employees are governed by this policy while on transit premises and will not be permitted to conduct transit business if found to be in violation of this policy. A safety-sensitive function is any duty related to the safe operation of mass transit service including the operation of a revenue service vehicle (whether or not the vehicle is in revenue service), dispatch and maintenance of a revenue service vehicle or equipment used in revenue service, security personnel who carry firearms, and any other employee or volunteer who perform duties requiring a CDL and/or performs a safety sensitive function and receives remuneration in excess of their actual expenses. Supervisors performing any of the functions described above are considered to be safety-sensitive employees. Participation in The Town's Substance Abuse Program as stated in this policy is a condition of employment. All positions at the Town were reviewed for safety-sensitive duties to determine the safety-sensitive positions. Additionally, any new positions created in the future will be reviewed for safety-sensitive duties. The following positions were determined to be safety-sensitive: Transportation Director,Transit Supervisor, Transit Foreman, Lead Bus Driver, Bus Driver, Fleet Superintendent, Mechanic 11, and Mechanic 1, Transit Facility Maintenance, and Transit Facility Maintenance Specialist All employees hired to perform safety sensitive duties after August 1", 2001, must sign a "Request/Consent for Information" release to be sent to all other DOT- regulated employers for whom the employee has worked within the previous three 3) years. Employees cannot perform safety-sensitive duties for more than 30 days unless Snowmass Village has obtained, or made and documented a good faith effort to obtain, the required information from previous employers. If an employee refuses to provide this written consent, Snowmass Village must not permit the employee to perform safety-sensitive functions. (§40.25) 12-03-02 Page 2 of 25 PROHIBITED SUBSTANCES Prohibited substances" addressed by this policy include the following: Illegally Used Controlled Substances or Drugs Any illegal drug or any substance identified in Schedules I through V of Section 202 of the Controlled Substance Act (21 U.S.C. 812), and as further defined by 21 CFR 1300.11 through 1300.15. This includes, but is not limited to: marijuana, amphetamines, opiates, phencyclidine (PCP), and cocaine, as well as any drug not approved for medical use by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration or the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Illegal use includes use of any illegal drug, misuse of legally prescribed drugs, and use of illegally obtained prescription drugs. Legal Drugs The appropriate use of legally prescribed drugs and non-prescription medications is not prohibited. However, the use of any substance which carries a warning label that indicates the mental functioning, motor skills, or judgment may be adversely affected must be reported to DAPM, Brandi Lindt or Director of Transportation, David Peckler backup DAPM); if neither is available advise supervisory personnel on duty and medical advice must be sought by the employee from their prescribing physician, as appropriate, before performing work-related safety sensitive duties. Pre-Duty Disclosure of Any Impairing Effect Medication Drivers are required as a safety rule to pre-duty disclosure of ANY prescription drug, over the counter medication, or any substance which might have an impairing effect on performance of safety-sensitive duties. If prescription or an over the counter medication, which has an impairing effect, is not disclosed pre-duty by a Driver, and that Driver tests positive for any impairing effect prescription or over the counter drug, that Driver will be subject to discipline, up to and including termination for violation of this safety rule. If disclosure is made, "Snowmass Village reserves the right to send a Driver for Fitness for Duty evaluation to evaluate the Prescription or over the counter medication and its impact on safety-sensitive duties. Federal regulations preempt any state regulations governing the use of medicinal marijuana. (§655.6) A legally prescribed drug means that the individual has a prescription or other written approval from a physician for the use of the drug in the course of medical treatment. It must include the patient's name, the name of the substance, quantity/amount to be taken, and the period of authorization. The misuse or abuse of legal drugs while performing transit business is prohibited. When taking a legally prescribed drug under medical care you must get a written release to work in a safety-sensitive position from the prescribing physician. Legally prescribed or non-prescription drugs or medications are normally not prohibited substances under this policy. A legally prescribed drug or medication is one for which the employee has a 12-03-02 Page 3 of 25 prescription or other written authorization from a licensed health care provider permitted by law to prescribe or dispense drugs or medications. The authorization must include the employee's name, the name of the substance, the amount to be taken and the period of authorization. There should be a written release by the prescribing physician to Snowmass Village to allow the person to continue work in a safety-sensitive position. If there is not one, the DAPM may request it. However, if the employee is using any drug or medication which may impair mental functions, motor skills or judgment, before performing work-related duties the employee must seek appropriate medical advice and obtain permission from the DAPM and if not available from the Director of Transportation then his or her supervisor (listed at the end of this policy). If an employee fails to follow the above procedure, or misuses or abuses the drug or medication, the drug or medication may be considered a prohibited substance for purposes of disciplinary action under this policy. The employee does not have to state what the specific drug is, but must advise that they are taking a drug which may affect their performance. The DAPM will request from the prescribing physician a statement in writing allowing the person to continue to work in a safety-sensitive position. Alcohol The use of beverages containing alcohol or substances including any medication, mouthwash, food, candy, or any other substance, which causes alcohol to be present in the body while performing transit business, is prohibited. No alcoholic substances shall be kept upon the property without the notification of and approval from management. PROHIBITED CONDUCT Manufacture, Trafficking, Possession, and Use Transit System employees are prohibited from engaging in the unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensing,possession, or use ofprohibited substances on transit authority premises, in transit vehicles, in uniform, or while on transit authority business. Law enforcement shall be notified, as appropriate, where criminal activity is suspected. Intoxication/Under the Influence Any safety sensitive employee who is reasonably suspected of being intoxicated, impaired, under the influence of a prohibited substance, or not fit for duty shall be suspended from job duties pending an investigation and verification of condition. Employees who fail to pass a drug or alcohol test shall be removed from duty immediately, informed of educational and rehabilitation programs available, and referred to a Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) and subject to disciplinary action, up to and including termination. A drug or alcohol test is considered positive if the individual is found to have a quantifiable presence of a prohibited substance in the body above the 12-03-02 Page 4 of 25 minimum thresholds defined in 49 CFR Part 40, as amended, or refuses to test. Snowmass Village requires all employees to report any alcohol criminal citations within 1 business day of incident. Alcohol Use No safety-sensitive employee should report for duty or remain on duty when his/her ability to perform assigned safety-sensitive functions is adversely affected by alcohol or when his/her breath alcohol concentration is 0.02 or greater. No safety sensitive employee shall possess alcohol while on duty, in uniform, while performing safety- sensitive functions, or just before or just after performing a safety-sensitive function. No safety-sensitive employee shall use alcohol within four hours of reporting for duty, or during the hours that they are on call. Violation of these provisions is prohibited and punishable by disciplinary action up to and including termination. Additional Prohibitions for Safety-Sensitive Employees Any safety-sensitive employee who uses alcohol within four hours prior to duty; or within eight hours following an accident (or until post-accident testing is completed); or who leaves, or is unavailable, at the scene of the accident prior to testing; or during otherwise specific on-call hours, will be subject to discipline including termination. 2.6 Noncompliance with Testing Requirements §655.49 Any employee who refuses to comply with a request for drug or alcohol testing, provides false information in connection with a drug or alcohol test, or attempts to falsify drug or alcohol test results through tampering, contamination, adulteration or substitution of a test sample, will be treated as if the employee had received a "verified positive" drug test result (i.e., a positive confirming test for drug use or alcohol concentration of 0.04 or greater), and will be removed from safety-sensitive service immediately(§655.61), and will be subject to discipline including termination. In addition, noncompliance with testing requirements constitutes a verified positive drug test result for purposes of section 3.9 of this policy(removal of safety-sensitive employees from service). COMPLIANCE WITH TESTING REQUIREMENTS All safety-sensitive employees will be subject to urine drug testing anytime while on duty and alcohol testing only just prior, during and just after the performance of safety-sensitive duties. The alcohol testing may be done using breath or saliva for the screening test. All confirmation tests for alcohol must be done using an Evidential Breath Testing Device. Any safety sensitive employee who refuses to comply with a request for testing shall be removed from duty immediately, informed of educational and rehabilitation programs available, and referred to a SAP. Any safety sensitive employee who is suspected of falsifying test results . 12-03-02 Page 5 of 25 through tampering, contamination, adulteration, or substitution will be required to undergo an observed collection. Refusal to Test What constitutes a refusal: It's considered a refusal to test if the MRO reports out a verified adulterated or substituted test result. During an invalid test result MRO review, if they get an "invalid" test result it is not a refusal but when a negative test result is needed, it must be retaken-rules specify how, reason for test. If an employee admits adulterating or substituting a specimen it is now a refusal to test. §40.33 The MRO may verify an invalid test result as cancelled with instructions to recollect immediately under direct observation) without interviewing the employee, as provided in § 40.159: 1) If the employee expressly declines the opportunity to discuss the test with the MRO; 2) If the DER has successfully made and documented a contact with employee and instructed the employee to contact the MRO and more than 72 hours have passed since the DER contacted the employee; or 3) If neither the MRO nor the DER,.after making and documenting all reasonable efforts, has been able to contact the employee within 10 days of the date on which the MRO received the confirmed invalid test result from the laboratory. 4) On the basis of extenuating circumstances, the MRO may reopen the verification, allowing the employee to present information concerning whether there is a legitimate medical explanation of the confirmed test result. In §40.191 Failure to cooperate with any part of the testing process (e.g., refuse to empty pockets when directed by the collector, behave in a confrontational way that disrupts the collection process, fail to wash hands after being directed to do so by the collector).. For an observed collection, failure to follow the observer's instructions to raise your clothing above the waist, lower clothing and underpants, and to turn around to permit the observer to determine if you have any type of prosthetic or other device that could be used to interfere with the collection process. 12-03-02 Page 6 of 25 Possess or wear a prosthetic or other device that could be used to interfere with the collection process. Admit to the collector or MRO that you adulterated or substituted the specimen. 2.6.2. Other Refusals Also, failure to appear for any test (except a pre-employment test if you gain employment elsewhere) within a reasonable time as determined by Snowmass Village; Failure to cooperate with any part of the testing process; Failure to sign required documentation; Failure to remain at the testing site until the testing process is complete; Provided, that an employee who leaves the testing site before the testing process commences (see §40.63 (c)) for a pre-employment test is not deemed to have refused to test; Failure to take a second test as directed by the employer or collector; Failure to permit or participate in a required observed collection or fails to follow the observed instructions to raise and lower their clothing and to turn around to permit the observer to determine if the employee has a prosthetic or other device that could be used to interfere with the collection process; The employee possess or wears a prosthetic or other device that could be used to interfere with the collection process; Failure to wash his or her hands after being directed to do so; Failure to undergo a medical evaluation or examination as directed by the MRO; Employee admits to the collector that he or she adulterated or substituted their specimen; Employee behaves in a confrontational way that disrupts the collection process—All of the above constitute refusals to test. 2.6.3. Alcohol Refusals Refusal to comply" does not include failure to sign the chain of custody form step 4; however the collector must note that the employee did not sign. Refusal to sign step #2 of the USDOT Alcohol Testing Form is considered a refusal to test. TREATMENT REQUIREMENTS All employees are encouraged to make use of the available resources for treatment for alcohol misuse and illegal drug use problems. Under certain circumstances, employees may be required to undergo treatment for substance abuse or alcohol misuse. Any employee who refuses or fails to comply with The Town's requirements for treatment, 12-03-02 Page 7 of 25 after-care, or return-to-duty shall be subject to disciplinary action, up to and including termination. The cost of any treatment or rehabilitation services will be paid for directly by the employee or their insurance provider. Eligible employees will be allowed to take accumulated sick leave and/or vacation leave to participate in the prescribed rehabilitation program. NOTIFICATION OF CRIMINAL CONVICTIONS All employees are required to notify the transit system of any criminal drug or alcohol statute conviction for a violation occurring in the workplace within five days after such conviction. Failure to comply with this provision shall result in disciplinary action, up to and including termination. All alcohol driving arrests will be reported to the DAPM or the Director of Transportation within one (1) business day after the arrest. PROPER APPLICATION OF THE POLICY The Town is dedicated to ensuring fair and equitable application of this substance abuse policy. Therefore, supervisors/managers are required to use and apply all aspects of this policy in an unbiased and impartial manner. Any supervisor/manager who knowingly disregards the requirements of this policy, or who is found to deliberately misuse the policy in regard to subordinates, shall be subject to disciplinary action, up to and including dismissal. TRAINING FOR SAFETY-SENSITIVE EMPLOYEES & SUPERVISORS All safety-sensitive employees shall receive a minimum of 60 minutes of training on the effects and consequences of prohibited drug use on personal health, safety, and the work environment and indicators of prohibited drug use. Supervisors responsible for making the decision to reasonable suspicion test must receive a minimum of 60 minutes of training on drug and 60 minutes of training on alcohol information regarding the physical, behavioral, speech and performance indicators of probable drug and alcohol use. This must include how to document the indicators of probable drug and alcohol use. TESTING PROCEDURES Analytical urine drug testing and breath testing for alcohol may be conducted when circumstances warrant and as required by Federal regulations. Testing shall be conducted in a manner to assure a high degree of accuracy and reliability, using techniques, equipment, and laboratory facilities that have been approved by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). 12-03-02 Page 8 of 25 Safety sensitive employees shall be allowed individual privacy during urine collection, unless there is reason to believe that the specimen may have been altered or substituted, or the test is a return-to-duty test or a follow-up test DIRECT OBSERVED COLLECTIONS (August 2009) The reason(s) for an observed collection must be explained to the employee. An observed collection is required in the following specific instances: The employee attempts to tamper with his or her specimen at the collection site. The specimen temperature is outside the acceptable range; The specimen shows signs of tampering—unusual color/odor/ characteristic; or The collector finds an item in the employee's pockets or wallet which appears to be brought into the site to contaminate a specimen; or the collector notes conduct suggesting tampering. The Medical Review Officer(MRO) orders the direct observation because: The employee has no legitimate medical reason for certain atypical laboratory results; or The employee's positive or refusal [adulterated/substituted] test result had to be cancelled because the split specimen test could not be performed for example, the split was not collected). The test is a Follow-Up test or a Return-to-Duty test. 2. The observer must be the same gender as the employee. 3. If the collector is not the observer, the collector must instruct the observer about the procedures for checking the employee for prosthetic or other devices designed to carry"clean" urine and urine substitutes AND for watching the employee urinate . into the collection container. The observer requests the employee to raise his or her shirt, blouse or dress/ skirt, as appropriate, above the waist,just above the navel; and lower clothing and underpants to mid-thigh and show the observer, by turning around, that the employee does not have such a device. If The Employee Has A Device: The observer immediately notifies the collector; the collector stops the collection; and the collector thoroughly documents the circumstances surrounding the event in the remarks section of CCF. The collector notifies the DER. This is a refusal to test. If The Employee Does Not Have A Device: The employee is permitted to return clothing to its proper position for the observed collection. The observer must watch the urine go from the employee's body into the collection container. The observer must watch as the employee takes the specimen to the collector. The collector then completes the collection process. 4. Failure of the employee to permit any part of the direct observation procedure is a refusal to test.. (§40.191-209) 12-03-02 Page 9 of 25 All testing will be conducted according to the procedures put forth in 49 CFR Part 40, as amended, including, picture identification of the employee, Federal Drug Custody and Control Form with unique specimen identification number completed by a trained collection site person who insures that the Custody and Control Form is completed correctly and signed and certified by the donor, collection of Split Sample specimens that are sealed and initialed by the donor. All testing for the presence of illegal drugs or alcohol misuse, will protect the employee and the integrity of the drug and alcohol testing process, safeguard the validity of the test results, and ensure the test results are attributed to the correct covered employee. Snowmass Village will allow a union or legal representative at the collection site, but they cannot interfere with the testing process and that would include waiting for them to arrive.. All tests, both alcohol and drug, must begin as soon as possible after the employee arrives at the collection site. The drugs that will be tested for include marijuana, cocaine, opiates, amphetamines, and phencyclidine. An initial drug screen, called an immunoassay test, will be conducted on each urine specimen. For those specimens that are not negative, a confirmatory Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS) test will be performed. The test will be considered positive if the amounts present are above the minimum thresholds established in 49 CFR Part 40, as amended. LITE SCREENING CUT-OFF CONFIRMATION CUT-OFF Man'uana-Delta 9 THC 50 n /ml 15 n /ml Cocaine-Benzo ecgonlne 300n /ml 150 n /ml Opiates-Morphine/Codeine 2000 n ml 2000 nglml PCP-Phencyclidine 25 n ml 25 n ml Amphetamines 1000 n /ml 500 n /ml In instances where there is a reason to believe an employee is abusing a substance other than the five drugs listed above, The Town reserves the right to request a separate sample and to test for additional drugs under The Town's own authority using standard laboratory testing protocols. The Town also reserves the right to require a fitness-for- duty examination by a licensed physician when an employee's observable behavior and actions are considered to be inconsistent with a safe, drug free workplace. The integrity of the alcohol testing process is insured by picture identification of the employee, use of a National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) approved Evidential Breath Testing Device (EBT) that displays and prints unique sequential numbers and is capable of producing 3 copies of the test result. The test 12-03-02 Page 10 of 25 is administered by a certified Breath Alcohol Technician (BAT) who is "trained to proficiency" in the operation of the EBT being used. The BAT completes a Federal Breath Alcohol Testing form and insures that it is signed by the donor. The employee shall be provided with written instructions prior to specimen collection for drug testing. If the initial test indicates an alcohol concentration of 0.02 or greater, a second test will be performed to confirm the results of the initial test. A safety- sensitive employee who has a confirmed alcohol concentration of 0.02 or greater, but less than 0.04 will immediately be removed from his/her safety-sensitive duties for a minimum the start of the employee's next regularly scheduled duty period, but not less than 8 hours or until a retest results in a concentration measure of less than 0.02. An alcohol concentration of 0.04 or greater will be considered a positive alcohol test and in violation of this policy and a violation of the requirements set forth in 49 CFR Part 655 for safety-sensitive employees. Alcohol testing will only be done just prior to, during, or just after a safety-sensitive employee's shift. Screening Test Technicians (STT) may be used to perform alcohol-screening tests saliva or breath), however, an EBT operated by a BAT must be used for confirmation of an alcohol test. Neither the STT nor BAT may act as a collector if they are a direct supervisor of the employee Any safety-sensitive employee that has a confirmed positive drug or alcohol test will be immediately removed from their duties, informed of educational and rehabilitation programs available and referred to a Substance Abuse Professional SAP) for an evaluation and assessment. A positive drug and/or alcohol test will result in disciplinary action, up to and including termination. Negative Dilute Drug Test Result When the Town receives a negative dilute drug test result, the Town will accept the result as a negative and no other action needs to be taken. This is the same for pre-employment tests negative dilute results. EMPLOYEE REQUESTED TESTING Any safety-sensitive employee who questions the results of a required drug test may request that an additional test be conducted. This test must be conducted at a different DHHS certified laboratory. The test must be conducted on the split sample that was provided by the employee at the same time as the original sample. The employee pays all costs for such testing unless the result of the split sample test invalidates the result of the original test. The method of collecting, storing, and testing the split sample will be consistent with the procedures set forth in 49 CFR Part 40, as amended. The employee's request for split sample testing must be made to the Medical Review Officer within 72 hours of notice of the original sample verified test result. The MRO must direct the laboratory in writing to send the split sample with appropriate copies of the chain of custody form and a copy of the MRO' request for testing to another DHHS certified laboratory. Requests after 72 hours will only be 12-03-02 Page 11 of 25 accepted if the delay was due to documented facts that were beyond the control of the employee. TYPES OF DRUG & ALCOHOL TESTING EVENTS Pre-Employment Drug Testing All safety-sensitive position applicants shall undergo urine drug testing immediately following the offer of employment into a safety-sensitive position or before transferring into a safety-sensitive position. Receipt by the Town of a negative drug test result is required prior to performing safety-sensitive duties. If the test is cancelled the applicant must retake and pass a drug test before being before performing safety-sensitive duties. If a safety-sensitive employee returns to safety sensitive duties that has been off for more than 90 days and has not remained in the random pool, must pass a Pre- Employment test before resuming duties. When a covered employee or applicant has previously failed a pre-employment drug test, the employee must present to the employer proof of successfully having completed a referral, evaluation and treatment plan as described in Sec. 655.62 If otherwise qualified, an individual with permanent or long term disabilities that directly render them unable to provide an adequate urine specimen will be able to perform safety-sensitive duties despite their inability to provide urine during a pre- employment test. The MRO will determine long term inability to provide urine by medical examination and consultation with the employee's physician. Reasonable Suspicion Testing All safety-sensitive employees may be subject to fitness for duty evaluation and urine and/or breath testing when there are reasons to believe that drug or alcohol use is adversely affecting job performance. A reasonable suspicion referral must be made by a supervisor, trained in the signs and symptoms of drug and alcohol use, who has personally observed and documented objective facts and circumstances which are consistent with the short-term effects of substance abuse. The criteria for a reasonable suspicion test must be based on contemporaneous, articulable, observations concerning the appearance, behavior, speech, or body odor of the safety-sensitive employee. A supervisor making the decision to reasonable suspicion test may not act as the STT or BAT for that test. Once the decision to reasonable suspicion test is made, the employee will be removed from safety-sensitive duties until the test results are received. The employee will be escorted to the collection site by the supervisor or another transit employee. 12-03-02 Page 12 of 25 Post Accident Testing Post accident testing of safety-sensitive employees involved in an accident/incident with the Town's vehicle (regardless of whether or not the vehicle is in revenue service) is mandatory for accidents where there is loss of life and for nonfatal accidents if, 1) an individual involved in the accident immediately receives medical treatment away from the scene of the accident, or 2) one or more vehicles involved in the accident incurs disabling damage (damage which precludes the departure of a motor vehicle from the scene of an accident in it usual manner in daylight after simple repair) requiring transportation from the scene by tow truck or other vehicle; or if the mass transit vehicle is a rail vehicle or vessel that is removed from revenue service. When there is loss of human life, each surviving safety-sensitive employee on duty in the mass transit vehicle at the time of the accident must be tested. Safety-sensitive employees not on the vehicle (e.g. maintenance personnel), whose performance could have contributed to the accident (as determined by the Town using the best information available at the time of the accident) must be tested. Safety-sensitive employees on duty in the mass transit vehicle at the time of a nonfatal accident (fitting the criteria above) must be tested unless their behavior can be completely discounted as a contributing factor in the accident. Other safety- sensitive employees whose performance could have contributed to the accident, as determined by the Town using the best information available at the time of the accident shall also be tested after a non-fatal accident. Following an accident safety-sensitive employees will be tested as soon as possible, but not to exceed 32 hours for drug testing. If alcohol testing is not done within 2 hours of the accident, the reason for not testing should be documented in a report and attempts to alcohol test must continue for up to 8 hours after the accident. If alcohol testing is not done within 8 hours or drug testing is not done within 32 hours following the accident, the reasons for not testing must also be updated on the written report. Any safety-sensitive employee involved in an accident must refrain from alcohol use for eight hours following an accident or until they undergo a post- accident alcohol test. The results of a blood, urine, or breath test conducted by Federal, State, or local officials shall be considered to meet the requirements of this section, provided such test conforms to the applicable Federal, State, or local testing requirements, and that the test results can be obtained by the employer The requirements to test for drugs and alcohol following an accident should in no way delay necessary medical attention for injured people or prohibit a safety- sensitive employee from leaving the scene of an accident to obtain assistance in responding to the accident or to obtain necessary emergency medical care. However, the safety-sensitive employee must remain readily available,which means The Company knows the location of the safety-sensitive employee. Any safety- 12-03-02 Page 13 of 25 sensitive employee who leaves the scene of the accident, without a justifiable explanation, prior to submission to drug and alcohol testing will be considered to have refused the test and shall face disciplinary action up to and including termination. Random Testin¢ All safety-sensitive employees shall be subject to random, unannounced testing. The percentage of the number of employees the Federal Transit Authority (FTA) currently requires to be randomly tested for drugs is 50% of the total number of covered employees annually. The percentage of the number of employees the FTA requires to be randomly tested for alcohol is 25% of the number of all covered employees annually. These percentages are subject to annual review by the FTA. The current rates are 25% for drugs and 10% for alcohol. The Town of Snomass Village will test at 50% for drugs and 10% for alcohol. The selection of safety- sensitive employees for random drug and alcohol testing shall be made using a scientifically valid method such as a random number table or a computer-based random number generator that ensures each safety-sensitive employee that they will have an equal chance of being selected each time selections are made. Random tests will be unannounced and spread throughout all days and all hours of all shifts The Town is in operation during the year. Employees are to proceed to the testing site immediately upon notification of a random test. The times of notification and arrival will be documented on the referral form by the collection site. There is no discretion on the part of management or operations in the selection and notification of individuals for testing. Second Chance Policv The Town believes in the value of a trained and licensed employee to the organization. The Town may therefore, depending of the relevant facts and circumstances of each case, allow safety sensitive employees with positive drug or alcohol tests a second chance to retain their position. Nothing in this section or elsewhere in this Substance Abuse Policy shall be construed in any manner that is inconsistent with the at-will status of all Town employees. The determination of whether a safety sensitive employee shall be given a second chance to retain their position rests within the sole discretion of the Town Manager. Any safety sensitive employee who is given a second chance to retain their position must conform to the Retum-To-Duty and Follow Up Testing procedures of this Substance Abuse Policy and the Federal guidelines stated in 49 CFR part 40, and sign a Second Chance agreement with the Town.. Return To Duty Testing Before any safety-sensitive employee is allowed to return to duty performing safety- sensitive duties following a verified positive drug or alcohol test they must be evaluated by a SAP, complete any recommended treatment and provide a negative return to duty test. Return to duty testing is done at the recommendation of the 12-03-02 Page 14 of 25 SAP and may be for drugs and/or alcohol. These tests (8/31/09) will be conducted under Direct Observation by the collection site. Follow-up Testing Once a safety-sensitive employee is allowed to return to duty, they shall be subjected to unannounced random follow-up testing for at least 12 months, but not more than 60 months with a minimum of 6 tests being done during the first 12 months. The SAP will determine the frequency and duration of the follow-up testing. Follow-up testing is separate from and in addition to the regular random testing program. Employees subject to follow-up testing must also remain in the standard random pool and must be tested whenever their name comes up for random testing, even if this means being tested twice in the same day, week, or month. These tests (8/31/09) will be conducted under Direct Observation by the collection site. Re-Entry Contract Employees who re-enter the workforce must agree to a re-entry contract. The contract may include (but is not limited to): A release to work statement from the Substance Abuse Professional. A negative test for drugs and/or alcohol. An arrangement to unannounced frequent follow-up testing for a period of one to five years with at least six tests performed the first year. 12-03-02 Page 15 of 25 DRUG TESTING PROCEDURES URINE SPECIMEN COLLECTION PROCEDURES: Urine collections will be performed to the standards set in 49CFR part 40 as amended. An overview of the procedures are available in Attachment A to this policy ALCOHOL TESTING PROCEDURES All alcohol testing procedures will be done according to the standards set forth in 49CFR part 40 as amended. An overview to the procedures is available in Attachment A. MEDICAL REVIEW OFFICER The laboratory results must be reviewed by a qualified MRO. The purpose of this review is to verify and validate test results. The laboratory shall report all results to the MRO in a confidential manner. A qualified MRO is a licensed physician who has knowledge of substance abuse disorders and has appropriate medical training to interpret and evaluate an individual's confirmed positive test result together with his or her medical history and any other relevant biomedical information. The MRO shall follow all procedures set forth in 49CFR part 40 as amended. SUBSTANCE ABUSE PROFESSIONAL (SAP) Any individual who has a verified positive drug or alcohol test shall be removed from safety-sensitive duties immediately, informed of educational and rehabilitation programs available, and referred to a Substance Abuse Professional (SAP). A SAP can be a licensed physician (Medical Doctor or Doctor of Osteopathy), or a licensed or certified psychologist, social worker, or employee assistance professional with knowledge of and clinical experience in the diagnosis and treatment of drug and alcohol related disorders or an addiction counselor certified by the National Association of Alcoholism and Drug Abuse Counselors Certification Commission. The specific requirements for a SAP can be found in 49CFR part 40. The responsibilities of the SAP include: Evaluating whether a safety-sensitive employee who has refused to submit to a drug or alcohol test or who has a verified positive drug or alcohol test result is in 12-03-02 Page 16 of 25 need of assistance in resolving the problems associated with prohibited drug and alcohol use. Evaluating whether a safety-sensitive employee who has a verified positive drug or alcohol test result has complied with the SAP's recommendations. Determine when return-to-duty testing is appropriate and whether it should be for drugs and/or alcohol. Recommend the number of months the returning safety-sensitive employee will be subject to follow-up testing(after the minimum six tests during the first 12 months) and whether it will be for drugs and/or alcohol. The SAP who determines that a covered employee requires assistance in resolving problems with substance abuse may not refer the employee to the SAP's private practice from which the SAP receives remuneration or to a person or organization in which the SAP has a financial interest. The SAP must follow the procedures and responsibilities set forth in 49CFR part 40. Employee Access to Records Drug testing records must be kept in a secure location with controlled access. Drug and alcohol test results may be released only under the following circumstances: Employer shall release information or copies of records regarding an employee's test results to a third party only as directed by specific, written instruction of the employee. Employer may disclose information related to a test result to the decision maker in a lawsuit, grievance, or other proceeding initiated by or on behalf of the employee tested. Upon written request, employer must promptly provide any employee with any records relating to his/her test, including calibration records and laboratory certification records. Employer must release information to the National Transportation Safety Board NTSB) about any post-accident test performed for an accident under NTSB investigation. Employer shall make available copies of all results of employer testing programs, and any other records pertaining to testing programs when requested by DOT or any DOT agency with regulatory authority over the employer or any of its employees, or to a State oversight agency authorized to oversee rail fixed guideway systems. 12-03-02 Page 17 of 25 SYSTEM CONTACTS Program Manager j(DAPM Drug and Alcohol Program Manager) or (DER Designated Employer Representative): Name: Brandi Lindt Title Assistant Finance Director Address: P.O. Box 5010, Snowmass Village, CO 81615 Telephone: (970) 923-3796 Marianne Rakowski Finance Director PO Box 5010 5nowmass Village, CO 81623 970-923-3796 David Peckler Transportation Director PO Box 5010 5nowmass Village, CO 81623 970-923-5986 Medical Review Officer ( MRO) Services Will Be Provided by: Name: Dr. James Vanderploeg M.D. Address: 700 Gemini, Ste 110, Houston, TX 77058 Telephone: (800) 480-8040 Substance Abuse Professional (SAP): Name: White River Counseling Center, Mr. Carmen Iacino Address: 758 Railroad Av., Rifle, CO 81650 Telephone: (970) 625-3416 DHHS Certified Laboratory: Name: Quest Diagnostics, Inc. Address: Telephone: (800) 877-7484 Collection Site; Name: Aspen Medical Care Address: 611 W. Main St., Aspen 81611 Telephone: (970) 920-0104 12-03-02 Page 18 of 25 The toll-free number for Substance abuse Assistance is : 1 - 800-662-HELP 12-03-02 Page 19 of 25 EMPLOYEE RECEIPT OF TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE SUBSTANCE ABUSE POLICY Return this completed form to your immediate supervisor. Print Employee Name: I have received and will read The Town of Snowmass Village's Substance Abuse Policy. I understand that I will be held responsible for the content of the policy, and I agree to abide by the Substance Abuse Policy and the drug and alcohol testing procedures described therein. If I need any clarification or if I have any questions regarding the substance of the policy, I will address them with the Town's program administrator. I understand that violation of this Policy may be grounds for disciplinary action up to and including termination. This policy adheres to the Federal Transit Administration's mandated regulations for drug and alcohol testing. Employee Signature: Date Signed: 12-03-02 Page 20 of 25 Attachment A Urine Collection and Alcohol Testing Procedures Urine collection for drug testing shall be done at a location that provides: a privacy enclosure for urination a toilet receptacle large enough to contain a complete void a source for washing hands a suitable surface for writing The collection site personnel shall be trained in the proper procedures for preparing the collection site, collecting the urine specimen, sealing and preparing the specimen for shipment and completing the custody and control form as required in 49 CFR Part 40. A DOT drug testing custody and control form will be used for the collection. The collection room shall be inspected by the collector before and after each specimen collection for removal of any unauthorized persons and materials that could be used to adulterate the specimen. The collection site will be secure to prevent unauthorized access during the collection process. The collector will verify the employee's identity by photo identification or by a company representative. The collection will not proceed if identity is not verified. The collection site will notify the employer if the employee fails to report or arrives more than 30 minutes late for the appointment. The employee will be requested to check belongings (purses & briefcases) and remove any bulky outerwear (sweaters,jackets, vests, etc.) The employee may retain their wallet. The employee will be directed to wash their hands. The collector will unwrap the collection cup or specimen bottle in front of the employee and direct them to the privacy enclosure. The collector remains outside the enclosure. The employee is instructed to provide at least 45 ml (about 2 ounces) of urine. If the employee is unable to provide at least 45 ml of urine they will be given up to 40 ounces of fluids and remain at the collection site for up to 3 hours in an attempt to provide the specimen. If the required amount is provided, the original sample is discarded. If the employee is still unable to provide an adequate specimen, the insufficient specimen is discarded, testing discontinued and the employer notified. The MRO shall refer the employee for a medical evaluation to determine whether the employee's inability to provide a specimen is genuine or constitutes a refusal to submit to a drug test. The examining physician shall provide the MRO a brief statement setting forth his/her conclusion and the basis for it. Upon receipt of the 12-03-02 Page 21 of 25 statement the MRO shall report his/her conclusions to the employer in writing. If the MRO determines there is no medical explanation for the inability to provide an adequate specimen, this will be considered a refusal to test. Within four (4) minutes of receiving the specimen from the employee, the collector will record the temperature of the specimen on the custody and control form. The temperature must be between 90.0 and 100.0 F. Any specimen temperature out of that range requires a second specimen to be collected immediately under direct observation by a collector of the same gender. The incident is noted in the remarks section of the custody and control form and both specimens are sent to the laboratory. The collector shall also visually examine the specimen for any unusual color or sediment, and note anything unusual on the custody and control form. If the employee refuses to cooperate with the collection process the collector notifies the employer immediately and documents the non-cooperation on the custody and control form. If a collection container is used, the collection site person, in the presence of the donor, pours the urine into two specimen bottles. Thirty (30) ml shall be poured into one bottle, to be used as the primary specimen. At least 15 ml shall be poured into the other bottle, to be used as the split specimen. If a specimen bottle is used as a collection container, the collector shall pour off 30 ml of urine from the specimen bottle into a second specimen bottle, to be used as the primary bottle), and retain the reminder (at least 15 ml) in the collection bottle to be used as the split specimen. Both bottles must be scaled and labeled in the presence of the donor. The labels must be printed with the same specimen identification number as the custody and control form. The donor initials the seals on the bottles verifying the specimen is his/hers. The custody and control form is completed. The collector and the donor must sign the appropriate certification statements on the form regarding authenticity of the specimen and information provided and the integrity of the collection process. Each transfer of custody must be noted on the chain of custody portion of the urine custody and control form. Every effort should be made to minimize the number of persons handling the specimen. The specimen must be stored in a secured location until transport to the laboratory. Both the primary specimen and the split specimen shall be sealed in a single shipping container, together with the appropriate pages of the custody and control form. The tape seal on the container shall bear the initials of the collector and the date of the closure for shipment. 12-03-02 Page 22 of 25 Observed Collections Procedures for collecting urine specimens shall allow individual privacy unless there is a reason to believe that a particular individual may alter or substitute the specimen to be provided. In the following circumstances the collector must observe the second collection immediately after the first collection. The employee has presented a urine sample that falls outside the normal temperature range (90.0 to 100.0 F). The collector observes conduct clearly and unequivocally indicating an attempt to substitute or adulterate the sample (e.g., substitute urine in plain view, blue dye in specimen presented, etc.) In the following circumstances (previous collection events) the employer may authorize an observed collection. Previous sample is invalid and there is no medical reason. Sample may be observed if employer/MRO requests as a result of: The employee has previously been determined to have used a controlled substance without medical authorization and the particular test is being conducted under the FTA regulations as a return to duty or follow-up test. The direct observation must be by a collector (or observer) of the same gender as the employee being tested. ALCOHOL TESTING PROCEDURES Alcohol testing shall be done at a location that provides: Privacy to the individual being tested Security with no unauthorized access at any time to EBT BAT conducting only one test at a time who must not leave the testing site while the preparations for testing or the test itself are in progress. Upon arrival at the testing site the employee must provide positive identification in the form or a photo identification or identification by a company representative. The BAT will explain the testing procedures to the employee. The BAT and the employee will complete, date and sign Step #1 and Step #2 of the alcohol testing form indicating the employee is present and providing a breath 12-03-02 Page 23 of 25 specimen. Refusal by the employee to sign Step #2 of the alcohol testing form will be noted by the BAT in the remarks section and is considered a refusal to test. Screening Test Employee is informed that testing will begin with a screening test. The BAT will open an individually sealed, disposable mouthpiece in veiw of the employee and attach it to the EBT. The employee will be instructed to blow forcefully into the mouthpiece for at least six seconds or until an adequate amount of breath has been obtained. The BAT will show the employee the result displayed on the EBT or the printed result. If the result of the screening test is an alcohol concentration of less than 0.02, no further testing is required. The BAT and the employee will finish filling out the alcohol testing form. The employee may return to their safety sensitive position and the test will be reported to the employer as a negative. Note: Alcohol screens may be performed by certified Screening Test Technicians STT) using alternative alcohol screening devices approved by the Department of Transportation. The alternative methods may test either breath or saliva. If the screening tests results are 0.02 or greater a confirmation test by a BAT, using an evidential breath testing device, must be performed. Confirmation Test If the result of the screening test is an alcohol concentration of 0.02 or greater, a confirmation test must be performed. The confirmation test must be conducted at least 15 minutes, but not more than 30 minutes, after the completion of the initial test. This delay prevents any accumulation of alcohol in the mouth from leading to an artificially high reading. The BAT will inform the employee of the need to conduct a confirmation test. The employee will be instructed not to.eat, drink, or put any object or substance in his/her mouth. The BAT will also instruct the employee not to belch to the extent possible while awaiting the confirmation test. The BAT will inform the employee that the test will be conducted at the end of the waiting period, even if the employee has disregarded the instructions. Before the confirmation test is administered, the BAT shall conduct an airblank on the EBT. If the reading is greater than 0.00, the BAT shall conduct one more airblank. If the second airblank reading is greater than 0.00, the EBT must not be used to conduct the test. The confirmation test is conducted using the same procedures as the screening test. A new mouthpiece will be used. 12-03-02 Page 24 of 25 If the initial and confirmatory test results are not identical, the confirmation test result is deemed to be the final result. If the result displayed on the EBT is not the same as that on the printed form, the test will be cancelled, and the EBT removed from service. The BAT will sign and date the form. The employee will sign and date the certification statement, which includes a notice that the employee cannot perform safety-sensitive duties or operate a motor vehicle if the results are 0.02 or greater. Refusal by the employee to sign the certification statement is not considered a refusal to test", but it will be noted in the remarks section by the BAT. The BAT will attach the alcohol test result printout directly onto the alcohol collection form with tamperproof tape (unless the EBT prints the results directly on the form). Reporting The BAT will transmit all results to the Designated Employer Representative in a confidential manner. In the event an individual must be removed from safety- sensitive duties as a result of the alcohol test, the BAT will notify the Designated Employer Representative immediately. 12-03-02 Page 25 of 25 MEMO To: Town Council From: Russ Forrest,David Peckler, Susan Hamley, Lesley Compagnone,Jason Haber, Chris Conrad Date: October 5,2009 Re: Final Red Line Review of the Comprehensive Plan 1.PURPOSE Today Council needs to do a final red line review of the Comprehensive Plan, focusing only on the changes in red. These were the agreed upon edits made throughout the Spring and Winter review sessions. Staff is suggesting scheduling a special meeting with Council on October 26`h to receive the final red line review input. Time may be very limited on October 5`h for this purpose. 2. FORMAT FOR FINAL The primary medium for the final version of the Comprehensive Plan Update will be digital. The goal is to have a user-friendly and interactive document that can be burned on to a disk and/or downloaded from the Web. Traditional hard copies will be available, but there will be fewer of them as we will rely on several new technologies to deliver this information. The economic and environmental savings of using this medium are unmatched. 1 Chapter 1 Introduction: The Comprehensive Planning Process 2 3 4 December,2008) 5 6 The Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan articulates a common vision for the 7 future of the Town. The Plan balances community values and vision with policies for 8 land use, economics, environment, housing, transportation and the arts. Both short-term 9 and long-term actions are required to implement the Plan. The residents of, and visitors 10 to, the Town of Snowmass Village are integral to the planning of the future_ of the_.....— Deleted:in 11 community. Our collective and individual responsibility is to work together to identify 12 common issues and needs and to pool resources in order to improve the community. 13 14 The Process 15 Just as with past planning documents, the ideas, concepts and input gained from planning 16 experts, technical professionals, the general public and others, contributed to this update 17 of the Comprehensive Plan. Public officials and citizens were interviewed and a series of 18 public meetings were held to gather the best information and most current ideas about the 19 Town's present condition and future opportunities. 20 21 The process began with stakeholder interviews with the following groups: 22 TOSV Planning Commission 23 Citizens for Snowmass Village&Citizens for Responsible Growth 24 community focus groups 25 Related Westpac and Chaffin Light 26 lodges and merchants 27 marketing/sales 26 The Aspen Skiing Company 29 Infrastructure and utility providers 30 Part-Time Residents Advisory Board 31 32 Topics discussed included: 33 Housing 3.1 Employment 35 Transportation 36 Services and infrastructure 37 Carrying capacity 38 Economics 39 Vitality 40 Community,character and culture 41 Growth and development 42 The Base Village,West Village and Village Center nodes 43 The environment 4k. Process 45 Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 1:Process December,2008 Page 1 1 Town staff initiated the process with a presentation of the State of the Comprehensive 2 Plan to the Planning Commission. The report identified specific areas of concern to 3 address in the update. 4 5 Public meetings then followed: 6 Public Meeting#1 —Vision 7 Public Meeting#2—Values 3 Public Meeting#3—Validate Vision and Values 9 Workshops—Specific to the redevelopment of the West Village 10 11 Common categories formed after these public meetings,they were assigned a chapter: 12 The Built Environment 13 The Natural Environment 1.1 Regional and Community Economics 15 Transportation 16 Housing 17 Arts and Culture 113 Facilities and Amenities it) 20 Policies 21 The Town of Snowmass Village shall: 22 23 Use the Comprehensive Plan as a regulatory document to guide Town elected 24 and appointed officials, staff, businesses, developers, property owners, and 25 other entities in implementing our goals and objectives. 26 27 Ensure that the Comprehensive Plan remains current and reflective of our 28 community values. 29 30 Ensure that implementation and updating of the Plan continues to be a 31 community-wide effort. 3'c 33 Provide opportunities for continued citizen involvement in implementation 34 decisions and in the land use planning process. The Plan will continue to 35 designate appropriate future land uses, activities and services, the protection 36 of the environment and the enhancement of the economy based on the 37 community's preferences. 38 39 Communicate and work with counties and municipalities in the region to 40 implement shared regional goals. 41 42 Authority 43 All municipal governments in the State of Colorado derive authority to enact land use 44 control measures from the general municipal authority granted in the Colorado 45 Constitution and by State Legislation. The specific authority for a statutory municipality Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 1: Process December,2008 Page 2 I to plan and zone is contained in Title 31, Article 23, Colorado Revised Statutes(C.R.S.). 2 These statutes clearly specify the provisions pertaining to planning and zoning activities 3 for municipal governments and also extend to home rule municipalities. In addition, the 4 jurisdiction of the Comprehensive Plan, pursuant to §31-23-212, C.R.S., includes land 5 within three miles of the boundaries of the Town located in unincorporated areas of 5 Pitkin County. 7 3 As a Home Rule Municipality, the Town may enact legislation that conflicts with state 9 legislation provided that the Town's legislation is of a purely local concern. The 19 authority of the Snowmass Village Town Council to adopt a Master Plan arises 11 specifically from Section 1.7 of the Town of Snowmass Village Municipal Charter,which 12 states,"The council shall adopt and maintain a comprehensive master plan of the Town." 13 In addition, the Planning Commission is charged with conducting a review of the Plan 14 according to Code. Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 1: Process December, 2008 Page 3 I Chapter 2 Community Character and Vision 2 3 December, 2008) 4 5 6 Introduction 7 Tucked high in the Brush Creek Valley, Snowmass Village is an extraordinary place to 9 live, work and visit. While creating this resort, the founders of the Town of Snowmass 9 Village also created a strong community.The community's Comprehensive Plan, and the 10 land use code adopted to implement that plan, helps define parameters for decision 11 making and articulates a future vision. The characteristics described below are essential 12 to create and maintain the character of the community and provide for the quality of life 1.3 enjoyed by residents and guests alike. The principles embodied in these characteristics 1.4 were derived from direct public input, and are the foundation of this Comprehensive 15 Plan. 19 17 Aspiration Statement 18 "We aspire to be the leading multi-season, family-oriented inclusive mountain resort 19 community. We will do this by creating, marketing, and delivering distinctive choices for 20 fun, excitement, challenge, learning, and togetherness. All this is done amidst our 21 unique, natural splendor...as part of a memorable Aspen/Snowmass experience. 22 Further, we wish to be seen by others as welcoming, dynamic, convenient, and 23 successful. We will always be responsible stewards of our environment, economy, and 24 society. When successful, Snowmass Village will have achieved the quality of life and 25 economic vitality that will assure our future as a sustainable resort community." 26 27 Vision: Snowmass Village in 2025 213 If we are successful in reaching our Aspiration, in the year 2025 the Town of Snowmass 20 Village will be characterized as follows: 30 31 The Town of Snowmass Village possesses a high quality of life with an intimate village 32 atmosphere- The Snowmass Village resort community is one of the premier, multi- 33 seasonal family- oriented resorts in the world- First class programs and public facilities 34 have been developed to broaden the seasons, provide a high level of customer service. 35 strengthen all business activity (especially locally-owned) provide community and visitor 36 amenities, and increase and diversify employment opportunities. It has done this while 37 maintaining a full-time residential community without exceeding its carrying capacity. 38 34 The completion of Base Village has successfully linked activity areas with pedestrian 40 trails and transit, and enhanced pedestrian connections to the Mall and the Snowmass 41 Center. The Center has expanded its role in meeting the convenience needs of the 42 community and guests. Development over the past 20 years has complemented and 43 even improved the resort and community, helped existing business, provided beneficial 44 recreational and cultural facilities, and added needed infrastructure. With the addition of 45 new, diverse commercial uses, more of the residential and visitor retail sales have been 46 captured in Snowmass Village. 47' 46 Improved transit services and parking facilities has reduced dependence on vehlCl2Sand.__..-- Deleted: the car 49 maintained adequate Levels of Service(LOS)on our roads. Our road system is safe and 50 efficient while remaining mostly rural in character. On entering and leaving Snowmass 51 Village, the understated, open feeling of the Brush Creek Valley continues to be Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 2:Community,Character and Vision December,2008 Page 1 1 preserved and enhanced. At the entrance to Snowmass Village, parking facilities, new 2 housing, the recreation center and the rodeo grounds have been sensitively integrated 3 into the natural environment. 4 5 The Town aspires to provide housing to all full-time and seasonal employees and. Fon+wtted:maent Leer: o",Frst 6 employees that service the Town of Snowmass Village, to the extent possible — as line: o" 7 defined in the Land Use and Development Code (LUDC)—who desire to Iive6 here with ------- Deleted: in 8 requirements that can be reasonably met. The proximity of housing to jobs allows 9 employees to conveniently walk or use transit to commute to work. By providing a pro- - ceteted:n 10 active housing-prograrnthere is_adequate-.housing. supports--a--high--leYel_of ,._. Deleted:aggressive 11 customer service throughout the community,thereby reducing the burden on the Town Deleted:o 12 and area's transportation systems. 13 .................... ...................... I.................................. ...... ------------------------------------------ Deleted: without exceeding the 14 Snowmass Village erces sports and athletics which provide substance for the soul Defetd:Town and region's 15 of a community. Snowmass Village offers multiple sporting activities for all ages and transport tion carrying capacity.¶ 16 abilities and takes pride in its array of offerings. The Village provides facilities that 17 encourage athletic programs of all types and consistently host.several-world--class-..... Deleted:a 18 athletic events on a yearl,4ba sis-------------------------------------------------------------------------_-----------.__ alp;y 19 20 Snowmass Village is attractive to those seeking to enhance the mind, body and spirit, a 21 concept the Town recognizes as vital to nurturing the entire person, JDf special__ _--- Deleted:Ir eduution. 22 significance to this concept is the Town's casual and performing_arts community and Deleted: 23 programs, which continue to draw guests from around the world. Our expanded year-Deleted:T 24 round development of arts programs promotes cultural consciousness, stimulates 25 economic viability,and fosters a sense of community pride. Easy access to a diversity of Deleted:he v 26 cultural offerings and institutions exemplify our arts programming. Our public art 27 program is an ongoing meansfor expression of.the.. ....Village's character. Deleted:vehicle 28 29 30 Challenges 31 The community is approaching buildout. This places a high priority on ensuring the 32 remaining development and redevelopment complement the existing conditions to 33 solidify the Town's sustainability and competitiveness far into the future. Carrying 34 capacity is limited by the transportation infrastructure which is also approaching 35 capacity. This challenge is magnified by the fact that a significant portion of our 36 workforce commutes from down valley. With increasing costs of commuting and 37 competition from down valley employers, we must provide workforce housing in, or 38 closer to, Town. Another challenge is the fact that the Town captures only 38 percent 39 (RRC Associates. 2008) of potential expenditures of guests, many of whom stay in 40 Aspen or down valley at night. Maximizing the Town's economic capture rate (making 41 the economic engine more efficient) will help the community financially thrive within its 42 carrying capacity for growth. 43 44 45 Character and Goals 46 In response to these challenges,our key goals are to: 47 48 Live within the constraints of natural and man-made systems Deleted: (environment and traffic) 49 Maintain or create a multi-faceted workforce that is essential to sustain the resort 50 and community economy h1 Capture a greater share of guest and resident's expenditures, Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 2: Community,Character and Vision December, 2008 Page 2 1 Attract more guests/visitors, especially by broadening summer and strengthening 2 winter seasons 3 4 If we are successful in reaching our Aspiration and goals, by the year 2025 the Town 5 of Snowmass Village will be characterized as follows: 6 7 A premier winter sports mountain with a wide variety of terrain that attracts all 8 levels of sports enthusiasts 9 A resort that benefits from its proximity to Aspen, but has its own individual 10 identity 11 A strong connection to the natural environment 12 I • tlmulatin atmospher@---------------------------------------------------------------------------------Deleted:Clean air,clear skies and a 13 Significant opportunities for a variety of recreational and cultural activities healthy, 14 A clustered, low density development pattern that allows for the physical and Deleted:Invigorating 15 visual openness and connection to the mountains to dominate valley views 16 A town core that has an intimate, village feel 17 A traffic system that allows convenient circulation and mobility 18 Physical separation from other communities that allows Snowmass Village to be 19 isolated in a dramatic valley setting 20 Friendly interactions with fellow community members and guests 21 The presence of a vital, permanent community of residents that take an active 22 role in, not only governance, but value a participation in "community life" as a 23 whole. 24 A casual lifestyle 25 Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 2:Community, Character and Vision December,2008 Page 3 Appendix—Chapter 2, Community Character and Vision Challenees To Achieving Our Vision While we hold our values true,we recognize that,at the same time,Snowmass Village is facing a number of challenges: The community is approaching buildout. There are relatively few areas for additional growth.This places a high priority on making sure the remaining development,and any redevelopment,complement the existing conditions,and provide essential services, accommodations and amenities that will help assure Snowmass Village's sustainability and competitiveness far into the future. The traffic system is reaching carrying capacity. Brush Creek Road, the principle vehicular access in and out of the valley,exceeds desirable traffic levels at peak periods. In order to avoid congestion in the future,careful attention must be paid to spreading out traffic usage,and broadening the use of alternative transportation modes in order to decreasing the use of single occupant vehicles. A significant portion of our workforce commutes into Snowmass Village from downvalley. Though we make an effort to accommodate as many employees in town as we can, it is important to our viability that those that we cannot house can reach Snowmass Village efficiently and safely. With increasing costs of commuting,and competition from down valley employers, if we are to continue to provide a high quality of guest services we must find ways to provide workforce housing in,or closer to,the community. A large portion of the skiers on Snowmass Mountain pass throughrSnowmass Village _ Deleted:uK going back to Aspen or down valley lodging locations. We"capture"only about 45%of the potential expenditures represented by this pass through traffic—which is a missed opportunity for local businesses. The location of the Town Core on a relatively steep hillside makes pedestrian connectivity a physical challenge. The strong,two season nature of our economy provides a low utilization rate for the off- seasons. This prevents us from spreading the costs of amenities, facilities and our workforce over a longer period of time and higher utilization rate—which discourages some investment and reinvestment. Our overriding vision is to maintain,and increase the sustainability of Snowmass Village as a leading mountain resort and livable community for its property owners and business people. Values to Vision Statements for each chanter During the update of the 2008 Comprehensive Plan the Town developed, based on the public input during the process, the following vision statements: Economy The Town of Snowmass Village will be the leading multi-season, family oriented mountain resort with distinctive locally owned commercial businesses that provides conference facilities and a unique and diverse shopping and dining experience across a range of price points for guests and residents. Recreation&Amenities The Town of Snowmass Village shall enhance the community's enthusiasm toward sports and athletics and increase the recreational health and vitality by providing year-round attractions and amenities that foster opportunities to be active for all ages. Community Arts The Town of Snowmass Village shall expand its role as a provider of culture and arts for the Roaring Fork Valley as well as provider of expansive educational opportunities. Visual and performing arts amenities and venues shall compliment Aspen's and create a strong identity and economic base for the community. Community The Town of Snowmass Village shall strike a healthy balance between community and resort. Creating and preserving areas where community members can meet formally as well as spontaneously to gather and socialize will be critical to the Town's success. The Town of Snowmass Village shall be dedicated to the safety of all its residents, employees and guests. Environmental Resources The Town of Snowmass Village shall create an ecologically sustainable community through energy independence,protecting open space and other natural resources such as water, and preserve critical view corridors. Built Environment The Town of Snowmass Village will have three interconnected commercial nodes(two resort oriented commercial nodes and one community oriented commercial node)that jointly have a small"mountain town"feel characterized by: Public gathering places that allow personal interaction&"people-watching," Sunlight to public areas, Easy pedestrian or mechanical connections between nodes,and Building placement that preserves long views from key public areas. Transportation The Town of Snowmass Village shall be served by convenient, effective, and attractive transit service between local commercial and residential nodes and work with the Regional Transportation Authority (RFTA) to improve transit services throughout the greater Roaring Fork Valley. A major objective for the community will be to minimize increases in single-occupant vehicle (SOV) use and to increase the use of transit, pedestrian, and other non-SOV modes for travel to/from and within the town core. Sustainable land use, urban design, and workforce housing strategies that create vibrant, mixed-use nodes and encourage walking and transit use are also an important component. Housing A significant amount of affordable housing in Snowmass Village is essential to providing a high level of service for residents, employees and guests,creating a sense of community and giving the Town and businesses an advantage in attracting and retaining qualified employees. I Chapter 3 Community Arts 2 3 February,2009) 4 Strategic Objectives 5 6 The Town of Snowmass Village values the richness and diversity of its cultural 7 resources. The community seeks to be a place where individuals and families can enjoy 8 the visual and performing arts and learn more about the integral role they play in our 9 society. Snowmass village shall have a unique cultural identity based on the belief that 10 the arts contribute to the resort's evolutionary nature and its strong economic base. Deleted:transformative 11 12 Background 13 There are several main-categories--that comprise-community arts in the Town of -... Deleted;three 14 Snowmass Village:V sual Arts, Performing Arty Entertainment. Events and Festivals. petered; and other Events 15 16 Visual Arts Deleted:Entertainment 17 The visual arts are a key ingredient of Snowmass Villa e§ cultural life. The beauty 18 and sweep of the natural environment provide a compelling backdrop for the 19 exploration of these tangible elements of our artistic community, which is served by 20 several key resources. 21 22 Anderson Ranch Arts Center.0_1@ Ranch js a learning community dedicated to ....... Deleted:In 1966,the historic 23 creativity and growth through the making and understanding of the visual arts, }t property known as Anderson Ranch was earmarked for use as an arts24Itsvisionistobeaworldleaderinthegrowthanddevelopmentofthevisuallcenter.In 1972,the Snowmass 25 arts, in the international dialogue that inspires common humanity through art Corporation,which owned the site, 26 making,and in the creation of a campus imbued with a spirit of community, turned ever its operation to a hoard or community leaders charged with27challenge,support,exploration, innovation and discovery. developing a nationally prominent 28 summer art school.The Snowmass 29 Public ^rt pro ram:The Snowmass Villa a Arts Adviso Board SAAB 01h oration conveyed ownership toC._L..9. . _ s.. _----_.__-______-_ _ is _-_ry_-._rd.(._.....)....._.----- 'i't on-profit Anderson Ranch Arts 30 and es the solicitation and lacement of ublic art,funded b ro rlations. \ "' r in the early 19803.Now, 31 from the Town's budget Thepublic art program remain_s a key element of 1;,, ted.I 32 Board's work and of the community's cultural life. 33 ted:34 Art Walk. Snowmass Village's Art Walk falls under the auspices of the SAAB 35 and is a specific subset of the Town's public art program.An Art Walk Master :`,,1,,''. ted'a 36 Plan was adopted in 2002.The Walk's purpose is to showcase local and ed;p 37 national artists and their work;to establish places of beauty, stimulation and ed:when I 38 reflection throughout the Village;and to provide connectivity between existing ed:was fi s eslatGShed in 39 and proposed physical amenities. its inmal charge was to 40 41 ed:a small 42 ed:Although ha SAAB'§' on has grown,t 43 Performing Arts Deleted:a so 44 Snowmass Yllaoe njoys a rich eenu of cultural events roduced by several local Deleted:also45artsorganizations. The Town supports such effos, both hilosophically, and in 46 MtlanKcases throughthe_9enerous deployment-of-its resources. Through.the SAAB,Dele°°d:menu 47 the Town continues to seek opportunities to host such events to aid in the realization Deleted:specific 48 of its vision as a vibrant community and successful resort. 49 Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 3:Community Arts and Culture February,2009 Page 1 1 Jazz Aspen Snowmass(JAS).This internationally renowned producer holds its 2 annual Labor Day Festival in Snowmass Village.The Village also plays host to 3 the Thelonius Monk Institute of Jazz,which is run by JAS. 4 5 Fanny Hill Concert Series. Programmed with the help of JAS and run by the 6 Town's Tourism Office, this weekly series of concerts has become a mainstay of Deleted:Marketing and Special 7 the Roaring Fork Valley's summer schedule of events.Events Department 8 9 Community Cultural Series. New to the Town's offerings is the Community 10 Cultural Series, sponsored by the SAAB and the Snowmass Chapel.The Series 11 incorporates both music and theater and includes performances throughout the 12 year,----------------------------Deleted:winter months 13 14 Aspen Film. Aspen Film produces the annual Aspen Filmfest and Shortsfest in 15 Aspen.The organization has also offered several Snowmass Village-based 16 programs and has expressed an interest in exploring additional, similar activities 17 in the future. These would encompass both educational programs(i.e.,animation ....... Deleted:These 18 workshops produced in cooperation with Anderson Ranch), and a short series of 19 films screenedjn Snowmass Village. Deleted:in the cabaret Room o 20 r The Silvertree Hotel 21 Theatre Aspen.Theatre Aspen is an organization that offers professional,equity- 22 based theatrical performances in Aspen's Rio Grande Park during the summer 23 season. In 2008,one of its family-friendly productions traveled to Snowmass 24 Village with the help of underwriters and was shown on the Fanny Hill stage.This 25 non-profit has also expressed interest in additional activity in Snowmass Village if 26 the appropriate facilities could be found. 27 28 ntertainment Events and Festivals Deleted:other addition o ------... n-y'.. hI- 66----- --- --°- ------------------- ----------29 In addition to the Fanny Hill Concert Series, the Town's Tourism Office produces a --- Deleood;Marketing and spacial 30 comprehensive series of programs throughout the calendar year. Such events are Eventsoepanment 31 intended to attract visitors to Snowmass Village and to augment activities for local 32 residents as well. 33 34 Existing Conditions 35 36 Snowmass Arts Advisory Board (SAAB): The SAAB was established in 1993 by a--------- co Not Highlight 37 town ordinance. Its mission is to demonstrate how the arts can contribute to the unique 38 cultural identity of Snowmass Village. It is the Board's belief that the arts are intrinsic to 39 the values, culture and heritage of the community. It is the Board's hope that enhanced 40 arts programming will promote a cultural consciousness, stimulate economic viability and 41 foster a sense of community pride Deleted: Combine wr Public An 42 Program above. 43 44 45 The Snowmass Village Arts Advisory Board's objectives are to: 46 47 Provide direction and leadership for arts initiatives, particularly as they impact the 48 Town's funding 49 Act as an arts advocate in promoting awareness and education 50 Provide information and expertise on arts-related issues Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 3:Community Arts and Culture February,2009 Page 2 1 Function as the primary arts liaison between the Town Council and the 2 community 3 Make recommendations to Council on arts-related issues, propositions and 4 funding proposals 5 Review and evaluate progress of the arts strategic plan 6 Oversee the Town's public art program 7 Work in cooperation with the Town's Tourism Office and other arts organizations..Deleted:Marketing and Specla D8thatpresentculturaleventsinSnowmassVillagetomeetthegoalsoftheEvents apartment 9 strategic plan 10 Seek and evaluate methods of providing stable funding for the arts 11 Assist in developing a user-friendly cultural information source for local citizens 12 and visitors 13 Support and assess proposals for a year-round facility with appropriate 14 performance, exhibit and teaching space 15 16 Policies 17 The Town of Snowmass Village shall: 18 19 Improve and maintain a successful resort in balance with the cultural and artistic 20 needs of the community. 21 22 Plan for and support development of the visual and performing arts within the 23 community. 24 25 Seek to provide the necessary facilities to support the community arts. 26 27 Seek to provide sustainable, dedicated funding for arts programs and associated 28 facilities. 29 30 Examine each development proposal for inclusion of proposed cultural elements 31 during development review of all new projects, and propose commitments to 32 support these elements. 33 Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 3:Community Arts and Culture February,2009 Page 3 Appendix - Chapter 3, Community Arts Synopsis of Public Input A sense of community is highly valued in Snowmass Village. Participants expressed a desire for liveliness and energy. Snowmass Village was envisioned as a place where residents, guests and employees could work, retreat and exist; a healthy place with diversity of age. Services, facilities, and amenities build the framework for a healthy, energetic community. Participants supported local-oriented services such as medical and dental offices and more gathering places where our residents can encounter the same people consistently and serendipitously. The expansion of cultural offerings was also strongly expressed. Vitality and age diversity can be created by meeting other goals of this plan. One prime method is allowing the workforce to live in the community. This brings a broader, younger group into the village to support retail and restaurants year-round. Below are community values and key issues conveyed during the public process for this update: Vitality: Lively place to live, work, retreat and exist, Promote health, In town /on site employee housing, Gathering places (errands, events, recreation) provided with development or by the Town, Create a "Snowmass fun" identity. Culture: Multi-purpose facility (for movies, concerts, conferences, theater, other cultural events), Increased cultural opportunities—music, arts, film, Increased and expanded educational opportunities, Establish Snowmass Village as the "Arts Education Center of the Valley." Cohesiveness: Small population, Safe, Social involvement/know neighbor, Family friendly, Community events. Performing Arts Venues— Facility Inventory Facility Location Seating Capacity Condition Comments Aspen HS Black Box Theatre Aspen 100 Excellent Anderson Ranch Meeting Hall Snowmass 100 Good Theatre Aspen Tent Aspen 150 Fair Improvements possible Snowmass Chapel Snowmass 200 Good New sanctuary=300 The Cabaret Room Snowmass 250 Good Status questionable Paepcke Auditorium Aspen 350 Good Renovations planned Belly Up Nightclub Aspen 450 Excellent Harris Concert Hall Aspen 500 Excellent State of the art Wheeler Opera House Aspen 500 Excellent Addition in discussion The District Theatre Aspen 550 Good Conference Center Ballroom Snowmass 1,100 Fair Status questionable Benedict Music Tent Aspen 2,085 Excellent Town Center Park Snowmass 8,000 Good 1 Chapter 4 Regional and Community Economics 2 3 December,2008) 4 Strategic Objectives 5 The fundamental economic structure of the resort community of Snowmass Village is a 6 Ln-nodal resort commercial core which achieves "critical mass." A,"local needs serving"Deleted:bi 7 node is required at the Snowmass Center. "Critical mass" is defined as that commercial Dew,third 8 space which, when effectively tenanted and programmed, is sufficient to create the 9 vibrancy necessary to meet and exceed the expectations of our guests and residents..........-- Deleted: Sufficient revenues would 10 be generated by guests of the 11 Background appropriately sized lodging properties,day visitors,non-resident 12 (Note – An extensive 11-page document addresses the background conditions in employees and fulV part-time 13 greater depth, with accompanying charts, graphs, statistics and research findings. If can residents. Many two sentences 14 be found in Appendix IV. The following is a synopsis of the Background information.) 15 16 While many of the issues from the 1998 Comprehensive Plan are still relevant, as the 17 community evolves, so have the concerns. From a market perspective, the critical land 18 use issues for this update surround the changing role and function of Snowmass 19 Village's three commercial nodes—where both retail and nonretail amenities will play a 20 significant role. How these three mixed-use development nodes can be oriented and 21 integrated in a way that is both economically sustainable and reflective of the Town and 22 stakeholders' desired vision is one of the primary goals of the Comprehensive Plan 23 update. 24 Deleted: the following 25 The strengths of the Town of Snowmass Village economy include Deleted:Surrounded by26tiII^paralleled scene and- -ccess-to world.classlerrain and activitiesn Deleted:u27econdlargestskiresortjnAndoneofthelargestinthecountryIntermscf 28 acreage Deleted:offers 29 Largest share of skier days in the Roaring Fork Valley Deleted:hiking,mountein biking,fly 30 Consistent'rankinc in the-top 5 in skiing p !i.catlOflS fishing and other outdoor adventures 31 a Benefits from ,prestige, image and national recogniti on, particularly as aV. ';`, Deleted:Among the 32 family-oriented resort r , Deleted.s 33 VOriety of accommodations and activltles which appeal-to a w_id_e range_ of_ Deli 34 visitors 35 Strong potential markets for restaurant, retail and commercial/lodge spending `: ` Deleted:Colorado 36 IN Proximity to internationally known Aspen (9 miles) Deleted;The I 37 Closest airport to a destination resort in the country(6 miles) Deleted:y 38 High level of real estate activity and value,Deleted:ad 39 High sales tax per capita 40 Well.-.known for its relaxed and intimate atmosphere Deleted:its 41 Over 7061.repeat customers Deleted:or+e s a v 42 The.potential-and relative weaknesses of the Town of Snowmass Village economy- Deleted:on a per capita basis 43 include'....................................................Deleted: 44 Formatted:Bullets and Numbering 45 A lack of an up-to-date critically massed resort commercial core Deleted:Address sentence structure 46 A sufficient amount of competitive lodging as necessary to support the in above tst.11 47 economic sustainability of our commercial core Deleted, the following48Asomewhatunderperformanceinoccupancyrates, accompanied by a more De lTnemaloriyorwhichnave49significantunderperfonnanceinretailcapturebeenaddressedintheplanningof Base Village): Chapter 4: Economics Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Page 1 December,2008 1 Heavy dependence on the four-month winter season 2 Opportunities to improve less than optimum facilities and amenities for the 3 skier,visitor and resident 4 M A lack of a sustainable funding mechanism for mechanical connections-_...,,._- Deleted:racking 5 between commercial nodes Formatted:Bullets and Numbenng 6 7 The Town has the potential to row into a stronger ulti-season resort and to rovida a --.- Deleted:year-mendP99TLtP.. 8 broader range of public facilities and services. Snowmass Village could substantially -- Deleted:also 9 increase summer and fall visitors b providing more attractive _menities; Deleted:infrastructure andYP9 10 11 Existing Conditions and Guiding Principles 12 The visitor oriented nodes (West and Base Villages) are agreed to provide the 13 necessary "critical mass" when each contains 65-75,000 sq. ft. of primary Food, 14 Beverage, Retail and Entertainment offerings(FBRE). The roles and offerings of each of 15 the commercial nodes were addressed in the Town's 2008 Marketing Strategic Plan,.... Deleted:2008 16 (MSP)as influenced by the analysis of RRC 2008 and Thomas Associates International 17 2002/2007 (TCI). These nodes complement, rather than replicate each other, for a total 18 of 130-150,000 sq. ft. The Base Village modeling work (Economic Planning Systems 19 [EPS] 2003) assumed this sizing with another 50,000 sq. ft. at the Center. Diversity of 20 FBRE offerings and price points, as well as the significant presence of "locally 21 owned/operated"businesses, creates a resort"personality"favored by locals and visitors 22 alike. As such, it is a point of competitive differentiation which should be assured by the 23 Town in support of economic vitality. 24 25 As expressed in the Town's community forums (2007-8), most still see this sizing as a 26 maximum, recalling the"just big enough" mantra of the eadier Base Village discussions. 27 The Marketing Strate is Plan found this "minimizing" approach preferred for both the 28 commercial nodes and appropriately diverse lodging. This was seen as more likely to 29 provide the desired quality of life for the community while creating a differentiated, more 30 welcoming,and convenient guest experience_= keep Deleted: 31 32 Connectivity, providing a level of highly convenient mobility between the nodes, has 33 been,and continues to be seen,as critical within a bi/multi-nodal system. TCI,as well as 34 the Marketing Strategic Plan, introduced and re-enforced this necessity. 35 36 Diversity of offerings and price point across the Lodging and FBRE product should be 37 required. While "legitimate" high-end lodging product, larger units (3+ bedrooms) and 38 fractional ownership should play a role, each should be limited. Such limitation would 39 avoid the negative impacts of over-supply, diminishing rental pool participation below our 40 80 percent goal and/or undermining our strategic intent to be an inclusive resort 41 community. 42 43 Seasonality is consistently an opportunity as well as a problem for mountain resort 44 communities. The Marketing Strategic Plan, as well as RRC 2008 and TCI, conclude 45 that we should continue to strengthen winter, significantly grow summer and push the 46 edges of the shoulder seasons. However, the "off-season" is seen by many locals to be 47 a necessary period of renewal,especially in the spring. 48 49 Group and conference business has been, and is expected to be, an essential element 50 within the resort. Over time, the group share of total overnight visitation might be Chapter 4: Economics Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Paget December,2008 1 somewhat lower than the historical estimate of 40-45 percent (MSP). However, ADR 2 might well be strengthened by such a transition as somewhat smaller groups and higher- 3 value incentive group targets are pursued. Appropriate conference facilities and 4 associated amenities will be increasingly important as will smaller, non-fractional lodging 5 1 required by such guests. The Marketing Strateqic Plan elaborates as to the quantity of 6 this "conference/group attendee" friendly lodging. It foresees not less 45-50 percent of 7 total "hot bed" units should be conference and group attendee as required, or 8 approximately 1000 of the"hot bed"units anticipated in EPS Economic Modeling 2003. 9 10 West Villa e.Re_Development--Plan should assure the continuity- of necessary-,,.. Deleted:Theg 11 conference facilities and associated lodging. The Marketing Strateqic Plan concludes 12 that a combined Conference/Performing Arts Center design may present opportunities 13 for programming synergy and operating efficiency. However, a design study needs to 14 precede any final decisions. Its location is seen as most likely in the West Village, 15 associated with the anticipated condominium hotel as provided by the Hotel 16 Development Agreement between Related WestPac (RWP) and the Town. As to 17 lodging, a significant portion of the "conference/group attendee"friendly units mentioned 18 above should be conveniently located to the conference facilities, preferably providing 19 interior access. 20 21 The growth in overnight visitation resulting from the Town's Comparative Demand 22 Analysis (CDA)2004 and the later RRC 2008 work were consistent with one another at 23 an annual rate of 3.7 percent. In accordance with comments above regarding future 24 seasonality, it is expected that the winter growth will be somewhat less than this and the 25 summer/shoulder will be somewhat higher. Skier days may be an indicator of winter..... Deleted:e n likely rack the 26 growth but may be higher given the robust forecast for local and regional population 27 growth as well as the inclusion of additional segments of the populace as "new' skiers. 28 The international market continues to be seen as a strong element in our winter 29 programming, especially given our proximity to Aspen. Market, competitive and regional 30 perspectives were provided by Winston & Associates, supported by TO and others, 31 during 2008. This work is included in the 2008 Comprehensive Plan Archive for use and 32 reference.The perspective of municipal impact is included within the archived Winston & 33 Associates work. 34 35 Economic Performance Indicators were agreed during the Base Village 36 analyses/approval process as primarily represented in the 2001 Town Baseline 37 Economic Indicators, EPS Economic Model, the EPS Fiscal Impact Analyses and the 38 CDA. Later RRC 2008 economic analysis employed essentially the same measures. The 39 Marketing Strategic Plan agreed that these indicators remained valid. The following table 40 presents the Economic Performance Indicators accompanied by their historicaUcurrent 41 values as well as the targets anticipated by the EPS Economic Model for the Town as a 42 whole. It also includes subsequent Planning Commission consensus views (2008 Minor 43 PUD Amend. Bldgs. 1313/12 Resolution): 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 Chapter 4: Economics Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Page 3 December,2008 1 ECONOMIC PERFORMANCE INDICATORS 2 Performance Historical Historical Goal/Tarnet Goal/Target Indicator Hotel/Core Fractional Hotel/Core Fractional Condo/3BR/4+BR Condo/ 3BR/4+BR Overall Overall Occupancy Frequency 48/39/445 55" tbd/tbd/46 7 57° Occ. Intensity Persons/Occ./BR 1.5 2.6 1.0_1.1 "1.5 Y•6 1.3/1.2 6 Rental Pool Participation % 99.6/75/83 ' 1 na tbd/756/80 Z' TBD Capture Rate % 382 na 55 55 Spend/Day/Overnight Visitor $ 1001 na 11023 110" ADR/Unit($) 161 - 228 0 300 TBD s sq. ft. Mall/Core Primary FIBRE 313' na 4002,1 na 3 4 Sources(refer to superscripts): 5 6 1.2001 Baseline Economic Indicators 7 2. EPS Economic Model and studies 2003 8 3. EPS Base Village Fiscal impact Analyses(FIA)2003, 2004 9 4. EPS Snowmass Center FIA, 2006 10 5. RRC 2007 data 11 6. Planning Commission Parameter Consensus Minor PUD Amend. Bldg. 12 2008 12 7. Derived from BV FIA as adjusted per CDA 13 8.TOSV Comparative Demand Analysis(CDA)2004 14 15 The forecasted capture rate change to 55 percent, from 38 percent, is the single largest 16 contributor to improved economic performance in the post-Base Village era. Increases in 17 occupancy frequency and ADR will also contribute, but to a lesser extent. The most 18 significant "downside" risk is the potential failure to sustain the 80 percent rental pool 19 participation levels. 20 21 22 Policies 23 The Town of Snowmass Village shall: 24 Decrease our dependence on ±g_winter.season by-broadening-visitor. Deleted:a four-plus 25 seasons, focusing on the expansion of the summer season and potentially 26 into the shoulder seasons. 27 28 Promote and influence the diversification of commercial offerings (types-of ....... Deleted:increase 29 retail as well as price points)to reach a broader segment of visitors. 30 31 Balance resort and community interests when considering future projects and 32 budget operations. Chapter 4: Economics Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Page 4 December,2008 2 Encourage appropriate critical mass to ensure economic sustainability, but 3 not build in excess of that critical mass. 4 5 deserve.and_increase facilities,._businesses,_employee_ housing,_amenities Deleted:In the commercial nodes,p 6 and events in the com_mercial nodes that will attract and retain guests and- 7 give everyone more reasons to stay in Snowmass Village. Ensure vitality by: 8 o Reguirin employee housing; Deleted:Strongly encouraging 9 o Concentrating high-occupancy lodging:and Deleted:a 10 o Enhancing employment opportunities for local employees. 1 12 Target an 80 percent rental pool participation ]or wholly-owned._._-.- Deleted:of 13 condominiums_. 14 15 Encourage an appropriate presence of locally-owned and operated 16 businesses (vs. nationally-recognized chains) which provide a unique and 17 differentiated offering. Deleted:do we need to define local? 18 YES- TOSV and/or RFV?Yes,need to define local—Snowmass owner,19 Maintain an appropriate presence of community-serving businesses oriented Valley owner,regional CO chain: 20 to providing for the daily or regular needs of residents. store size;revenue???what actions 21 are appropriate to defend this 22 Strengthen the Town's commercial base through differentiating the identity of statement? 23 three nodes, and then uniting them through cooperative strategies, and 24 convenient physical connections. 25 26 Support expanded conference facilities and services. 27 28 Encourage consistent operating hours.Deleted:Atltl Policy re: 29 Formiatted:Bullets and Numtw nq 30 31 In Summary 32 33 While many of the stakeholders (community, resort, developer, and rental guest and 34 property owner) may share significant commonality of objectives, there will inherently be 35 conflicting interests, differing opportunities and varying rewards potential amongst and 36 between them. In order to assure economic sustainability of the resort and thus, the 37 quality of life desired by the community, this chapter of the Comp. Plan is intended to 38 provide an economic framework for decision making which appreciates the various 39 views, recognizes the rights of private property and fully represents the interests of the 40 Snowmass Village Community. 41 Chapter 4: Economics Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Page 5 December.2008 Appendix-Chapter 4,Regional and Community Economics Background Competitive Position within Colorado Ski Country Colorado Ski Country draws over 12 million skier visits per year and is among the most desired Alpine tourist destinations in the world. Snowmass Village is but one of over a dozen other resort villages in the region. In order to remain competitive, Snowmass Village seeks to further differentiate itself and build on its unique identity. Seasonality The issue of seasonality is more pronounced in Snowmass Vil]age than at some Deteow:at competing resort destinations in Colorado Ski Country. Developing a commercial land use strategy that strengthens business activity year-round is an important stakeholder concern that is addressed in this update of the Comprehensive Plan. Integration and Connectivity The Town goal is to develop an appropriate balance between the number of skiers we serve at the Snowmass Ski Area and the available short-term accommodations. The development of high-occupancy units and employee housing in the Town Core will bring vitality to both the resort and the community. This goal must be balanced with competing goals to minimize traffic impacts and maintain the character and integrity of the community. The Base Village project will go a long way in helping to accomplish this goal. Base Village could also create direct competition for existing retailers at the Snowmass Mall. The development of Base Village can contribute to a better economy for existing business in a number of ways and can be managed as an opportunity to achieve this goal. In working with geography of the )3rush Creek Valley.itself and in order to kmpr°vT oetetm:saoAm previous land-use design flaws, the need for integration relates to both physical --- neteted:. .aonre connectivity as well as to the creation of three clusters that are distinct, yet serve complementary functions. The success of Snowmass Village from an economically sustainable commercial/retail perspective will depend in large part on the evolution of distinctive characters and primary functions for each of the commercial nodes: Base Village, Snowmass Center and the Snowmass Mall. Deterea:wr,i Yaasc Retail Leakage It is clear that a significant proportion of local shopping, food & beverage and entertainment spending potential is being captured by outside markets, notably Aspen and Glenwood Springs. The relatively small size of the resort and community, its seasonality and the draw of Aspen Jargely explain our inability to capture more retail sales revenue. The local .. oeteued:- economy in Snowmass Village is strong, but the Town is "leaking" sales tax potential. By acting to stop this leakage and to capture more secondary revenue from the ski and tourism industry, the Town could generate revenue to build needed community facilities, support affordable housing and provide services to the Snowmass Village community. Lively Public Realm A lively public realm is a vital component of an economically sustainable alpine resort village. Hosting and properly servicing a variety of tourist cohorts(including conference, group and social guests) is vital to maintaining a vibrant and healthy resort community and village. 2. Snowmass Village Economic Setting Table 4.1 Skiing and tourism, including the spin-offs a.eoa of short term lodging, retail goods and ad.w services, are the cornerstones of the Snowmass Village economy.tm a.Ski Industry Skiing is by far the most dominant economic activity in the Snowmass aM,r Village economy. Three-quarters of all sales tax revenue are collected during the ski season. The Snowmass Ski Area is a primary eY contributor to the growth in year- con y a Tax, round and part-time residents. nAOW At 3 13 skiable acres Snowmass is Deleted:003 the largest of the four mountains Awned and operated by the Aspen s DCICted:(a U Wl of3,100 acrta) Skiing Company and one of the largest in the country However----------------------------------------------------------------- -- Deleted,colorodo during the 2006-7 season, Snowmass ranked eighth in Colorado-for total_skier__ - Deleted:vii LT visits(770,000)(see Table 4.1 —note that the Park City resort is not in Colorado). Tthe Snowmass Ski Area is the second largest in the state, ranking first among_- - Deleted:Bcsidcs bons on ofd. larger ski areas in the state.Colorado ski areas with the lowest number of skiers per acre. The Snowmass Ski Area is the most important of four areas operated by the Aspen Skiing Company. Among the four Aspen Skiing Company ski areas, Snowmass Ski Area captures over 50%of the total skier days(as shown in Table 4.2). Table 4.2 Percentage of Aspen Area Skier Days by Ski Area Ski Area 1996-1997 2006-7 Snowmass 54.6% 53.2% Aspen 23.9% 22.7% Buttermilk 10.9% 10.6% Aspen Highlands 10.7% 13.0% burcc fdwvdn.11i fwmiv.U.G.Ayvn¢iinR foryanv i. Aspen/Snowmass Skier Demographics Table 4.3 P Aspen Sluing Company Demographics provided by Aspen Skiing Company— also see Table 4.3) QenderMale 60% Female 40% 56% percent of Aspen/ Snowmass skiers Age have household incomes of$100,000 or more. 25-44 s rsx 154J 35% 45-64 40% Households with children represent 28%of 65+ 10% Aspen/Snowmass skier population. This llaasehordlacome Under 18% compares to 49.3% in 1998. Singles represent S50.000.S99,999 1716 the largest component (36%), but singles tend 100,000-5149,99Y 34% Aspen Mountain more than Snowmass. S250.000-$500,000soo,000 14% to ski As P f500,000> 8% Aspen/Snowmass attracts older visitors,Family Status P c;n8r°,nn d,;rdren JsX with 40%between 45 and 64 years of age. Cauple,na ehirdrra le% Household with children 18% lauseuold.w/rh;ldren nn IonBer at home 19% Approximately 50% of Aspen/Snowmass V,, Cn.m,nrr, 2119 skiers arc over age 45. Nationally, 7.4% of 193itea one or mart time., 739 skiers arc 55 or older. For destination resorts, 11kited 20 or more rimer 16% 10.3%of the skiers arc over age 55. CompositionDeitinadan 61% Locals 10% More so than other resorts, the Aspen/Do),Skiers 10% Snowmass customer base is fairly even in Secondilomeamners 8% distribution among the four census regions of the country. Foreign visitors represent approximately 17% of the Aspen/Snowmass customer base with the top three origins being Australia, United Kingdom and Brazil. Overall, the top domestic origins for guests are the Tri-state New York area, followed by Chicago, Los Angeles,and Denver. 62% of the skier composition are destination visitors,20%are locals, 8%second homeowners and 10%day visitors. Snowmass Overroght Skiers:-Long_..... Deleted:L stays,Flyers,Repeat guests,Intermediates, Affluent,Older,From distant locations, 27% of visitors in 2007 were new customers, 73% have visited one or more Snowmass Latham times and 26%have visited 20 or more times. Strong family focus,Slightly more in 41- 60 ages,from the Heartland,Ski in Snowmass,Intermediates 84% of peak season Snowmass visitors arrive by plane. Source:Aspen skiing Company,RRC Associates Overnight visitors to Town are primarily middle-aged, affluent and well educated, and close to 40%of groups arrive with children. Table 4.4 Ski Magazine Reader Resort Ratings: Snowmass vs. 18 Competitors ID r>e rahreeBe b:v Dr.v NI w.v w.v NM1 F9p uM n n an Nm i m u ro 3 ae nWtlB Na .-.. .. 0 w. laomwa, ha M. o... ..............+feint 5x lbD ... ..twn13•D D - L....:_... ...................................................._.... far u Aey a k 61,ya `r ` 0a a 0 Iti S aw.plwlw hDwhrl ii. Ski Market Trends(Source: Aspen Skiing Company, RRC Associates) Nationwide there has been a decline in skier visits of 6.9%over last season,to 54.8 million visitg(this represents a decline of 1.5% compared to the 10-year .... Deleted:. average). The primary reasons were warm weather in the East and California. Within this national decline, Colorado narrowly set another record with 12.6 million visits,primarily due to a rebound in the southern resorts. Major destination resorts Table 4.5 showed slight declines with M National Skier Participation by Age,Gender Beaver Creek, Breckenridge and Whistler being the exceptions. I I In competing ski resorts across the country, over the last 15 years there have been ! " major investments in infrastructure, retail and I I I lodging. n The "baby boom" generation, which powered the ski industry in the 1980s, is skiing less. Table 4.6 . National Skier Participation by Age Group and Ethnicity under 214 29 to 2 21 44 Past- Baby Baby 41 to 6O to Boom Boom Bust 92 4 at er or or Baby Pre- Gen Y Gen X Boom AM @ee I I E s eex e.ax a • 1I u n a xs u a w u M m s• W a a n u u a•o•nu wM The number of people on the slopes with incomes of$50,000 or less is in sharp decline. The percent of skiers that are female declines dramatically after age 40 -- suggesting a need for more things for women to do while men are skiing. Baby boom" families are heavily involved in work and raising children. They have less leisure time and are more likely to travel to a destination resort than day ski. This trend is affecting Front Range skiers as well. Table 4.7 Summer Visitor Interests-Rocky Mountain Region vs.Snowmass Village Rocky Oountain-bound Past Snowmass Winter+Past Snowmass Summer(n=80) n-154)n-211) Age 35-44 5+(47 median)5+(48 median) Income over$100K 13% 3% (77%among overnight) %(62%among overnight) Education Some College Graduate School Graduate School Length of Stay 9 days 10 days(median 7 nights)5 days(median 5 nights) Means of Travel %drive(1,000 miles or 8%0y (85%fly) 7%drive(<300 miles)(57%fly) ess) Summer Less expensive,camping Upscale Hotel or condo in Snowmass Village Accommodations Type of Summer Relaxing,family-oriented Active,upscale Active Vacation Sought Activities Natural beauty Hike,golf,fine dining Hike,bike,golf,fine dining sight-wring Events Family events—arts and -sophisticated,cultural events— •Sophisticated,cultural events—j=concerts. tells fairs,rodeo a=concerts,wine and food wine and food festivals festivals rxtrcme spores—as a spectator Post Saa"'nmra winter guesu mean those People who loo-visircd in winner and netunnd in summer. b.Conferences and Tourism Conferences are a significant contributor to the Town's economy. The Conference Center is used extensively in both ski and non-ski seasons and may be responsible for up to 45% of Snowmass Village guests outside the ski season. As shown on the following chart(Table 3.7),during the period 10/06-09/07,the Snowmass Conference Center was utilized 84 days with seven of those days utilizing the entire Ballroom as one unit. Half of the days had no activity while just less than 20%of this period had less than half of the total space in use. The summer special events calendar has grown to include at least one program every weekend as well as several activities, most of which are free. Summer events such as Chili Pepper& Brew Fest,Jazz Aspen Snowmass, mountain bike races, Balloon Fest and many others bring guests to town who generate additional revenues to carry businesses through the summer season. While summer visitor volumes are significantly lower than those in winter, visitor preferences have historically tended to be very similar across seasons. Table 4.8 Snowmass Conference Center Usage JYMM••x•N.uq. 14 ylq•;lgxSRaFPJIIIxY IY kJMx lmm M•am SItlIICNOW pxnuw]an SpMnEry. SW M•x.P W 1P.Y]nAxYwnnx NMx]Ya41Yrw nM.wn nllm Yxxwxgnwx•F Wixm m •TP Sn u•x'xx Wtle IT1y} xM 4P completely used YM)fn,23%of days YM Js,•P UnM]x.P SpM]a'nP Partially used 0 x°'^"27%of days SSVM iTPmMexnn P•M•MUD 1xMMM•iP NM used Y.,P 5a%of days n•Mmm9M1M11 1Y.n ixnr IM in xl•x c. Lodging Quality of Bed Base Many Snowmass Ski Area skiers choose to spend Observations of RRC customer survey: their nights in Aspen. Visitors are attracted to Drop in lodging satisfaction year-over- entertainment Aspen because of the wider variety of eating and year and high variability performanceentertainmentopportunitiesandbyAspen's popular image. by property. e Of our list of 28 lodges 5 ranked Good/Excellent"category,only 1 of Skiers and other visitors spending the night in those properties was in Snowmass. Snowmass Village are likely to purchase more food, a drink, clothing, and other goods here. In addition, Ofourlistor ,oftthosethelengthofvisitorstayhelpsestablishthecriticalPoolcategory,of those 5 were mass of buyers and users needed to support retail located in Snowmass: 18%of total. stores and civic amenities. Only 25%of Snowmass Village's annual lodging revenue occurs in May October To gain a broader understanding of the Town's potential peak capacity, there are 2,878 total residential In the combined Aspen/Snowmass units in Snowmass Village (including single-family, market, Snowmass has 42%of the multi-family, lodging and employee units). Within total lodging units and 53%of skier these units, Snowmass Village can accommodate about visits,but only 17%of retail sales. 11,000 residents and guests in the peak season. Cmvre Snnwmn<a.Ctra evic Mnrknina P Approximately ,000_.skiers are _actually skiing in Deleted:I Snowmass Village during an average day. Outside of Aspen and Snowmass Village, the Roaring Fork Valley has a significant number of tourist beds and a large resident skier population. Snowmass Ski Area currently hosts the majority of these local skiers. According to RRC Associates occupancy report generated on behalf of Aspen/Snowmass partners, Snowmass Village's annualized occupancy is about 45%. During the peak season, December 20 to March 31,occupancy averages 84%. Between 2004 and 2006, sales tax on lodging represented between 45% and 49% of total sales taxes, the largest single contributor of sales tax revenues to the Town. While the revenue potential of the Snowmass Village lodging industry is closely related to the number of available accommodation units and occupancy rates, it is also affected by the type and quality of accommodations available in the Town. Higher quality units generally translate into higher revenues per skier night. d. Seasonal Economics The Snowmass Village economy is extremely seasonal, spanning the relatively short ski season at the Snowmass Ski Area. A typical season lasts 140 days. Other ski areas seasons may extend up to 157 days. This seasonality is reflected in the Town's sales tax receipts. Seventy-five percent of all lodging and other economic activity in the Town occurs in the four-month winter ski season. The economy is made up of mostly small businesses. It is particularly hard for small businesses to make long-term investments based on the revenue from a four-month business season. This is also true of their willingness to make long-term commitments to joint or public marketing strategies,or taxes and assessments to build community facilities. Anything that can be done to spread business activity over a longer period of time will have a beneficial impact on the stability of the Town's economic base and its ability to accomplish long-term objectives. Because of the large size of the Snowmass recreation area and its substantial lodging base in the Town, Snowmass Village could expand its number of summer visitors substantially. This extra revenue could help pay for improvements and facilities that benefit the Town's year-round residents and visitors. Table 4.9 Bookings between November 2006-April 2007 wmem.m..u.w.v u»..n-•.sn a,aw,Iwm Mp.yf.dbWq Mn.Ab.p120i O.brYm Ywadlbf4an.sed NST n m L j e I I J I I e. Retail,Commercial and Restaurant Retail shopping is a price of entry in resorts and we need to have it to remain competitive. While such trends are difficult to project, it is clear that retail expenditures per visitor in Snowmass Village (and the Aspen area as a whole) have been increasing during recent years. While skier visits at the Snowmass Ski Area -_- Deleted:we increased about 15% between the 2001-2 and the 2006-7seasons, sales taxes grew Deleted:a about 20%. (Resident incomes represent a small portion of the increase,since resident expenditures are limited to 10 to 15%of total sales tax revenues;the balance is due to visitors.) i. Current Retail Inventory The current retail inventory in Snowmass Village is concentrated in one primary node and one local-serving needs node with additional uses (e.g. food & beverage) also included in various lodges. The West Village/Mal is presently the-; Deleted:M:ar, primary comparison and food& beverage retail node, offering 91,823 square feet Deleted: of floor space. The Snowmass Center serves as the primary convenience node with 24,741 square feet of retail floor area plus office space. Outside of these two primary retail commercial nodes,retail and related floor area totals 18,083 square feet. The total retail inventory in Snowmass Village is 134,647 square feet including 16.8% of convenience retail, 51.0% of comparison retail goods, and 32.2%dedicated to food&beverage/entertainment. The West Village%Jvlall displays a distinct seasonality, with nearly 75% of_„ Deleted: sales occurring during the four-month winter season. This amount of retail, is proportionately low compared to other ski resorts. This can primarily be explained by Snowmass Village's proximity to Aspen, which has a large and highly successful retail sector. During the past two years, businesses have displayed average sales performances typical of Mall venues (in the range of$250 to $300 per square foot gross leasable area). The mix of retailers in the West Village/Mall responds to the visitor-oriented demand, with emphasis upon sporting goods,clothing,restaurants,and skiing- related services,but without a very well balanced mix or offering. There is no formal effort to manage tenant diversity among the properties and there are no national retailers. it. Market Issues The potential effects of additional retail development on the local economy can be understood by analyzing current expenditure patterns, business performance and future demand projections for specialty shopping, eating and drinking and services. Most expenditures by Snowmass Village residents and guests occur in Aspen, the Roaring Fork Valley and elsewhere. Capturing a portion of this leakage"as well as attracting new residents and guests will expand and improve the retail sector in Snowmass Village. Potential retail business and restaurant expenditures by Snowmass Village residents and visitors are currently (2006) estimated to equal nearly $131 million annually(medium of the possible range estimated). Actual sales in Snowmass Village were $57 million, roughly 42 percent of total expenditures. The difference between the above numbers($74 million)equals the amount of sales `leaking" (purchases occurring elsewhere). Most of the visitor leakage" goes to Aspen; a significant portion of resident expenditures is occurring down valley or in other localities. iii. Retail Market Demand Capturing increased sales from skiers passing through Snowmass Village as well as residents and lodges in Snowmass Village should support higher income levels and some additional retail space in Snowmass Village. Retail market demand in Snowmass Village is based primarily upon visitor expenditures, although permanent and seasonal residents also contribute to demand. Lodging/living elsewhere guests" (.??l constitute the largest expenditure, a combination of lodging, restaurant, skiing, and retail expenditures. Lodging/living elsewhere guests account for approximately 71% of total expenditure potential. Day-skier guests spend less money, principally because they are lodging elsewhere. Although these guests represent approximately 30%of the visitors to Snowmass Village, their expenditure potential is about 16%of the total. The increases in visitors, general price inflation and changing expenditure patterns have contributed to growth in retail market demand over the years. Seasonal variations will continue to occur, and our economy remains subject to national economic trends and local conditions. Key observations of the retail demand forecast include: Numbers of overnight guests during the winter are not assumed to increase significantly,although the demographic composition may continue to evolve. There will remain intense competition for the destination skier mountain resort market. Day-use guests, especially from an increasing down-valley population base, should continue to be a growing source of visitors. Residential expenditures will be limited by relatively small increases in resident population and the small resident base, (e.g., Snowmass Village is and will remain too small to support a typical community-scale shopping center). Food and beverage sales are an important economic sector in Snowmass Village. During the 2004-2005 seasory-local spending_in restaurants, food stores, drug_ Deleted:s and liquor stores averaged over $10 million per year. The range and variety of restaurants and the presence of unique restaurant/entertainment concepts can be a factor in the skier/visitor choice of where to spend the night. Convincing more people to stay and eat at local restaurants will also ease peak traffic patterns up and down the Brush Creek corridor. Synopsis of Public Input The community is highly aware of the importance of keeping Snowmass Village economically sustainable by establishing a critical mass and mix of commercial uses. However, with this in mind, it is also important to balance the economic potential with other values of the community such as village character and a small town feel. Therefore, during conversations of the economy, the built environment often was discussed concurrently. An important question expressed was the appropriate amount of future development that is "just big enough" to keep the economy stable but not exceed the community's carrying capacity or change its village character. The participants also emphasized the need for community-oriented businesses so that the community could become more self-sustaining over time. The summary of the public comments follows: High level of local ownership("no national chain stores"); Maintain and expand types of community-oriented businesses; Increase diversification of commercial offerings: Types of retail, Broader price points(from reasonable to true high-end), Differentiate 3 nodes and their personalities (to be complementary and not competitive with one another), o Improve the "product image" (maintenance, quality of buildings, ADA-accessibility?); Maintain total commercial quantities,re-allocate between villages: Minimum of 130,000 square feet, Maximum of 200,000 square feet; Expand the two major seasons: strengthen winter and grow and extend summer; Increase vitality/activity: o High occupancy turnover beds("real hotels"), o Conference-friendly (single or double occupancy) high occupancy turnover beds, Places for public interaction, Conference/performing arts center, On-site or in-town employee housing; Minimize construction impacts on commercial uses by phasing future development. 1 Chapter 5 Community Services, Facilities and Amenities 2 3 February,2009) 4 Strategic Objectives 5 6 The Snowmass asyMage.warnunitv values the services, amenities and facilities provided-_....... Deleted:Town of 7 by both the public and pdvate--sectors."-f6e--com-mun-ity-also--values--th-e--amenities-and I 8 facilities provided by the natural environment.-In order to complement commercial and........ Dail and the ski rnountmn-- 9 business enterprise with the appropriate communky--s--e-r-v-i-c-e-s,,--facilities- and-amenities,-,a-, 10 solid understanding of community values and service deficiencies in the Town of 11 Snowmass Village is important. The Town must evaluate future growth in relatioR to Deleted:ship 12 whether adequate public services,amenities and facilities abould exist or expand. Deleted:aKvays 13 14 Background 15 16 Carrying Capacity of Services, Facilities and Amenities W Snowmass Village residents recognize that the Town must live within the Town's 18 carrying capacity which applies to community services, facilities and amenities.The town 19 should function within its ability to adequately and property service its population without 20 exceeding water supplies, overuse of roads and compromising education and health 21 facilities. 22 23 The Role of Aspen and the Roaring Fork Valley 24 The City of Aspen and the Roaring Fork Valley (RFV) provide complementary lodging, 25 I dining and shopping opportunities to the Town of Snowmass Village. Snowmass 26 Village's sense of community extends into Aspen and RFV with schools, recreational 27 facilities, cultural amenities and sources of employment. Many Snowmass Village 28 residents enjoy thesm.a.11.town..feel-of-Snowmass Village-while havingthe option-t-o-also...... Deleted:retafive 29 enjoy Aspen and RFV amenities. Community facilities are divided into three categories 30 in relationship to Aspen and the RFV: 31 32 Unnecessary Duplication: There may be no need to duplicate Aspen 33 facilities in Snowmass Village. For example, the Aspen Valley Hospital and 34 the Aspen and Roaring Fork School Districts service Snowmass Village. 35 36 Required Duplication: Some facilities continue to be necessary in 37 Snowmass Village regardless of whether Aspen has similar facilities, such as 38 childcare facilities, post office, grocery store, gas station,recreation center, ...... Deleted:ote 39 library,etc. 40 41 Optional Duplication: Aspen has some facilities that Snowmass Village may 42 want to duplicate. For example, Aspen emphasizes its summer performing 43 arts facilities. Snowmass Village may want to develop its own performing arts 44 facilities which could have year-round use. 46 46 Existing Conditions and Guiding Principles 47 The Town of Snowmass Village provides trash collection, road maintenance, police 48 protection, public transportation, affordable housing and administrative services to the Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 5:Services, Facilities and Amenities February,2009 Page 1 1 community. Other agencies provide fire and emergency medical services, water and 2 sewer services,electricity,telephone, cable and natural gas. 3 4 Community Amenities 5 The community.values areas where there can be repeated spontaneous encounters with --..-- Deleted:yearns for 6 neighbors. The ability to do this not only creates a sense of community and a safe, 7 small town feel, it creates vitality and energy. Non-retail amenities are vital in generating 8 added drawing power and a more well-rounded year-round Snowmass Village 9 community. For the Town's three commercial nodes to be truly complementary, the 10 inclusion of desirable non-retail amenities should be planned. 11 12 Snowmass Ski Area 13 The Snowmass Ski Area is currently perated.by.ft Aspen Skiing.Company-and-- Deleted:owned and 14 includes 3,100 acres of terrain. In addition to skiing, snowboarding and other 15 traditional winter sports, the ski area offers year-round recreational opportunities. 16 The Snowmass Ski Area is a significant economic jengine in the community qW 17 providing jobs, generating revenue and contributing to the viability of other in 18 businesses linked to the ski resort and tourism. er 19 20 Snowmass Villaget Golf Course _ ot Highlight 21 Award-winning architect Jim Engh designed the Snowmass Club Golf Course--.. ' - ot Highlight 22 He took cues from the ranching families that had inhabited these valleys fora rodent:tat: o.s^ 23 century and the result is an 18-hole course with maiesti c views, challenging 24 landscapes and sensitivity to the land and the sky above it.With five sets of tees. 25 novices and pros alike are guaranteed an adventure. 26 r-onmatted:Font:Bold 27 Parks,Trails 8 Open Space wnnamed:mdant.tart: o,First 28 Parks and trails are significant community assets. Thec-provide-passive_and l,ne: g 29 active recreation opportunities for residents and visitors. Snowmass Village has Deleted:9 30 an extensive trail system with 5.9 miles of paved trails and 46.5 miles of unpaved Dew; and 31 trails. Open space areas secure wildlife habitat and preserve visual character. 32 Including the Snowmass Ski Area, over 8,700 acres are dedicated to public open 33 space/conservation and recreation with close proximity to wilderness areas and 34 U.S. National Forest land_Deleted:. 35 Dele11P:Add note 'ro 1ry to 36 Town Park 1d .ss area end National Fofaat.11 37 The Snowmass Village Town Park offers year-round recreational opportunities 38 and consists of: the recreation center and indoor gym, tennis courts, soccer field, 39 softball field, playgrounds, skate park, sand volleyball courts, basketball court, 40 active wetlands area and the Rodeo events arena. 41 42 Community Services 43 Community services play an important role in determining carrying capacity and 44 development should not cause a significant decrease in the level of service provided. 45 These services and capacities need to be evaluated periodically to establish carrying 46 capacity, and then addressed at the time of land use or development application 47 submittal. To expand and best leverage services with surrounding districts and 48 government entities the Town should work with local and regional districts and utility 49 providers. 50 Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 5:Services,Facilities and Amenities February,2009 Page 2 1 Current List of District Service Providers (for a more detailed description of 2 services provided,see Chapter 5 appendix.) 3 Snowmass Water and Sanitation District 4 Snowmass-Wildcat Fire Protection District 5 Aspen School District Deleted;Publics 6 Aspen yg ey Hospital[._ ...._.bIj s--t-i-i Ct.................................... .................................. ...... Deleted:Roaring Fork School 7 Colorado River Conservation District District 8 Colorado Mountain College Deleted:I 9 Telecommunication and Transmission Services 10 11 Community Facilities 12 Community facilities are also crucial in regard to carrying capacity. New development 13 should not result in a strain to our facilities. 14 15 Current List of Facilities in the Town of Snowmass Village(for a more detailed 16 description of all facilities and the services provided,see Chapter 5 appendix.) 17 Such as: 18 The Little Red Schoolhouse 19 The Snowmass Village Recreation Center and Gym 20 Town Hall 21 AEse V llage Conference Center Deleted:Snowmass 22 Silvertree Conference Fomiatted:Not Highlight 23 Viceroy Conference Center 24 Public Plazas and Event Areas 25 The Snowmass Chapel and Community Center 26 Anderson Ranch 27 28 Policies 29 The Town of Snowmass Village shall: 30 31 Provide for a variety of parks, trails and recreational facilities that meet resident 32 and visitor needs, and that enhance the community's quality of life. 33 34 Provide public services in an efficient, responsible and financially viable manner. 35 36 Create incentives for the provision and /or development of essential community 37 services and facilities, such as professional community-based service office 38 space and public space. 39 40 Ensure that land use decisions maintain and enhance the Town's ability to 41 provide services, facilities and amenities for the resort community New ...... Deleted:community and the 42 development shall assist in providing these in a fair and equitable manner and Deleted: 43 adequately compensate for its impact on public services and infrastructure.Fornnatted:Not flighlIght 44 45 Provide incentives for providing community-wide cellular coverage, wireless or Deleted: 46 other technologig§................. ........................................................................... Dell Y 47 Dell48Fyp]q@t@.ly!Hrq.growth to the Town's-carrying-capacities-in j relation to facilities, To 49 services and amenities. Deice;e 50 Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 5:Services, Facilities and Amenities February,2009 Page 3 1 Examine avery development proposal for opportunities to create, enhance and/or .---- Deleted:each 2 maintain the Town's facilities, parks and trails infrastructure. 3 Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 5:Services,Facilities and Amenities February,2009 Page 4 Appendix—Chapter 5: Community Services, Facilities and Amenities Existing Conditions and Guiding Principles To respond to the public desires for a vital, social and healthy community, the Town should develop a detailed plan for amenities. To provide appropriate amenities the plan should identify and prioritize desired amenities such as an: Ice skating rink, Multi-purpose performing arts center, Sports playing fields , Additional trails, Playground for children (pirate ship, climbing wall), Zip lines, Indoor play area, Dog park, and Public spaces. To be fiscally responsible for the provision of amenities, the plan should be referred to in the Town's Capital Improvement Plan and other budgeting programs and also reviewed during land use and development review for opportunities with new development. The community values athletics and sports. Two other inclusions in the plan are a strategy for the expansion of events and an approach to community health needs. A strategy for the expansion of events allows for an active and vital social environment for all age groups. The strategy should include public and private funding of events. Such activities or amenities could include: Ice sculptures, Environmental hikes, Sound and light shows, Sustainability education, Concerts, Mountain events, Competitions (bike race: I'Alp d'Huez), and A variety of restaurants and bars. An approach to address community health and medical needs of a full community demographic spectrum should list the essential services, i.e. pharmacy, medical, dental offices. After essential services are identified, Staff should ensure zoning allows the group services in one location (new Center, Offices at Snowmass). Existing Facilities Snowmass Water & Sanitation District The Snowmass Water and Sanitation District is a special district and was formed in June 1966. The District's 1966 Service Plan targeted a build-out population of 29,000 people. The district has acquired water rights to meet the average-year and dry-year estimated peak water demands for that population. This equates to a capacity of 6,200 Equivalent Residential Unit (EQR's). Currently, the facility is meeting 4,700 EQR's. The District has 5.2 mg (16 acre-feet) of water storage. For Snowmass Village, water is a limited resource and an element that should be watched while the community grows. It is identified as limiting factor for the Town's carrying capacity. There is some stress in winter when there's a larger local population and also in later summer when outdoor use increases. The issues for the District are raw water supply and storage capacity. Current storage capacity is 36% below the amount needed to serve demand anticipated for Base Village development. At the time of this report, the District was attempting to securing additional storage to accommodate existing and future growth at the Zeigler Reservoir. The water district has received preliminary approval to move forward to secure this water storage area. This additional storage site would allow additional flexibility for future development, and expansion of existing uses including community amenities and employee housing. If the location is not approved, the Town will need to increase its efforts to work with the District to meet its needs. With this comes an opportunity for the Town and District to develop a common correlation between water use and land use so that water needs can be measured and tracked as future development occurs. The District's water treatment plant capacity and potable water storage were established by analyzing peak demand for water, fire flows and emergency storage during a major system failure. The water treatment plant can treat 4.7 million gallons per day (mgd) and has an ultimate design capacity of 5.1 mgd. At capacity, the District could treat a flow of 6.5 cubic feet per second. The District operates a sanitary sewage plant that performs primary, secondary and advanced treatment at a capacity 3.2 cubic feet per second. Sewer capacity appears to be adequate to accommodate growth. Snowmass-Wildcat Fire Protection District The Snowmass-Wildcat Fire Protection District was organized in 1971 as an all volunteer department. Since that time, population demands have increased the need for prompt reliable emergency services that has gradually transformed the Snowmass-Wildcat Fire Protection District into a professional agency with 16 full-time employees and I 1 resident firefighter EMTs. The Snowmass-Wildcat Fire Protection District utilizes 9 fire suppression units and 3 "advanced life support" ambulances that serve the community's citizens, tourists and day skier population. The Snowmass-Wildcat Fire Protection District encompasses 21 square miles which includes the Town of Snowmass Village, Snowmass Creek drainage and Wildcat Ranch areas. Emergency services mutual aid is offered with cooperation by the Aspen, Basalt and Carbondale Fire Departments. Other Districts Snowmass Village is also a part of the Aspen Public School District RE-1, the Roaring Fork School District RE-1, the Aspen Valley Hospital District, the Colorado River Conservation District, and Colorado Mountain College. Telecommunication and Transmission Devices Snowmass Village embraces technology and should continue to in order to proceed as a world class resort. The Town should evaluate cell phone and other technology needs such as wife within the community—especially the Town Core. As technology advances, there will be greater demand for locating new telecommunication reception devices. These devices must be carefully sited to mitigate visual impacts and impacts to environmentally sensitive areas. Little Red Schoolhouse. The Little Red Schoolhouse is one of the To'wn's few historic structures. Built over a century ago, the schoolhouse is owned by the Town and leased to a day care center for local residents. Projections for Roaring Fork Valley indicate a 30 to 80 percent growth in childcare demand over the next 20 years. With these projections, childcare capacity will be exceeded between 2007 and 2012. The Little Red Schoolhouse is at capacity with 10 children in early childhood facility and 22 children in preschool facility. Tree House Adventure Center. The Tree House Adventure Center, a new, state-of-the-art 25,000-square-foot kids ski facility is located in the Base Village. The Treehouse stands as the first of its kind in the snow sports industry, and will contain: family-friendly climbing gym, teen activities, kids' retail and a host of themed rooms for ages eight weeks and older. The Aspen School District does not currently have a school or other facilities in Snowmass Village. The current capacity of the district schools includes 25 students at the High School, 140 students in middle school, and 40 students in the elementary schools. The capacity limits are set by policy and not necessarily capacity of facilities or ability to expand. An additional Capacity of 300 Students could be gained by limiting downvalley enrollment. Snowmass Village Recreation Center& Gym The 9,000 square foot Snowmass Village Recreation Center was opened in 2007. State- of-the-art amenities include Matrix cardio equipment, a weight room, four outdoor pools with water features for kids and an adult hot tub. Town Hall Facilities A new Town Hall was opened to the public in 2008. The facility holds the majority of Town including Town Manager/Administration, Police, Finance, Building and Planning and Marketing, Special Events and Group Sales. The facility also houses the town council chambers and community meeting rooms. A branch of the Pitkin County Library has been opened in the facility. The Housing Office is located in Mountain View employee housing complex, Public Works has a facility on the just east of Town off of Owl Creek Road and the administrative offices of the Transportation Facilities are located in the Snowmass Mall. The Bus Barn and Shuttle Drivers' Lounge are condominiums in the Mall that are Town- owned. Snowmass [pillage Conference Center In 1984-85, the Town of Snowmass Village financed the construction of a conference center adjacent to the Snowmass Village Mall. The Town of Snowmass Village manages the 30,000 square foot conference center nut leases the space. The Conference Center hosts a wide variety of conferences and specializes in seminars for medical professionals. See Chapter 3 for more information). The Conference Center is viewed as an important facility to the community. There is some threat to the continuance of the facility as it is today. In addition, the need for more large meeting rooms and an expanded facility has been expressed. Snowmass Chapel& Community Center In 1987, the Snowmass Chapel and Community Center (SCCC) was constructed to provide counseling services and wedding, worship and memorial services to residents and guests. Protestant and non-denominational services are held throughout the year, with weekly Catholic mass in the winter months. The SCCC offers 20,000 square feet of chapel and community space. Synopsis of Public Input A sense of community is highly valued in Snowmass Village. Participants expressed a desire for liveliness and energy. Snowmass Village was envisioned as a place where residents, guests and employees could work, retreat and exist; a healthy place with diversity of age. Services, facilities, and amenities build the framework for a healthy, energetic community. Participants supported local-oriented services such as medical and dental offices and more gathering places where our residents can encounter the same people consistently and serendipitously. The expansion of cultural offerings was also strongly expressed. Vitality and age diversity can be created by meeting other goals of this plan. One prime method is allowing the workforce to live in the community. This brings a broader, younger group into the village to support retail and restaurants year-round. Below are community values and key issues conveyed during the public process for this update: Vitality: Lively place to live, work, retreat and exist, Promote health, In town/on site employee housing, Gathering places (errands, events, recreation) provided with development or by the Town, Create a "Snowmass fun" identity. Culture: Multi-purpose facility (for movies, concerts, conferences, theater, other cultural events), Increased cultural opportunities—music, arts, film, Increased and expanded educational opportunities, Establish Snowmass Village as the "Arts Education Center of the Valley." Age: More age diversity of full-time residents, 5 star nursing home, Age-targeted events, Work center, Telecommuting program /outreach to companies. Recreation, Amenities: Adequate facilities for aging community members, Greater diversity of recreation and sporting activities, Expanded athletic events, Necessary amenities for all ages to utilize, More than just `resort-based' facilities but also community-based facilities. Government: Political will/leadership, Fair, balanced local government, Balance of resort and community. Cohesiveness: Small population, Safe, Social involvement/know neighbor, Family friendly, Community events. Snowmass Village Partnerships Aspen Skiing Company The obligations of the Aspen Skiing Company, and the Snowmass Land Company - the major property owner and developer in the Town - are contained in various land use approval ordinances and agreements. Under the land use approvals for Two Creeks and the Pines subdivisions, the Land Company is obligated to build specific trails and roads, to pay specified development mitigation fees, to mitigate wildlife impacts and to provide a specific numbers of affordable housing units within the Town. Under the land approval for the ski area expansion, the Aspen Skiing Company must pay mitigation fees to the Town to compensate for transportation and other impacts on the Town. Roaring Fork Transportation Authority The Town cooperates with the Roaring Fork Transportation Authority to provide transit services and is a member of the RFTA board. The Aspen Skiing Company contracts with RFTA to provide base-to-base skier transportation services. Second Homeowners Advisory Board Second Homeowners Advisory Board was created to communicate various Town projects and information to other second homeowners. Snowmass Village Resort Association Prior to the Town's incorporation, Snowmass Village Resort Association (SVRA) was the resort's first governing body. The SVRA provided basic services to the Mall area. They also managed the town's recreation assets as well as marketed the resort. When the Town incorporated, SVRA was relieved from services such as garbage collecting and snowplowing. More recently, the Town's Marketing / Special Events / Group Sales Department has taken over many of the resort marketing / public relations roles and the marketing and managing of the Snowmass Conference Center. Marketing and Lodge Taxes are the association's funding sources. I Chapter 6 Environmental Resources 2 3 December, 2008) 4 Strategic Objectives 5 The natural environment is a primary asset to the community and positively influences the 6 continued success of the resort. The environmental resources of the Town of Snowmass Village 7 have played a significant role in attracting people to the area, as well as in stimulating and 8 regulating the Town's growth and development. The community supports the conservation and 9 preservation of unique lands,wildlife habitat,stream corridors,sensitive hillsides, important view 10 corridors, and other significant natural features. The Town promotes long-term stewardship of I I clean water and air, energy efficiency, and ongoing opportunities for residents and visitors to 12 explore,learn and enjoy the natural beauty of the area. 13 14 Background 15 Recognizing that the quality of our environmental resources are directly tied to the health of our 16 citizens, our resort competitiveness, and our economy, the community initiated a number of 17 efforts aimed at improving environmental sustainability during 2008. IS 19 The concept of environmental sustainability speaks to the preservation of an ecological system in 20 its naturally occurring state,that it may continue providing life-supporting resources such as food, 21 water and oxygen over a very long period of time. Ecological sustainability is integrally linked to 22 our resort economy by virtue of global warming's predicted impact on winter recreational 23 activities, Preserving the quality of our natural environment and taking action to minimize local . Deleted: h has been predicted 24 contributions toward global climate change is expected to positively affect our resort that in the next 25 years,winters will 25 competitiveness and long-term economic stability. become shonef and there will be a 3 26 to 4 degree increase of mromge temperature,resulting in more rain27Landdevelopment, and its associated energy consumption, can negatively impact the natural and less snow. (Source:Aspen 28 environment by consuming resources faster than they are able to be regenerated. Consideration of Global Change Institute). 29 impacts to ecological sustainability can be applied to several aspects of development review. By 30 considering the characteristics of a site in its natural condition (soils, drainage ways, slope, solar 31 access,etc)and those of a proposed development's impacts to the surrounding environment(view 32 sheds,air quality,wildlife,etc)environmental quality can be preserved. 33 34 Protection of wildlife has long been a value in the Town of Snowmass Village,although much of 35 the development and recreational activities we enjoy today have been created in direct conflict 36 with that statement. Wildlife migration corridors have been pinched to a fraction of what they 37 once were, while production areas and other important habitat areas have been impacted 38 tremendously. Development should be located and designed Jo minimize its imnact to wildlife_-,- Deleted: so as not 39 and wildlife habitat Wetland and riparian communities arc especially significant in this-re gard Deleted; diminish wddsfe 40 because they have the highest density and diversity of wildlife species. habitat or 41 Deleted: theezislenceand 42 Scenic views and air quality are also highly important. Air quality is an environmental resource diversity of species 43 that has been periodically and narrowly measured (primarily during periods of heavy 44 development activity) through PM-10 monitoring, designed to measure particulate matter 45 I important to public health and safety. Air Quality Monitoring Plans, requiring the most 46 appropriate and up-to-date technologies available at a given time, are required on a project-by- 47 project basis, in order to ensure that the quality of our air is protected. Quality public views 48 contribute greatly to the uniqueness and attractiveness of this valley, and significantly contribute Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 6: Environmental Resources December,2008 Page 1 I to the desirability of our resort, and the value of local real estate. While the quality of public 2 views has no direct impact on environmental carrying capacity, it is highly valued from a quality- 3 of-life perspective. 4 5 The Snowmass Water and Sanitation District recently conducted a review of its water rights -------- Formatted: Left, Don't 6 inventory and its ability to serve future development and service requirements generally in the adjust space between 7 Snowmass Village area(W.W. Wheeler&Associates-Dry Year Yield Analysis For Snowmass Latin and Asian text, Don't adjust space 8 Creek Water Supplies And Evaluation Of Raw Water Storage Requirements-2006). The review 9 considered the treatment capacity of the Water Treatment Plant,the priority and diversion 10 availability of its water rights,raw water and potable water storage capacities,peak demand 11 requirements,projected growth and raw water storage for system reliability. The limiting factor 12 to the ability of the District to provide potable water service was determined to be the legal and 13 physical availability of raw water of satisfactory quality for treatment at peak demand times.The 14 District currently is serving a demand of approximately 4,900 equivalent residential units(EQRs). 15 The District's analysis estimates that approximately 1,100 EQRs will be added upon completion 16 of Base Village, Sinclair Meadows, Entryway,Snowmass Center(assuming a project similar to 17 the 3rd Amendment),and West Village(assuming a 20 percent increase in EQRs,i.e.bedrooms 18 &bathrooms).This falls within the District's anticipated ability to reliably serve 6,200 EQRs.On 19 the basis of the planning the District determined that a reasonable estimate of its ability to reliably 20 serve potable water is 6,200 EQR. The District determined that treatment capacity of the Waste 21 Water Treatment Plant is adequate and can treat the anticipated associated influent from 6200 22 EQR potable water usage. 23 24 Existing Environmental Conditions 25 Detailed descriptions and discussions on the following environmental resources are included in 26 the Chapter 6 Appendix: 27 28 Elevation 29 Slope 30 Aspect 31 Geology/Soils 32 Vegetation 33 Hydrology 34 Rain/Snowfall 35 Wildlife 36 Water 37 Open space 38 Environmental sensitivity 39 40 41 Policies 42 The Town of Snowmass Village shall: 43 44 1. Promote renewable energy generation, conservation of natural resources, and energy 45 efficiency. 46 47 2. Employ smart growth strategies and land use policies that limit development to the 48 minimum amount deemed necessary for the community to achieve economic 49 sustainability. Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 6:Environmental Resources December,2008 Page 2 1 2 3. Provide essential community-oriented goods, services and housing with an aim to 3 reducing the environmental impacts associated with our dependency on other 4 communities. 5 6 4. Promote community stewardship for the Town's natural resources, and for those of the 7 Brush Creek and Owl Creek Valleys, by supporting land use policies and regulatory 8 processes that acknowledge an understanding of our environmental carrying capacity. 9 10 5. Ensure that development review processes include consideration of the community's 11 environmental values and an understanding of potential impacts to environmental 12 resources. 13 14 6. IdentifX androtect significant public views and view corridors, and enhance the visual ----- - Deleted: P 15 quality of open space, national forest, wilderness and agricultural lan-ds o-f the own,Formatted: Not Highlight 16 Brush Creek and Owl Creek Valleys. 17 Formatted: Not Highlight 18 7. Protect riparian habitat and ensure that riparian vegetation and streambeds are maintained 19 in a naturally functioning state. 20 8. piscourage development in critical wildlife habitat areas, including but not limited to elk . Deleted: ¶ 21 calving, severe winter range and migration corridors mapped by the Colorado Prohibit 22 Department of Wildlife (CDOW), in order to maintain ecosystem integrity, and preserve 23 the existence and diversity of species within the Town. 24 25 9. Require new development to incorporatelrtitigation measures deemed appropriate by the Deleted: appropdme 26 Town and ecologically sound design principles that protect wildlife and wildlife habitat 27 in Snowmass Village. 28 29 10. Update, adopt and reference the following reports , as such reports may be deemed 30 pertinent to the specific project under development review: 31 a. no vnpass Village Elk Monitoring Studv(20.051 Deletetl:. y 32 b. GreenwnvMaster Plan,(1000). 33 c. Two Creeks and the Pines Wildlife Enhancement and Management Plan(1994) 34 d. Snowmass Ski A. Wildlife Enhancement and Management Plan(1994) 35 e. Snowmass Ski Area 1994 FE/S Mitigation and Monitoring Plan 36 f Snowmass Wildlife Committee Report(1991) 37 g. Pitkin County Wildlife Taskforce and Report 19691 Formatted: Font: NotP ( ) 38 Deleted: <g>y 39 11. Evaluate all proposed development and redevelopment against the Town of Snowmass 40 Village Environmental Sensitivity Map. 41 42 12. Require a site-specific review for any proposed development that appears to penetrate 43 any part of designated sensitive lands. 44 45 I 13. Qi.Lcourale construction on slopes greater than 30°/- Deleted: Prohibit 46 Deleted: ,unless approved by a 47 14. Encourage new development to restore degraded reaches of the Brush Creek Watershed supermajority vote of the Town 48 located within Town,and adjacent to.and/or within their projects_ ________________ _ _ _ Council,and subject to specific 49 findings,exceptions and/or 50 15. Encourage new development to help fund bridges and culverts necessary to preserve the circumstantial criteria 51 Town's waterways located adjacent to,and/or within their projects.Deleted: Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 6: Environmental Resources December,2008 Page 3 2 16. Prohibit any new development that is determined to cause an exceedence of the 3 Snowmass Water and Sanitation District's stated maximum treatment capacity(currently 4 defined as 6,200 EQR's). 5 6 7 Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 6:Environmental Resources December,2008 Page 4 Appendix—Chapter 6, Environmental Resources Synopsis of Public Input Though the topic was not a prominent one during the public process for the 2008 update of this plan, a healthy natural environment continues to be highly valued by the community. Public input received on the topic of environmental resources addressed the following areas: Preservation of open space, Maintaining view corridors, Retaining the scenic beauty, Promoting respect of our mountain environment,and Protecting water quality, air quality and wildlife. Existine Environmental Conditions 1. Elevation Elevation affects vegetation, temperature, precipitation, oxygen and air pollution. The Town boundary encompasses a topographic span reaching from the lower end of Wildcat Ranch, at approximately 7,300 feet, up to 12,600 feet at the summit of the Snowmass Ski Area. Brush Creek Road, at its intersection with State Highway 82, is at an elevation of 7,500 feet. Elevation rises steadily as Brush Creek Road approaches and enters the Town limits at 7,900 feet. A majority of the Town's residential neighborhoods,as well as its commercial core lie between 7,800 and 9,100 feet. 2. Slope Slope steepness is one determinant of the development suitability of land. Consideration should be given to physical hazards, the potential for successful rcvegetation, and the difficulty in repairing soil disturbances. Steep slopes are vulnerable to erosion and soil slippage. The Snowmass Village Municipal Code prohibits construction on natural slopes greater than 30%, unless approved by a supermajority, vote of the Town Council, and subject to specific findings, exceptions and/or circumstantial criteria. Approximately 7700 acres, or 44%, of town land has a slope of 30% or greater. Mapping of slope is broken into five categories: 0%—3%,3% - 8%, 8%-15%, 15% - 30%,and 30%or greater and can be found at the end of this chapter. 3. Aspect Slope aspect is how a site is oriented to the sun, which influences soil and air moisture and temperature. The majority of Snowmass Village has a cooler slope aspect, a situation which is typical of ski areas. Slopes south of Brush Creek Road and much of Wildcat Ranch have a northern aspect with denser vegetation, longer snowpack, moist soils and increased wildfire hazards. Slopes north of Brush Creek Road have a primarily southern aspect with few trees, drier conditions and higher erosion potential. 4. Geology/Soils[ Most of Snowmass Village's soils have high shrink-swell potential, low strength and slow permeability. A large portion of the surface geology is Mancos shale, which can present challenges to development. On specific sites, soil type should be analyzed for engineering qualities and limitations for construction, ability to support plant growth, stability on slopes, erosion potential and drainage characteristics. 5. Vegetation Snowmass Village's diverse physical conditions create a complex distribution of plant communities. Vegetation distribution is influenced by elevation, solar exposure, slope aspect, soil characteristics, geology, moisture, and wind. Due to their respective aspects, north-facing slopes have abundant streams and lush meadows while south-facing slopes are semi-arid. Changes in the landscape's plant species are most evidently tied to changes in elevation and according to slope aspect. Major plant communities appear as irregular bands, often with very narrow transition bands between them. The succession of plants, beginning with lichens and mosses in dry areas and water plants in the streams and ponds,has climaxed in the four major"Vegetation Life Zones" within Snowmass Village. Foothill Zone. The Foothill Zone extends from the edge of the Roaring Fork Valley to the Rodeo parking lot and the Snowmass Club golf course. This is primarily a shrub zone, with few trees except in riparian areas and in deep ravines with northern exposure. Sagebrush, oakbrnsh, chokecherry and serviceberry dominate,but coexist with aspen trees, foxtail barley, slender whe.atgrass, yarrow Deleted:. and vetch. Deleted:9 Montane Zone. This zone covers most of the former ranch land that is now golf course and residential development. Mountain meadow and grassland communities are numerous in this zone. Douglas Fir is prevalent and turf-forming 1 Geology and soils information was obtained from the United States Geological Sumnj (USGS)and the Soil Survey of the Aspen-Gypsum Area. grasses such as red-top, timothy and native bluegrass cover moist meadows and the wetter and cooler areas.Along water courses, distinct riparian forest and shrub communities occur which include: narrow leaf cottonwoods,mountain alder,river birches,Colorado blue spruce,aspen trees and several species of willow. Subalpine Zone. This region begins at 8,000 feet on north-facing slopes and is covered by dense forests of Engelmann Spruce and Subalpine Fir, with equally dense intrusions of aspen groves or an occasional lodge pole pine stand. In the winter, these dense forests protect snowfall from melting so snow often remains on the ground until early July. Moisture-loving plants such as Fairy Slippers, Woodnymphs, and Dotted Saxifrage thrive in this woodland. Alpine Zone or Tundra. Above timberline is the alpine zone. Like the Arctic Tundra, it is a treeless region of grassland and rock fields. Snow melts sooner in this zone than the Subalpine Zone due to the lack of trees to shade the ground and the fact that winds keep the snow layer thin. A short growing season exists but allows for alpine flowers. In 2005, the Town of Snowmass Village adopted the Pitkin County weed control program that attempts to strategically remove noxious weeds from Pitkin County. The program includes a plan and community outreach objectives to address noxious weeds from spreading in Snowmass Village. 6. Hydrology Brush Creek is Snowmass Village's main watercourse and flows through Town from the Divide into the Roaring Fork River. Brush Creek's two major tributaries, the ' West and East Forks, flow from the Snowmass Ski Area along Fanny Hill in the west and below the Two Creeks lift in the east. Brush Creek Road parallels the creek. Historically, the creek and the road have vied for territory. As a result, the creek has suffered in the areas of bank erosion and degradation of stream biology. Cumulative impacts resulting from a variety of development practices have impaired the stream channel's ability to function naturally. The degradation of Brush Creek not only affecLs Snowmass Village but also impacts the downstream water quality of the Roaring Fork River. The Town has identified stream sections of Brush Creek that are candidates for restoration. Since the early 1990's, four reaches of Brush Creek (Woodbridge, May Fly, Snowmass Chapel and Base Village) have been restored. The majority of the projects were financed by the Town with the exception of the Base Village reach which was restored as a condition of development approval. There is an existing town fund for stream restoration but no regular budget line. There are no standard design specifications for restoration because each reach has different fluvial characteristics requiring a design specific to the reach. The Roaring Fork Conservancy, a non-profit watershed conservation organization, monitors the health of regional water ways. The Conservancy placed Brush Creek on its impacted list in its 2006 Water Quality Report due to consistently high pH and phosphorous levels and continued development along the drainage way. A targeted study was initiated in 2006 to set baseline conditions for the creek, determine the levels and duration of pollutants, and to determine appropriate management of open space parcels with regard to the riparian habitat. Most parameters in the study reflected normal and relatively healthy conditions though continued concern of high pH levels and impacts due to development continue. The Conservancy plans to continue monitoring of the Creek in the future. Future recommendations may include the need for a minimum in-stream flow to be established to ensure continued health. Water quantity is also important to measure. In recent years, heavy snow pack has eased the drought in the region and will likely begin refilling depleted reservoirs in the Colorado River Basin. However, severe or extreme drought conditions still exist and climate change or continued years with low precipitation removes the amount of water available to us and left in stream. 7. Rain/Snow Rain and snowfall affects several aspects of daily life in Snowmass Village. The public health and safety is frequently impacted by snowy and icy road conditions,and heavy downpours have been known to cause landslides and flood damage from time to time. The community's fire suppression capabilities and drinking water supply are heavily reliant on annual rain and snowfall totals. Our economy is closely tied to annual skier day numbers.which are greatly affected by snow conditions. Weather impacts resulting in airport and/or Toad closures also have significant impacts on the local economy. Finally,the condition of our natural environment(i.e.,ve etpative growth,soil erosion, wildlife health and habitat)is largely reflective of the rain and snowfall activity within a given year,or over a longer period of time. Formatted:Indent Rrst line: 0.25' Data collected by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's(NOAA)_ rvmwtcea:Aunt.Not Bold WWesternRegionalClimateCenterfromtheAspenIS COLORADO Cooperative.._ ..........Formatted;Aunt:Not Bold,Not Observer Program(COOP)weather statiott(1980-2008).provides the followin g Italic information regarding rainfall and snowfall in the Sno mass Village area:FomwKed:Font•.Not Sold,Not Italic Annual Average Total Rainfall(Precipitation): 24.61 inches FomtanBa:Auld:Not Italic Formatted:Font:Not Italic Annual Average Total Snowfall : 177 inches, Fomratted:Font:Not Sad Formatted:Font:Not Sold Formatted:Font Not Bold Formatted:Font:Not Bold Fomtatted:Font:Not Bold Annual Snowfall Totals 300 250 200 150 V VV 100 Annual Snowfall Totals 50 0 e0 tiA~e y0°A0 9A° tieti, 5A° hyb gee ti NAti, 5A°' tiAtO,tAatiesweetiestiestiesties tie° ee tiee tiee ee' ycP ycP ticQ ticP Mean Monthly Precipitation (inches) 1979-2009 3 2.5 2 1.S tMean Monthly Precipitation(inches) 1 1979-2009 0.5 0 JaWadQ ^ w O VLLafQ n O Z C Mean Monthly Snowfal (inches) 1979-2009 30 25 20 15 Mean Monthly 10 Snowlal(inches) 1979-2009 5 0 X04 OFT 8. Snowmass Water and Sanitation District Formatted:Numbered+Level: 1+ Numbering Style:1,2,3,...+start at:9+Alignment:Len+Aligned at: The Snowmass Water and Sanitation District is a special district created under the 0.25"+Tab after: 0"+Indent at: provisions of the Special District Act,32-1-101 C.R.S. The District was formed in a 5' 1966 to provide potable water and sanitary sewer service for the Snowmass Village area. The District operation consists of water and sewer systems. i. Water System. The water system consists of a raw water intake system,a Water Treatment Plant to treat raw water and make it potable,a system of pressure zones, water tanks and water pipelines to deliver potable water to its customers. The Water Treatment Plant has a treatment capacity of 5.1 million gallons per day of potable water. The Water Treatment Plant utilizes mechanical filtration and ultra violet treatment to process raw water and produce potable water. Raw water is diverted from one of the three District sources of supply, Brush Creek, East Snowmass Creek and Snowmass Creek,or from storage at the Ziegler Reservoir and conveyed by pipeline to the Water Treatment Plant. Potable water storage tanks totaling in aggregate of approximately 6.2 million gallons are located in various District pressure zones to allow the District to manage water distribution during peak demand periods or during exigent circumstances. ii. Waste Water System. The waste water system consists of collection sewer mains and lift stations and a Waste Water Treatment Plant. The Waste Water Treatment Plant has a treatment capacity of 3.2 million gallons per day of influent. The Waste Water Treatment Plant is a mirror image 1.6 million gallon bifurcated system allowing the District to utilize the minimum capacity for its primary and tertiary treatment. After completion of the treatment process,treated effluent is discharged into Brush Creek. Sludge waste from the treatment operations is taken to the Pitkin County landfill to aid in the composting project or to the District's sludge disposal site in Woody Creek. The District recently conducted a review of its water rights inventory and its ability to serve future development and service requirements generally in the Snowmass Village area(W.W. Wheeler&Associates-Dry Year Yield Analysis For Snowmass Creek Water Supplies And Evaluation Of Raw Water Storage Requirements-2006). As discussed more fully in Chapter 6,the District currently is serving a demand of approximately 4900 equivalent residential units(EQR). On the basis of the planning the District determined that a reasonable estimate of its ability to reliably serve potable water is 6200 EQR. The District determined that treatment capacity of the Waste Water Treatment Plant is adequate and can treat the anticipated associated influent from 6200 EQR potable water usage. The District is pursuing upgrades and capital replacement to its system and is replacing older water and sewer pipelines with pipelines made of modem materials. The District anticipates that it will require approximately$4,000,000.00 per year to conduct the upgrade and capital replacement program. The District is also seeking approval to expand Ziegler Reservoir to a total storage capacity of 225 acre feet with an estimated project budget of$10,000,000.00." Wildlife De et The Comprehensive Plan WildlifeXap shows the habitat o(three s2ccies of raptors,_ big horn sheep and ptarmigan. Seasonal Activity Maos show critical habitat for mule deer and elk. These mapped species were selected from a broad range of mammals and birds because they have a high level of public interest or are an "indicator e ter, species"'for the a in and around Snowmass VillaM While the black bear attracts a .---. un a n high level bf public interest, it was not mapped because its range covers the entire Deleted: Rgo" Town. The wildlife maps were created using Colorado Division of Wildlife(CDOW) data. Deleted`ft The United States Forest Service (USFS) has compiled a list of Management Indicator Species (MIS) for the Burnt Mountain area. These species are also of high public interest or are indicator species. Additionally,the White River National Forest has also drafted a list of sensitive species that are likely to occur in forested and non- forested communities in the area. The CDOW and USFS species lists should be kept on file in the Planning Department and reviewed when making planning decisions to ensure that impacts to indicator species or local sensitive species are identified. Development can then incorporate appropriate mitigation and ecologically sound design that protects the wildlife in Snowmass Village. a. Environmentally Sensitive Wildlife Areas Elk Habitat Areas. Regulations to protect certain elk habitats are included in the Town Municipal Code. Town policy prohibits development in the elk calving, 2 Indicator Species are species whose habitat also meets the needs of an array of other species. severe winter range and migration corridors mapped by the CDOW, unless certain conditions are met. The elk that use habitats in or adjacent to Snowmass Village are part of the Maroon Bells-Snowmass Wilderness (MB-SW) elk herd. Theq size of this herd. Deleted:is has been estimated at approximately 350 elk. The MB-SW elkherdcombines with other herds in the winter, forming a group estimated at more than X00 elk Deleted:orabow that use the surrounding winter range. Deleted:r The 1994 Snowmass Ski Area Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) indicates that half of the elk habitat has been rendered unsuitable due to nearby development on both private and national forest land. Since 1966, calving habitat has been reduced by 54% and the migration corridor for the MB-SW herd has been reduced by 90%. Because of habitat loss, protecting the remaining habitat should be a high priority if the herd is to remain viable. Elk Habitats vital for protection include: i. Calving Habitat (Production Areas). This includes, but is not limited tolhe---.---- Deleted:T aspen groves in the Owl Creek drainage cast and north of Burnt Mountain. This extends west through Owl Creek, Spring Creek, East Fork of Brush Creek- and to the area immediately adiacent to The Pines. This also includes areas such as Kelley Park, Mandalay Ranch and the USFS area prescribed as the future-413"in the White River National Forest Plan. ii. Migration Corridors. These include,several routes between summer and --..-- Deleted:Tin, winter range areas, including, but not limited to the three crossings on Brnsh Creek Road near the Droste and Seven Star properties and the crossings along Owl Creek Road. iii. Winter Range. In general, winter range located within Town limits extends north of------- rom,at ed.rodent:Left: o• Owl Creek Road,south and west of Highway 82,and cast and north of Wildcat Reservoir Detetcd:o.«aa During winters with deep spows,winter range availability is the most crucial factor in Deter;and Snowmass C¢ct Road, the survival of the herd. Severe winter range habitat in the Snowmass Village area is awa teu nur svowmasa located on the south or west facing oakbrush or sage-covered hills of the Seven Star, Droste and Wildcat Ranch properties,------------------------------------------------------------------- ............. Deleted:9 b. Areas of Ecological Significance. In addition to the elk habitat areas, there are three areas of ecological significance with elements that can support wildlife on a continuous basis and have a high biodiversity,value: i. Upper Eastern Section of the Snowmass Ski Area near Elk Camp. ii. Sam's Knob west to East Snowmass Creek and to the top of the Big Bum. These areas contain mixed conifer-aspen habitat which are used throughout the year by deer, elk, bighorn sheep, neotropical birds, raptors, carnivores, small and medium-sized herbivores and ptarmigan. Land use decisions concerning the portions of the Snowmass Ski Area located within the Town's boundaries should insure preservation of the richness of this wildlife mix. iii. Habitat between Spring Creek and Owl Creek. This is a core area of species diversity due to the type of vegetation, abundant water and remoteness. It is of particular importance to elk and deer in the spring for calving/fawning and nursing. c. Dedicated Open Space and Other Areas of Wildlife Importance The Town owns the first two of the three open space parcels listed below, which have high value for wildlife. Any development of public facilities and/or recreational uses should promote wildlife stewardship on these parcels. These areas include: i. Open Space above Horse Ranch Subdivision - These 650 acres of open space has high value for wintering deer and elk. It is closed to all activity from Octoberber 30th—June 20th.. .......... Deleted:Sept xis ii. East Highline (Hidden Valley) - This 200 acre parcel was deeded to the Town from the Snowmass land Company for wildlife habitat preservation. It is located in the draw near the Town cemetery and was intended for elk spring fall migration and winter range. iii. Horse pastures between Brush Creek Road and Horse Ranch Drive - This area is an important deer and elk travel corridor between the dedicated open space parcels. Preserving this area also ensures an undeveloped link for big game moving between winter and summer ranges. d. Current Wildlife Management and Mitigation Plans The Town currently has a number of plans and documents to guide the management of wildlife, including: nowmacs Village Elk Monitoring Stud 005 Formatted;rout:italic2 ---------------------------------_------ Greenway Master Plan, (2000). Two Creeks and the Pines Wildlife Enhancement and Management Plan 1994). Snowmass Ski Area Wildlife Enhancement and Management Plan(1994). Snowmass Ski Area 1994 FEIS Mitigation and Monitoring Plan. Snowmass Wildlife Committee Report(1991). Pitkin County Wildlife Taskforce and Report(1989). These reports should be updated as necessary, formally adopted, and referred to during development review. Deleted:s The community views open space as an important resource, and recognizes that it provides several benefits. Preserving open space allows for protection of sensitive habitat, creates open areas in the built landscape, and promotes a rural character. Open space also provides a mental and spiritual benefit. The Town has an open space program and owns several parcels that are restricted to use as public open space. To better manage this resource, the community needs to understand why the land is to be kept open and what the best use is for the properties. We can start by inventorying our properties to identify the legal parameters that are keeping the areas open(i.e. deed restriction,public ownership, development requirement). Knowing the ownership and potential for our open spaces will let us know where future acquisitions should occur as opportunities arise, or needs are identified. Effort should be given to analyze management techniques and methods of acquisition. 11 Environmental Sensitivity----------------------------------------------------------------- Deteted:o Environmental Sensitivity Map.The Environmental Sensitivity Map indicates all oersted: land that is markedly sensitive to environmental impacts from development. The Environmental Sensitivity Map indicates natural thresholds for the carrying capacity of the Town. The highest values have been placed on the protection of wildlife, stream corridors, steep slopes, open space and scenic views. Sensitivity is determined by the resource's historical ability to recover from development impacts and remain sustainable. Some environmental resources do not change significantly over time, while other resources are dynamic and may need periodic impact assessment, evaluation and monitoring. These areas have physical and ecological features whose preservation is essential to the Town's ability to maintain a high quality environment. The map covers the entire Town limits as well as the designated Influence Areas. Physically sensitive features include: 1. Slopes in excess of 30%. These steep slopes are often highly visible and development of them could have a major visual, safety and financial impact. 2. Brush Creek. Brush Creek is important both for its scenic value and for its ecological value as a wildlife, wetlands and riparian area. 3. Critical Wildlife Habitat. Critical habitat areas for indicator species can be both ecologically and visually sensitive areas. The Environmental Sensitivity Map designates sensitive areas for preservation, conservation, open space, or low-density residential. All proposed development and redevelopment will be evaluated against this map. Proposed development which appears to penetrate any part of designated sensitive lands will require a site-specific review prior to approval,regardless of the location. 1 Chapter 7 Built Environment 2 3 February,2009) 4 Strategic Objectives 5 The Snowmass Village community values the open, natural and rural character of the 6 Brush Creek and Owl Creek Valleys. The Town seeks to preserve the beauty of the 7 landscape by ensuring that the image, scale and development patterns of the Town are 8 harmonious with its natural setting. The Town values the separation afforded by the 9 undeveloped open space along Hiehline. Brash Creek and Owl Creek Roads; and wants 10 to preserve the sequence of open views that unfold along Brush Creek Road.The Town is 11 committed to creating a vital, distinctive town core with a Rocky Mountain flavor and a 12 defined center of activity ('sense of place') that reflects the appropriateness of its 13 intended setting. 14 15 Background 16 The Built Environment incorporates key concepts from other sections of the 17 Comprehensive Plan, particularly those related to land use and built form, and describes 18 in an inclusive way how land should be developed,or not developed, and preserved; and 19 what actions must be taken to achieve the community's Aspiration Statement. 20 21 The Built Environment inter-relates with all of the elements of this plan from how 22 something is built (energy efficiency, character, footprint), to what is built (housing, 23 infrastructure, amenities, businesses) to the impacts of what is built (traffic and parking 24 demand,and services). The community understands these inter-relations and realizes that 25 criteria and guidance applied at the time of development application review truly shapes 26 the community and can be used to reach several of our goals. 27 28 A major expansion is underway at the Base Village that a°--^° `-e— the 1pO8 29 30 It 31 consists of a mixed-use (commercial and residential) resort development. It will 32 significantly increase the mass, and scale of the Base Area, as well as increase the 33 commercial and residential offerings of Snowmass Village. Its architectural style will 34 also change the character of Snowmass Village. And yet, Fiat being eampletedAs of the 35 adoption of this Comprehensive Plan, the full impact of the development has not been 36 experienced. 37 38 Influence Areas 39 40 There are three influence areas adjacent to the Town: Lower Brush Creek Valley,Owl 41 Creek Valley and Divide. 42 43 1. Lower Brush Creek Valley Influence Area 44 Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 7:Built Environment February.2009 Page 1 45 The Lower Brush Creek Valley is located along Brush Creek Road between 46 Highway 82 and the Rodeo Grounds. It is the main entrance into Snowmass 47 Village and is a critically important scenic resource to the Town. Lower Brush 48 Creek provides the first significant view of the Village's ranching heritage. 49 Approaching the Town, ranch lands and stables introduce the Town's heritage. 50 The open character of undeveloped lands emphasizes Snowmass Village as a 51 separate community, distinct from other communities in the Roaring Fork Valley. 52 The Lower Brush Creek Valley is a picturesque, high quality visual and wildlife 53 resource. Existing development is low residential density and does not add 54 significantly to the traffic on Lower Brush Creek Road. Preserving the area's 55 open character is a priority in the 1-lower Brush Creek Valley. The Highway 82 56 Intercept Lot is under Pitkin County jurisdiction and managed by the City of 57 Aspen. It provides a strategic parking and transit site for both Aspen and 58 Snowmass Village. This site may provide the opportunity to increase remote 59 parking in a location that is already a major transit and intermodal transfer stop. 60 Furthermore, the Town may explore opportunities for creating transit oriented 61 development,particularly affordable housing at this location with Pitkin County. 62 63 The key objectives for the Lower Brush Creek Valley Influence Area are: 64 65 A natural entry approach including a gateway sign at the Brush Creek Road/ 66 Highway 82 intersection, 67 68 Preservation of open space which typifies rural character of the natural and 69 agrarian landscape of the Lower Brush Creek Valley, 70 71 Limit future development to no higher use than allowed by the Estate 72 Residential land use category, as provided in the Town's Land Use and 73 Development Code, 74 75 ii.Owl Creek Valley Influence Area 76 77 Owl Creek Road serves as an alternative access to Snowmass Village. The Owl 78 Creek Valley's rural character provides an important separation between 79 Snowmass Village and Aspen. It also supplements the Lower Brush Creek's goal 80 of emphasizing Snowmass Village as a distinct and separate community. 81 Maintaining the Nordic skiing easements is an important goal in the winter. 82 83 111.Divide Influence Area 84 85 The Divide Influence Area lies at the far west end of Snowmass Village, in the 86 vicinity of the upper Brush Creek drainage area. It is accessed on Town roads. 87 88 Comprehensively Planned Areas 89 90 There are seven Comprehensively Planned Areas (CPA's) in the Town of Snowmass 91 Village, and specific land uses and objectives are designated for each of those areas.The Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 7:Built Environment February,2009 Page 2 92 main purpose of CPA's is to discourage piecemeal consideration of individual parcels and 93 projects and give Town officials the ability to require applicants to plan comprehensively. 94 The Comprehensively Planned Areas are created to make sure that any development 95 proposed for these areas is consistent with the goals,objectives,uses and circulation patterns 96 in the Comprehensive Plan. A Comprehensively Planned Area does not imply rezoning nor 97 does it preclude rezoning. Site specific studies were conducted of the potential land uses, 98 relationships with surrounding land uses and circulation patterns in these areas. Maps of 99 each of the CPA's are included at the end of this chapter. 100 101 Underlying land uses can be expanded within the CPA boundary if a determination is 102 made that a specific community benefit will result.CPAs include: 103 104 In the lower valley: 105 106 Rodeo Grounds/Entryway CPA, 107 Faraway Ranch South CPA, 108 Faraway Ranch North CPA; 109 110 In the Town Core: 111 112 . • Faraway Ranch North CPA(including the Snowmass Center) 113 West Village-Mixed Use CPA,and 114 Base Village CPA,and the 115 Multi-family Residential CPA. 116 117 Lower valley 118 119 a.Rodeo Grounds/Entryway 120 121 The Rodeo area is the gateway to the Town of Snowmass Village and is located at the 122 intersection of Brush Creek and Highline Road. The rustic, western appearance of 123 the Rodeo Grounds and surrounding open land is a significant element of the 124 community's rural character. This area currently is a primary summer recreational 125 activity area and includes the community park, skateboard and basketball facilities, 126 the rodeo grounds, the golf course and softball field. The Town "welcome" 127 information booths and the major vehicle intercept parking facility are located just 128 westin the vicinity of the Brush Creek/Highline intersection. Northwest of the Town 129 Park there is a Public Facilities Use site s°°°--°" la °°'h°Sehael v"° This site with 130 131 such as a sehoel and affefdable housing. 132 133 134 b.Faraway Ranch South(Parcel K&N) 135 136 Faraway Ranch South straddles Faraway Road south of and immediately adjacent to 137 Brush Creek Road. This property has employee housing and a condominium project Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 7:Built Environment February,2009 Page 3 138 The Timbers at Snowmass) with ski-in/ski-out access to the Snowmass Ski Area. 139 Though development of this CPA has been completed, the key objectives for the area 140 should be preserved in the future. 141 142 c.Faraway Ranch North(Parcels IA,A,B,C,D,F,G,H,H-1,t) 143 144 Faraway Ranch North includes the areas north of the Snowmass Center and a number 145 of parcels north of the Woodbridge Condominiums. (Note: The Snowmass Center 146 itself is located in the Snowmass Center CPA below). This area has spectacular 147 views of the ski area and Mount Daly. 148 149 The preferred plan for this area recommends low-density, multi-family development 150 would be considered in the base of the draws as part of a Comprehensive Plan,to take 151 advantage of the area's proximity to public transportation,the ski area and shopping. 152 153 The Town Core 154 155 The Town Core is a tri-nodal area that includes the West Village-Mixed Use CPA 156 including the Mall commercial area and surrounding residential properties), Base 157 Village CPA and the Snowmass Center (a portion of Faraway Ranch North CPA). 158 Prior to the development of the Base Village, the West Village commercial area was 159 historically the primary resort-commercial area in the Town—with an intimate, small 160 village character. Base Village is a larger scale center, with a tourism focus and an 161 intensely developed mixed-use area, intended to add vitality to the Town Core 162 throughout the year. The Snowmass Center, including grocery store,gas station,post 163 office and office functions, serves many of the local, functional needs of the 164 community.The mix of uses in the new Base Village has added a new dynamic to the 165 Town Core, creating three nodes with different characters and roles. (Chapter 4 and 166 the 2008 Strategic Marketing Plan outline broad directions for the amount and type of 167 development and redevelopment to be targeted for each node). 168 169 Integrating the three two resert-commercial nodes and eemmunity eefafnefeial fiedej 170 while—retaining their distinctive character and roles can strengthen Snowmass 171 Village's 'sense of place' as well as add many positive features to the Town Core. 172 Effectively connecting Base Village, the Snowmass Center and West Village will 173 create a functional Town Core serving the community and its visitors. 174 175 The preferred plan for the Town Core represents a cohesive plan for linking the three 176 sites together. Important to the effective integration of these three nodes is the 177 circulation and access to, through and from the area for mass transit,private vehicles, 178 pedestrians and skiers. 179 180 a.Town Core: Snowmass Center CPA 181 182 The Snowmass Center includes offices, grocery store, post office, gas station, 183 restaurants and other community-oriented commercial uses. This area has Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 7:Built Environment February,2009 Page 4 184 spectacular views of the ski area and Mount Daly. The preferred plan for the 185 I Snowmass Center CPA includes: that any redevelopment of the site shall-4e 186 Primarily include mixed use community-serving commercial ee;,,mem uses, 187 parking, and strong transit connections to the other two resort commercial nodes. 188 Community-Servine Commercial" includes uses such as the post office, grocery 189 store, pharmacy, automotive gas/service station & general store, professional 190 medical facilities, locksmith, laundry, restaurants, banks, and local apparel shops. 191 On a secondary basis, residential uses may also be considered to the extent it 192 supports community-serving commercial uses. 193 194 b.Town Core: West Village–Mixed Use CPA 195 196 West Village includes the West Village commercial area (the "Mall") as well as 197 the surrounding residential and other properties located between Fanny Hill and 198 the Numbered Parking Lots, between Fall and Campground Lanes. The West 199 Village includes a high concentration of short-term accommodations,commercial 200 retail,and restaurant uses. 201 202 In the West Village, revitalization and redevelopment are encouraged—so long as 203 the intimate character of the place is preserved, and transportation and other 204 carrying capacity limits are not exceeded. 205 206 The design of the West Village should distinguish itself as a unique commercial 207 center. Design guidelines to allow design review will be an important component 208 of this achieving this character and assuring it is complementary to the overall 209 Town Core character of reflecting our mountain setting. (For general design 210 objectives,see Preserving Community Character and Sense of Place below.) 211 212 e.Town Core: Base Village CPA 213 214 Upon buildout in 2011, the Base Village will compliment and be in balance with 215 the existing Mall as part of the bi-nodal resort commercial plan. A transit facility 216 and courtyard are also located in the development. The transit facility was sized 217 assuming that the primary transit facility would remain at the West Village. 218 219 d.Multi-family-Residential CPA 220 221 Multi-Family - Residential CPA includes the older (25 years and older) multi- 222 family residential properties held in condominium ownership that are located 223 within the Town. 224 225 The preferred plan for the Multi-Family - Residential CPA area encourages and 226 facilitates the revitalization and reinvestment of multi-family properties that are 227 aging enough to require capital reserve expenditures. The pla intent 228 FeffleYe FegUIRtOIFY ObStaeleS that 1111YA ROM As bAIFViPFq tR _, 229 Town of Snowiness Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 7:Built Environment February,2009 Page 5 230 231 232 The Future Land Use Plan 233 234 The community continues to deal with the need to balance the aspects of resort and 235 community, transportation and housing, and creating a 'sense of place.' The 236 strengthening and completion of a vital and vibrant Town Core is still an issue for the 237 community. At the same time,we need to ensure that we live within the Town's carrying 238 capacity. It is important not to exceed resources or strain the abilities to serve the 239 community adequately and in a responsible manner. We wish to be sensitve to the 240 natural environment and not force negative impacts. An important question for our future 241 is the level of development that is "just big enough"to keep the economy stable but not 242 exceed the community's carrying capacity. For the remaining areas subject to 243 development, our intension is to find an appropriate balance between the impact of 244 growth and quality of life and community character; protect the integrity and character of 245 the community while accommodating some level of growth but within our carrying 246 capacity. The Future Land Use Plan was created around our community thresholds and 247 expresses our expectations for new development and redevelopment 248 249 Several factors were identified during the Comprehensive Plan process and analyzed to 250 determine their limitation to growth. These factors include: 251 Transportation Sewer Education/Chi ldcarc Public Safety Environment Emergency Services Housing Public Health Water Utilities and Infrastructure 252 253 The key limitations to growth for Snowmass Village are: 254 Roads (discussed in Chapter 8), a net increase in vehicular traffic can not 255 be accommodated without a decline in the level of service. 256 Water -especially raw water availability & storage (discussed in Chapter 257 6),and 258 Affordable Housing for the Employee Base(discussed in Chapter 9). 259 Just Big Enough"Philosophy(discussed in Chapter 4). 260 261 Development within the Town has caused us to quickly approach the thresholds levels for 262 these elements. Physical limitations and policy parameters influence how quickly we 263 reach the threshold for each. The community acknowledges that we need to understand 264 the limits for growth as the remaining areas subject to change are developed or 265 redeveloped. When reviewing any future development or land use proposal, our elected 266 and appointed officials must consider the limitations to growth before a decision is made. 267 Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 7:Built Environment February,2009 Page 6 268 269 Existing Conditions and Guiding Principles 270 Commercial Nodes 271 The Town of Snowmass Village will have three interconnected commercial nodes(two 272 resort oriented commercial nodes and one community oriented commercial node)that 273 jointly have a small "mountain town"feel characterized by: 274 275 Public gathering places that allow personal interaction&"people- 276 watching," 277 Sunlight to public areas, 278 Easy pedestrian or mechanical connections between nodes,and 279 Building placement that preserves long views from key public areas. 280 281 Comprehensively Planned Areas 282 283 The key objectives for the Rodeo Grounds/Entryway include: 284 285 286 Enhancement of the rodeo grounds and arena area 287 Preservation of the open pastures/open setting, 288 Increased recreational use including playing fields, pedestrian and bike trails and 289 a recreation center, 290 Expansion of public parking, 291 Enhancement of the pond,-aad Brush Creek,and adjacent wetlands,and 292 Affordable Housing Fnrmalfad:Bullets and Numbering 293 294 The key objectives for the Faraway Ranch South include these elements: 295 296 Employee housing, 297 Low-density,high occupancy,multi-family residential housing, 298 I •i mixed, Use SIE.FeMat OR alid BOMMIMillyeefilleF Bt the b1150 of Assay Mill r 299 Enhancement of skier and pedestrian trails, 300 Faraway Road/Brush Creek Road intersection improvements,and 301 OUST e.ed development coupled with maxim- tee an 302 Connections to the Town Core, specifically the Snowmass Center and the Base 303 Village area. 304 305 The key objectives for the Faraway Ranch North(outside of the Snowmass 306 Center)include: 307 308 Employee housing, 309 Preservation of open space in the draws behind the Snowmass Center, 310 Clustered residential at the base of the draws,and 311 Preservation of trails and other recreation areas and habitat. 312 Town of Snowmass village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 7:Built Environment February,2009 Page 7 313 The three key objectives for the Town Core include: 314 315 Effectively integrating the two resort commercial nodes and community 316 commercial node(Base Village, West Village and Snowmass Center)through 317 improved transit and pedestrian connectivity and mobility; 318 Maintaining the individual, yet complimentary and mutually enhancing, 319 character and roles of the two resort commercial nodes and community 320 commercial node to provide diversity of amenities and services for guests and 321 residents. 322 Provide "just enough" critical mass at a pace that doesn't exceed the.......f Formatted:eunets and Nuirbednq 323 absorption rate of the community with regard to construction impacts and 324 possible interruption of construction due to outside circumstances. NOTt 325 326 Formatted: No bullets or numbednq 327 328 Key objectives of the Snowmass Center CPA include these elements: Formatted:indent.First line: o.s• 329 330 Improved mass transportation/pedestrian connectivity and mobility to Base 331 Village and the Mall as well as surrounding properties, 332 Continued community-o4ente&,ervine commercial, office, public uses (post 333 office, grocery, Town Hall) and residential uses to the extent it supports 334 community serving commercial uses, 335 Employee housing, 336 Maintain local owned/locally serving businesses in the Snowmass Center, 337 Redevelopment of the Snowmass Center buildings, 338 Creating informal gathering places for community,and 339 future commercial development should strive to retain existing business 340 owners in the Center and to minimize, to the extent possible, the impact to 341 these businesses during construction. 342 343 Key objectives of West Village—Mixed Use CPA include these elements: 344 345 In the commercial areas maintain an intimate"small village"character. e..e....n.. to 3 story ayemge height ..hire. _.e_e •... - -..-346 j--b.. Formatted:Indent:Left: 0.65' 347 348 349 Provide a diversity of commercial (retail/restaurant) experiences (and prices) 350 that complement(not compete)with the other nodes. 351 352 Integrating with Base Village and the Snowmass Center via seamless 353 pedestrian and transit connections. 354 355 Improved transit. 356 357 Improve the entry or`sense of arrival' to Base Village and West Village. 358 Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 7:Built Environment February,2009 Page 8 359 More efficient use of existing surface parking and consider reconfiguration 360 and increase in capacity through parking structures, while respecting the 361 parking standards stated in the Transportation Chapter (Chapter 9) of this 362 Comprehensive Plan. 363 364 Promotion of Town greenway and riparian enhancement goals through 365 completion of Benedict Park and Trail system and further enhancement of the 366 Brush Creek corridor 367 368 r^^^-^^^ en of sustainable and ` a'-°.Expand the Town's 369 Artwalk. 370 371 Creation of public spaces and amenities that expand the winter and summer 372 seasons,such as: 373 Plazas, 374 Ice rink, 375 Movie theater, 376 Water features, 377 Performance space, 378 Public spaces for festivals 379 380 Special attention should be given to features attractive to children and 381 adolescents that will augment Snowmass Village's appeal as a family-friendly 382 destination. 383 384 Ensure that conference/convention capabilities and functions continue to exist 385 in West Village,by: 386 o Providing an appropriately sized conference center accessible to the 387 entire community 388 o aa-ad44ien-1!Providinge a"conference hotel"defined as follows: 389 a Formatted;indent:Left: 1.2-, No bullets or 390 A building or group of adjacent buildings or portion thereof numhe nq 391 within the West Village operated under a single brand name Formatted:Bullets and Numbering 392 that (A) contains rooms, areas or separate spaces intended for Formatted:Indent:Lee: t.as wghr. 0.3^ 393 temporary occupancy by guests typically by the day or week 394 though it may be for longer periods), each of which contains 395 sanitation facilities and may contain a small kitchen area, and 396 B) generally offers one or more enhanced levels of service, 397 such as: (i) a level of staffing, amenities, service or facilities 398 above that customarily found in multi-family dwellings; (ii) 399 twenty-four-hour front lobby check-in with in-house maid, 400 concierge, room and maintenance services; and (iii) 401 standardized fixtures and furnishings with central telephone, 402 internet, cable television, heating, air conditioning and hot 403 water systems for all units. 404 Town of Snowiness Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 7:Built Environment February,2009 Page 9 405 I o Ensuring tThe ability of these two facilities to function together in a 406 complementary fashion 407 408 Ensure that there is not a net loss of"hotel-like"or high occupancy turn over 409 rooms(H.O.T.Beds)in West Village. 410 411 Support $buildings, spaces and activities that will expand both the summer 412 and winter seasons. 413 414 Maintain a strong mix of uses - commercial, office, food and 415 beverage/retail/entertainment,residential,and public uses. 416 417 Recognize that Rresidential uses can include a variety of unit types but that 418 they should focus on maintaining high-occupancy uses. 419 420 E-aeearage-[ncentivize and encourage locally-owned, "non-chain" types of 421 businesses that preserve unique shopping experiences. 422 423 Ensure convenient mountain access. Formatted:indent.Hanging: 0.22' 424 425 Recognize and encourage timeless architecture that is compatible with and• •--- romratted:Indent:tea: 0.53',Hanging: X426 preserves the character of the Town as a unique mountain community that 0.22",Tab stops: 0.75",List tab+Not at 0.68"+ t' 427 F°• that is influenced by, responds to and does not 426 overwhelm the natural features and mountain setting thal-surrounding the 429 property. 430 Organize service and delivery to minimize conflicts with transit and 431 pedestrians in order to function effectively. 432 433 Encourage revitalization and reinvestment in existing properties. 434 435 436 Key objectives of the Base Village CPA include these elements: 437 438 Tourism oriented commercial uses, 439 Resort oriented uses, 440 Resort administration, 441 Adequate parking for short-term,commercial and residential, 442 Adequate transit facilities 443 Restaurants,bars,cafes and 444 Overnight accommodations 445 I Affordable Housing Formatted:Bullets and Numbering 446 Enhanced connectivity to other commercial nodes 447 448 Key objectives of the Multi-Family-Residential CPA include: 449 Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 7:Built Environment February,2009 Page 10 450 o Encourage revitalization and reinvestment in properties,including 451 general upkeep and maintenance,remodels and minor redevelopment 452 oriented commercial uses, 453 454 I o IncentivizeC-neearage revitalization and reinvestment in properties, 455 including general upkeep and maintenance,remodels and minor 456 redevelopment. 457 458 o Facilitate the improvement and/or addition of amenities,including 459 meeting spaces,fitness and/or spa facilities,lobby,outdoor gathering 460 spaces,pools and/or hot tubs,landscaped areas,and fire pits and/or 461 barbeques. 462 463 o Facilitate the improvement and/or addition of building improvements, 464 including exterior cladding,window and/or door upgrades,roof 465 replacement,entry and arrival features,decks and/or porches. 466 467 o Provide the ability to offset revitalization and reinvestment costs by 468 adding-a-nentixelconsidering increases in floor area. 469 470 Future Land Use Plan 471 472 Lower Brush Creek Valley is to remain in its natural, open condition. Only a minimal 473 amount of residential development may occur. A How:..`_...main.. eeRIPF should be 474 Aaltematives should be explored to expand 475 public parking. In addition, a master plan should be completed for the rodeo site to 476 complete the planning for the entryway. Preserve the Brush Creek Corridor's open 477 pasture and ranching land uses. Horse stables and the newly renovated rodeo arena 478 enhance the ranching heritage of the Town. Maintain the primary intercept parking 479 lot at the Rodeo/entryway.Encourage visitors to use public transit in the Village. The 480 Town Core should create a "sense of place" by developing a concentration of 481 recreation, shopping, dining, entertainment, living and working opportunities. 482 Development of the Town Core should include an easy and effective way for people 483 to move to, from and within the area. The Plan will be updated continually by the 484 Planning Commission and Town Council and implemented over a twenty year time 485 period. 486 487 Annexation Policy 488 489 Existing and future land use in the Influence Areas could have significant impacts on 490 Snowmass Village. Governing jurisdictions should evaluate land use decisions and 491 mitigate their impacts in a way that is consistent with this plan. The goal is to 492 establish a cooperative process for review of future land uses in the Influence Areas. 493 Town of Snowiness Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 7:Built Environment February,2009 Page 11 494 Portions of the Influence Areas may be considered for annexation. In the Divide 495 Influence area there are pocket parcels that could be considered for annexation, 496 however the land lying west of the ridgeline (as determined by the Town), between 497 the Snowmass Creek drainage and the Brush Creek drainage, shall not be considered 498 for annexation. Should it be determined that a public benefit could result from 499 annexation, annexation may be considered.-A! this 500 brie benefit is the annexation _f land the time, _ _. o _r, Feel. Valley 501 infl__neeArea bolo the Seven. c._rPropeFty '..r !he OW'r_ 1.. .n,...... 502 Afea. Consideration for annexation in these areas should require a determination of 503 public benefit for Snowmass Village.Annexation outside of the influence boundaries 504 should not be considered. Annexation limits should be consistent with property 505 boundaries whenever possible. 506 507 508 Telecommunication and Transmission Devices 509 510 As technology advances, there will be greater demand for locating new 511 telecommunication reception devices. These devices must be carefully sited to 512 I provide as broad a service as possible, while mitigatinge visual impacts and impacts 513 to environmentally sensitive areas. 514 515 Guidelines for Preserving West Villuge's Character& Sense of Place 516 517 518 There are a number of urban form characteristics that are present in Snowmass - 519 Village, and are typical of successful, enjoyable pedestrian villages universally, 520 that we wish to perpetuate in West Village. The following is a preliminafy list of 521 pammeters fbF ni. edevelopment 522 523 Village Scale 524 525 Pedestrian areas are "outdoor rooms" whose walls are formed by the surrounding 526 buildings. The shape and feel of these rooms is created by the height, character and 527 variety of the facades that enclose them. 528 ext----- sprees ha e been ae_..ed from e•.c!uali g many d•ff.._.._. public spaeesi hew 529 1'..,.e.:..,. fiteit..\ ..eople e.............d a_....a °_'_'n reef.._ _..r._...._.. ._.......... ... 530 531 532 Heights and Mass. The height and mass of new building ------ Formatted:eulleted+Level:t+Nignee ac: 533 should be related to the prevailing scale, form and proportion of surrounding Ou"+Indent at: 0.5" 534 buildings,to avoid overwhelming or dominating the existing character of the area 535 Lin'_:.. the height of the onalesing buildings is 4 or less then the width of L 536 e :. doe nelesed.and pedestIt:...,, tend to fee' exposed. When thir 537 height efquFwunding buildings is eq el to eF greater than the width of the space Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 7:Built Environment February,2009 Page 12 538 I it feels like a `eanyon' The meet Pomifenghle prep°.,•°_.. s___ to he whoa th 539 height e f the build; the width of the spoee the enel se 540 541 in °°.. °1'... buildings a1E a street er plaza seldom 6...°.. ...:C...... height Ref 542 it desifable. Thele fOR seme latitude is °..........J°"° A Fang@ of A to 7 pan he a 543 J guide ...e..,°blene.°,.s 544 545 in o.....e instanees, the e ffee. is aeeeptable, of even desirable far 546 example as a sheo` n ° g link between e 11.........spaees. T te stia shad° 547 esits:detations .. .is pFefeFable to Orient any relatively leligeF etinditions 546 R A 15191411 SA Ith diFORtilIn 549 550 In the tetal height of the building m peed the .... 551 552 fiagad°satisfies the ffefefled height t...:dth I'Ati. 553 554 VAen exeeptions;Is the height fatio earmet be avoided,speeial attention should b 555 gk,en to ElFeating a well defined , nd n°°f ......hasi through 556 557 Formatted:Indent:Left: 0.5", No bullets or 558 Design articulation. Groups of buildings should be located to avoid creating a-. numbering 559 wall" or "row" effect by incorporating offsets or protections to articulate Formatted:NOmlal,Bulleted+Level: 1+ 560 individual units or groups of units and give the appearance the building is made Aligned at: 0.25 560 at: o.s^ 561 up of a collection of smaller structures. 562 563 Human Scale. People spaces should respect human scale. 564 565 Serial Discovery 566 567 When streets are straight,and the end is visible, pedestrians tend to turn back sooner, 568 putting the shops at the ends at a disadvantage. Village streets are more interesting, 569 and there is a sense of discovery that draws pedestrians onward, when the view 570 continually disappears around a bend or a corner. Link activity areas and destination 571 points so they easily attract a critical mass of people, creating vitality. Sequence 572 views to pull people into activity areas and lead them from one feature to the next. 573 Elements should be organized to lead people to the front door and invite them in. 574 575 Irregular Street/Walkwav Edge 576 577 On West Village streets/walkways the buildings form the edge of the street/walkway. 578 A strong street/walkway edge is important, but perfectly aligned facades tend to be 579 monotonous. Features that give interest to streets and walkways include: slightly 580 irregular fagade lines, varied setbacks, small plazas, planters and large flower pots, 581 and changes in texture of the street/walkway materials. 582 583 Building Height Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 7:Built Environment February,2009 Page 13 584 585 Building heights vary greatly in the West Village commercial areas. While zoning 586 prescribes a maximum height, it is undesirable to evolve to a uniform"buzz cut"look 587 for the Village. Consistent with the Height Ratios above, in buildings along 588 pedestrian areas, should be - mixture of 2 to ' swies, wit higher building masses 589 should be stepped back from view. 590 591 To give life and visual variety to the West Village, towers, cupolas, chimneys and 592 other features not useable as living areas are encouraged, (not to exeeed 253 `ig 593 then the suppeniRg bui4ding*. 594 595 Building Materials 596 597 Buildings should incorporate materials and details that are indigenous to- rormattea:nom l 598 Colorado by integrating heavy timbers, natural siding materials and rock into the 599 building design. The materials should be non-reflective and predominantly 600 authentic in their appearance,to include natural textures and weathering. 601 Stum 4s ., dominant Fn a 'el in them Village and ene that distinguishes C...,..--ass 602 603 604 605 606 Transportation Mode Priorities 607 608 Pedestrian mobility is the highest priority in the West Village followed by transit, 609 van/buses for lodges, and finally vehicles. Vehicular traffic is to be discouraged and 610 conflicts between pedestrians and cars or service vehicles are to be avoided. Transit 611 is the second highest priority in the West Village and should have optimal access to 612 ski portals and commercial areas 613 614 Given the hillside location of West Village, and an altitude that is challenging for 615 many visitors, a secondary system of relatively easy pedestrian connectivity is 616 desirable. This may consist of mechanical means (escalators, elevators, or tram) 617 combined with horizontal walkways. If retrofitting the existing buildings proves 618 unfeasible, consideration should be give to incorporating this level of mobility into 619 any development on the numbered lots.This system will also provide accessibility for 620 the disabled,which is important to serving all the guests attracted to Snowmass. 621 622 Climate/Solar Orientation 623 624 Due to Snowmass' alpine climate, sun is an important comfort factor. Shaded areas 625 have ambient temperatures substantially below those of sunlit areas, which is 626 especially significant in winter, fall and spring. All pedestrian areas should have 627 significant periods of sun during the year. Due to the low winter sun angle, the 628 amount of sun will be less, buts preservation of some sun should be 629 encouraged allowed. Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 7:Built Environment February,2009 Page 14 630 631 a Lighting 632 633 Visually attractive night lighting is important to enhance the magic of the visitor's 634 experience as well as for safety and way finding. However, light 'pollution' obscures 635 views of the night sky that are important to the Snowmass experience. All lighting 636 should be sharp-cutoff type,and directed downward or at solid surfaces. 637 638 a Signage 639 640 Signage designed to be complementary to the building facade and architecture 641 enhances the appearance of our commercial areas. At the time of development 642 review, criteria should be developed to address the appropriate size(s), design and 643 lighting and made a condition of the redevelopment. 644 645 a Integrating the Natural Environment 646 647 Preserve and enhance natural areas and water features such as Benedict Creek 648 and Benedict Park. Modifications and impacts should be minimized. 649 650 Use interpretive information and signage to draw attention to nature,mountain 651 ecology and the effects of time,natural processes and change. 652 653 Make connections with nature. Use views, vegetation and water as details to 654 the design and to transition between the man-made environment and nature. 655 Building massing should be porous enough to let nature penetrate and be a 656 part of it,both visually and physically. 657 658 Take advantage of views and view corridors. Site buildings and adjust 659 building massing to preserve views from public places Of everaeeks-end 660 lendmarlES. 661 662 Use natural features, trail corridors, buildings and other spaces to direct 663 visitors and reinforce the connection with the natural mountain environment. 664 665 Building architecture must be adapted for the specific mountain site. Structures---- Formatted:Bullets and Numb; 666 should not overwhelm our connection to the mountain environment. 667 Formatted:Indent:Left: 0.75" 668 Policies 669 The Town of Snowmass Village shall: 670 671 Maintain the Town of Snowmass Village's distinct community identity by 672 preserving existing open space areas between the Town and other communities. 673 Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 7:Built Environment February,2009 Page 15 674 Maintain the open character of the lower Brush Creek Valley as the entryway to 675 Snowmass Village. Focus development away from this critically important visual 676 and natural resource corridor. 677 678 Minimize the negative environmental and visual impacts of development and 679 preserve open space for scenic,recreational and wildlife uses. 680 681 Limit aAnnexation should `..,a be—limit''^•°a to areas where a public benefit can be 682 shown. Consideration of any potential annexation should be limited to the west 683 by the ridgeline into the Snowmass Creek drainage, and otherwise by designated 684 Influence Areas. 685 686 Comprehensively address cumulative impacts and community objectives when 687 making specific land use decisions,for example: 688 689 o Increase the capture of paefghday guests, and yet make sure that 690 new development doesn't diminish roadway levels-of-service, 691 o Incorporate on-site local workforce housing, 692 o Provide remote parking,and/or contribute to the transit system—on both a 693 local and regional basis. Make decisions that best serve the resort and the 694 community over the long-term 695 696 During development or land use review, fully understand the limitations to growth 697 for our community (our carrying capacity) and how the proposal impacts these 698 limitations. 699 700 Complement and integrate new development into the existing character of 701 Snowmass Village, reflecting a compact, pedestrian/village-scale environment 702 based on a high-quality alpine resort experience. 703 704 Create a compact, clearly defined and well-connected Town Core with services 705 and housing in proximity to each other. Density and growth should be 706 concentrated in the Town Core area and land uses should support a place where 707 visitors and locals can interact. 708 709 Preserve the community character of Snowmass Village through intelligent land 710 use; sensitive design; compatible mass, scale and density; and full evaluation and 711 mitigation of impacts caused by new development. 712 713 Encourage new development and/or redevelopment that serve visitor's recreation, 714 I dining,shopping,apres-skignlertainment and basic service needs. 715 716 Ensure that new development includes appropriate employee housing onsite or in 717 Town. 718 Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 7:Built Environment February,2009 Page 16 719 Encourage more amenities that enhance business, minimize vehicle trips and 720 generate local sales tax revenues. 721 722 Encourage Transit Oriented Development(TOD) ideas within the Town Core and 723 regionally,to provide housing in close proximity to jobs. 724 725 Closely examine commercial development in areas outside of the Town Core, 726 ensuring that such development is consistent with overall Town goals and there is 727 a significant public benefit. 728 729 Provide Tough' critical mass at a pace that doesn't exceed the absorption 730 rate of the community with regard to construction impacts and possible 731 interruption of construction due to outside circumstances. 732 733 I • The Town shall not eliminate cCritical elements of the Town infrastructure and 734 necessary community facilities should not be eliminated until a suitable 735 replacement is constructed. 736 737 Consider lone ranee goals and community needs as a whole when making specific 738 land use decisions. Make decisions that best serve the resort and the community 739 over the long term. 740 741 Require that development projects within the Comprehensively Planned Areas be 742 designed consistently with the preferred character in the plan. 743 744 Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 7:Built Environment February,2009 Page 17 1 Chapter 8 Transportation 2 3 January,2009) 4 Strategic Objectives 5 The Town of Snowmass Village supports continued improvements to an integrated 6 mobility system that minimizes vehicle traffic, increases pedestrian options and links 7 land use and urban form with sustainable transportation. The goal is a transportation 8 system that serves residents, guests, employees and visitors quickly and effectively with 9 minimum impacts on the quality of life. 10 11 The Town of Snowmass Village shall be served by convenient, effective and attractive 12 transit service between local commercial and residential nodes, and work with the 13 Roaring Fork Transportation Authority(RFTA)to improve transit services throughout the 14 greater Roaring Fork Valley. A major objective for the community will be to minimize 15 increases in single-occupant vehicle (SOV) use and to increase the use of transit, 16 pedestrian, and other non-SOV modes of travel in the town. Sustainable land use, 17 urban design and employee housing strategies that create vibrant, mixed-use nodes that 18 encourage walking and transit use are design elements for achieving these goals. 19 20 Background 21 Traffic is the significant carrying capacity limit to the town's growth and continued 22 success. Recognizing that approved development will push traffic up to, or beyond, 23 maximum desirable levels, future development must address traffic in their land use 24 decisions to not increase current levels. The transportation issues we face today and into 25 the near future include: 26 27 Local roadways will exceed previously established Levels of Service (LOS) 28 thresholds during peak periods while congestion exists on Highway 82 for even 29 longer periods, 30 The current local and regional transit systems are approaching peak period 31 capacity, 32 Remote parking lots are at or exceed capacity during peak days of peak season, 33 and 34 More designated pedestrian commuting means and walkways pre needed .. Deleted! mmmudngoderded 35 topography & other constraints aside), and grade separated crossings when sidewalks 36 feasible. 37 38 Existing Conditions&Guiding Principles 39 (Note — An extensive 13-page document addresses these areas in greater depth, with 40 accompanying charts, graphs, statistics and research findings. it can be found in 41 Appendix #. The following is a synopsis of the Existing Conditions and Areas of 42 Significance information.) 43 44 1. Measurement of "Person Trips:" Create a useful tool to measure and 45 understand the ramifications of(re)development on the transportation system. It 46 is important to understand the future impacts of (re)development on all the 47 various modes of travel. Modeling of "person trips will not replace the LOS 48 measurements of traffic volume, but would incorporate LOS standards for the 49 other modes of transportation as well. We are approaching critical mass in the Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 8:Transportation January,2009 Page 1 I three current key transportation areas: parking, traffic and mass transit. It is 2 becoming difficult to make changes in one area without having a negative impact 3 on another. For example, it is possible to say that no employees of a 4 re)development will be parking in the Village. This would have a favorable 5 impact on traffic volume, but it could have a negative impact on parking in 6 another location and add to the demand for transit services. It 3 important.to._.,-.- Deleted:wail be 7 know that adequate capacity and funding exists to accommodate and support the 8 re)development,. It is necessaryc to develop__review.sta_n_dard_s a_n_d___m_iti atiOn Deleted: This is new concept for9 measuring mobility needs.9 measures that will be reasonable,consistent and applicable. Deleted:Further study is needed 10 2. Traffic Volume: In the review of Base Village it was stated that the "Cumulative 11 total of future projected traffic, including the Base Village and other outparcel's 12 traffic projections at full build out indicate that one-way peak hour volumes along 13 Brush Creek Road are projected to exceed the Town's established limits." It was 14 projected that the cap of 925 one-way trips would be exceeded roughly 15-20 15 times, at approximately 1,145 one-way trips. This would be considered LOS D. 16 LOS D is described as being congested to the point of"approaching gridlock." It 17 is important to note that this is projected to occur on 15-20 times in the peak 18 season. The Transportation Plan recommends the community continue to apply 19 Transportation Demand Management (TDM) and alternatives to strive to 20 preserve the LOS C standard of 925 into the future. Alternatives that are realistic 21 and financially sustainable will need to be developed to achieve this goal. It is 22 recommended to continually monitor the traffic volume on Brush Creek and any 23 other locations deemed appropriate. 24 3. Parking Inventory and Distribution: The Base Village land use application and 25 Entryway projects have changed the parking inventory in the Village. 26 Development upon the base area lots A-C will result in a parking structure 27 containing public parking with the capacity in the AM peak hour for 200 day 28 skiers and 175 commercial parking spaces. Adding this to the 1,000 parking 29 spaces in the Numbered lots results in 1,375 public parking spaces above the 30 Wooden Skier Bridge. This is an increase of 175 parking spaces over the 1,200 31 spaces recommended in the original Comprehensive Plan. This increase in 32 parking would not have a significant impact on the LOS on Brush Creek Road. 33 The Entryway project is designed to have 325 surface parking spaces upon 34 completion,_'T'he 1998, and in this updated,Comprehensive.Pla.ri recommends .. Deleted: In the Entryway planning 35 650 parking paces at the Entryway site}>Iternatives_to_providing_the_650..% process it was contemplated that 36 parkin spaces or more as may be necessary in order to fulfill the demand. This ',';, additionalover couldsurfacethe parking to 37 will require further solutions that will require future study. will most likely push achieve some 600 parking spaces 38 parking further from the community. This will have impacts on other jurisdictions Deleted: had 39 and the regional transit services. Deleted:ad 40 4. Transit Carrying Capacity: The existing regional and local transit services are Deleted:.The decking over of the 41 reaching heir carrying capacity to the AM and PM peak hours. The local service surface parking polingmaynotbea 9 rY 9 P Y P practical political/economic alternative 42 Village Shuttle) is operating at 6,000-7,000 passengers a day during peak for the community. 43 periods. The regional services (RFTA) are at 2,500 — 3,000 for valley wide 44 services and 3,500 —4,000 for day skier services. The existing facilities for both 45 regional and local transit services are at their practical limits in the peak periods 46 for both bus bays and queuing space for passengers. To make significant 47 increases in the carrying capacity of transit services will require investments in 48 infrastructure, rolling stock and personnel. The original Comp Plan and the Base Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 8:Transportation January,2009 Page 2 1 Village land use submission both contemplated a redeveloped Mall area with a 2 transit station. This was tied directly to the Bi-Nodal commercial goal stated in 3 both studies. If redevelopment of the West Village and the reconfiguration for the 4 existing transit facilities are put off significantly into the future, then interim 5 solutions may be necessary to continue quality transit services. 6 5. Alternative Technologies: Cable technologies, aerial guide ways and 7 pedestrian improvements have been incorporated into the Base Village 8 development plan to help mitigate traffic impacts. Evaluation studies are 9 launched to examine and monitor overall success of these alternative 10 technologies. Long range planning that preserves corridors for alternatives are 11 still recommended in the Transportation Plan. We should preserve these 12 corridors and do this throughout the entire Village. 13 Policies 14 I The Town of Snowmass Village shall: 15 16 Measure transportation performance in the context of "person trips," rather than 17 only in vehicle trips. It has become increasingly clear that using a roadway/car- 18 based LOS metric leads to roadway-based mitigation measures. Given current 19 realities, this creates a conflict with the community vision for a "rural" Brush 20 Creek Road. Shifting the metric to "person trips" allows a more complete context 21 of moving people through town, and expands the toolkit of strategies to use. This 22 approach allows for new development only by mitigating traffic through other 23 strategies;,such as. remote/intercept.-parking,.parking_Apred_use-measures,._.... Deleted:: 24 transportation demand management strategies, mixed land uses, on-site Deleted: fee-in-uew 25 employee housing, attractive pedestrian environments, and other measures to 26 address traffic.This involves measuring the use(volume/ridership) of each travel _.. Deleted:The amount of 27 mode, the capacity or availability of each mode, and the associated costs of development,therefore,is restricted 28 expanding each mode. by the cost or the mitigation. 29 30 Require new development and redevelopment to project the number of"person 31 trips' generated by their application, and present alternatives that strive to 32 achieve a zero growth rate in traffic volume in the peak periods. The approach 33 must be realistic and not overtax any one of the components of the overall 34 transportation system. Developers are to demonstrate how alternative modes of 35 transportation will be encouraged through traffic mitigation such as: 36 37 o Design and configuration of the development or redevelopment 38 o Amenities 39 o Roadway design 40 o Parking(on site and/or off site) 41 o Transit 42 o Staggering employment and service shifts and find creative staffinm----- Formatted:Bullets and Numbering 43 solutions 44 o Pedestrian corridors 45 o Alternative mobility devices-(Gondolas, independent two-way escalators,Deleted:s 46 etc) 47 o Additional employee housing in town 48 o Funding or construction of intercept parking Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 8:Transportation January,2009 Page 3 I o Long-term commitment to a lodging community shuffle service that_- . -- Deleted: private 2 complements the public system. Deleted: vansn(shu ue)sn em 3 o Contribution to a mass transit system 4 o Find creative alternatives to transportation funding including, but not------- Formatted:Bullets and Numbering 5 limited to, transit mitigation impact fees that could be put into a trust 6 possibly utilizing the interest to subsidize operating and maintenance 7 costs. 8 9 10 Uphold the following performance standards as a base line for measuring the 11 impact of future development: 12 13 o Upper Brush Creek Road (above Woodbridge): no significant (equal 14 or greater than five percent of current PM peak hour, peak direction 15 phpd) roadway traffic) net increase in vehicle trips-during the-PM_peak-------- Deleted:vehicle 16 travel period(3:00 to 5:00 pm) 17 o Lower Brush Creek Road (below Woodbridge): maintain existing LOS 18 standard/threshold of 925 peak hour,peak direction jphpd)trips 19 o Owl Creek Road: maintain existing LOS standard/threshold of 650 peak 20 hour,peak direction(phpd); 21 o Intersections: maintain existing LOS C standard/threshold 22 o Non-auto travel modes (for example: walking, busses):monitor usage-_------ Deleted: 23 and capacity to ensure that capacity is not to exceed more than the 10 24 busiest days of peak season 25 26 Comprehensively link land use/employee housing decisions with mobility options. 27 Increase the availability of affordable housing in the town core to reduce 28 workforce commuting along Brush Creek Road. 29 30 Address future parking needs primarily through off-site parking and programs .... Deleted:fee-In-lieu 31 limiting the amount of new on-site parking provided in town. Require 32 development to provide adequate parking per the Land Use Code but at a Town 33 approved location that does not cause a net increase of vehicles on the critical 34 sections of Brush Creek Road during peak hours. Parking may be built off-site 35 with proven ability to move people from the parking lots to the town core and 36 base of the ski area. Additional parking may be allowed in Two Creeks Lot, the 37 Rodeo Lot or other town approved location if parking offsets traffic volume on 38 Brush Creek Road. 39 40 Maintain a maximum of 1,375 spaces for public parking in the town core(1,000 in 41 the Numbered Lots and 375 in Base Village). Make space at Two Creeks and 42 the Rodeo Lot available for day skier parking and limit 200 of the 1,375 spaces in 43 the Town Core to day skier parking. Continue to ensure that the objective of 44 achieving 85 percent utilization of day parking through pricing (Ordinance #9 45 series of 1994)remains in balance with this plan's goal to control traffic volumes 46 within the community. 47 48 For muIti-family development,-increase the use of mass transit in the Brush-- ----- Deleted:existing 49 Creek corridor to reduce individual automobile use. The use of personal vehicles 50 may be lessened by providing effective transit, intercept parking, traffic demand Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 8:Transportation January,2009 Page 4 1 management, courtesy van service, enhanced pedestrian/bicycle opportunities, 2 and improved amenities such as ski lockers near transit stations. 3 4 Develop a fully integrated commuter-oriented trail, bike and pedestrian system 5 for year-round use that connects to regional trail systems and transit stops_ Deleted:summer and winter 6 7 Work with RFTA, Aspen Skiing Company and other transportation stakeholders 8 to provide an integrated premium mass transit system for the Roaring Fork 9 Valley. 10 11 Maintain the 'village feel" and character of Brush Creek Road from Highway 82 12 to the town core, but plan for future premium transportation technologies in the 13 Brush Creek corridor. 14 15 Develop seamless transportation links between Base Village, Snowmass Center 16 and West Village so guests and workers will be able to travel back and forth 17 without cars. Ensure that the capacity and speed will meet expectations. 18 19 Reduce conflicts between pedestrians, buses and delivery services. Encourage 20 Jimited and operationally functional.underground .parking_and_/or.underground___----- Dealeted: 21 service and delivery in the West Village. 22 23 Support and encourage the use of alternative fuels inAyoicles............................... Deleted: Townawrted Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 8:Transportation January, 2009 Page 5 Appendix —Chapter 8, Transportation Synopsis of Public Input Participants in the Comprehensive Plan Update conveyed a desire to maintain low congestion on the town roadways. An equally important issue was the ease of access around town, especially concerning parking for locals. To accomplish this, participants supported a significant increase in use of transit and decrease in car use. Interest lay in improving transit valley-wide. Increased pedestrian access was also highly supported. Desire existed for seamless pedestrian linkages among the three commercial nodes and accessibility across the spectrum for an aging community. Alternative fuel options for public transportation relate the issue of transportation to the environmental resource goals of the plan. Existing Conditions and Guiding Principles 1. Arrival Most winter guests (85 percent) get to Snowmass/Aspen primarily by air, and 57 percent of summer guests as well. They arrive at either: Aspen/ Pitkin County Airport and take a short drive or shuttle to Snowmass Village, Eagle County Airport and drive an hour and a half to Snowmass Village, Grand Junction and drive two and a half hours to Snowmass Village, or They land at Denver International Airport (DIA) and drive 3 %2 hours. Some day visitors, and most non-resident workers, come to Snowmass Village from down valley locations ranging from nearby Basalt/Carbondale to as far away as Silt, Rifle, Hotchkiss, and Delta. Regardless of the origin, guests and workers must travel on Highway 82 to reach one of two roads into Snowmass Village. Highway 82 already exceeds roadway capacity at peak periods. Figure 8.1 Guest Arrivals.From left to right:A)Now do people get to Snowmass/Aspen;B)Purpose of All Trips,and C)Origin of Ali Trips 9uino.10mr &gra eeingalrer1% grye 6imlmm.Vlaege o% 16% Shappngla NN wo.k 13% 9% AWeMilkln County 0% 22% Glr..00a spnngs Arson 6% 38% Gr14%14% Dennm Intem9iontl Ash tirporl 43% 35% rile County Airport Racreenon even 11%77% 15% Source:Condon.Scott."Aspen's Main Carrier Vows Better Service.-The Aspen Time 13 Oct.2007. Figure 8,2 Traffic Vohtmes:Peak Season Aivrage(upper)and on the 10 busiest Days(lower)—compared to Level Of Service C ono V+r od EIM as caeca v vac C \ a® I a i z o a s e v e e m " iz is w u do VVay to Bued a Cued am mac r xo F eoo o av 2. Roadway System The Town of Snowmass Village is primarily accessed via Brush Creek Road; a long two lane rural cul-de-sac that extends from Highway 82 to the West Village. Owl Creek Road serves as an alternative arterial access. It is a two-lane paved road that intersects both Highline and Brush Creek Roads and connects to Highway 82 south of the airport closer to Aspen than Brush Creek Road). A series of cul-de-sacs serving residential neighborhoods intersect with Brush Creek Road. Traffic volumes are greatest in the winter with pronounced inbound and outbound peaks. In the summer, the afternoon peak hour traffic volume is 40% lower. Winter conditions were used for this analysis because they reflect both the highest daily peak and peak hour conditions. Under current conditions, using the "busiest 10 days" criteria, Brush Creek Road, in the vicinity of the Snowmass Center, approaches LOS C. The maximum one way peak hour directional volume by level of service' is presented in the following table. LOS C is the existing standard, for significant sections of Brush Creek Road as well as key intersections, but may not necessarily be a sustainable one. Table 8.1 LOS Standards-Average of 10 Peak(Busiest)Days-One-way Peak Hour L QS Q'B=CAD=ELF Brush Creek Road 500 700 925 1,175 1,400 >1,400 Owl Creek Road and Highline Road 350 500 650 800 950 950 The analysis of traffic at buildout indicated that traffic will significantly increase along Brush Creek Road. This increase is primarily due to new commercial, retail and mixed use development associated with the Base Village (under construction at the time of this Comp Plan update), as well as redevelopment of the West Village and Snowmass Center. Table 8.2 Inicrscction Levc!of Scrvicc Standards LOS Delay in Seconds A 5.0 B 5-15 C 15-25 D 25-40 E 40-60 F 60 The peak hour one-way threshold is arrived at by multiplying maximum volume capacity by the ratio of facility and volume to capacity,which takes into account density, speed and delay. The proposed peak hour directional level of analysis is based on the maximum single direction lane capacity defined by the Highway Capacity Manual, and adjusted to reflect grade and resident/visitor mix within the Town of Snowmass Village. While future development will increase traffic on Brush Creek Road in peak season, in non-peak periods there is an opportunity to "smooth" out traffic flow through a diversified land use mix to "spread out' traffic throughout the day and evening when additional roadway capacity is available rather than concentrating most traffic in peak periods. Thus, in any project assessment it may be important to take into account both "10 busiest days" and Peak Season averages. The "10 busiest days" was established as the threshold to preserve a high quality of life for the general population of the village. The Peak season averages are based on the traffic volumes at: Christmas, New Years, Presidents weekend, and all of March. Analysis of key intersections for conformance with LOS standards shall continue to be required of future land use proposals. The precise amount of the buildout traffic increase depends on the actual effectiveness of potential trip reduction strategies (e.g. as proposed in the Traffic Impact Assessment for the Base Village submission. Figure 8.3 shows projections of both Peak Season Average and "10 Busiest Days"with, and without trip reduction assumptions. As shown, the resulting level of service could range from "D" to "E". With capacity constraints on Brush Creek Road (physical capacity and desire to stay as close as possible to LOS "C"), future traffic flow management should focus on minimizing automobile traffic increases, particularly single-occupant vehicles. To do this will require a shift to greater use of transit and pedestrian alternatives, as well as a comprehensive assessment of parking/ transit/pedestrian land use relationships in any future development or redevelopment. Figure 8.3 Brush Creek Road Levels of Service Comparison:Peak Season Average vs. 10 Busiest Days for Existing compared to Existing Plus Approved Traffic Generation Land Uses I Brush Croak Raed.Peak.Xour/P.eak.Day F 1400- 14a0— so0— E- tii7s 1000 1137 101, 4 RDO r t CTZ soo a r B601 400— 200— t— A t o a Fxistinp Fxiet.epproved FxLat-approved wl by reduction woo tdp r8duc 0 Peak Season Average 10 Busiest Days Average The Town of Snowmass Village's transportation demand management program is effective and should be further developed and strengthened. Examples of transportation demand management strategies include: Flexible work schedules to allow employees to commute in the off-peak hours, Flexible skiing options to spread day skier trips to the off-peak traffic hours, Employee transportation allowances that Figure 8.4 RFTA Ridership 1996—2006(top)and Shatde Passengers encourages carpooling 1006-2007(bonom) Source:http://w w.colomdoski.com and transit use, Preferential carpool and open•Snov ms ToMI RFTA RWenhlp 1996"2966 Zip Car parking spaces, and y-iWI Subsidized RFTA passes 21p.00a S.for employees, visitors, 10 and residents. so.aoe e re.. Transit w s.al.sdw+moe'mm The Roaring Fork Transit Authority RFTA) provides regional transit service from Snowmass Village to Aspen and down valley to Silt and Rifle. The Snowmass Village shuttle JMJ i0 E!H nP MY A!1 IlL .VD service currently operates 20 - 23 buses on eight fixed winter routes. Dial-a-Ride service is available to remote locations and during off-hours. Extensive private transit is available originating both within Town and elsewhere and includes charter bus, hotel shuttles/courtesy vans and taxi/limousine services. Currently, Snowmass Village only has adequate storage facilities for 24 of their 28 buses. Because low temperatures create more wear and tear on diesel engines, all diesel buses should be stored inside to increase vehicle life. The potential impact of future development on traffic levels on Brush Creek Road creates the necessity to reduce dependence on personal vehicles and greatly increase 2 By request(call-in), now operated by High Mountain Taxi utilization of transit. While this change will allow Snowmass Village to achieve other economic objectives (e.g. diversify the range and type of retail offerings), it will also Figure 8.5 Existing Transit Ridership(RFTA and Shuttle)2006—2007 by Location Existing Transit Ridership(2006 and 2007 YTD) Existing TrWOWWRWarshlki: I Village Shuttle Routes Nl1AGE RIXREI Vt CL ROUTE:OUNTRY ROUTE3 C ROOEO LOTROUTE4 r R VILLAGE RWTE5 r r M AL(AOE ROUTE 5 d NLIAK ROtJ7E 7 RFTA MELID RAN HORSE RANCH ROU!_> t 9651 Y ti RFTA-TOSV ROUTE 1 g. 1 ay,,u5rng 0 O RFTA-TOSV Shuttle Bus Stops 5 f a E Average Monthly Ridership 71.ad5 w m U rFE GvIt CHErYY N LOOt d: x.519 I x H!ry L: 0N i` 7,5U7 E O T05V nsa'n O 1t.aga G`V Transl[StA,O 0 r C 3`0 3 S WF tope 6 aN n+m fm uvnr•w4.•.ry nvn-i.n-. xY w.s xu,&.lx. A, trigger significant cost and service implications for both the Shuttle and RFTA. In addition to requiring a larger overall transit fleet, it will require agreement between the Town and RFTA as to allocation of routes, consideration of the type of vehicles that will best serve guest expectations, and substantially increased facilities for maintenance and storage of vehicles. Most day visitors will continue to enter Snowmass Village via Brush Creek Road, park at the Rodeo Grounds and transfer to Village shuttles. The major day skier parking area and transit center will be at the Town Park. With increased use of Owl Creek Road for commuting to and from Aspen, Two Creeks will be more important for parking day skiers. Transit is a primary transportation choice within Snowmass Village. Regional transit service is provided by RFTA, local service by the Town of Snowmass Village. Private transit is available from several providers. Improved transit centers and nodes will increase the effectiveness and attractiveness of transit by capturing more day- skiers, visitors and employees. Major RFTA and Snowmass Village transit centers include a redeveloped center at the Mall, and a new facility integrated into Base Village. Buses will typically end inbound trips and begin their outbound trips from the Mall. Access to the Mall will remain inbound via Brush Creek Road and outbound via Carriage Way. Base Village transit center has been designed as an integral element of the new Base Village development. The Base Village transit center has limited ability to queue passengers separately for uphill and downhill trips, sufficient bus bays to accommodate RFTA, Snowmass Village and private transit providers. Limited number of pedestrian trails and thoroughfares provide convenient links to surrounding properties and activities. The transit stop at the Snowmass Center should be significantly improved by locating new stops at the west end of Snowmass Center. It is important to separate the transit station and travel route from private vehicle. An excessive amount of headway time is lost in the Snowmass Center to traffic congestion. Transit center improvements at the Mall, Base Village, Snowmass Center and Town Park should include comfortable access, egress and queuing, heated passenger waiting areas, information boothAiosks, restrooms and adequate space for future transit services. RFTA and Snowmass Village services have identified these needs: Bus bay requirements are preliminary and do not include staging for vehicles in peak periods. Need for a specific number of bus bays will be refined as precise regional and local transit service is defined for each location. Table 8.3 Bus Bay Requirements by Transit Center TOOSV RFTA Requirement Requirement Location Function s s Other Needs Mall TOSV 8-10 bus bays 5-6 bus bays 5 cabs, limos, DAR* RFTA Transit 4-6 private shuttles & 1 Service Area charter bus Base TOSV 4-6 bus bays 3-4 bus bays 4 cabs, limos, DAR Village RFTA Transit 4 private shuttles & 1 Service Area charter bus Snowmass TOSV shuttle 4-6 bus bays - 2 cabs, limos, DAR Center stop 2 private shuttles Town TOSV shuttle 3-6 bus bays Brush Creek No service Park pick-up & Road stops drop-off area Two TOSV 2-4 bus bays 1-2 bus bays 2 cabs, limos, DAR Creeks RFTA shuttle 2 private shuttles pick-up & drop-off area DAR: Dial-a-Ride Beyond the year 2025, it will not be possible to build enough roads, or develop enough housing to meet demand. As future traffic increases to where LOS "D" is reached, further mass transit improvements will be needed, and the role of transit must be expanded. Snowmass Village will need to be flexible and take advantage of future transit technology opportunities. Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) improvements are being proposed for the Highway 82 corridor between Glenwood Springs and Aspen. Ideally, connecting service will be provided to Snowmass Village. It is recommended that the Village identify and acquire a right-of-way corridor/easement for accommodating future technologies between Highway 82 and the Town Core. More immediate transit improvements to consider include the use of larger 45 passenger buses from Highway 82 into Snowmass Village. Improvements to the Intercept lot at Highway 82 and increased service to the lot will make it an attractive park and ride for day skiers and employees. Parkin Today the Town of Snowmass Village and the Aspen Skiing Company (ASC) jointly manage the use of public-access parking spaces. Vehicles using public-access parking must obtain a parking permit. At the Snowmass Center there are privately-owned public parking spaces that are not managed by either Snowmass Village or ASC. There are also 400 spaces at Brush Creek Road and Highway 82 (the Intercept Lot) that are owned by the Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT) and managed by the Elected Officials Transportation Committee (EOTC). There are a total of 2,165 public-access parking spaces in Snowmass Village. The Town limits the use of public access spaces to 2,250 - The Numbered Lots are located adjacent to the West Village area. Parking in the Numbered Lots that is not used by the residents and guest of the West Village properties is used for resident-public access to the commercial retail and ski area. The Base Village development is also creating 375 spaces (not including residential) of structured parking to be used by village-residents, commercial patrons and day skiers. Under a Shared Use parking management plan, 200 day skier parking spaces are provided for in the parking structure. In the Entryway planning process it was contemplated that additional parking could be added by decking over the surface parking area to achieve some 600 parking spaces. The decking over of the surface parking may not be a practical political/economic alternative for the community. The Two Creeks lot is located at the base of the Two Creeks ski area portal and historically has been a paid parking lot. The Town Park is at the entrance to the Village on Brush Creek Road. Parking to date has been free at Town Park, and free shuttle transportation is provided to the Town Core. There are roughly 700 spaces at the Town Park and Two Creeks Lots. These two lots intercept vehicles traveling to Base Village and the West Village which reduces congestion in the Town. Employees of ASC have been relocated to parking in the Black Saddle Golf Course parking lot, although some provision for ASC employees (150 total) to park in the Number Lots has been provided to date. The parking capacity map illustrates that Town Park and Two Creeks Lots are at or exceed capacity during the ten busiest days. To successfully park more vehicles remotely, the size of these lots would need to be increased. The previous Comprehensive Plan parking cap of 2,250 parking spaces is being reached at times during peak season, and the rate at which this occurs for the day skier parking has become more frequent. The parking cap will be reached upon C 0 Figure 8.6 Existing Public Parking by Location m pExisting Public Parking:2007108 5ki beaso e g t hkingtat 0 m trarvacwwa.. im a nan.a 4pww n NCd E .aoe•w. y xn MMexm Nhpx JCMS P Mv/a Rqi.• Y Oww1MNC s xxx b r Kdxf a h q sk e a Q VMni I1•p4M N N.M1NBCMNSYa9C i a H3 spaco a ai psak InspacesaveibbNM .tpm RSA sa,pd.,•y aooam°„ Town 1p the 200TIW AneWYM 1ao v...a 5 ski season is 3,166 'ti'~ti w° xemm .en plus annMar X00 at Ma e Intercept Lot i lage parking structure in 2010. New development is still required to provide new on-site parking. Conversely, providing additional parking conflicts with the objective of reducing vehicular traffic through town. There is an opportunity now to shift the focus from parking "supply" to parking "demand." The demand for parking is affected by many factors, such as the convenience of the pedestrian environment, availability of transit, convenience of travel from remote parking, and transportation demand management (TDM). Strengthening Snowmass Village's Fee-in-lieu program could provide funding to meet the parking demand while meeting its other objectives. Figure 8.7 Parking Occupancy vs. Capacity Per Lot By Average Season(left)and by 10 Busiest Days(right) z90 so Bo aoa no zas B90 Boo f R50 Yt 699 4m 15D tos u zoo mo 95 0 B HOEW Black Se . T.Ll.ek. W.,wo'. Bma Vm,. NMC 8444tl1a T—f . •Qv P.h' nVnoaea rou v.MWLO oBUm.CV ew.. A1J)a Remrrirg C.pr+ A e.M.,L t Awap QmWonc Table 8.4 Private Parking Above Woodbridge Pedestrian Bridge Number of Source:Snowmass Village Transportation and Planning spaces Departments Employee Housing 469 Multi-Family Residences/Lodge/Hotel 1.241 Commercial/Office 327 Total 2,037 Figure 8.8 Parking Space Distribution by Location Figure 8.9 Purpose of Trip:A!!Lots Business/Other Sightseeing Yrcercept Lm 15% 1% 0% Redeo CorM ShoppinglOining work 3% `aY 22% west vllage a6x Rcdeo r>r 13% ASC h§ntenaric0 Fecay 1% Two Geeb 15% Base VBage6% Guide Lot 1% Recreation Black S."'. 77% clubhouse 6% Service and Delivery The ability of commercial delivery vehicles to move about and load and unload items is not meeting the needs of users. Adequate delivery facilities have not been developed, especially in the Mall /West Village area. Mall transit and parking redevelopment plans should accompany improvements to commercial delivery functions. Commercial delivery functions should be comprehensively analyzed, including a complete assessment of delivery functions on Daly and Elbert Lane. Base Village and other areas of new development should effectively accommodate and integrate necessary commercial delivery. Pedestrian Linkages Pedestrian linkages between housing, destination / activity areas, parking lots and transit stops are essential to convenient movement and effective transportation systems. In Snowmass Village, existing pedestrian links serve mostly recreational uses and link them to residential, lodge and parking areas. Some non-recreational links connect other areas but are incomplete. Where there are no sidewalks or paths, pedestrians are forced to walk on narrow roadway shoulders. The linkages between employee housing, Snowmass Center and the Mall are particularly inadequate. The significant distances and large grade changes in the Town Core make pedestrian trips difficult and increase vehicle trips. Improved pedestrian connections that include designated crosswalk between the Mall, the new Base Village and Snowmass Center may reduce automobile trips. Enforcement of the right-of-way of the pedestrian in a crosswalk to give them priority should be studied. The success of the transportation plan will rely in part on the pedestrian linkages between housing, activity centers, transit stations and stops. The Mall, Base Village and Snowmass Center are key locations to link; however, there are extensive grades to overcome. Improved pedestrian connections may include sidewalks, bridges and people movers. The Town Core area should be intensively developed as a pedestrian district. In addition, both Daly and Elbert Lanes should be modified to improve pedestrian circulation and limit automobile use. I Chapter 9 Workforce Housing 2 3 January,2009) 4 5 Strategic Objectives 6 The Town of Snowmass Village, as a resort community, considers the provision of affordable 7 employee housing (workforce housing) to be a critical element of our success. We aspire to 8 provide such housing to all full-time employees - as defined in the Land Use and Development 9 Code (LUDC) — who desire to live in Town with requirements that can be reasonably met. 10 Achieving this objective will assure an adequate workforce, create a diverse, vibrant community 11 and lessen the environmental impacts. 12 13 Background 14 The Town of Snowmass Village has historically been a leader in providing workforce housing for 15 employees. However, the demand for affordable housing remains a pressing issue in 16 Snowmass Village and the region.The median income of a three-person household in the Town 17 of Snowmass Village was $87,800. This income, based on a 2008 housing study from RRC 18 Associates, can afford a home valued at approximately$350,000. The median sales price of a 19 free market single-family home in Snowmass Village in 2007 was$3.96 million and $950,000 for 20 a multi-family unit(Coates, Reid, and Waldron, 2007): Resort communities including Snowmass 21 Villaqe have increasingly found the issue of work force housing challenging considering the 22 income levels supported by the resort service industry and the escalating price of free market 23 housing. The Town of Snowmass Village and Aspen have historically depended on employees 24 finding affordable housing down valley (Basalt to Rifle). However, with the oil and gas industry 25 in the area growing at a rapid pace, employees are finding jobs closer to home. In addition, 26 home values from Rifle to Snowmass Village are now out of reach for many service employees. 27 Maintaining both a quality work force, and a strong community, has required an aggressive 28 housing policy and these needs have only grown with additional job opportunities up and down 29 the Roaring Fork Valley. 30 31 It should be recognized that there are cycles in the labor and housing market. The policies 32 reflected in this chapter reflect long-term observations and trends in the labor and housing 33 market in Snowmass Village. 34 35 Existing Conditions and Guiding Principles 36 The critical issues associated with workforce housing include: 37 38 Total Jobs: In 2007 and 2008, RRC Associates was hired to determine how many 39 jobs and employees exist in Snowmass Village and where they live. They were also 40 asked to evaluate how many jobs Snowmass Village businesses generated. RRC 41 concluded that in the winter (06107) there were 3,914 peak winter jobs and 2,474 42 summer jobs. Each employee,on average,works 1.35 jobs in the winter and 1.3 jobs 43 in the summer (See Table 1). Based on the number of jobs in the Town of 44 Snowmass Village,there are 2,900 employees in the winter and 1,903 employees in 45 the summer. Based on the information in Table 2 there appears to be 1,740 full time 46 year round employees working in the Town of Snowmass Village. 47 48 Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 9:Workforce Housing January,2009 Pagel 1 2 Table 1: Current makeup of lobsAvorkers Winter 2006107 Summer 2006 Year-round jobs 1,6591 42.4% 1,659 67.0% Seasonal iobs 22,256 57_6%815 33_0% Total jobs 3,9141 100.0% 2,474 100.0% I Average iobslworker 1.35 1_3 Employed persons 2,900:0 1,903 3 Source: Colorado Dept.of Labor and Employment QCEW employer address files;2008 4 I TOSV Employee Housing survey by RRC Associates. Seasonal employees represent 5 40%of total employees. 6 7 e Historical Policy: Over the history of Snowmass Village, housing goals and polices 8 have fluctuated. The 1998 Comprehensive Plan stated policy was to house 60 9 percent of Snowmass Village employees. In addition,the 1998 Plan included a 10 policy to"increase employee housing mitigation requirements for developers so that 11 they mitigate 100 percent of their housing impact."The Land Use Code in 2008 12 requires that developers provide housing for 45 percent of new employees generated 13 from a project. 14 w Where Employees Live: Table 2 summarizes where Snowmass Village employees 15 live.Of note,49 percent or 852 people of Snowmass Village's full time(work summer 16 and winter)employees(1,740 people)live within Town. Of the roughly 2,900. 17 persons employed in Snowmass Village in the winter, approximately 1,100(39 18 percent)are Snowmass Village residents,while approximately 1,800(61 percent) 19 commute from elsewhere.). This adds significantly to the daily traffic volume on 20 Brush Creek Road. It also should be noted that 23 percent of workers that live in 21 Snowmass Village in the winter out-commute to other communities such as Aspen. 22 If hypothetically,all these out-commuters worked in Snowmass Village,the Town 23 would house 50 percent of its total winter peak season workers. 24 Table 2:Summarizing Where Employees Currently Live 25 EMPLOYEES WORKING IN SV IN WINTER Work In SV i TOTAL workI BOTH winter Work in SVl svinwlnte I summ¢ winter ONLY w tive In TOSV 1,119 852 267 f Live elsewhere 1180 887 892 i Total 2,900 1,710 1,160 2 Live In TOSV 2,9% l9K 29% u Liveelsewhere 1fi{7 Sl% 7»Y M' Total 100% 100%100% 26 Source: Colorado Dept. of Labor and Employment OCEW employer address files; 2008 27 TOSV Employee Housing Surveys by RRC Associates. Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 9:Workforce Housing January,2009 Paget 1 2 Regional Housing: In the last 10 years, housing prices have risen sharply in down 3 valley communities. The average single-family home sales price has risen from just 4 above $200,000 to over $500,000 in both Glenwood Springs and Carbondale. Even 5 in traditionally affordable locations such a Rifle and New Castle home prices can be 6 out of reach for many employees. The average single-family homes sales price in 7 2007 was $301,739 and $372,000 respectively (Garfield County Assessors Office, 8 2007). 9 10 Housing Supply: Current housing supply is summarized in Table 3. Approximately 11 1,453 employees are housed in 563 restricted units (either by deed or zoning) and 12 360 non-restricted units (free market homes and dwelling units provided by 13 employers). It is difficult to determine how many units are occupied by seasonal 14 versus full time employees, and it should be noted that some households contain 15 I both residents who work in Snowmass Village on a seasonal basis and residents 16 who work in Snowmass Village on a full-time year-round basis. However, it is 17 estimated that most of the Aspen Skiing Company units (68 units/154 employees), 18 and some of the dedicated units by lodging(150 units/179 employees)are utilized by 19 seasonal employees. This roughly equates to minimum of 23 percent of the total 20 occupied employee housing stock being occupied by primarily seasonal employees. 21 The Town has historically focused on providing housing to full time employees. 22 23 Table 3:Housing Supply- Employee Units in the Town of Snowmass Village 24 25 Percent of 5 maiden Total employees employee Housing units housed house EMPLOYEE HOUSING UNITS IN T9SV: TOSV Housing Office units 374 558 38 County deed restricted(Fairy ay 3) 30 48 3 Other restricted(e.g.by zoning) 35 45 3 Accessory Employee Units 7 7 0 Accessory Caretaker Units 43 43 3 Skim restricted Club Commons) 68 154 11 Dedicated but not restricted mostly lodges) 150 179 12 Total affordable l employee units 713 1,034 71 FREE-MARKET UNITS IN TOSV: Free-market units occupied by employee 210 419 29% TOTAL UNITS HOUSING EMPLOYEES IN TOSV 1 923 1,453 100 HOUSING UNITS OUTSIDE OF TOSV 890 1,780 nla GRAND TOTAL 1,813 3,233 nla 26 27 Source: Town of Snowmass Village housing records; Dec. 2007 State of Snowmass;SV 28 employee surveys; RRC 29 30 Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 9:Workforce Housing January,2009 Page 3 1 e Housing Demand in 2008: Based on the 2008 Snowmass Village employee 2 housing survey conducted by RRC Associates, of the 887 full time year round 3 employees that commute to Snowmass Village, approximately 33 percent are renters 4 who would prefer to live closer to work. Assuming 2 workers per household, this 5 yields a demand for approximately 146 units, of which all would need to be 6 subsidized. The potential demand for the peak number of 1,780 commuters (887 7 year round+893 winter seasonal employees)using the same methodology would be 8 294 units. Additionally, approximately 50 employee-housing units would be needed 9 to accommodate unmet housing demand associated with unfilled jobs in the winter. 10 Demand from unfilled jobs may or may not to be added into our demand forecast, 11 since this may reflect typical unemployment in the Village. It is estimated that 164 12 full time year round employees would like to live in Snowmass Village. Another 13 indicator on current demand is that the Town of Snowmass Village Housing 14 Department in December of 2008 had the following wait list for deed restricted 15 housing: 80 people for studio unit; 86 people for a 1 Bedroom; 60 people for a 2 16 bedroom,and 3 people for a 3 bedroom. 17 18 Table 4:Housfna Demand Person Total persons working In TOSY Persons working working In In both winter& in TOSV In winter TOSV In winter summer only DEMAND ASSOCIATED WITH IN-COMMUTERS: Incommuters 1,780 887 893 of In-opmmuters who rant&prefer to Nye closer lo p of immmmuters who rent 8 prefer to live doser l0 v 588 293 295 rvHH N 2.0 2.0 Housing units demanded by in-Cortmutem 294 146 14 DEMAND ASSOCIATED WITH UNFILLED JOBS: Unfilled lobs in TOSV 136 48 88 I Average lobs per wttker 1.35 1.35 1.35 1 Average workers per household U U Z9 Housing units required to rill unfilled jobs 5o 18 TOTAL HOUSING UNITS DEMANDED: 344 164 180 19 Source:2008 TOSV,employer and employee surveys;.RRC Associates---------------------------------- Deleted:sv 20 21 22 RRC Associates was asked to project future housing demand for both full time and 23 seasonal employees. It should be noted that this prediction may reflect a worst case 24 scenario based on market forces for future demand of housing and assumes the 25 town does not implement polices to prevent the erosion of housing. The following 26 predictions do not include new development at the Center or West Village. They 27 made the following predictions: 28 29 30 31 32 Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 9:Workforce Housing January,2009 Page 1 1 2 3 Table 5:Future Housing Demand Forecast 4 Units Assumption 164 Current unmet demand for housing in Snowmass Village of full time em to ees See Table 4 189 90%of free market units occupied by full time employees would be lost over time. 85 Dedicated unrestricted housing scattered through Snowmass Village if lost Assume 100%seasonal 36 Potential loss of 28%of owner occupied for-sale TOSV housing from retirement 474 Total demand for units assuming 2 employees per unit. 5 6 Policies 7 The Town of Snowmass Village shall: 8 9 The Town of Snowmass Village shall, as its primary housing goal, provide housing for YQ . celeted:65 10 percent of the full-time year round employees (60 percent of total employees). Recent 11 studies of historical patterns(RRC 2008 and Pathways 2003) indicate that 50 percent of 12 our current full-time employees live in the Village and an additional 10 percent wish to do 13 so under reasonable requirements. This suggests a total apparent demand of 60 14 percent. Full time employees represent 60% of total employees. An additional 1j( ........ Deleted:s 15 percent is added to the mitigation ratio in response to forecasted changes in the future 16 environment. These changes foresee reduced affordability of"down valley" alternatives,Deleted,The Town of Snowmass 17 increased cost and inconvenience of commuting, retired employee residency and a village snail 18 reduced contribution of Town free-market employee housing.Deleted;e 19 Deleted: IVDD 20 establish--as_asecondary goal to__provide. housing to seasonal employees_ 21 inventory could be allocated, on a priority basis, to small Town businesses(as defined in Formatted:Not Highlight 22 the Land Use and Development Code),which.are owned.and operated-by-Snowmass;+' Deleted;The Tom of snowmass 23 Village residents. However, it is recognized that such projects would be a lower priority Village Shall 24 within the Town's housing program and addressed only after the primary goal has been Deleted:r 25 achieved. Deleted:66 26 Deleted:The mitigated housing 27 WORK ON STRUCTURE.&quire-private de_veloperstoprovidehousing for percent % shoua first be provided for buume 28 of total employees generated b a development. Mitigation housing should first be year round employeesthen generated by9ypdevelopmentandthen 29 provided to full time employees generated by a new development and then. at the •'--.- Deleted:30 discretion of the Town,for seasonal,employees-------------------------- 31 Deleted: employees generated by 32 The developer should provide the land for affordable housing and shall maximize (on new development 33 sites deemed suitable b the Town the location of affordable housing on the Deleted: Seasonal empbyees y 9 represent 40%of total employees- 34 development site. If physical constraints (in the Town's opinion) limit the location of add to Table 1. 35 housing on the development site, affordable housing required by developers should be Formatted:Not Highlight Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 9:Workforce Housing January,2009 Page 5 I located either within walking distance of the development site or located to minimize the 2 use of commuting in personal vehicles. 3 4 gnsure._that.employees- are housed in close proximity to_-transportation nodes to -... Deleted:The Town shall 5 minimize vehicular traffic and the demand for parking for affordable housing projects. In Deleted:e 6 addition,the Town shall explore design alternatives for auto-free employee housing. 7 8 geYelop.policies and actions to maximize the long-term efficiency of its housing stock.Deleted:The town shall 9 The Town of Snowmass Village shall implement actions to provide housing for retiring Deleted;d 10 homeowners in deed restricted housing to maximize the efficiency of larger deed 11 restricted homes. In addition,the Town shall develop programs to incentivize free market 12 employee occupied housing from being lost from the employee housing supply..................._ .--- Deleted:¶ 13 Deleted:O,Enmurage and 14 When appropriate, work.r.egionally, in partnership with other public and private entities,facilitate(he development of 15 to bring about a wide variety of affordable housing types, sizes and price ranges to.serve `. warkroroe housing on Town wned and other public lands where 16 the needs of all employees, including those that choose to live outside of town limits.appropriate within land use 17 Regional housing solutions should focus on sites that have dose pedestrian access to considerations as necessary to close 18 mass transportation. Increasing density around transportation nodes (transit oriented the gap ir any between existing fun 19 development) to maximize housing at transportation nodes regionally, should be time employee demand and current y1 20 encouraged and complement RFTA's Bus Rapid Transit program. w 21 22 view and assess housing needs for both full-time and seasonal employees,every 3 to_ --- Deleted:Every 3 to 4 years the fb------23 4 years• to ensure housing s"u"p,upply is meeting demand for full time year round •, Town of Snowmass village shall 24 employees.Deleted:r 25 26 Award higher priority in the tenure-based housing lottery process, and consider - .. . Formatted:Indent:Left: 0.25•, 27 increased housing mitigation requirements of developers in order to accommodate Bulleted+Level:l+Aligned at: 28 housing needs of regional employees of districts and/or entities that provide services to 0.75•+Tab after: 1•+Indent at: 29 the Snowmass Village community. 1',Tabs: o.s,List tab+Not at t 30 Deleted:for critical Snowmass 31 Support energy efficient housing. village and essentiallocape:daycm.32 teaches,( lot example:day care. teachers,medical personnel,public 33 Long-term affordability needs to be maintained on deed restricted units that are servants,community service). Award 34 integrated with free market units when considering a now condominium development.families priority an futum sales of affordable units of three bedrooms or 35 The economic effect created by potential assessments, both common and special,mere. The developer mitigation 36 should be considered, as they would affect the long-term affordability of the employee requirement may need to be 37 units. Increased at the discretion of the Town,to accommodate Formatted:Indent:Left: 0.25" Deleted:regional employees Nal service the Snowmass Village community.¶ Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 9:Workforce Housing January,2009 Page 6 Appendix—Chapter 9, Employee Housing Existing Conditions and Guiding Principles Types of Employee Housing(see fmnotei) a. Long-Term Rentals Long term rentals meet the needs of people of all ages and household types. It requires more square footage,personal storage space,parking and neighborhood green space than single-season housing. Public transportation is important, though not as critical as for single-season housing.The Town currently manages approximately 247 long-term rental units. b. Deed-Restricted Sales Units Deed-restricted sales units serve employees with a long-term commitment to the community and should not be mined in the same building with rental employee housing. They are ultimately governed by individual homeowners associations and supported by Town authority and resources to enforce housing requirements. Square footage,storage, parking and green space needs are equal to or greater than those of long-term rentals. The Town currently manages approximately 127 deed-restricted sale units. c. Employee-Occupied Free-Market Housing There are approximately 150 free-market,dedicated but legally unrestricted employee dwelling units in the Town today. These units include employer-provided housing in multi-family and lodge dwelling units. Additionally,there are approximately 50 accessory and caretaker units in single-family homes. In addition,an estimated 210 free- market single-family homes and condominiums house many management workers and business owners,or are shared rentals by Village employees. Free-market units contribute to employee-housing needs although the Town may lose this unregulated employee housing stock as properties are re-sold. d. Single-Family Housing There are currently 774 free-market single-family units and 35 employee-restricted single-family units, for a total 809 units.Another 29 employee units have been approved at Rodeo Ranch but are unbuilt. Existing employee units are located at the Crossings at Horse Ranch subdivision and range in size from 1950 to 2400 square feet. There are 202 approved free-market single-family home sites that remain undeveloped. Approximately 112 free-market SFR units remain undeveloped. e. Duplexes Snowmass Village has one duplex subdivision located in Ridge Run 1,containing 15 duplex lots(30 units),all free-market units. f. Multi-Family Housing 1 Source: 1998 TOSV Comprehensive Plan and Working Draft: Key Housing Measures,4/13/08. Snowmass Village has 2,903 multi-family units, of which 483 units are hotel rooms, 1,811 are free-market units and 610 are restricted or dedicated employee units. Permanent residents occupy 13 percent of the free-market multi-family units. Multi- family employee units range from studios to three bedrooms. The majority of the multi-family employee housing is located in the Upper Village. g.Other Current and Future Providers Other providers of employee housing include: Pitkin County(30 deed-restricted owner units at Fairway 3),Aspen Ski Company(68 units at Club Commons),the Fire House, Anderson Ranch and the Water& Sanitation District(a total of 35 units; includes a small number of other scattered units). Approved-but-unbuilt employee units include: 29 single-family and 45 multi-family(including 26 at the new Base Village). It. Sinele Season Housing(The Town does not currently provide any single-season housing) This housing option is generally more attractive to younger,single people who are new to the area. Conventional apartment-type housing(studios,one-bedrooms and shared two- bedrooms)is more desirable than dormitory style housing. Provisions must be made for resident vehicles and some personal storage.Accessibility to public transportation is a crucial to this type of housing. Current Housing Needs(see footnote 2) Based on the 2008 Snowmass Village employee housing survey,of the 1,780 in commuters during the peak winter season,approximately 33 percent are renters who would prefer to live closer to work. Assuming 2 workers per household,this yields a demand for approximately 294 units,of which all would need to be subsidized. This demand includes both year-round and seasonal housing(estimated at 50 percent each). Additionally,approximately 50 employee housing units would be needed to accommodate unmet housing demand associated with unfilled jobs in Snowmass Village. In addition,based on development that has been approved but not yet built, there is a potential demand for approximately 106 more units(excluding employees required to be housed by Base Village developers). In the longer term,there is a potential need for approximately 274 more units to make up for the potential lass of unrestricted employee housing units,and the conversion of employee-occupied free-market units to second homes or retiree housing. Allowing employees to retire and continue to live in restricted units reduces the existing housing supply by an additional 36 units. Over the long-term, in the categories described above,there is a potential need for approximately 580 units,of which at least 50 percent could be attributed to year- round employees. 2 Source: Snowmass Housing Overview,5/19/08 Town Council Meeting, RRC Associates. Free-Market& Housing Costs(see footnote 3) In 2007,the median sales price of a single-family home in Snowmass Village was 3.96 million($950,000 for multi-family housing). In Carbondale,the median single-family home price was$589,784($375,950 for multi-family housing),and 229,650 in Parachute($189,800 for multi-family housing). In 2007,the average wage per job in Snowmass Village was$23,000,in Carbondale it was$35,000, Parachute it was$47,000. The Snowmass Village average wage that would support purchasing a free-market home is approximately$65,000. Even assuming a substantial increase in wages,it is evident that most permanent residents in the Roaring Fork Valley cannot afford to purchase free-market units in Snowmass Village.These figures make clear why Snowmass Village workers are commuting from further and further away. Although a significant number of residential units have been constructed in Snowmass Village and the Roaring Fork Valley in the past few years,most of those units are priced for upper-income buyers. Reasonably priced housing in Snowmass Village and within the Roaring Fork Valley for low and middle-income households is extremely difficult to find. From 2005 to 2007 less than 1 percent of the inventory on the market was affordable to an average Snowmass Village wage eamer. Although Aspen,Pitkin County and Snowmass Village have made a significant effort to provide affordable housing, there is still a significant unmet demand. Existing Development Mitigation Requirements Snowmass Village requires employee-housing mitigation from new development with a winter housing impact. Requirements are based on job generation rates for different land uses. A formula determines how much restricted housing square footage will mitigate the development's impact. Snowmass Village can determine that a cash-in- lieu fee equal to the cost of providing restricted employee housing is more appropriate. As a result of significant employee housing contributions,the Snowmass Land Company currently has approximately 150,000 square feet of housing mitigation credit that can be applied to future development. Synopsis of Public Input In general, the most prevalent public comments focused around the following objectives: AtWppt to house 45%_to 65%0 of Snowmass Village workers in town, Deleted:,i. Include housing for all economic levels ofworkers (not just the lowest income levels), Provide housing for year-round employees, Keep accurate data about the status of employee housing in Snowmass Village, and Keep an accurate assessment of the housing need in Snowmass Village. 3 Sources: Notes RE: Comprehensive Plan Update/Snowmass Village, czbllc, 1/31/2008; Land Title Aspen;Garfield County Assessors Office. While discussing community issues with stakeholder groups,the lack of affordable housing for current and potential employees was repeated multiple times as a limitation to providing adequate services. These positions include services provided by firefighters, emergency medical technicians,police officers,day care providers,town staff, snow plow drivers,and town administrators. Chapter 10 Actions and Implementation February, 2009) Introduction This chapter summarizes the actions and implementations in the individual Comprehensive Plan chapters. Actions are chosen to best apply the Town of Snowmass Village's key policies of the Update to the Comprehensive Plan: Live within the constraints of natural and man-made systems (environment and traffic) Maintain or create a multi-faceted workforce that is essential to sustain the resort and community economy Capture a greater share (leakage)of guest expenditures, Attract more guests/visitors, especially by broadening summer and winter seasons Actions are grouped according to the chapter topic. The column adjacent to the action shows which department/person is responsible for the implementation. Next to that is a prioritization column. Though it is understood that Town Council will prioritize the implementation actions, a suggested timeframe to complete the action is suggested. This is a working document and completed and/or outdated items should be deleted and new items added and prioritized. Comprehensive Plan Actions Table begins on Page 2. Regional and Community Economics Responsible Priority De artment 1. Develop a joint retail management strategy to secure a mix of Marketing 1-2 years tenants that optimizes retail potential (as is done in most regional shopping malls). The management strategy should include: Selection of a mixture of uses to ensure a certain degree of vibrancy both in summer and winter seasons; Balance in terms of price points; Healthy balance between local/national tenants; Retail mix that will cater to locals as well as tourists. 2. Maintain the existing location of ski lift sales at the Snowmass Planning Ongoing Mall. 3. Consider adaptive reuse opportunities for problematic retail Marketing 1-2 years locations at the Snowmass Mall. 4. Establish system to monitor progress towards the implementation Planning Annually of policies of the Comprehensive Plan. If policies are not being effectively implemented by market forces, or voluntarily, identify necessary establish remedial action. 5. Formally adopt and implement the 2008 Snowmass Village Marketing 1 year Strategic Marketing Plan. 6. Challenge existing partners (Anderson Ranch, Aspen Music Fest, Marketing Ongoing Jazz Aspen Snowmass, ACES, ASC, Aspen Film, Rodeo, etc.) to expand their programs and events in the Village. 7. In order to provide conference-attendee friendly accommodations, Planning Ongoing require 45-50 percent of core Village HOT bed units be non- fractional, hotel, studio or one-bedroom units. 8. Do an annual assessment of construction to assure a necessary Marketing Annually quantity of commercial space and HOT bed accommodations remain available. Community Arts Responsible Priority De artment 1. Develop a detailed plan for the arts that: Marketing 2 years Analyzes how to best leverage programs with surrounding communities, organizations, and government entities; Identifies and prioritizes desired amenities; Includes a strategy for the expansion of events to allow for an active and vital environment for all age groups, addressing both public and private funding of events; and Provides a market and financial analysis of a permanent performing arts facility, with recommendations on the ongoing funding, management, and operation of such a facility. Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 10: Actions and Implementation February, 2009 Page 2 2. Support the enhancement of Anderson Ranch Arts Center's SAAB Ongoing presence throughout the Village. 3. Establish an arts focus for West Village redevelopment, including Planning 2-3 years or the possibility of a performance facility; rehearsal, classroom, sooner if PUD studio, exhibit spaces; and public art. is submitted Community Services, Facilities& Amenities Responsible Priority De artment 1. Develop a communications master plan policy, including but not Community 2 years limited to, providing incentives for providing community wide Relations Officer cellular coverage, wireless and other technology that keeps abreast of the times. 2. Establish system to monitor the carrying capacity of our Economic 1 year community amenities, services and facilities to ensure adequate Resources levels, establish thresholds. Director(ERD) 3. Modify review criteria to include community services, facilities Planning 1 year and amenities "carrying capacity" in all development and land use reviews in order to avoid exceeding our capacities. Environmental Resources Responsible Priority Department 1. Pursue the Goals identified in the Town's Environmental ERD Ongoing Sustainability Plan. 2. Adopt and execute an annual Environmental Implementation Plan. ERD Ongoing 3. Establish a Town advisory committee or task force dedicated to ERD 1 year those issues concerning environmental sustainability. 4. Establish a dedicated funding source for programs, projects, and ERD 1-2 years other initiatives designed to help the Town achieve its environmental goals. 5. Prepare a biannual report on environmental performance indicators ERD Ongoing to inform future updates to the Town's Environmental Sustainability Plan, and to help prioritize items to be included in future Environmental Implementation Plans. 6. Prepare Land Use and Development Code amendments to add ERD, Planning 1-2 years clarity and achieve consistency among Town policies related to preservation of the natural environment, sustainable development and energy conservation. 7. Prepare Land Use and Development Code amendments to ERD, Planning 1-2 years strengthen review standards concerning environmental impact analysis and the consideration of carrying capacities. Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 10: Actions and Implementation February, 2009 Page 3 8. Prepare Land Use and Development Code amendments requiring ERD, Planning 1-2 years new development to demonstrate no negative impact, or mitigation of any unavoidable impact upon scenic and natural resources within the Town and its influence areas. 9. Pursue stream restoration projects through public funding and ERD Ongoing community partnerships, and require new development to incorporate stream restoration measures (including construction of new bridges and/or culverts) in reached adjacent to their projects. Built Environment Responsible Priority De artment 1. Develop detailed design guidelines to implement the concepts in Planning 2 years this Chapter. 2. Modify design review process to consider a physical or virtual Planning 1 year model that encompasses a significant portion of the surrounding context. 3. Create standards, and means of measuring compliance, for Planning 1 year increased energy efficiency and `green' building practices. 4. Study the feasibility of creating a continuous (weather protected) Planning 4-5 years pedestrian connection between the various levels of the West Village. 5. Re-evaluate and update the Build Out Allocation Chart. Planning 2 years 6. Modify development review criteria to require applicants to Planning 1 year address carrying capacity at the time of development or land use submittal and require analysis of carrying capacity in Staff review of the project. 7. Revise the definition of 'community benefit' to assure that it Planting 1 year encompasses public gathering areas, employee housing and / or other amenities that help realize the Aspiration. 8. Create standards to evaluate the pace and phasing of a Planning 2 years development proposal with regard to construction impacts and possible interruption of construction as it would affect the community as a whole. 9. Establish guidelines to fully implement the "Just Big Enough" Planning 1 year philosophy of the Comp Plan and the Strategic Marketing Plan. 10. Develop guidelines to incentivize transit oriented development to Planning 1 year provide employee housing in close proximity to Village jobs. 11. In conjunction with any significant development or redevelopment Planning 2-3 years Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 10: Actions and Implementation February, 2009 Page 4 proposal of the West Village and Snowmass Center, include analysis of: Underground parking, Central delivery, including eastern edge delivery connections Consolidated transit facilities Transportation Responsible Priority De artment I. Create (and require all development to utilize) a single traffic Planning 1 year model to standardize the analysis of traffic impacts. Establish a mechanism for determining the amount of person trips to be created by a proposed development. Modify development review criteria to require traffic impact assessments of new development to include both capital and operating costs. 2. Prior to any new development or redevelopment in West Village, Planning 1 year modify development review application to require the developer address a check list to assure that the policies are consistent with policies of this chapter. 3. Evaluate the effectiveness of the commercial delivery access in the Transportation 2-3 years Base Village redevelopment. Incorporate a revised transit center that removes pedestrian/bus conflicts and consolidates bus services. 4. Conduct detailed pedestrian linkage analysis of Base Village, West Transportation 2-3 years Village and the Snowmass Center. S. In conjunction with RFTA, commission a detailed transit analysis Transportation 1-2 years that identifies the potential bus requirements for several scenarios for various combinations of lodging at build-out, commercial and employee housing. Expand current monitoring of transit ridership and parking utilization. 6. Determine the feasibility of alternative transit modes for the Brush Transportation 1 year Creek Corridor from Highway 82 to the Town Core. 7. Establish a monitoring system to track the potential transportation Transportation 1 year impact of new development, including appropriate data on intersection LOS. 8. Determine transportation improvement priorities. Identify what Transportation 1 year developments trigger improvements. 9. Develop comprehensive sub-area plans for the Rodeo Grounds and Transportation 5 years the Highway 82 intercept lot that address parking, information, bus transfer, employee housing, baggage transfer,bus types, etc. 10. Expand the capacity of potential traffic fee-in-lieu to fund Transportation 1-2 years Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 10: Actions and Implementation February, 2009 Page 5 programs that meet parking demand, not just increased supply. 11. Improve pedestrian trail linkages in the Town Core, including Transportation 1-2 years overlay of the trails network and access to bus infrastructure. Housine Responsible Priority De artment 1. Establish regular monitoring and report annually to Council on Housing Every 2 years Snowmass Village's Work Force Housing of Snowmass Village employees. 2. Update Land Use Code as necessary to implement the Housing, 6 months recommended policies of this chapter, including a Work Force Planning Housing mitigation of 65 percent. 3. Evaluate, and increase if necessary, incentives for the creation of Housing 1-2 years caretaker or accessory dwelling units on single family homes. Adjust regulations and enforcement to assure that accessory dwelling units are rented to Snowmass Village employees. 4. Discontinue the practice of giving"credits" in-lieu of actual Housing t year housing units to satisfy development mitigation requirements. 5. Explore the possibility of meeting additional workforce housing Housing 2-3 years needs through purchase or lease of the existing free-market housing stock, 6. Conduct site planning "capacity analysis" study of potential Housing 6 months workforce housing, including a supply-demand balance forecast. Town of Snowmass Village Comprehensive Plan Chapter 10: Actions and Implementation February, 2009 Page 6 MEMORANDUM TO: Snowmass Village Town Council FROM: Jason Haber, Economic Resource Director DATE: October 5, 2009 SUBJECT: ENVIRONMENTAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE BIANNUAL STATUS REPORT AND 2009 RENEWABLE ENERGY OFFSET PROGRAM FUNDING REQUEST. I. PURPOSE AND ACTIONS REQUESTED OF COUNCIL Receive a status report from the Environmental Advisory Committee and approve the 2009 Renewable Energy Offset Program (REOP) funding request in an amount not to exceed 26,000. q. BACKGROUND On February 2, 2009, Council accepted the Snowmass Village Environmental Sustainability Plan and directed staff to convene an advisory group to assist in the Plan's implementation. The Snowmass Village Environmental Advisory Committee (EAC) formed in March 2009, and has been meeting twice a month since that time. Over the last six months, the Committee has focused its efforts on accomplishing the fifteen (15) initiatives identified in the 2009 Environmental Implementation Plan (attached). As suggested in the Implementation Plan, the EAC is now presenting the first of its biannual status reports to Council. In addition to the EAC status report, Council is also being asked to consider a $26,000 REOP funding request, based upon the recommendations of the EAC. The REOP Fund has a current balance of $32,691, which has been generated through the payment of in-lieu fees made pursuant to the regulations of Ordinance No. 11 of 2008, Building Efficiency Standards and Renewable Energy Offset Program (REOP). Consistent with the REOP Fund Spending Protocols adopted under Resolution No. 27 of 2008, Town staff and the EAC are requesting that Council authorize expenditures to cover four (4) distinct items that support the goals and implementation measures outlined in the Town's Environmental Sustainability Plan. III. EAC STATUS REPORT The following discussion will address progress made by staff and the EAC with respect to each of the initiatives identified in the 2009 Environmental Implementation Plan. 1 . Collaborative relationships have begun to be developed with several Town Departments and other community partners. Town staff and the EAC have had direct interaction and collaboration with the following groups: Aspen Skiing Company's Environmental Advisory Council, CORE, Pitkin County Energy Manager, City of Aspen Canary Initiative, For the Forest, US Forest Service, and the CML Energy Sustainability and Environment Committee. 2. Town operations have continued all of the sustainable standard operating procedures discussed previously with Council. New ideas continue to be implemented, including, as an example, a shift to using electronic meeting agendas as opposed to printed agendas for Town staff meetings. Our biggest environmental improvements have come as a result of new information-gathering software and operational fine tuning in the Facilities Management Division. In 2008/09 adjustments made to building systems have resulted in more than $100,000 in savings from reduced energy usage. 3. All of the necessary components are being pulled together in order to develop a baseline environmental indicators report for the Town. The Town's Energy Tracker software, acquired in 2008, allows staff to closely monitor water use, electrical and natural gas consumption in several different Town facilities. Combined with fuel farm data, we have all of the essential inputs to fully understand the Town organization's environmental footprint. The Town has contracted with Schmueser Gordon Meyer Engineers (SGM) to conduct industrial energy assessments for seven unique Town facilities, and staff is recommending that Council approve additional assessments to address the Town-owned housing facilities. These assessments provide specific recommendations highlighting the most cost-effective and environmentally beneficial improvements to be made to these facilities. Also recommended, is a Town membership with the International Council for Local Environmental Initiatives (ICLEI). ICLEI provides access to proprietary software that will help staff determine the Town's carbon footprint and develop realistic reduction or stabilization targets. 4. Staff has submitted two significant grant applications in pursuit of federal dollars available for environmental initiatives. First, the Town has signed on as a partner applicant for grant funds available through the EPA's Community Action for Renewed Environment (CARE) grant program. This grant seeks funding for several government and non-profit partners in the Roaring Fork Valley, including Snowmass Village, CORE, the City of Aspen, Pitkin County, Aspen Center for Environmental Studies, and the Sopris Foundation to establish a collaborative process to develop a strategic plan addressing environmental issues in the region. These issues would include air quality, drinking water, surface and ground water, waste disposal and indoor environmental health. The Town has also submitted a grant request seeking $100,000 from the New Energy and Economic Development (NEED) grant program. This program is being administered by the Colorado Governor's Energy Office (GEO), distributing federal money made available through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). If this request is successful, these funds would be used to leverage other funds available for the implementation of a wide variety of recommended energy efficiency improvements to the Town's Public Works Facility on Owl Creek Road. Implementing the proposed improvements would support the retention and/or creation of nearly 10 local jobs, reduce the Town's annual utility costs by more than $16,000 and result in 104 tons of reduced carbon emissions per year. 5. The EAC has explored the issue of waste collection and diversion, accompanying the Town's Solid Waste and Recycling staff on a tour of the Pitkin County Landfill and developing a broad understanding of the department's successes and challenges. The Committee has also worked with the Town's Special Events division, resulting in a contract with the 'Zero Hero' waste diversion company for the 2009 Chili Pepper and Brew Festival. Another area of focus, and one thought to have the greatest potential for near-term improvement has been construction and demolition waste. Based on staff input, the Committee has come to recognize that significant improvements in our waste diversion rates will only be accomplished through fundamental changes in our waste collection system. The complexity and controversial nature of this endeavor has led the Committee to view this as a longer-term goal. 6. The EAC has met on several occasions with the Town's Marketing Dept. and the Aspen Skiing Company's event staff in a collaborative effort to develop green special event criteria. With experience gained through the 2009 summer season, the Committee is making progress toward a set of criteria intended to be included as a condition of receiving a Town special event permit. The EAC's goal is to have the criteria in place for the 2010 summer events season. 7. Several new protocols have been introduced in an effort to prioritize electronic communications throughout the Town organization. For example, the Pitkin County Alert system has been implemented to provide emergency updates and information regarding construction activity throughout the Town. In addition, the Town's employee newsletter and staff meeting agendas are now distributed in electronic formats. 8. The EAC has worked closely with the Town's Building Department to help facilitate the implementation of the Town's Efficient Building Standards and Renewable Energy Offset Program (REOP). The Committee continues to consult with the Building Department as we explore opportunities to incentivize sustainable building practices and develop a Green Building Code for the Town. The Town's Land Use and Development Codes are expected to receive greater attention from the Committee upon completion of the ongoing Comprehensive Plan Update. 9. While it does not appear that the Town is on track to achieve its goal of reducing organizational paper consumption by 20% this year, there have been several improvements in this area. We are no longer purchasing any printers without double- sided printing capabilities, we are saving and re-using single side printed paper for fax and draft document printouts, and we have developed a plan for transitioning to a paperless packet system. This plan will be discussed with Council in greater detail at a later date. If Council chooses to appropriate the funds necessary to launch the paperless packet, such a change would provide a significant boost toward reaching the stated reduction target. 10.Staff and the EAC have paid close attention to the Renewable Energy Offset Program and are presenting a follow up regarding proposed disbursements of REOP funds in conjunction with this EAC Status Report. In light of recent conversations with City of Aspen Building Dept. staff, Town staff will be returning to Council in the near future to discuss a couple of recommendations concerning changes to the REOP Ordinance. One of the recommended changes will likely be to increase the on-site mitigation credit for solar photovoltaic systems from a factor of two to a factor of three. The effect of this change would be to require only a 33% offset, as opposed to a 50% offset, when an applicant chooses to use grid-tied PV to mitigate their exterior energy uses. This change would bring us back into consistency with the City of Aspen REMP requirements. The second recommended change will likely address applicability of the REOP Ordinance with respect to previously approved Planned Unit Developments. 11 .The EAC has put little to no effort into improving trail to transit connections so far. Other than having a few conversations with Public Works and Transportation Dept. staff, this item has been a low-priority for the EAC. 12.The Town was a participant in the 2009 Plastic Bag Challenge. Staff does not have a final tally on the number of plastic bags avoided from use at this time. 13.With respect to tracking and supporting progressive climate legislation, staff and the EAC have benefited greatly from our collaborations with CORE, the City of Aspen and Pitkin County. These efforts have focused largely on developments concerning Pitkin County Referendum 1A - The Energy Smart Loan Program (addressed under a separate item on today's Council agenda) and the City/County Renewable Energy Mitigation Program. As noted in the CORE proposal highlighted later in this report, staff and the EAC believe that our efforts in this area will be greatly served by an ongoing relationship with CORE. 14.Development of an energy procurement and generation strategy will naturally follow the completion of our environmental baseline analysis and the energy assessments being completed by SGM. To address this initiative directly, SGM has also been asked to evaluate Town-wide opportunities for solar, hydro and wind power generation. Once all of this information is compiled, staff and the EAC will be able to consider options and opportunities, and develop a comprehensive strategy for Council consideration. 15.The EAC worked with the Town's Community Relations Officer to develop a Town- hosted website to serve as an informational resource on environmental issues http://www.tosv.com/sitepages/pid229.r)hr)). Presentations have been made to the Part Time Residents Advisory Board, as well as Snowmass Village lodging operators and business owners to discuss environmental best practices for property managers and operators. The EAC also hosted a showing of Al Gore's climate change documentary An Inconvenient Truth." Results from the Town's energy assessments will help staff and the EAC further develop informational pieces for distribution. The EAC continues to meet on a bi-weekly basis, and its members have devoted countless hours of volunteer time to these accomplishments. The group remains dedicated to these pursuits, and would like to express its gratitude for the assistance and collaboration provided by all of the Town Departments and staff. The EAC would like to bring specific attention to the efforts of the Public Works Dept. and Facilities Management staff for their outstanding work to address the Town's environmental performance and climate protection efforts. Based upon several department head interviews, independent research, and presentations received from the various community organizations noted above, the EAC has concluded that a comprehensive understanding of our energy use is critical to developing an effective strategy for reducing energy costs, reducing carbon emissions, and beginning the process of greening our community and the Town organization. An effort to develop this understanding and secure the essential tools and resources necessary for success in this effort serves as the foundation for the 2009 REOP Funding Request outlined below. IV. 2009 REOP FUNDING REQUEST Resolution No. 27 of 2008 states that 'Within one year of the effective date of Ordinance No. 11 , Series of 2008, the Town of Snowmass Village may solicit and accept written REOP funding applications from Snowmass Village residents, property owners, and businesses, as well as from builders, developers, public agencies, special districts, and non-profits conducting business or providing services within the Town of Snowmass Village." Given the limited availability of funds for 2009, staff and the Environmental Advisory Committee are not recommending a public solicitation for funding applications at this time. However, in an effort to achieve the broadest community benefit with the limited resources available, a handful of expenditures are being recommended at this time. Resolution No. 27 of 2008 stipulates that expenditures of REOP funds shall be for the following purposes: 1. Planning, design, and/or implementation of a renewable energy generation project, 2. Purchase of renewable energy offsets (credits), 3. Providing a community grant and/or rebate program for energy efficiency enhancements or renewable energy generation projects, and 4. Funding other resources and administrative costs associated with green building or sustainability-oriented efforts. Expenditures of REOP funds are further limited to projects demonstrating consistency with the following criteria: 1. The application demonstrates a quantifiable return on investment in terms of: a. Reduced demand for energy derived from non-renewable sources, or b. Reduced emissions of greenhouse gases. As such, the following components comprise the 2009 Renewable Energy Offset Program Funding Request: 1. International Council for Local Environmental Initiatives (www.icleiusa.org) 1-Year Membership - $600 Highly recommended by the City of Aspen's Canary Initiative staff, ICLEI membership would provide the Town with access to valuable tools and resources focused on environmental sustainability and climate protection. ICLEI is an association of approximately 1,100 international city and county government agencies (600 US members, 20 Colorado members) that are committed to finding and sharing answers to the issues concerning environmental sustainability and climate protection. ICLEI has developed a five-step process that establishes a framework for quantifiably evaluating progress toward community sustainability. ICLEI-developed software and measurement protocols would allow the Town to conduct an energy use and emissions inventory for the community as a whole and for the Town organization. In combination with the SGM energy assessments discussed below, ICLEI membership will enable the Town to determine where our emissions are coming from and target areas to focus investments that maximize both economic and environmental bang for the buck. ICLEI also serves as an information clearinghouse, providing notifications of federal and state grant opportunities, while helping communities develop the strategic planning, back-up data and analysis to support their grant requests. 2. Community Office For Resource Efficiency (www.aspencore.org) 2009 Membership — Up to $5,000 Town staff and the EAC agree with the proposal outlined in the attached Town of Snowmass Village Board Membership Agreement, and request Council approval for a 2009 expenditure equal to 10% of REOP fees collected in 2009 (currently 3,269), up to a maximum contribution of $5,000. 3. TOSV Facility Energy Assessments and Renewable Energy Evaluations 15,000 On June 1, 2009 staff reported to Council that the Facility Maintenance Division intended to contract with Schmueser Gordon Meyer (SGM) for a renewable energy evaluation and energy audit of several Town facilities for a cost of up to $26,000, as outlined in the attached proposal from SGM. At that time, it was anticipated that the audits would be paid for through a combination of Town utility funds realized through 2009 cost savings and Holy Cross funds available through their Commercial and Industrial Energy Audit Grant Program. In reviewing the formulas and options concerning the Holy Cross funding, staff has determined that the Town would be eligible for a larger grant if the funds were used to implement the audit recommendations, rather than to pay for the audits themselves. As such, staff and the EAC recommend that $15,000 in REOP Funds be appropriated toward the cost of completing the audits. These audits have already been performed, and staff has had the benefit of using their analysis and recommendations as the basis for a $100,000 NEED Grant application currently pending with the Governor's Energy Office. As an example of the value represented by these audits, making the recommended improvements for the Public Works Shop Facility alone would save the Town $16,000 per year in utility costs, with a simple payback of seven (7) years, and carbon emissions reductions of 104 tons per year. Once all of the facility audits are complete, staff will prioritize which energy efficiency improvements should be implemented. The intent remains to use a combination of NEED Grant funds and the Town's Holy Cross Community Enhancement Fund, which currently has a balance of approximately $500,000 to fund the improvements. 4. TOSV Housing Energy Assessments 5,400 Upon staff's request, SGM has met with the Town Housing Dept. and developed the attached proposal to provide energy audits for all of the Town-owned affordable housing complexes. Similar to the audits described above, the analysis would provide the Town with a comprehensive understanding of the efficiency of the Town's affordable housing stock. This analysis will provide a comprehensive set of recommendations for energy efficiency improvements to be made at the unit-specific and complex-wide levels. Staff and the EAC recommend that $5,400 in REOP Funds be appropriated toward the cost of completing the housing audits. The EAC recommends that Council approve the 2009 REOP Funding Request outlined above. The expenditures appear to be consistent with the adopted REOP Spending Protocols, and are expected to result in the following benefits to the Town of Snowmass Village: Provide the Town with strategic tools and technical assistance to inform decision-makers and provide back-up data to support future grant requests. Connect Snowmass Village with national environmental leaders and locally- based resources. Establish a baseline environmental analysis for Snowmass Village, enabling the Town to develop implementation measures that will save taxpayer dollars and improve long-term community livability, air quality and public health. Develop strategic projects and programs that will support the local economy and create jobs through demand for energy efficiency services and products. Contribute to building a legacy of environmental leadership while inspiring community engagement around the issue of environmental sustainability. III. STAFF RECOMMENDATION That Council accept the Environmental Advisory Committee Status Report and approve the recommended 2009 expenditures from the Renewable Energy Offset Program (REOP) Fund in an amount not to exceed $26,000. Attachment 1 1. PAge 1 of 2 Snowmass Village 2009 Environmental Implementation Plan February 2, 2009 As of this date, the Town of Snowmass Village is operating under a contingency budget plan, which has required cuts to existing programs, services, and staffing levels throughout the organization. As such, the 2009 Environmental Implementation Plan does not include any Implementation Concepts that involve new budget appropriations or staff resources. Responsibility for this Implementation Plan will lie with the Town's Economic Resource Director, who, in collaboration with other Town departments and community partners, will spearhead efforts to accomplish the various initiatives presented. A biannual status report and plan update will be presented to Council, in order to track the progress being made within each of the initiatives described below. 1. Collaborate With Town Staff and Other Community Partners Convene quarterly meetings of Town departmental representatives to brainstorm opportunities and report on ongoing efforts to make Town operations, policies and procedures more environmentally friendly. Convene quarterly meetings with other community partners (such as the Aspen Skiing Company, utility providers, special districts, other regional jurisdictions, and community interest groups)to develop relationships, share knowledge, and coordinate efforts around common environmental goals. 2. Continue Ongoing Efforts and "Green" Operating Procedures Already In Place Staff has identified numerous operational initiatives, programs and procedures that are already being implemented, and which are consistent with the Town's Environmental Goals. These efforts are being implemented throughout the Town organization, and will continue to be implemented as standard operating procedures. A list of these initiatives will be discussed during staffs presentation to Council. 3. Conduct Baseline Analysis of Town Environmental Indicators Work with Town departments to develop a broad understanding of our environmental footprint. Examine organizational use of electricity, natural gas, gasoline and diesel fuel, and office paper. Understand waste generation rates at the organizational level and Town-wide. Inventory Town- owned buildings and vehicles and identify opportunities for efficiency upgrades and renewable energy generation projects. Conduct in-house energy audits and building shell analyses on Town-owned buildings. Consider special events and other Town-sponsored activities in terms of opportunities to reduce environmental impacts. Set percentage reduction targets based on baseline usage. 4. Pursue Grants and Provide Grant Assistance Identify and pursue grant opportunities available to help fund renewable energy generation projects (i.e., micro-hydro, solar, etc...) and other projects to help reduce the community's carbon footprint and accelerate our progress toward environmental sustainability. Provide information and assistance to community members interested in pursuing sustainability-oriented grants(i.e., for appliance rebates, home energy efficiency upgrades, etc...). 5. Improve Waste Collection and Diversion Strategies Work with the Town's Solid Waste Dept.to convene a working group to identify opportunities to improve the Town's waste collection systems and waste diversion/recycling programs. Attachment 1 Page 2 of 2 6. Adopt"Green" Special Events Criteria Work with the Town's Marketing Dept. to develop criteria and standard operating procedures designed to minimize the environmental footprint of special events held within the Town. Identify best practices for minimizing waste, energy consumption, and greenhouse gas emissions. 7. Prioritize Electronic Communications Work with the Town's Community Relations and Marketing Depts. to prioritize use of electronic communications strategies, as opposed to distributing printed materials (i.e., for surveys, advertisements, public notices, etc...). S. Evaluate Building, Land Use & Development Codes Work with the Town's Planning and Building Departments to review the Building Code, and the Land Use & Development Code to identify potential amendments aimed at strengthening environmental protections and enhancing energy efficiency requirements in new building and development proposals. 9. Reduce Town's Organizational Paper Consumption by 20% Transition Town organization to electronic record retention system. Adopt internal purchasing policy requiring all future printer/copier purchases to have double-sided printing capability. Develop plan to transition to a paperless packet system (for Town Council, Boards and Commissions). Investigate benefits of acquiring Smartboards for Town conference rooms to avoid paper use. Re-use single side printed paper for fax and "draft' printing jobs. 10. Follow Up On Renewable Energy Offset Program Return to Council in March 2009 to address REOP fee schedule. Return to Council prior to November 2009 to address REOP fund distribution (grant/subsidy) program. 11. Improve Trail to Transit Integration Work with Transportation Dept. and Trails Committee to identify opportunities to better integrate bike/pedestrian trails with transit infrastructure. 12.Participate in Reusable Bag Challenge Partner with the Village Market, CAST and CORE in the Reusable Bag Challenge to encourage a reduction in the use of plastic shopping bags. 13. Track and Support Progressive Climate Legislation Staff will monitor and bring to council's attention legislative initiatives representing progressive climate policy at the local, state, and federal levels. 14. Develop Energy Procurement & Generation Strategy Begin development of an energy procurement strategy that considers a mix of generation technologies and sources for satisfying the Town's energy needs. Once financial resources are available, this strategy would be ready for implementation. 15. Develop Informational Resources and Conduct Educational Outreach Work with Full and Part-Time Residents, Business and Lodging Operators, and Property Managers (in partnership with the Sopris Foundation, CORE, CLEER, and local utility providers) to develop informational resources and practical strategies for reducing energy use in Snowmass Village. Attachment 1 CQRE Page 1 of 3 Community Office for Resource Efficiency Town of Snowmass Village Board Membership Agreement Founding Partner Snowmass Village was a founding member of CORE's Board in 1994. Other members included the City of Aspen, Pitkin County, Holy Cross Energy, Rocky Mountain Natural Gas and the Energy 2000 Committee. Each member committed to yearly financial support for CORE. Snowmass Village's commitment at that time was $10,000. TOSV contributed this amount for the first few years following the 1994 agreement. These payments stopped for reasons that cannot be indentified at this time. Today, CORE's Board is comprised of the City of Aspen, Pitkin County, Holy Cross Energy, Snowmass Village, and the Town of Carbondale. CORE's Board and staff are currently working to reincorporate Source Gas, which left CORE's Board when RMNG was bought out, and would be interested in incorporating the Town of Basalt as well. Rebates and Incentives o Between 2005 and June 2009 CORE distributed at least $51,000 in rebates to Snowmass Village residents, primarily for energy efficient appliances. Additional rebates were given prior to 2005; unfortunately, there are gaps in documentation. Past Grants The following is a list of past grants to the Town of Snowmass Village. Please note that this list only includes large Green Key Grants and does not include "smaller" grants such as Green Design Grants, Community Grants, Geothermal /Microhydro Feasibility Study Grants or Mini Grants. Estimated "small" grant total - $11,000 Rodeo Place Affordable Housing - $90,000 Brush Creek Affordable Housing - $23,000 SV Rec Center - $40,000 Total - $164,000 The following is a list of grants that were given within Snowmass Village, but not directly to the Town of Snowmass Village. SkiCo Microhydro - $20,000 SkiCo Energy Monitors - $7,500 CORE, P.O. Box 9707 Aspen, CO 81612 970-544-9808 www.aspencore.org Estimated "small" grant total —$14,000 Attachment 2 Total—$41,500 PAge 2 of 3 Total CORE contributions to Snowmass Village to date exceed $255,000 plus staff time. Future Benefits to Snowmass Village Administration of REOP rebates Should rebates be distributed by TOSV, CORE would be willing to use its staff, experience and expertise to administer that program on the Town's behalf, much like CORE's current partnership with the City of Aspen. Grant collection and review In order to best coordinate and leverage grants funding, CORE would be willing to meet with potential REOP grantees, collect applications on TOSV's behalf, review applications and offer recommendations to the Town. CORE staff would also be able to track progress on funded projects and present yearly reports. On Call Consulting CORE staff would be available to assist TOSV staff and elected officials on energy and conservation issues. Information Updates CORE staff would work to update TOSV staff and elected officials on current energy trends, grants and project opportunities for the Town. Information Center for Snowmass Village Residents CORE would continue to serve as an information resource for Town of Snowmass Village residents. REMP/ REOP Grants o In discussion between TOSV and CORE staff, it is apparent that TOSV will choose to distribute its REOP grant funds without incorporating them into the larger REMP pool within Aspen and Pitkin. The following partnership was discussed in order to best leverage funding between the two programs. The REMP program would continue to accept applications from within Snowmass Village with a maximum funding amount matching REOP's contributions to the project. The REOP program would accept applications from organizations and projects outside of TOSV boundaries but that benefit the Snowmass community. Examples might include the local School District or RFtA. It is suggested by CORE staff that REMP and REOP programs operate on the same yearly review schedule in order to best coordinate funding initiatives. CORE, P.O. Box 9707 Aspen, CO 81612 970-544-9808 www.aspencore.org Attachment 2 PAge 3 of 3 CORE Compensation o In light of the aforementioned contributions to the Snowmass Village community, TOSV's participation as a founding member of CORE and the Town's commitment to become a fully participating member of CORE, the following financial agreement is being suggested: On an annual basis TOSV would pay CORE the lesser of$15,000 or 10% of the previous year's REOP income. TOSV's minimum annual payment, regardless of REOP income, would be $5,000. This agreement would create a maximum yearly payment of$15,000 from TOSV in boom years and a minimum payment of$5,000 in thin years. A minimum payment is requested by CORE's Board and staff in order to allow for accurate annual operating budgets and to provide consistent services to TOSV. For calendar year 2009, REOP's first year, CORE is requesting 10% of REOP funds for financial support - with no $5,000 minimum. As of this date, that would represent a contribution of roughly $3,269.00. CORE, P.O. Box 9707 Aspen, CO 81612 970-544-9808 www.aspencore.org If J SCHMUESER II GORDON ' MEYER GLENwooD SPRINGS Atanpt ch7m7epnpFt 3 CRESTED BUTTE ENGINEERS i SIU R y E Y O R,,S 1 1 6 w. 6TN, suRE 200 PTt@%oJF pg 6 P.O. Box 3088 GIFIN.COD SRiPIS.CO 81601 ASPEN. CO 81512 CRESTED BUTTE. CO 81 224 970.945-1004 970-925.6727 970-349-5355 Ex: 970945-5948 rx: 970-925-4157 Pv: 970349-5358 i May 5,2009 Nick Reitter Facility Manager Town of Snowmass Village 3745 Owl Creek Snowmass Village, CO 81615 RE: Town of Snowmass Village Facility Audit and Clean Energy Consulting Proposal Dear Nick, Please accept our proposal to provide facility audits and clean energy consulting services per the scope of services you and I discussed on our walk-thru on April 23 a. The enclosed attachment lists SGM's specific scope of work/deliverables and provides a cost breakdown for each project we discussed. 1 want to highlight some aspects of our scope of work that may require some clarity. For some facilities we are proposing 'audits' and for others we are proposing 'retro-commissioning.' In many ways both approaches achieve similar goals, but to be clear in what our scope is, I wanted to differentiate the two. Our audits include evaluation of all building components relating to energy use, such as the building shell,plug loads, lighting, 1-IVAC equipment, etc.The audit report includes a comprehensive list of`challenges' and `solutions' upon which you can act. We also include an Implementation Plan to help initiate the process;however this is not typical with most audits. Retro-commissioning on the other hand includes a similar scope,but in this case it excludes a review of anything but the mechanical systems. What it does include that a typical audit does not is measurement and verification (similar to testing and balancing) after improvements have been made. I apologize if this adds confusion, but it's important that we follow ASHRAE standards when we 'retro-commission' a project. I look forward to working with you on this project and look forward to hearing from you to so that we can move your project forward. Sincerely, Dan Richardson Senior Energy Consultant Attachment 3 Page 2 of 6 Scope of Work for Town of Snowmass Village Energy Audits & Clean Energy Consulting The following is an outline to successfully plan, create and implement a Roadmap for a Clean Energy Economy for the Town of Frisco. The outline includes tasks that may be lead by Town staff or SGM, but are included to present a complete picture. Within this outline is our proposed scope of work. Project 1: Public Works Sho 1. Audit `AB' facility 2. Audit `Administration' facility, excluding dog kennel and apartments 3. Audit `C' facility All audits include the following scope of work: a. Meet with staff to obtain operating condition information &project goals b. Analyze past utility data/facility energy intensity c. Conduct audit; log equipment nameplate data for equipment logs d. Draft audit report with recommended improvements, return on investment (ROI) analysis and Implementation Plan e. Present to Town staff Proposal Project 1: 3,700 Project 2: Recreation Cente 1. Retro-commission main facility 2. Retro-commission gym facility 3. Troubleshoot chlorine system 4. Troubleshoot lighting controls 5. Create Replacement Schedule for HVAC equipment All retro-commissioning includes the following scope of work, as defined in ASHRAE standards: a. Analyze past utility data/facility energy intensity b. Develop Owner's Project Requirements (OPR) c. Document the existing equipment (provided in SGM's 'Equipment Log) d. Identify operational inefficiencies (documented in report, similar to audit) e. Quantify and prioritize the inefficiencies (documented through ROI and OPR, similar to audit) f. Determine how to best optimize the operation or equipment (documented in Implementation Plan, similar to audit) g. Implement the changes (By Town of Snowmass Village) h. Verify with ongoing measurements and retro-commissioning (SGM budget includes an allowance for testing and balancing after project completion. SGM can sub-contract this work, or the Town can hire directly for 'thirdparty'verification.) Proposal Project 2: 4,985 Attachment 3 Page 3 of 6 5/5/2009 Page 2 of 5 Project 3: Town Park Statio 1. Create Replacement Schedule for HVAC equipment Scope of work: a. Log equipment nameplate data b. Draft Replacement Schedule for all HVAC equipment c. Present to Town staff Proposal Project 3: 355 Project 4: Town Hall 1. Create Replacement Schedule for HVAC equipment Scope of work: a. Log equipment nameplate data b. Draft Replacement Schedule for all HVAC equipment c. Present to Town staff Proposal Project 4: 1,060 Project 5: Snowmelt Boiler 1. Retro-commission `Top of Village' boilers 2. Retro-commission `Lot 2' boilers All retro-commissioning includes the following scope of work, as defined in ASHRAE standards: a. Analyze past utility data/facility energy intensity b. Develop Owner's Project Requirements(OPR) c. Document the existing equipment (provided in SGM's 'Equipment Log d. Identify operational inefficiencies (documented in report, similar to audit) e. Quantify and prioritize the inefficiencies (documented through ROI and OPR, similar to audit) f. Determine how to best optimize the operation or equipment (documented in Implementation Plan, similar to audit) g. Implement the changes (By Town of Snowmass Village) It. Verify with ongoing measurements and retro-commissioning (SGMbudget includes an allowance for testing and balancing after project completion. SGM can sub-contract this work, or the Town can hire directly for 'thirdparty'verification.) Proposal Project 5: 2,350 ssgntsgl-I\projects\proposals\2009\Town of Snowmass Village\SV audit scope scope 5 4 09.doc Attachment 3 Page 4 of 6 5/5/2009 Page 3 of 5 Project 6: Parcel C Gara 1. Retro-commission `Top of Village' boilers 2. Retro-commission `Lot 2' boilers All retro-commissioning includes the following scope of work, as defined in ASHRAE standards a. Analyze past utility data/facility energy intensity b. Develop Owner's Project Requirements (OPR) c. Document the existing equipment (provided in SGM's 'Equipment Log) d. Identify operational inefficiencies (documented in report, similar to audit) e. Quantify and prioritize the inefficiencies (documented through ROI and OPR, similar to audit) f. Determine how to best optimize the operation or equipment (documented in Implementation Plan, similar to audit) g. Implement the changes (By Town ofSnowmass Village) h. Verify with ongoing measurements and retro-commissioning (SGM budget includes an allowance for testing and balancing after project completion. SGM can sub-contract this work, or the Town can hire directly for 'third party'verification) Proposal Project 6: 1,170 Project 7: Street Li ht 1. Audit all street light applications A_udit would include the following scope of work: a. Meet with staff to obtain operating condition information& project goals b. Analyze past utility data/facility energy intensity c. Conduct audit; log lamp & fixture type d. Draft audit report with recommended improvements, return on investment(ROI) analysis and Implementation Plan e. Present to Town staff Proposal Project 7: 1,855 sgmsgl•I\projects\proposals\2009\Town of Snowmass Village\SV audit scope scope 5 4 09.doc Attachment 3 Page 5 of 6 5/5/2009 Page 4 of 5 Project 8: Brush Creek H dr 1. Conduct pre-feasibility on a hydro-electric facility to determine if Feasibility Study is worthwhile Scone of work: a. Meet with staff to obtain critical information &project goals b. Obtain electrical use data for closest grid-tie meter account c. Use SGM's `Hydro Per Forma Tools' to size, cost and perform return on investment analysis d. Present to Town Staff Proposal Project 8.1: 1,255 2. Conduct a Feasibility Analysis on the project Scope of work: a. Verify availability of appropriate water rights b. Verify head and flow data; conceptual turbine design c. Verify projects costs, land use issues and functionality d. Verify permitting issues and associated costs e. Negotiate preliminary PPA or net-metering terms with Holy Cross Energy f. Re-evaluate Per Forma, including internal rate of return and alternative funding mechanisms g. Draft report with all information and recommended next steps It. Present to Town Staff Proposal Project 8.2: 8,700 Project 9: Town-wide Photovoltaic Anal si 3. Conduct pre-feasibility on photovoltaic system on the Public Works Shop, Town Hall, Parcel C Facility, and the gymnasium at the Recreation Center Scope of work: a. Meet with staff to obtain critical information &project goals b. Evaluate conceptual PV applicability through site visits, existing drawings and other tools c. Use SGM's `PV Per Forma Tools' to size, cost and perform return on investment analysis d. Draft summary report with all information and recommended next steps e. Present to Town Staff Proposal Project 9.1: 635 sgmsgl-I\projects\pmposals\2009\Town of Snowmass Village\SV audit scope scope 5 4 09.doc Attachment 3 PAge 6 of 6 5/5/2009 Page 5 of 5 4. Assist the Town in pursuing viable photovoltaic systems Scope of work: a. Review financing parameters and goals with Town staff b. Draft RFP for PV installation and possibly financing c. Manage RFP process if necessary Proposal Project 3: TBD Project 10: Town-wide Wind- eneration Anal si According to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory Wind Map,the wind resource in Western Colorado is very poor, with the exception of a few ridge tops. The Aspen Skiing Company is currently studying the wind generation potential and it is recommended that the Town wait and see the results of this analysis before acquiring an anemometer. Proposal Cost Summary Table: Task Description Total Fees Project 1 —Public Works Shop 3,700 Project 2— Recreation Center 4,985 Project 3—Town Park Station 355 Project 4—Town Hall 1,060 Project 5—Snowmelt Boilers 2,350 Project 6—Parcel C Garage 1,170 Project 7 — Streetlights 1,855 Project 8.1 — Brush Crook Hydro 1,255 Project 8.2— Brush Creek Hydro 8,700 Project 9— PV Analysis 635 Project 10 —Wind Analysis n/a TOTAL PROPOSED FEE 26,065 sgmsgl-I\projects\pmposals\2009\Town of Snowmass Village\SV audit scope scope 5 4 09.doc Attachment 4 Page 1 of;3 9/3/2009 Paget of 3 Scope of Work for Town of Snowmass Village Housing Energy Audits Project 1: Brush Cree 1. Perform HERS Rating with Blower Door Test on (1) unit 2. Troubleshoot boiler and hot water system 3. Provide Summary Report for entire complex for non unit-specific recommendations All audits include the following scope of work: a. Meet with staff to obtain operating condition information& project goals b. Analyze past utility data/facility energy intensity (as available) c. Conduct rating with Blower Door Test and Final REMrate report Proposal Project 1: 1,300 Project 2: Creeksid 1. Perform HERS Rating with Blower Door Test on (1) unit 2. Provide Summary Report for entire complex for non unit-specific recommendations All audits include the following scope of work: a. Meet with staff to obtain operating condition information & project goals b. Analyze past utility data/facility energy intensity (as available) c. Conduct rating with Blower Door Test and Final REMrate report Proposal Project 2: 725 Project 3: Pallsade 1. Perform HERS Rating with Blower Door Test on (1) unit 2. Troubleshoot boiler and hot water system 3. Provide Summary Report for entire complex for non unit-specific recommendations All audits include the following scope of work: a. Meet with staff to obtain operating condition information &project goals b. Analyze past utility data/facility energy intensity (as available) c. Conduct rating with Blower Door Test and Final REMrate report Proposal Project 3: 1,150 1:\2002009.352.001 SV Energy\001\(G)Project Management\Proposal\SV housing Attachment A 9 3 09.doc Attachment 4 Page 2 of 3 9/3/2009 Page 2 of 3 Project 4: Villas North 1. Perform HERS Rating with Blower Door Test on (1) unit 2. Troubleshoot boiler and hot water system 3. Provide Summary Report for entire complex for non unit-specific recommendations All audits include the following scope of work: a. Meet with staff to obtain operating condition information &project goals b. Analyze past utility data/facility energy intensity (as available) c. Conduct rating with Blower Door Test and Final REMrate report Proposal Project 4: 1,300 Project 5: Mountain Vie 1. Provide Summary Report for entire complex for non unit-specific recommendations Proposal Project 5: 350 Project 6: Mountain View I 1. Provide Summary Report for entire complex for non unit-specific recommendations Proposal Project 6: 750 1:\2009\2009-352.001 SV Energy\001\(G)Project Management\Proposal\SV housing Attachment A 9 3 09.doc Attachement '4 Page 3 of 3 9/3/2009 Page 3 of 3 Proposal Cost Summary Table: Task Description Total Fees Project 1 — Brush Creek 1300 Project 2— Creekside 725 Project 3 —Palisades 1150 Project 4—Villas North 1300 Project 5—Mountain View 350 Project 6—Mountain View II 575 PROPOSED FEE 5,400 1:\2009\2009-352.001 SV Energy\001\(G)Project Management\Proposal\SV housing Attachment A 9 3 09.doc MEMORANDUM TO: Snowmass Village Town Council FROM: Jason Haber, Economic Resource Director DATE: October 5, 2009 SUBJECT: Resolution No. 26, Series of 2009 — In Support of Pitkin County Referendum 1A - Energy Smart Loan Program I. PURPOSE AND ACTIONS REQUESTED OF COUNCIL Council is asked to approve the attached resolution in support of Pitkin County Referendum 1A. Referendum 1A will appear on the November 3, 2009 ballot. If passed, the measure will allow Pitkin County to issue bonds and create the Energy Smart Loan Program. II. BACKGROUND The Energy Smart Loan Program will be a voluntary program offering residential and commercial property owners (within a designated local improvement district) access to low- interest loans for energy efficiency upgrades and renewable energy projects. If a property owner chooses to secure a loan, repayment will occur via a special assessment placed on their property tax bill. The loan commitment would run with the property, and could be passed on to a new owner upon sale of the property. It is important to note that this is not a tax and that only those property owners who choose to participate in the program will have an obligation of repayment. For more information on the ballot initiative, see: http://www.votevesla.org/votevesla.org/Home.html. In order to make this program available to Snowmass Village residents, the Town will be asked to opt into the Pitkin County local improvement district by an ordinance to be considered at the October 19, 2009 Town Council meeting. III. DISCUSSION The Energy Smart loan Program will allow property owners wishing to make their buildings more energy efficient to make these improvements with virtually no upfront costs (although there will likely be a small loan application fee to cover administrative costs). A positive economic impact is anticipated with the increased demand for home improvement services. The Energy Smart Loan Program is a tool that can help advance several goals of the Town's Environmental Sustainability Plan, most importantly, reducing greenhouse gas emissions from residential and commercial buildings as a result of improved energy efficiency and the addition of renewable energy systems. IV. STAFF RECOMMENDATION Staff recommends that Council approve the resolution in support of Referendum 1A. I Town of Snowmass Village 2 Town Council 3 4 Resolution No. 26 5 Series of 2009 6 7 8 IN SUPPORT OF THE 2009 PITKIN COUNTY BALLOT ISSUE KNOWN AS 9 "REFERENDUM 1A" THAT CREATES THE ENERGY SMART LOAN 10 PROGRAM. 11 12 13 WHEREAS, the Pitkin Board of County Commissioners passed a 14 resolution submitting to the Electorate at the Election to be held on November 3, 15 2009, a financial question for Pitkin County Clean Energy Local Improvement 16 District arising under Section 20 of Article X of the State Constitution, known 17 locally as Referendum 1A; and 18 19 WHEREAS, Referendum 1A will create the Energy Smart Loan Program 20 which will offer low interest loans to families and businesses for energy efficiency 21 upgrades and renewable energy projects; and 22 23 WHEREAS, the Energy Smart Loan Program is not a tax and only 24 property owners who choose to participate will bear loan principal and interest 25 repayments through a special assessment on their property tax bills, and 26 27 WHEREAS, the loan commitments remain with the property, not the 28 property owner; and 29 30 WHEREAS, the Energy Smart Loan Program can stimulate the local 31 economy by putting people back to work including the construction, plumbing, 32 electrical, carpentry and renewable energy trades; and 33 34 WHEREAS, the Energy Smart Loan Program supports the goals of the 35 Snowmass Village Environmental Sustainability Plan; 36 37 38 NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the Town Council of the Town of 39 Snowmass Village supports the ballot question known as "Pitkin County 40 Referendum 1A" that creates the Energy Smart Loan Program, and urges the 41 electors of the Town of Snowmass Village to support said proposed referendum 42 and to vote "Yes" on its passage. 43 44 / 45 / 46 / 1 47 READ, APPROVED AND ADOPTED, by the Town Council of the Town of 48 Snowmass Village on October 5, 2009 upon a motion by Council 49 Member I the second of Council 50 Member and upon a vote of in favor 51 and opposed. 52 53 54 TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE 55 56 57 58 59 Bill Boineau, Mayor 60 61 ATTEST: 62 63 64 65 66 Rhonda Coxon, Town Clerk 67 68 69 2 TO: SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL FROM: RUSS FORREST, TOWN MANAGER SUBJECT: MANAGER'S REPORT DATE: October 5, 2009 Proposed Budget Schedule The following is the proposed schedule for the 2010 budget review. October 7`h Budget meeting with Town Council and required Staff to review the budget from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. October 1 g'h First Reading of Ordinance for 2009 Revised Budget and Resolution to approve 2010 Budget November 2nd Second Reading of Ordinance for 2009 Revised Budget December 14'h Special Town Council Meeting to approve the Mill Levy Reminder of Potential Special Meeting on October 26, 2009 Staff would like to schedule a special meeting on October 26`h to resolve any issues related to developing a Resolution for the School District Affordable Housing Project review. In addition, Staff anticipates the need for a special meeting to complete the review of edits on the Comprehensive Plan. EOTC Meeting The next EOTC meeting is scheduled for October 15, 2009, in the Council Chamber's of Aspen City Hall, to begin at 4pm. Pitkin County will chair and host the meeting. The main agenda item of the meeting will be the 2010 budget. Strategic Direction for the Snowmass Village Town Council On October 7 as part of the above mentioned Budget meeting, staff would like to request that the Town Council review and discuss its long range goals i.e. what would you like to accomplish in the next year. This will be valuable in adjusting resources to ensure that the Council's goals are achieved. The following is a summary of the goals and specific actions the Town Council wanted to achieve from the retreat in December of 2008. Staff has provided an update on the progress to date on each goal and specific action identified by the Council 1.Definition of Success and Goals Success for Town Council is achieved by attaining the following goals: 2. High Level Goal Areas of Council Provide the leadership to define and implement the community's vision. Ensure that the Town's plans for future development reflect the values and needs of the community while maintaining the quality of life the community expects during and after construction. Status: By completing the Comprehensive Plan and implementing the land use policy, the Council is realizing the Community's vision for the future. Provide the leadership that facilitates clear, open, honest, and full communication among Council members, staff and the community. Status: This Goal should be evaluated by the Council. Additional specific objectives may want to be established to measure this goal. 3. Specific Goals of Council Complete the Comprehensive Plan, which includes defining the community's vision and values, determining carrying capacity, updating land use policy and developing a long-term housing and environmental strategy. Status: The Planning Commission and Town Council have completed its review of the Comprehensive Plan. The next step is for the Town Council to review edits that have been made at the Council's direction before completing a final document. Increase economic sustainability by strengthening the winter season and broadening the summer season while increasing the total capture rate. This would be achieved while living within the carrying capacity of the community. Status: The national economic downturn has affected Snowmass Village. The Town has adjusted its spending to reflect very conservative revenue forecasts. In many ways this is helping the Town find a sustainable equilibrium after the growth of services that occurred in the last 6 years. The Comprehensive Plan has also helped identify specific carrying capacity limits for growth now and into the future. Complete a housing action plan and implement a new policy to address the following: 1. New development mitigation for housing Status: All background work has been completed. Council asked that the Comprehensive Plan be reviewed first before completing this review. Staff is scheduling this for Council in November now that the significant review of the Comprehensive Plan has been completed. 2. Review and revise housing policy for the lottery process and new deed restrictions for housing projects. Status: The high priority actions for review have been completed by the Housing Committee and reviewed by the Town Council. 3. Other housing polices identified in the Comprehensive Plan. Status: Council has significantly completed its review of the Comprehensive Plan. Complete and adopt an Environmental Sustainability Plan that will move the Town towards achieving a goal of renewable energy generation that offsets non-renewable energy use. Status: The Sustainability Plan has been completed. We are now implementing the Plan. Actively improve and enhance the Town's outreach and communication with the public. Status: 1. The Town has significantly upgraded its website to improve outreach and communication — included in the technology upgrades are a Town Manager's Blog, streaming video, improvements to the "Contact Us" feature, an "Announcements' section and ease of use when signing up for E-newsletters. 2. The Town has stepped up proactive communication with the local paper and the two Aspen dailies: the relationship with all papers remains healthy. The Snowmass Sun now runs a regular Town Manager's guest column on topics ranging from public safety issues to the current financial situation. 3. The Town continues to send out quarterly E-newsletters to the public and the list has grown to more than 1,400 individuals. 4. Lastly, the Town has partnered with Pitkin County in its text messaging system —an initiative aimed at informing citizens of everything from emergencies, to construction updates to special events. 4. Other Specific Actions Discussed Insert the next agenda in Council packets Status: Complete and ongoing Move the council delivery time of the packet back to allow more time for Council to review agenda items. Status: This has been completed Begin doing quarterly "informal" council meetings, potentially for lunch, to discuss goals, performance and to continue to enhance staff/Council relationships Status: Need to schedule an informal meeting. Regularly and proactively communicate information on Town projects. Status: The Town has proactively communicated information on budgetary issues, new policy (CO monitors), and actions. Pending Strategic Actions Last Updated—September 24, 2009 Staff Action Status Date to follow-up w/ Contact I I Council Land Use Comp. Plan Comprehensive Completed sections with edits will be Will be scheduled Team Plan Update forwarded to Council and staff will provide a with Council until memo on a chapter that highlights major approved. Ongoing changes in each chapter prior to it being discussed with the Town Council John Dresser Demolition Council asked that an ordinance be prepared November 2, 2009 to provide a period of time to review demolition permits before demolition of a building occurred. Council agreed that staff should develop language for future PUDs to identify critical integral components of a PUD that must continue to exist overtime. In addition, John Wilkinson requested that staff bring back a land mark ordinance for discussion in the future. Jason Tree Ordinance Frame goals and provide alternative November 2, 2009 approaches to tree protection. Staff has several ordinance examples available for Council. Trees on single-family lots are protected through the Snowmass HOA, which does regulate tree removal. Most PUDs in Snowmass have Landscape Plans that provide some level of protection from tree removal. Other Land Use Other Land Use Code Improvements should Code Issues also be considered with the completion of the Comprehensive Plan. Staff would recommend having a work session with Council to review potential code changes. Housing Housing Draw Site/Land On February 17 1h the Town Council asked that Department Inventory a Land Inventory to identify potential housing sites be completed after the Town completes is June budget review. This project would cost approximately $16,000 based on a proposals from Design Workshop. No funding is currently appropriated for this project. Housing Housing Lottery/ The Housing Committee has received Committee has Department Guidelines direction from Council on housing policy completed it review issues to review. They had an initial of the high priority discussion with Council on July 27" to the issues identified by discuss lottery process. The Council asked the Town Council that a follow-up discussion be scheduled. Housing Housing Policy The consultant has completed a rational Department nexus study and can begin to work with the November 2, 2009 Town on a new housing policy. The Planning Commission is also reviewing housing goals as part of the Comp. Plan review. Staff will schedule two agenda items based on the input from Council on October 6 (these could be on the same dates)which would be 1) policy discussion to modify the current land use code related to affordable housing; and 2) a review of deed restriction policy. Housing Excise Tax Schedule a work session to discuss the November 2, 2009 Excise Tax and its application Joe C Natural Disasters On 11/3/08 Council asked that staff further November 2, 2009 Terri and Cost evaluate criteria for allowing some costs from Everest) Recovery in Deed property damage incurred by natural disasters Restricted For in deed-restricted homes to be recovered Sale Housing upon the resale of the home. Examples of criteria discussed included: cap on recovery based on a % (percent) value of the home and requirements for comprehensive insurance. Budget/Finance Finance Monitoring Council will begin to consider the 2010 October 7, 2009 Department Revenue budget on October 7'" and also receive an update on the 2009 budget. Environment/Sustainability Jason Haber Review of REOP On October 20, 2008, Council passed a October 5, 2009 fee schedule motion directing staff to schedule this review for March 2, 2009. On March 2, Council asked that the fees and language for PUDs be reviewed prior to November 2009. SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL GENERAL IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT NO.1 AGENDA OCTOBER 19, 2009 PLEASE NOTE THAT ALL TIMES ARE APPROXIMATE— ITEMS COULD START EARLIER OR LATER THAN THEIR STATED TIME CALL TO ORDER AT 3:30 P.M. Item No. 1: ROLL CALL Item No. 2: RESOLUTION NO. 1, SERIES OF 2009 — AMENDING THE 2009 GID BUDGET (Time: 5 Minutes) A RESOLUTION AMENDING THE 2008 BUDGET FOR THE SNOWMASS VILLAGE GENERAL IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT NO. 1 OF THE TOWN OF SNOWMASS VILLAGE ACTION REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: Review and approve Resolution No.1, Series of 2009 Marianne Rakowski, GID Advisory Board Member Page 1(Tab A) Item No. 3: RESOLUTION NO. 2, SERIES OF 2009 — ADOPTING THE 2010 BUDGET (Time: 5 Minutes) A RESOLUTION ADOPTING THE 2010 BUDGET AND APPROPRIATING FUNDS FOR THE SNOWMASS VILLAGE GENERAL IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT NO.1 ACTION REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: Review and approve Resolution No. 2, Series of 2009 Marianne Rakowski, GID Advisory Board Member Page 6 (Tab B) Item No. 4: ADJOURNMENT 12" DRAFT SNOWMASS VILLAGE TOWN COUNCIL REGULAR MEETING OCTOBER 19, 2009 PLEASE NOTE THAT ALL TIMES ARE APPROXIMATE — ITEMS COULD START EARLIER OR LATER THAN THE STATED TIME CALL TO ORDER AT 4:00 P.M. 10-19-09 TC Agenda Page 2 of 3 Item No. 1: ROLL CALL Item No. 2: PUBLIC NON-AGENDA ITEMS 5-minute time limit) Item No. 3: COUNCIL UPDATES Item No. 4: RESOLUTION NO. 23, SERIES OF 2009 —APPROVING THE 2010 BUDGET Time: 15 minutes) ACTION REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: Approve, modify or deny Resolution No. 24, Series of 2009. Marianne Rakowski Item No. 5: FIRST READING — ORDINANCE N0. 12, SERIES OF 2009 — AMENDING THE 2009 BUDGET Time: 10 minutes) ACTION REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: Approve, modify or deny First Reading of Ordinance No. 12, Series of 2009. Marianne Rakowski Item No.6: SECOND READING — ORDINANCE NO. 8, SERIES OF 2009 GENERAL OFFENCES Time: 15 minutes) ACTION REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: Approve, Modify or Deny Second reading of Ordinance No. 8 Series of 2009 Art Smythe Item No .7: FIRST READING — ORDINANCE NO. 11, SERIES OF 2009 STONEBRIDGE CONDOMINIUMS MINOR AMENDMENT TO A FINAL PUD Time: 75 minutes) ACTION REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: Approve, modify, or deny the First Reading of Ordinance No. 11, Series of 2009 Bob Nevins Item No. 8: PLACEHOLDER FOR PITCO ENERGY OPT IN Time: 15 Minutes) ACTION REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: Jason Haber Item No. 9: COMPREHENSIVE PLAN — Time:45 minutes) ACTION REQUESTED OF COUNCIL: Review red-lined version of Chapters 8 and 2 Transportation and Community Character and Vision. Begin review of Chapter 1. 10-19-09 TC Agenda Page 3 of 3 Comp Plan Team (Russ Forrest, Chris Conrad, Lesley Compagnone, Jason Haber, David Peckler) Page (TAB ) Item No. 10: MANAGER'S REPORT Time: 10 minutes) Russell Forrest.......................... Page (TAB--) Item No. 11: AGENDA FOR NEXT TOWN COUNCIL MEETING I............................. Page (TAB--) Item No. 12: APPROVAL OF MEETING MINUTES FOR: Page (TAB--) Item No. 13: COUNCIL COMMENTS/COMMITTEE REPORTS/CALENDARS Page (TAB--) Item No. 14: ADJOURNMENT NOTE: Total time estimated for meeting: Approximately 4 hours and 34 minutes (excluding items 1-3 and 15 -18) ALL ITEMS AND TIMES ARE TENTATIVE AND SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT FURTHER NOTICE. PLEASE CALL THE OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK AT 923-3777 ON THE DAY OF THE MEETING FOR ANY AGENDA CHANGES. 1 2 SNOWMASS VILLAGE 3 REGULAR MEETING MINUTES 4 MONDAY, JUNE 29, 2009 5 6 CALL TO ORDER AT 400 P.M. 7 8 Mayor Boineau called to order the Special Meeting of the Snowmass Village Town 9 Council on June 29, 2009 at 4:00 p.m. 10 11 Item No. 1 ROLL CALL 12 13 COUNCIL MEMBERS PRESENT: Arnold Mordkin, Markey Butler, John Wilkinson, Bill Boineau , and Reed Lewis. 14 COUNCIL MEMBERS ABSENT: All council members were present. 15 STAFF PRESENT:Russ Forrest, Town Manager: Rhonda B. Coxon, Town Clerk: Chris Conrad, Planning Director; John Dresser, Town Attorney; and Jason Haber, Economic Resource Director; Terri Everest, Housing Secretary 16 PUBLIC PRESENT: 17 Rick Griffin, Sally Sparhawk, Bob Purvis and other 18 members of the Public interested in today's Agenda 19 items. 20 21 Item No. 2 PUBLIC NON-AGENDA ITEMS 22 23 Tom Yocum a Snowmass Village Resident representing the Snowmass Village 24 Rodeo spoke to using between the berm and the bike pass for additional parking for the 25 Rodeo. 26 27 Mel Blumenthal a part time resident speaking on behalf of the Part Time 28 Residents Advisory Board referred to the July 7th and 8th agenda of this Board pointed 29 out the various Tax Districts that will on the agenda and invited Town Council and 30 full time, and part time resident to attend. 31 32 Speaking on his own behalf regarding Chief Sowles our local fire chiefs comments in 33 the paper regarding not being able to assist in fires within the Base Village area. 34 35 Thomas Cosivich resident of Snowmass Village on Wood Road asked if there is 36 something that can be done about the construction debris where the staging area is. 37 He asked if it can be cleaned up now that construction has come to a halt, the 38 neighbors would greatly appreciate it. 06-29-09 TC Minutes Page 2 of 4 39 40 Item No. 3 COUNCIL UPDATES 41 Closed Trail 42 Mayor Boineau stated there is a sign saying 'Trail Closed" where the ditch washed out 43 before the Ditch Trail and it would be nice if we could get that trail open for the public 44 45 New Trial 46 Council Member Wilkinson noted that the new pedistrian trail by the Meadow Ranch 47 and Sinclair Meadows has been completed. 48 49 Employee Housing 50 Council Member Wilkinson stated the Aspen School District is willing to speak to us 51 regarding the employee housing site they have puchased at Anderson Ranch and 52 following our PUD process. 53 54 Ride for the Cure 55 Council Member Wilkinson noted that the Ride for the Cure will be held in Snowmass 56 Village on August 21, and 22, 2009. 57 58 Restaurants 59 Council Member Mordkin concerned about the restaurants in Base Village closing on 60 Mondays and Tuesdays, we are a Resort and should be open 7 days a week. 61 62 General Improvement District 63 Council Member Mordkin would like to request another meeting of the GID to discuss 64 the situation of the Skittles running to restaurants that are not open. We pay millions of 65 dollars a year to market this resort. 66 67 Play Ground 68 Council Member Lewis asked about the playground that used to be at the end of mall in 69 front of Goodfellows, staff will call the Silvertree Hotel to see when it will be put up. 70 71 Item No. 4 DISCUSSION ON HOUSING GUIDELINES 72 73 Housing Manager Joe Coffey stated that at the June 15, 2009 Regular Meeting of the 74 Snowmass Village Town Council directed the newly appointed Housing Advisory 75 Committee to prepare a list of Housing Guideline topics that need to be discussed 76 before the upcoming housing lotteries. 77 78 Larry Dempsey member of the Housing Advisory board invited members of the 79 community to come to the Public meetings on Tuesdays at 4:00 p.m. with their ideas 80 and suggestions. 81 82 83 06-29-09 TC Minutes Page 3 of 4 84 Coffey noted at the Regular Meeting of the Town Council on June 15, 2009 the Town 85 Council also reviewed the items they wanted the Housing Advisory Board to 86 address. He noted those items as lottery procedures, priorities for special districts and 87 number of people required per bedroom. 88 89 There was Town Council consensus for the Housing Advisory Committee to also look at 90 re-zoning some of our current neighborhood and lot splitting with multi-family versus 91 single family home, a retirement policy and a possible guest unit. 92 93 Item No. 5 COMPREHENSIVE PLAN -CHAPTER 7 BUILT ENVIRONMENT, 94 CHAPTER 4 REGIONAL AND COMMUNITY ECONOMICS AND CHAPTER 5 95 COMMUNITY SERVICES, FACILITIES AND AMENITIES 96 97 Town Manager Russ Forrest stated staff is prepared to discuss Chapter 7 Built 98 Environment and chapter 4-Regional and Community Economics. Economic Resource 99 Director was present to make changes to the current written Chapter. Town Council 100 reviewed each Chapter line by line page by page and provided staff with suggested 101 language changes. 102 103 Town Council discussed changes in the following areas of Chapter 7, influence areas, 104 Comprehensively Planned Areas ("CPA"), the future land use map, guidelines for 105 preserving West Village's character and sense of place and policies. 106 107 There was a lengthy discussion regarding the language pertaining to tri nodal and the 108 potential definition of each nodal, the Future Land Map, definition of Town Core, 109 residential in the Snowmass Center, build out, the Visitor Center/Nature Center, 110 protecting ridge lines and view planes of Daly Mountain, pedestrian walk ways and 111 building heights. 112 113 Town Council commented that they like reviewing Chapters in a Special Meeting 114 dedicated to the Comprehensive Plan they asked staff to set another meeting for July 115 27, 2009. When all Chapters have been reviewed the Council will receive a redline 116 copy for review. 117 118 Item No. 6 EXECUTIVE SESSION 119 120 At 7:20 p.m. 121 122 Town Council will now meet in Executive Session pursuant to C.R.S. 24-6-402(4) and 123 Snowmass Village Municipal Code Section 2-45(c), to specifically discuss two items 124 Determining positions relative to matters that may be subject to negotiations, developing 125 strategy for negotiations, instructing negotiators pursuant to C.R.S. 24-6-402(4)(e) and 126 Snowmass Village Municipal Code Section 2-45(c)(5); and 127 06-29-09 TC Minutes Page 4 of 4 128 Conferences with an attorney for the purposes of receiving legal advice on specific 129 legal questions pursuant to C.R.S. 24-6-402(4)(c) and Snowmass Village Municipal 130 Code Section 2-45(c)(2); 131 132 Arnold Mordkin made the motion to approve convening into Executive Session Reed 133 Lewis seconded the motion. The motion was approved by a vote of 5 in favor to 0 134 opposed. 135 136 Voting Aye: Arnold Mordkin, Markey Butler, John Wilkinson, Bill Boineau , and Reed 137 Lewis. 138 139 Voting Naye: None. 140 At 8:45 p.m. 141 Reed Lewis made the motion to approve reconvening to the Special Meeting of the 142 Snowmass Village Town Council on June 29, 2009 Arnold Mordkin seconded the 143 motion. The motion was approved by a vote of 5 in favor to 0 opposed. 144 145 Voting Aye: Arnold Mordkin, Markey Butler, John Wilkinson, Bill Boineau , and Reed 146 Lewis. 147 148 Voting Naye: None. 149 Item No.7 ADJOURNMENT 150 151 At 8:46 p.m. 152 Reed Lewis made the motion to adjourn the Special Meeting of the Snowmass Village 153 Town Council on June 29, 2009 Arnold Mordkin seconded the motion. The motion was 154 approved by a vote of 5 in favor to 0 opposed. 155 156 Voting Aye: Arnold Mordkin, Markey Butler, John Wilkinson, Bill Boineau , and Reed 157 Lewis. 158 159 Voting Naye: None. 160 Submitted By, 161 162 163 164 Rhonda B. Coxon, Town Clerk 1 SNOWMASS VILLAGE 2 REGULAR MEETING MINUTES 3 MONDAY, AUGUST 3, 2009 4 5 CALL TO ORDER AT 4:00 P.M. 6 7 Mayor Boineau called to order the Regular Meeting of the Snowmass Village Town Council on 8 Monday, August 3, 2009 at 4:05 p.m. 9 10 Item No. 1 ROLL CALL 11 COUNCIL MEMBERS PRESENT: Mayor Bill Boineau, John Wilkinson, and Reed Lewis. 12 COUNCIL MEMBERS ABSENT:Arnold Mordkin and Markey Butler. 13 STAFF PRESENT: Russ Forrest, Town Manager; Hunt Walker, Public Works Director; John Dresser, Town Attorney; Rhonda B. Coxon, Town Clerk; Jason Haber, Economic Resource Director; Terri Everest, Housing Secretary 14 PUBLIC PRESENT: Jeff Edelson, Carolyn Purvis, Terry Doyle, Debbie Shore, George Bletsas, Greg Rulon, Jeannie Woods, Gary Hartman, Rick Griffin, Jim Light, David Rachofsky and other member of the Public interested in today's Agenda items. 15 16 Item No. 2 PUBLIC NON-AGENDA ITEMS 17 18 Greg Rulon representing the Snowmass Rodeo thanked the Town for the $40,000 for capital 19 improvements and the Marketing Department for the use of the tent and $15,000 for joint 20 marketing. He provided a P&L for review by the Town Council. He reported that the new layout 21 has worked extremely well this year. He thanked all volunteers and noted the Rodeo Board is 22 working with the Town Marketing Department for next year. 23 24 Item No. 3 COUNCIL UPDATES 25 26 Mountain Event 27 Council Member Wilkinson thanked the Marketing Department for paying to open the Village 28 Express for the weekend. It was very successful and over 400 people rode the lift in two days. 29 30 Skate Park 31 Council Member Wilkinson would like to enforce helmet usage at the Skate Park. Staff noted 32 that further enforcement would require a full time attendant at the Skate Park. Public Works 33 Director Hunt Walker will check with other communities for their policies. 34 35 Snowmass Bucks 36 Council Member Lewis asked Marketing Director Susan Hamley to explain the "Snowmass 37 Bucks" program which benefits the local merchants. The "bucks" can be found in the local 38 newspapers. 39 08-03-09 TC Minutes Page 2 of 4 40 Item No. 4 CONTINUATION OF PUBLIC HEARING AND SECOND READING - ORDINANCE 41 NO 9, SERIES OF 2009 -SNOWMASS CHAPEL 42 At 4:12 p.m. 43 Mayor Boineau opened the Public Hearing for the Snowmass Chapel. 44 45 Jim Light member of the Snowmass Chapel Board stated that they are eager for this item to be 46 approved, but feel it.deserves the attention of the Town Council excluding Arnie Mordkin. 47 48 Town Manager Russ Forrest stated that the next meeting that all Council Members are in 49 attendance is September 14, 2009. 50 John Wilkinson made the motion to continue Items 4, 5 and 6 from today's agenda to 51 September 14, 2009. Mayor Bill Boineau seconded the motion. The motion was approved by a 52 vote of 3 in favor to 0 opposed. Council Member Mordkin and Butler were absent. 53 54 Voting Aye: Mayor Bill Boineau, John Wilkinson, and Reed Lewis. 55 56 Voting Naye: None. 57 58 The Town Council feels there is reasonable cause to continue this item for the second time due 59 to Council Member absences. It is only fair to the applicant to have a Council of four at the table 60 for the vote of these items. 61 62 Item No. 5 RESOLUTION NO. 14, SERIES OF 2009 - SNOWMASS CHAPEL 63 Continued to the Regular Meeting of the Snowmass Village Town Council on August 17, 2009. 64 65 Item No.6 RESOLUTION NO. 15, SERIES OF 2009 - SNOWMASS CHAPEL 66 Continued to the Regular Meeting of the Snowmass Village Town Council on August 17, 2009. 67 68 Item No. 7 REPORT ON CAPITAL PROJECTS FROM THE FAB 69 70 Rick Griffin Chairman of the Financial Advisory Board (FAB) stated that Town Council (by the 71 request of the Town Manager Russ Forrest) asked the FAB to look into the Town's Capital 72 Projects. The Board started this project seven months ago and is in agreement with the 73 findings. At this time he provided the names of all those on the FAB. 74 75 The FAB reviewed the financial management of the Town Hall, Entryway and Rodeo Place 76 Housing project in order to determine how to improve the financial process of future Town 77 projects. 78. 79 The FAB submitted recommendations for the Town Council on how they may better manage the 80 costs of its capital improvement projects and thus ensure that the public has confidence in the 81 Town's ability to manage projects. The FAB feels many of these suggestions are obvious, they 82 were not followed in conducting the reviewed projects. 83 84 Mayor Boineau thanked the FAB for the work put in to this report and asked that in the future 85 the press and the public not receive the information prior to the Town Council receiving it. 08-03-09 TC Minutes Page 3 of 4 86 87 The Town Council thanked the FAB for the report and they appreciate the work that was put into 88 the report. 89 90 Colleen Doyle from the Part Time Residents Advisory Board commented on the report and 91 acknowledged the level of detail. 92 93 Item No. 8 RODEO PLACE PHASE 2B 94 95 Town Manager Russ Forrest and Housing Secretary Terri Everest stated that seven individuals 96 are interested in the Rodeo Place 2A and we will have 33 units up for sale in the next couple of 97 months which includes Sinclair Meadows. Staffs recommendation is to stop at the first four 98 homes in Phase 2A due to a soft market at this time. 99 100 Jeff Edelson from the Snowmass Wildcat Fire District encourages Staff and Town Council to 101 continue moving forward with housing. 102 103 Item No. 9 COMPREHENSIVE PLAN 104 Town Council directed staff to review the redline copy of the Comprehensive Plan during a 105 Regular Meeting of the Town Council not a Special Meeting so the Public will be better 106 accommodated during public comment. 107 108 Item No. 10 MANAGER'S REPORT 109 110 EOTC 111 Town Manager Russ Forrest reminded Town Council of the EOTC meeting at the Conference 112 Center on Thursday, August 6, 2009 beginning at 9:00 a.m. He provided information that will be 113 discussed at this meeting. 114 115 Building 7 Insurance Claim 116 Mayor Boineau asked about where we are in the process of filing a claim for Building 7 in Base 117 Village. Town Council directed staff to file the claim immediately and start the process. 118 119 Item No. 11 AGENDA FOR NEXT TOWN COUNCIL MEETING 120 Town Council reviewed and commented on the agenda for the Regular Meeting on August 17, 121 2009. 122 123 Item No. 12 COUNCIL COMMENTS/COMMITTEE REPORTS/CALENDARS 124 125 Village Express 126 Mayor Boineau stated the past weekend was a huge success with the Village Express and it 127 would be a very nice amenity to welcome business to the Village if that lift was open next 128 summer. 129 130 Item No. 13 ADJOURNMENT 08-03-09 TC Minutes Page 4 of 4 131 132 AT 5:40 p.m. 133 Reed Lewis made the motion to adjourn the Regular Meeting of Snowmass Village Town 134 Council on Monday, August 3, 2009. John Wilkinson seconded the motion. The motion was 135 approved by a vote of 3 in favor to 0 opposed. Council Members Mordkin and Butler were 136 absent. 137 138 Voting Aye: Mayor Bill Boineau, John Wilkinson, and Reed Lewis. 139 140 Voting Naye: None. 141 Submitted By, 142 143 144 145 146 Rhonda B. Coxon, Town Clerk 147 Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Town Council Special TC Meeting Meeting 4:00 p.m. Budget 8:30 — 3:30 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 EOTC 4:00 p.m. Aspen Council Chambers 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 Town Council Meeting 4:00 p.m. 0 1 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 Town Halloween Council Meeting 4:00 p.m. 0 0 4 • FSun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Town Council Meeting 4:00 p.m. 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 Town Council Meeting 4:00 p.m. 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 THANKSGIVING Town Hall Closed Y 29 30 1 1